EAST ALEUTIAN ISLANDS BOROUGH AND WEST ALEUTIAN ISLANDS CENSUS AREA, ALASKA
ISLANDS OF THE ALEUTIAN CHAIN
 
(Only islands 1/2 mile long or greater are listed here)
Adak Island Size: 28 mi. long. Aleut name reported as "Ayasgh" or "Kayaku" by Maxim Lazerov in 1761 (Coxe, 1787, p. 81). Adakh" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). adaq" which R. H. Geoghegan translates as "father." Description: Mountainous island lying near the center of the Andreanof Islands
Adugak Island
Size: 1.2 mi. across. History: name reported in 1840 by Father Ioann Veniaminov which may possibly be from the Aleut word "adudak" which, according to R. H. Geoghegan, means "somewhat long."
Description: 6 mi. N of Cape Sagak at SW tip of Umnak Island
Agattu Island Size: 20 mi. long. History: Aleut name published as Agataku by Reverend Coxe (1787, p. 50). The early Russians called the island Ostrov Kruglyy, meaning round island. The island probably was discovered September 21, 1741 (Old Style (O.S.) calendar) by the crew of the St. Paul, under the command of Captain A. I. Chirikov (Golder, 1922, v. 1, p. 307). Marcus Baker (1906, p. 82) indicates that Agattu may have been the island named St. Abraham by Vitus Bering, October 29, 1741 (Old Style (O.S.) calendar), but Golder (1922, v. 1, p. 202) attributes that distinction to Shemya Island
Alaid Island Size: 3.1 mi. long. History: Named by the Russians from its resemblance to Alaid Island, one of the Kuril Islands in Russia, "sometimes called Little Alaid, presumably to distinguish it from that island. The American whalers call it Alida and C. Grewingk said Alaid or Herzfels (German)-Serdtse Kamen" (Baker, 1906, p. 88). Captain Tebenkov (1852. map 30), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), reported the name Alaidskaya Pupka, meaning Heart Rock or Navel of Alaid. Description: westernmost of Semichi Islands
Aleutian Islands Admiral Adam Johann von Krusenstern, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), (1770-1846) first proposed that the name "Aleutian" (1827, v. 2, p. 78), used to designate the native people living on the islands, be applied to the whole archipelago; linguistic origin and meaning of the name is unknown. The chain includes five major groups; Andreanof Islands, Fox Islands, Islands of Four Mountains, Near Islands, and Rat Islands. Description: Island chain separating the Bering Sea from the Pacific Ocean, extending in a arc from the Alaska Peninsula WSW approximately 1100 mi to and including Attu Island approximately 600 mi E of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy, Soviet Union
Amaknak Island Size: 4.3 mi. long. History: Aleut name; published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, maps 14-15), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) as "Ostr(ov) Amaknakh", meaning "Amaknak Island." Spelled "amakhnak" by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 281), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN); "Amaknak" by U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF) in 1888. According to R. H. Geoghegan, the name means "burial place," from "amaiknag" meaning "place of impurity". Description: in Fox Is., in Unalaska Bay, on NE coast of Unalaska Island.
Amatignak Island Size: 6 mi. long. History: Aleut name reported by Commodore Joseph Billings about 1792, as "Amatignas". Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 29) shows "3(strov) Amatignak", Captain Lutke (1836, p. 323) gave "Amatignak and Amatygnak 'qui en Aleoute signifie copeau (wood chip)'. Description: in Delarof Is., southernmost of Aleutian Islands.
Amchitka Island Size: 35 mi. long and 3 mi. wide. History: Aleut name reported by early Russians as "Ostrov Amchitka." Baker (1906, p. 96), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), indicates that this may be the island named "St. Makarius (St. Markiana)" by Vitus Bering on October 25, 1741 (Old Style (O.S.) calendar). Golder (1922, p. 199-200), however, was of the opinion that Amchitka is too low to have been seen by Bering, and thus it is more probable that Kiska as the island so named. Description: One of the Rat Islands; Aleutian Islands.
Amlia Island Size: 45 mi. long and 8 mi. wide
History: Aleut name; reported in 1761 as "Amlak" by Captain Tolstyk of the ship Andreiani Natalia, according to Ivan Petroff (Bancroft, 1886, p. 168). The name "Amlia" was published in Lieutenant Sarichev's atlas (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). The southern part of Atka Island has been called "Amlia Peninsula". Description: in Andreanof Islands.
