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BETHEL CENSUS AREA
TOWNS, VILLAGES AND POPULATED PLACES
Aguikchuk No information available. Located on USGS Baird Inlet B-7 map.
Akiachak
Pop. 229
History: Eskimo village shown on an 1898 fieldsheet by W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who obtained the name "Akiatshagamut," meaning "Akiachak people," from J. H. Kilbuck, Moravian missionary. This is undoubtedly the same village listed in the 11th Census, in 1890 as "Akiakchagamiut" with a population of 43; the village had a population of 165 in 1900, 156 in 1939, and 179 in 1950. A post office named "Akiachak" was established there in 1934. Population 107 (1960), on N shore of Akutan Harbor, on E coast of Akutan I., Krenitzin Is., Aleutian Island a4 540805N1654620W Akiachak was incorporated as a city on February 7, 1974. On right bank of Kuskokwim River, 13 mi. NE of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Akiak No information. Located on USGS Bethel D-6 map.
Akmiut
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village listed as Akmute on the 1880 Census map. J. E. Spurr and W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who passed the site in 1898 did not mention it. Description: on left bank of Kuskokwim River near mouth of Holokuk River, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Akulurak History: Eskimo village or camp. Name means that in between according to a 1949 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) field report. The place had a population of 15 in 1940. Description: on left bank of Kuskokwim River, 2.5 mi. NE of Helmick Point and 43 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Aniak
Pop. 308
History: Founded about 1910 when a trading store was located here to supply the mining operations at the heads of Tuluksak and Aniak Rivers. A post office was established in 1914 (Ricks, 1965, p. 4). Aniak was incorporated as a city on June 1, 1972. Description: on S bank of Kuskokwim River at head of Aniak Slough, 59 mi. SW of Russian Mission, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Anogok History: Name of an Eskimo summer camp first reported as "Anogogmute," meaning "Anogok people," by E. W. Nelson (1882, map), U.S. Signal Service, who visited it in December 1878. Description: On the NW side of the entrance to Kuskokwin Bay, 12 mi SE of the mouth of the Kuguklik River and 9 mi S of Kipnuk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Apokak History: Eskimo name for village obtained in December 1878 by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, and listed in the 1880 census as "Apokagamute," i.e. "Apokak people" with 94 people. The 1890 Census listed it as "Ahpokagamiut" with 210 people. U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) reported in 1949 that "the village has been abandonded for many years. Two dilapidated cabins remain." Description: at mouth of Apokak Slough, on Eek Channel of Kuskokwim River, 48 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Atmautluak No information. Located on USGS Baird Inlet D-1 map.
Aziavik
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village listed in the 1880 census with a population of 132 by Ivan Petroff as "Aziavigmute," i.e., "Aziavik people." Description: on Osviak River near its mouth at Bristol Bay; Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts
Barnum
(historical)
History: Site of abandoned Eskimo village called "Avriotmut." The name Barnum was reported in 1920 by Harrington (in Brooks and others, 1921, pl. 7), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In 1921 there were two cabins here and in 1940 the population was 27. Description: on right bank of Goodnews River, at mouth of Barnum Creek, 12 mi. NE of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Bethel History: Bethel was originally the site of a Yup'ik Eskimo village and trading post of the Alaska Commercial Company. Listed as "Mumtrekhlogamute" with 41 people by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census, in 1880. The name is reported to mean "Smokehouse people" because here a peculiar house for smoking fish was erected .Bethel was first established by Yup'ik Eskimos who called the village "Mamteriilleq," meaning "Smokehouse People," named for the nearby fish smokehouse. There were 41 people in Bethel during the 1880 U.S. Census.The Moravian Church established a mission in the area in 1884 by Weinland and J. H. Kilbuck. The name given to the mission is derived from the biblical passage "And God said unto Jacob, Arise, and go up to Bethel, and dwell there; and make there an altar unto God. (Genesis 35:1). The scriptural Bethel was 22 mi. N of Jerusalem and means "house of God" in Hebrew. The Alaskan Bethel had a population of 33 in 1890, 110 in 1910, 221 in 1920, 278 in 1930, 376 in 1940, and 651 in 1950. The Bethel post office was established in 1905. Before long, Bethel was serving as a trading, transportation and distribution center for the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, which attracted Alaska Natives from surrounding villages. The City was incorporated in 1957.