Amtagis Islands Size: 0.5 mi. across. History: Aleut name; published as "O(strova) Amtagis" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 27), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: in mouth of Kobakof Bay, on S coast of Atka I
Amukta Island Size: 5 mi. across. History: Aleut name reported in 1768 by Captain Lieutenant Krenitzin and Lieutenant Levashev (in Coxe, 1787, map p. 205), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: westermost of Islands of Four Mts.
Anagaksik Island Size: 1 mi. across History: Aleut name; published as "O(strov) Anagaksik" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: in Andreanof Is., 4 mi. E of Umak I.
Anangula Island Size: 2.4 km (1.5 mi) long. History: Aleut name reported by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 299) as "Anangouliak" and by Father Veniaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 156) as "Ananulyak". This island was called 'O (strov) Anayulyakh " or "Anayulyakh Island" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 25), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: In the Aleutain Islands off W coast of Umnak Island, 5 km (3.1 mi) NNW of Nikolski Bay.
Andreanof Islands Size: 310 mi. long. History: First explored by Russians Andreian Tolstyk, Peter Vasiutkin, and Maxim Lazaref in 1761. The merchant Tolstyk owned the expedition vessel Andreian and Natalia, named after himself and his wife.
Description: Island chain In the Aleutian Islands between the Islands of Four Mountains to the E and the Rat Islands, to the W and extending from Amukta Pass W about 310 mi to Amchitka Pass; they include Seguam, Amlia, Atka, Great Sitkin, Little Tanaga, Umak, Igitkin, Chugul, Tagalak, Kagalaska, Adak, Kanaga, Tanaga, Gareloi, Amatignak, Ulak, Unalga, Kavalga, Ogliuga and other smaller islands.
Argonne Island Size: 0.7 mi. long. History: Named in 1933 by members of the U.S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition, for the U.S.S. Argonne. Description: N of Staten Island, Bay of Islands, W coast of Adak Island, between Staten and Dora Island.
Asuksak Island Size: 1 mi. long History: Aleut name published as "O(strov) Asukhsakh," or "Asukhsakh Island," by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). possibly come from the Aleut word "asux" which according to R. H. Geoghegan, means "clay pot" or "boiler." Description: In Andreanof Islands., small island N of the W end of Umak Island and S of Grat Sitkin Island.
Atka Island Size: 55 mi. long. History: Aleut name; reported by early Russian traders; published as "Atchu Island" by Reverend Coxe (1780, p. 156); "Atghka" by Captain Cook (1785, v. 2, p. 503), RN; "Atkha Ile," by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 307), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN); "O(strov) Atka," or "Atka Island," on the 1848 Russian Hydrographic Dept. Chart 1400, and by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 27), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: largest of Andreanof Islands.
Attu Island Size: 37 mi. long. History: Attu, although possibly seen by one or both of the 1741 expedition ships from a great distance, was officially discovered and called "Saint Theodore" by Captain A. I. Chirikov in the spring of 1742 (Bancroft, 1886, p. 93). The first landing on the island appears to have been in 1745 by a party of promyshlenniki led by Mikhail Nevodchikov. The Aleut name of the island was early transcribed by the Russians as "Ostrov Attu"; spelled "Atakou" by Captain Cook (1785, v. 2, p. 502), Royal Navy (RN). Description: the westernmost of Near Islands, the farthest W of Aleutian Islands.
Aziak Island Size: 1 mi. long. History: Aleut name; published in 1852 as "O(strov) Azyak," or "azyak Island" by Capt Tebenkov (map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and in 1848 as "O(strov) Azik," or "Azik Island," on Russian Hydrographic Dept. Chart 1400. Description: In Andreanof Islands., S of Great Sitka Island and W of Tanaklak Island.
Barabara Island History: Published in 1956 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) on Chart 9145. Description: in Andreanof Islands., 3 mi. NNE of Trunk Point on E coast of Tanaga I.
Bobrof Island Size: 2.5 mi. across History: Reported in 1790 by Commodore Joseph Billings, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published "O(strov) Bobrovoy Vilga", or "Sea Otter Vilga Island". "Vilga" may have been the Aleut name. Baker (1906, p. 558) published "Sea Otter Islet." Description: in Andreanof Island between Kanaga and Tanaga Island.
Bolshoi Island Size: 1 mi long History: Published as "O(strov) Bolshoy" or "Large Island", by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 27), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: Largest of the Bolshoi Islands, in Nazan Bay on the E coast of Atka Island.
Bolshoi Islands History: Published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in the 1944 aleutian Coast Pilot (p. 100).
Description: group, extends 2.3 mi. in Nazan Bay on E coast of Atka Island.
Box Island Size: 150 mi. across. History: So named in 1934 by members of the U.S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition, "because of the signal Box on the island.". Description: in Andreanof Islands. in Great Sitkin Pass, between Kanu and Great Sitkin Islands
Buldir Island History: the October 28, 1741, (Old Style (O.S.) calendar), entry in the log book of the St. Peter, commanded by Vitus Bering, reads "By the will of God Stephan Buldirev (later written Stephan Bogdriev), naval cooper, dies of scurvey" (Golder, 1922, p. 210). Bering named an island "St. Stephen." Golder, correlate the island of Bering with that of present-day Buldir Island, and, if so, it may have been named for the sailor that died on its discovery day. published on a 1791 map by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and thus he may be responsible for the naming. Baker (1906, p. 151), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), gives the meaning of "Buldir" as "hut" (or hovel)," implying a descriptive name. v. 2, p. 247) appears to translate the name as "round". Description: one of Rat Islands.
Carlisle Island Size: 5 mi. across. History: named by the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office in 1894 for John G. Carlisle, 1835-1910, Secretary of the Treasury. was called "O(strov) Tano" or "Tano Island" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1876, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN); "O(strov) Tanakh-Angunakh" or "Tanakh-Angunakh Island" by the Russian Hydrographic Dept. in 1847 on Chart 1379; and "O(strov) Kigalgin" or "Kigalgin Island" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 25 dated 1849) Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). names differ from those published by Baker (1906, p. 264). Description: one of Islands of Four Mtns.
Castle Island History: Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1956 (Chart 9145).
Description: off West Chunu Point, off SW coast of Kanaga Island.
Chagulak Island Size: 2.5 mi across. History: Aleut name given by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1931 in order to avoid the repition of the name Chugul. The island ws called "Os[strov] Chugula," or "Chugul Island," by Lieutenant Sarichev, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN).
Description: One of the Islands of Four Mountains.
Chisak Island Size: 0.6 mi. long History: Name derived from Cape Chisak, and given by members of the U.S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition in 1934. Description: off S coast of Little Tanaga Island.
Chuginadak Island Size: 14 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 25), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). According to R. H. Geoghegan, the Aleut stem "chugi" means "to roast or fry." or "Khagamil Island" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and "O(strov) Kigamilyakh," or "Kigamilyakh Island" by the Russian Hydrographic Dept. (1847, Chart 1379). come from the Aleut "tanam-anguna," meaning "the great land." According to R. H. Geoghegan, this name applies to "one of the islands of the Four Mountains, whence it is fabled the Aleut race sprong." Description: largest of Islands of Four Mountains.
Chugul Island Size: 5 mi. long History: Aleut name reported by early Russian explorers and recorded as "Tshugulla " by Commodore Joseph Billings, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1790. Two forms, "Tchougoul" and "Tchougoulak," were published by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 320), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN),. The island is shown as Chugul Island by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in the 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (p. 103). Description: between Atka and Adak Islands., Andreanof Islands.
Crone Island Size: 1.5 mi. long History: Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1957 Chart 9193. Description: off S coast of Adak Island.
Davidof Island Size: 2.3 mi. long History: Commemorative name published by Admiral von Krusenstern (1827, sheet 18), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), for the Russian naval officer Gavriil Ivanovich Davidov, who with N. A. Khvostov, explored Alaska during 1802-1804. Admiral von Krusenstern applied the name, I (sle) Dawydoff, to Segula Island, but in 1855 the US Navy Hydrographic Office clarified the size and position of both Davidof and Segula Islands and reapplied the names. Description: in Rat Islands. between Little Sitkin and Khvostof Islands., 24 mi. NW of Amchitka I
Delarof Islands History: Commemorative name given by Captain Lutke (1836, p 323), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Delaroff Iles" for the Greek-born administrator Eustrate Ivanovih Delarov, director of the Russian American Company from 1784-1791. Description: Group of nine; Gareloi, Skagul, Oglivga, Kavalga, Unalgs, Ilak, Ulak, Tanadak, and Amatignak Islands, W of Andreanof Island, between Amchitka and Tanaga Passes
Dora Island Size: 1 mi. long History: Named in 1934 by members of the U.S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition, for the steamer Dora, "long engaged in trade in southwestern Alaska." Description: on W coast of Adak I. in Bay of Islands