Description: population 1,258, on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 90 mi. SW of Aniak and 83 mi. E of Nelson I., Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Chakwaktolik History: Eskimo village visited in 1897 by Lieutenant J. H. Jarvis, U.S. Revenue-Cutter Service (USRCS), and reported as "Chukwoktuligamute," meaning "many pike lake." Description: on N shore of Aropuk Lake, 70 mi. SW of Marshall; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Chefornak Description: On the left bank of Kinia River, 5.5 mi. N of Tern Mountain.
Chimekliak History: Eskimo village reported on an 1898 fieldsheet by W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as "Chim-e-kliag-a-mut"; name was obtained from J. H. Kilbuck, Moravian missionary. "This may be identical with "Chenik" of a Russian Admiralty chart of 1802" (Baker, 1906, p. 178). Ivan Petroff, in the 1880 U.S. Census calls it "Chimiagamute" with 71 people; the 1890 Census lists it as "Chimingyangamute" with 40 people. Description: 1 mi. NE of Beacon Point, on left bank of Kuskokwim River, 50 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Chuarlitiligamut
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, reported in 1898 by J. E. Spurr and W.S . Post U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as "Chwarlitiligamut," meaning "Chwarlitilik people." Description: on right bank of Kanektok River, 9 mi. W of Amakatatee Creek and 64 mi. NE of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Chuathbaluk History: Originally named for the Russian Orthodox mission, but restored to original Eskimo name in 1948 meaning "big blueberries", which used to grow in the village. The establishment of Moravian missionaries on the river in 1885 motivated the Orthodox Church to reactivate its Kuskokwim Mission. This led to the founding of the Russian Mission (sometimes referred to as Little Russian Mission to distinguish it from the Russian Mission on the Yukon River), in 1891 with Father J. Orlof as resident priest. The major centers of the Russian (Greek) Orthodox Church along the Kuskokwim River are Sleetmiut, Russian Mission, Lower Kalskat, Kwethluk, and Napaskiak (Oswalt, 1963, p. 7). Description: On the N bank of the Kuskokwim River, 9.5 mi E of Aniak.
Crooked Creek History: Village established about 1909 near or at a small Indian village. G. C. Anderson, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in 1910 reported it as "Portage Village" because it was at the south end of a portage route up Crooked Creek to the Iditarod placers. The Parent Trading Post was established here about 1918, and the locality took that name. A post office called "Crooked Creek" was established here in 1927 (Ricks, 1965, p. 15). Its population was 48 in 1939 and 43 in 1950. It is now primarily an Indian village. Description: population 92, on N bank of Kuskokwim River, E of junction of Creeked Creek, 33 mi. NW of Sleetmute and 50 mi. NE of Aniak, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Eek History: population 200, on left bank of Eek River, 12 mi. E of Kuskokwim River and 41 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Description: population 200, on left bank of Eek River, 12 mi. E of Kuskokwim River and 41 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Georgetown History: Name of a trading post reported in 1910 by Maddren (in Brooks and others, 1911, pl. 11), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Presumably named for the post owner, George Fredericks. A post office was located here from 1912 to 1913. See George River. Description: on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 16 mi. NW of village of Red Devil and 22 mi. NW of Sleetmute, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts
Goodnews Bay History: Incorporated as Goodnews Bay on 7/9/1970. A post office called Goodnews Bay was established here in 1930 (Ricks, 1965, p. 24). Eskimos from the former village of Mumtrak moved here and a government school was founded. The name "Goodnews" was published in 1937 by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The population in 1960 was 154. Description: On the N shore of Goodnews Bay at the mouth of Goodnews River 69 km (43 mi) WNW of Togiak, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Goodnews Mining
Camp
History: Named for the Goodnews Mining Co.; name published in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). This semi-permanent settlement was the largest mining camp in the district in 1940. The camp was established about 1934 when large-scale operations in minin g of platinum-bearing deposits in this area began. (Mertie, 1940, p. 57). Description: N of junction of Platinum and Squirrel Creeks, 2 mi. S of Red Mtn. and 25 mi. NE of Cape Newenham, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Inger
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village reported as Ingeramiut, meaning mountain people, with a population of 35 in the 1890 Census. Description: on Nunivak I. in Bering Sea
Ingrimiut
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, reported in 1949 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). The name means "mountain people." Description: 24 mi. NE of Cape Mendenhall, on W shore of Etolin Strait, Nunivak I
Itulilik
(historical)
History: Eskimo camp or settlement, now abandoned, shown on a manuscript map by W. R. Buckman who prospected the Chulitna valley in 1902-1903. He spelled the name "E-tu-le-lig-a-mute" i.e. "people of Itulik (Creek)." See Itulilik Creek. Description: on E bank of Holitna River, 22 mi. S of Sleetmute, Stony River Low.