Eddy Island Size: 0.5 mi. across History: So named by members of the U.S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition in 1934, "because of the eddies in the water." Description: Off the S entrance to Bay of Islands, W coast of Adak Island
Egg Island Size: 0.7 mi. long History: Name published by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in the 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (p. 93 ). The island could have been so named because of its steep-sided, round- topped shape. Description: in Egg Bay, N coast of Atka I
Egg Island Size: 1 mi in diameter History: In the Aleutian Isalnds, 2 mi NE of Sedanka Island and 7 mi E of Unalaska Island
Elf Island Size: 2 mi. long History: Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1957. Description: off SE coast of Adak I
Fox Islands Size: 290 mi. long History: Name first recorded in May, 1778 by Captain Cook (1785, v. 2, p. 380), RN. Sarichev (1826, map 1), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) published the name in Russian as "Ostrova Lisyy," or "Fox islands" and Captain Lutke (1836, p. 279) Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published the name in French as "Iles aux Renards." Baker (1906, p. 265) says "The whole Aleutian chain is known to mariners and whalemen as the Fox Islands * * *." See Aleutian Islands. Description: chain comprises E end of Aleutian Is., between Alaska Peninsula to the E, and Islands of Four Mountains to the W, extend from Isanotski Strait SW about to Samalga Pass; include Samalga, Umnak, Unalaska, Unimak and the Krenitzin Is., along with other smaller islands
Gareloi Island Size: 6 mi. across History: name published as "O(strov) Goreloi," or "Goreloi Island," by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), from the Russian word for "burnt" or "burning." Tebenkov ( 1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), was "Anangusik." form "Gareloi," appeared on U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS), U.S. Navy Hydrographic, and British Admiralty (Brit. Adm.) charts, prior to 1902. Description: Delarof Islands
Great Sitkin Island Size: 7.5 mi. across History: Aleut name published by the Russians as "Os(trov) Sitkhin,: (in Sarichev, 1826, map 3). The island was called "Great Net Island" by W. H. Dall, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) (1880, p. 247). Description: island, 7.5 mi. across, one of Andreanof Islands
Green Island Size: 0.5 mi. long History: Named by members of the U.S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition in 1934.
Description: Long narrow island in the S portion of the entrance to the Bay of Islands, W coast of Adak Island, Aleutian Islands.
Herbert Island Size: 5.5 mi. across History: Named by the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office in 1894 for Hilary Abner Herbert, 1834-1919, Secretary of the Navy. This island was called "O(strov) Ulyaga" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and "O(strov) Ullyagin" by the Russian Hydrographic Dept. in 1847 on Chart 1379. These variant name differ from those published by Baker (1906, p. 264). See Islands of Four Mountains. Description: one of the Islands of Four Mts
Hog Island Size: 0.9 mi. long History: The Russians placed hogs on this island and the name was published as (Ostrov) Svinoy, meaning Hog Island, by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 26), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 15) Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published the Aleut name as (Ostrov) Uknodok or Oknodok Island. Description: in Unalaska Bay, on NE coast of Unalaska Islands.
Igitkin Island Size: 6.7 mi. long History: Aleut name recorded as "Egilka" by Commodore Joseph Billings, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1790 and published by M. Sauer in 1802. Description: 3 mi. SE of Great Sitkin I., between Adak and Atka Islands., one of Andreanof Islands., Aleutian Islands.
Ilak Island Size: 1 mi. across History: Aleut name recorded by Commodore Joseph Billings as "Illuk," and published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Illakh." The adopted form "Ilak" was published in the 1946 supplement to the 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1946, p. 120). Description: in eastern Delarof Islands
Islands of Four Mountains Size: 80 mi long History: The name is translated from Russian "O(strova) Chetyre Soposhnye," meaning "Islands of Four Volcanoes" (Sarichev, 1826, map 3) and was applied by the early Russian explorers beacuse of four prominent volcanoes located on four of the islands. The Aleut name "Unigun" was reported in 1940 by Father Veniaminov. There appears to be confusion regarding the names of these islands, possibly because only four of the five are on most early maps and charts. The present names were gathered in 1894 by a field party on the the U.S.S. Concord and published in 1895 by the U.S. Navy Hydrography Office (Chart 8). See Carlisle, Chuginadak Herbert, Kagamil, and Uliaga Islands.
Kagalaska Island Size: 10 mi. long History: Aleut name published by F. P. Lutke (1835, p. 321). The Russians published it as "O(strov) Kagalasksa," or "Kagalaksa Island" (Tebenkov, 1852, map 28).
Description: One of Andreanof Islands., immediately E of Adak Island
Kagamil Island Size: 6.2 mi. long History: Aleut name applied to this island by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 25), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). or "Chuginok Island" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and "O(strov) Kigalga," or "Kigalga Island," by the Russian Hydrographic Dept. (1847, Chart 1379). Description: one of Islands of Four Mountains
Kanaga Island Size: 32 mi. long History: Aleut name published by G. A. Sarichev (1926, map 3) and Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Kanaga," or "Kanaga Island." may be the island called "Kanaton" by Captain James Cook, RN, in 1778. Description: one of Andrfanof Islands
Kanu Island Size: 1.7 mi. long History: Name derived from Unak Island and given by the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office in 1936 because "There being so much similarity in the names (of nearby) Ulak I., Umak I., and Unak I., serious delay might result in sending a rescue party to one of these islands, as was brought out in the 1934 report of the expedition, and for this reason Unak I. was spelled backward. . ." The name "Unak" is derived from the Aleut "unaq" meaning "wound," published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) as "O(strov) Yunakh," or "Yunakh Island." Description: between Great Sitkin and Umak Islands., Andreanof Islands
Kasatochi Island Size: 1.5 mi. across History: Russian name published as "Kosatochyey" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1802, v. 2, p. 179), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN); shown as "L'ile Kassatotchy" by Lutke (1836, p. 310), and as "O(strov) Kasatochiy" on Russian Hydrographic Dept. Chart 1400 (1848). Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as an extinct crater, containing a lake. Description: 15 mi. NW of Atka I., Andrfanof Islands
Kavalga Island Size: 5.5 mi. long History: Aleut name pbulished as "Kakhvalga" by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 323), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) and as "Kavalga" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: Delarof Islands.
Khvostof Island Size: 1.8 mi. across History: Russian name probably given by Captain Von Krusenstern (1827, sheet 18), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as Khwostov, for Nikolai Alexandrovich Khwostov, a Russian naval officer, who explored Alaska in 1802-04 with G. I. Davidov. Captain Lutke (1836, p. 326), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), applied the name "Khvostoffile" to the entire group of islands that include Khvostof. Description: 4 mi. SE of Segula I., one of Rat Islands.
Kigul Island Size: 0.5 mi. across History: name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (p. 71). Description: off SE coast of Umnak I.; Aleutian Islands
Koniuji Island
Size: 0.8 mi. long History: name applied because of the great number of crested auks which the Russians call "Kanoozhki" or "Kanooskie," and which the Aleuts call "Kunuliuk." "Kanigui Island," by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: 10 mi. N of Atka Islands., Andranof Islands
Little Kiska Island Size: 3.5 mi. long History: So called by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 326), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), to distinguish Petite Kyska Ile (Little Kiska Island) from Grande Kyska Ile (Kiska Island). Description: E of Kiska I., one of Rat Islands
Little Sitkin Island Size: 6.8 mi. across History: named "Os(trov) Malyy Sitkhin," meaning "little Sitkin island" on the 1848 Russian Hydrographic Dept. Chart 1400. may possibly be from the Aleut word "sitxan," which, according to R. H. Geoghegan, means "from beneath or from under." Description: one of Rat Islands
Little Tanaga Island Size: 10 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Tanaga," or "Tanaga Island." to Little Tanaga Island by the North Pacific Exploring Expedition in 1855 to distinguish it from the larger Tanaga Island. Description: one of Andreanof Islands
Loaf Island History: Named by the US Army during its occupation of the island during World War II; shown on an Army Map Service (AMS) map published in 1948. Description: on W shore of Massacre Bay, on SE coast of Attu I
Near Islands Size: 95 mi. long History: This name is a traslation of the descriptive name "Plishnie Ostrova," published by G. H. von Langsdorff (1813-14, v. 2, p. 13). Lieutenant G. A. Sarichev (1826, map 1), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published the name as "o(stro) va Blizhniye." This name was given by the early Russian explorers because these are the nearest of the Aleutian Islands to Asia. See Aleutian Islands.
Description: Island chain comprising the west end of the Aleutian Islands, extending from the Ingenstrem Rocks westward about 95 mi to Peaked Island just off Cape Wrangell, west of Attu Island. The principal islands are Attu, Agattu, and the three Semichi Islands, Alaid, Nizki, and Shemya
Nizki Island Size: 3 mi. long History: Derived from Russian word (Nizkiy) meaning "low" and probably given by the U.S. Army; published by Army Map Service (AMS) in 1943. The island was shown in 1956 as "Oubeloi" by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: middle island of Semichi Islands
North Island Size: 0.7 mi. long History: Descriptive name given in 1934 by members of the U. S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition. Description: On the E side of the entrance to The Bay of Islands, W coast of Adak Island
Ogangen Island Size: 2 mi. long History: This name was published in the 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (p. 54). Description: in Raven Bay on S coast of Unalaska I
Ogchul Island Size: 0.5 mi. across History: Name published by US@C&GS in 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (p. 71). Description: 4.5 mi. SE of Amos Bay, on S coast of Umnak I
Ogliuga Island Size: 3 mi. across History: Name published by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 323) as Ogloga Ile and, with Skagul Island, called the Delarof Islands. The adopted form Ogliuga was published by the US@C&GS in the 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot (p.120). Description: Delarof Islands
Oglodak Island Size: 1.2 mi. across History: Name published by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 320-21) possibly derived from the Aleut word Agligak, meaning albatross. Description: W of Atka Pass, between Atka and Tagalak Islands
Otter Island Size: 0.8 mi. long History: Translation from the Russian O(strov) Bobrovoy meaning "Otter Island" and published by Captain Lieutenant Vasiliev (1829, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: 7 mi. S of St. Paul I
Peter Island Size: 0.6 mi. across History: Local name published in 1951 on a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) map.
Description: in Anderson Bay, S side of Makushin Bay, on Unalaska I
Pribilof Islands History: Named by Lieutenant G.A. Sarichev about 1792 for Gavriil Loginovich Pribylov (died 1796), who while an employee of the Lebedev-Lastochkin Company, discovered Saint George Island, one of the Pribilof Islands, in June 1786. The islands were first referred to as Novy, meaning new, and Lebedevski, the name of the owner of Pribilov's vessel. G.I. Shelikov called the islands Zoubov for the then Russian Minister of the Interior. They were also referred to as Kotovy, meaning fur seal, and Sieverny, meaning north (relative to Unalaska Island). Description: Located in the Bering Sea, consisting of Saint Paul, Saint George, Walrus, and Otter Islands
Rat Island Size: 9 mi. long History: This name is a translation from the Russian "Krysi" and probably from the Aleut name "Ayugadak," meaning "rat." Commodore Billings (1802, p. 220-221), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), listed Krissey Island; A. Arrowsmith (in Sauer, 1802) called it "Rats Island." "Os(trov) Ayugadak (Krysi)" was published in 1848 on Russian Hydrographic Dept. Chart 1400. Captain Lutke (1836, p. 326-327), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published "Kryci" and "Ayoungadakh." Description: island, 9 mi. long, 13 mi. NW of Amchitka I., in Rat Islands.
Rat Islands Size: 180 mi long History: The name is translated from Russian "krysi" or possibly from the Aleut name "ayugadak," reaning "rat" and was applied by Captain Feodor Petrovich Lutke, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), who visited the Aleutian Islands in 1827 on a voyage around the world. Lutke (1836, p. 324) called the islands "IIles Kryci (aux rats)," and Baker (1906, p. 521), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), reported thay were "ususally called Krysi or Rat Islands." Description: In the Aleutian Islands between the Near Islands to the W and the Andreanof Islands to the E, and extending from Amchitka Pass W to Buldir Island. Includes Semisopochnoi, Amchitka, Rat, Little Sitkin, Segula, Kiska, Buldir Islands and several smaller islands.
Ringgold Island Size: 1.5 mi. long History: Named in 1936 by the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, for Captain Cadwalader Ringgold, U.S. Navy (USN), Commander of the North Pacific Exploring Expedition in 1855. Description: on W coast of Adak I. in Bay of Islands.
Sadatanak Island Size: 1.5 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 27), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Sadatanak," or "Sadatanak Island." Description: off S coast of Atka I.
Sagchudak Island Size: 1.3 mi. across History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 27), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Sagchudak," or "Sagchudak Island." Description: off Kobakof Bay, on S coast of Atka I.
Saint George Island Size: 12 mi. long History: Discovered and named by G. G. Pribilov in June, 1786, after his vessel the Sveti Georgiy. See Pribilof Islands and St. Paul Island. Description: one of Pribilof Islands.
Saint Paul Island Size: 10 mi. across History: Early in June, 1786, G. G. Pribilov left some hunters on St. George Island with provisions for the winter. A year later, on June 29, 1787 (Old Style (O.S.) calendar), an unusally clear atmosphere permitted the promyshleniki to see another large island 30 miles northward which they named "Saint Peter and Saint Paul," because it was the dedicated day of those two Holy Apostles. The first half of the name was soon lost in popular usage (Bancroft, 1886, p. 192 and 193). Description: one of Pribilof Islands.
Salt Island Size: 1.3 mi. long History: translated from the Russian-French names "Soleniile" and "Solenyile," or "Salt Island" published by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 310) Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: off Banner Bay, on N coast of Atka I.
Samalga Island Size: 4.2 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Samalga," or "Samalga Island." Father Veniaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 157) reported that in 1764 there was a settlement on this island containing not less than 400 people. Description: W end of Fox Islands.
Sedanka Island Size: 11 mi. long History: in 1792 Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 14), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), recorded "O(strov) Spirkin." "Sithanak," which Marcus Baker recorded "Siginak," and R. H. Geoghegan spelled "Siginaq," meaning "braided" or "curled." Between 1824 and 1834 Father Veniaminov and Captain Lutke, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), used the names "Borka" and "Spirkin" or "Spirkine." (1906, p. 133) published "Biorka," which he reported as being from the "Norwegan Bjerk O, or Swedish Bjork O, meaning Birch Island." Description: in Fox Islands., off NE coast of Unalaska I.
Seguam Island Size: 15 mi. long History: Reported in 1778 by Cook (1785, v. 2, track chart), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Lieutenant Sarichev in his atlas 1826, map 3) indicated "Ostrov Segum" from an Aleut name. Called "Segouam ile" and "Gorely Ile" by Lutke (1836, p. 306). Goreli is Russian for "burnt." Description: easternmost of Andreanof Islands.
Segula Island Size: 4 mi. across History: Aleut name used by early Russian explorers along with the name "Chugul." of 1855, reported its Aleut name as "Tchougoule (or Tschechovla)" and also called it "Iron Island." A. J. von Krusenstern, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), called "Dawydoff" in 1827. Description: 11 mi. WNW of Little Sitkin I. in Rat Islands.
Semichi Islands Size: 13 mi. long History: Probably discovered on October 29, 1741 (Old Style (O.S.) calendar), by Captain Commander Vitus Bering, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), who applied the name "St. Abraham" to one of them. See Shemya Island. According to Baker (1906, p. 561), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who cites W. H. Dall, the name "Semichi" was applied to these islands by the early Russians, the name being derived from the Russian "Semik," which is "the feast on the seventh Thursday after Easter, on which day they were discovered." Reverend Coxe (1787, p. 50) called them "Shemya." Description: Shemya Islands., 20 mi. ESE of Attu Islands.
Semisopochnoi Island Size: 13 mi. across History: Descriptive name derived from the Russian words "sem" meaning "seven," and "sopochka," meaning "extinct volcano"--seven volcanoes or seven peaks. Published by Lieutenant G. A. Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Semisoposhnoy". It was published as "O(strov) Semisopochnyy" or "Semisopchnyy Island" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 29), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). The island may have been named in 1790 by Lieutenant Sarichev, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: island, 13 mi. across, northeasternmost of Rat Islands.
Shemya Island Size: 4 mi. long History: Reverend Coxe (1787, p. 50) applied this name to the entire group of islands called "Semichi" by the Russians. The name has subsequently been reapplied to this particular island. According to Golder (1922, p. 202, 275) this may have been the island named "St. Abraham" on Ocotber 29, 1741 (Old Style (O.S.) calendar), by Vitus Bering on the St Peter. See Semichi Island. Description: easternmost of Semichi I.
Skagul Island Size: 1.8 mi. across History: Aleut name published as "Skakhoul Ile" which, with Ogliuga island, constituted the Delarof Islands, according to Captain Lutke (1836, p. 323), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). The adopted form was used by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) as "O(strov) Skagul," or "Skagul Island." Description: Delarof Islands.
Staten Island Size: 1 mi. long History: So named in 1934 by members of the U. S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition, "because of a fancied resemblance in outline to Staten Island, N. Y." Description: on W coast of Adak I. in Bay of Islands.
Tag Islands Size: 0.5 mi. across History: Aleut name published as "O(strov) Tagachalugis," or "Tagachalugis Island" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), which refers to the largest island. This and other long variants were shortened to "Tag Islands" by Board on Geographic Names (BGN) recommendation. Description: 2.5 mi. S of Skagul Islands., Delarof Islands.
Tagadak Island Size: 1 mi. across History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Tagadakh", or "Tagadakh Island." According to R. H. Geoghegan, this Aleut word means "fresh" or "new." Description: between Great Sitkin and Umak Islands., one of Andreanof Islands.
Tagalak Island Size: 4 mi. long History: Aleut name published from Commodore Joseph Billings' track chart of 1790-92 by Lieutenant Sarichev, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) in 1802; also published as "Tagalak" by Captain (1836, p.320) Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Description: between Atka and Adak Islands., Andreanof Islands.
Tanadak Island Size: 0.5 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Tanadak", or "Tanadak Island." The Aleut name may mean "crab place" or according to R. H. Geoghegan, the name means "eternal ground" or "burial place" and comes from the Aleut "tanadakuq", which means "he goes to his eternal ground, he dies." Description: 1.5 mi. W of Ulak I., Delarof Islands.
Tanadak Island Size: 0.6 mi. long History: Named by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 27), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Ostrov Tanadak," from an Aleut name. Description: 1.5 mi. S of E tip of Amlia I., Andreanof Islands.
Tanaga Island Size: 25 mi. across History: Aleut name published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Tanaga," or "Tanaga Island." Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Taniaga" and by Grewingk (1850, p. 230) as "Takawangha." Description: one of Andreanof Islands.
Tanaklak Island Size: 1.7 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Tanaklakh," or "Tanaklakh Island." Description: between Great Sitkin and Umak Islands., one of Andreanof Islands.
The Signals History: Named in 1888 by U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). Captain Tebenkov (1852,map 26), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), referred to them as "Kekur Kuka," possibly meaning cCook's Pillars." Description: off NE coast of Sedanka I.
The Three Sisters History: Named by members of the U. S. Navy Aleutian Island Survey Expedition in 1934. Description: group of three, each 0.2 mi. long, in Three Arm Bay, on W caost of Adak I.
Tidgituk Island Size: 0.5 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 20), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Tidgitok," i.e. "Tidgitok Island." Description: in entrance to South Bay, on S coast of Tanaga I.
Ulak Island Size: 6.5 mi. long History: Name published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Illak," apparently from the Aleut name "Ulak" or "Ulaq," meaning "house" or "everybody's house." The adopted name was published on a U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) chart. Description: Delarof Islands.
Ulak Island Size: 1 mi. long History: Aleut name published as "Ulak ile" or "Ylak Island," by Captain Lutke (1836, p. 323), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), and is apparently of the same derivation as "O(strov) Ulyadak," or "Ulyadak Island," shown on Russian Hydrographic Dept. Chart 1400 in 1848. The Aleut name "Ulaq" means "house." Description: 3 mi. E of Great Sitkin I., Andreanof Islands
Umak Island Size: 6.5 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "O(strov) Umakh," or "Umakh Island." Description: one of Andreanof Islands
Umnak Island Size: 113 km (70 mi) long History: Aleut name reported in 1768 by Captain Lieutenant Krenitzin and Lieutenant Levashev (Coxe, 1787, map p. 205), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). This island was called "oomanak" by Captain Cook (1785, v. 2, p. 504), RN, and "Umnak" by Father Veniaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 139). There is an old Aleut legend, as told by Ted Bank (1956, p. 227-228), that when the first Aleuts came to the islands there were no trees, as now, except on this island. There was one tree, with no branches or leaves, so tall that it disappeared in the clouds. The tree was twisted, and to the Aleuts it looked like the seaweed that they used to make fish lines; therefore , they called the island "Umnaqs," meaning "fish line." Visions told the people that the tree stood for the Aleut way of life, and if it were destroyed, the Aleut race would disappear forever. When the Russians came to the island, they cut down the tree to make a house for themselves, but they all died soon after. The Aleuts were afraid and built a house around the stump of the tree to protect it. Description: One of the Fox Islands
Unalaska Island Size: 20 mi. long History: This island, largest of the eastern Aleutians, was first discovered by the Russians in about 1760. They called it both "Unalashka" and "Agunalashka" (Coxe, 1787, chap. 8-10). The Aleut name was published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 14, dated 1792), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Ostrov Unalashka" or "Unalashka Island" which Baker (1906, p. 652) says is "a contraction of the true name " 'Nagounalaska'* * *" Father Veniaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 158), who lived on the island for ten years, wrote that the Aleut's called it "Na-u-an Alakhskha," meaning "this here Alakhskha." According to R. H. Geoghegan, the name comes from the word "unanak" which is the name the Fox Islanders use to designate themselves. Description: One of the Fox Islands
Unalga Island Size: 1.5 mi. across History: Name of Aleut origin; published in 1848 on Russian Hydrographic Chart 1400, as "O(strov) Zapadnyy Unalga," or "western Unalga island" to distinguish it from the Unalga Island between Akutan and Unalaska Islands; published by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 28), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), as "Onstrov) Unalga." Description: one of Delarof Islands
Yunaska Island Size: 14 mi. long History: Aleut name published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), as "Os(trov) Yunaska," or "Yunaska Island." Description: one of Islands of Four Mts

Return to Aleutian Islands Home Page

 

This page was last modified: Sunday, 27-Nov-2011 21:55:20 MST  

You are our 1477 visitor since 10/1/2009 - thanks for stopping by!

Copyright 2009 to present for the benefit of the AKGenWeb Project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-