Kalskag History: This village is listed as "Kaltkhagamute," with a population of 106 in the 1880 Census of I. Petroff. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), spells the name "Kal-tchagamut" on his 1898 fieldsheet, but places the village on the right bank of a slough, 4 miles southwest of the present village called "Kalskag." people have moved to Lower Kalskag and Kalskag. Incorporated as Upper Kalskag. Description: On N bank of Kuskokwim River, 24 mi. W of Aniak, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kanloyak
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village reported in 1949 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). "There is presently (1949) no sign of former habitation." Description: Incomplete Record, Borough/Coordinates do not match. On Nelson I., 2 mi. SE of Nightmute and 100 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Kashegelok History: Eskimo village reported as "Kasheg-e-log-e-mute" by W. R. Buckman, a prospector who wintered here in 1902-03. Description: population 5, on right bank of Holitna River, opposite mouth of Chukowan River, 64 mi. SW of Sleetmute, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Kasigluk History: Eskimo village, one of the "Tundra Villages," listed with a population of 66 in 1939 and 111 in 1950. The Kasigluk Post Office was established in 1962. Description: population 244, 2 mi. W of Nunapitchuk and 27 mi. NW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kepangalook History: Eskimo camp reported in 1951 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: population 10, on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 6 mi. NE of Bethel, Yukon Kuskokwim Delta.
Kinak
(historical)
History: former Eskimo village or camp, named for the stream; reported in 1949 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS); "Village now deserted. Description: on left bank of Kinak River, 96 mi. SW of Bethel; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Kinak
(historical)
History: former Eskimo camp or village visited by E. W. Nelson in January 1879. i.e. "Kinak River people." about 175. in 1890; and 209 in 1900. Description: on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 4 mi. E of Tuntutuliak and 40 mi. SW of Bethel; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kinegnak History: this village may have been established by Eskimos from the old village called "Kinegnak" near Cape Newenham. in 1938 by Gerald FitzGerald, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); the name was published by Mertie (1940, pl. 1), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: population 20, 1 mi. N of Chagvan Bay at junction of Kinegnak River and Kookukluk Creek and 28 mi. NE of Cape Newenham; Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Kinegnak
(historical)
History: Eskimo village listed in the 1890 Census as "Kinegnagmiut" and "Kniegnagamute," meaning "Kinegnak people." in 1890 was 76; the inhabitants "lived in underground huts of driftwood covered with sods." Description: on S point of Cape Newenham, 39 mi. SW of Goodnews; Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts
Kipnuk History: Eskimo name of a village reported in 1937 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Name has been in use 15 years." and 185 in 1950. Description: population 221, on left bank of Kuguklik River, 4 mi. SE from Kinak Bay, 68 mi. W of Quinhagak; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Klahangamut
(historical)
History: Eskimo village first mentioned in 1880 by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census in 1880 as "Klchangamute," meaning "Klchank people." now abandoned. Description: W of Nanvakfak Lake, 16 mi. W of Goodnews; Kilbuk-Kuskokwim Mts.
Kongiganak History: Name of an Eskimo village reported in 1878 by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, as "Kongiganagamiut," i.e. "Kongiganak people." Description: on W shore of Kuskokwim Bay, 14 mi. SW of Kulvagavik, 34 mi. SW of Quinnagak, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Koot
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo camp or village listed with a population of 117 in the 1890 Census; reported as "the largest village of the Nunivagmiut (Nunivak people)" by Hodge (1907, p. 725), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Description: Located near Cape Etolin, Nunivak Island.
Kulvagavik History: Eskimo village reported in 1879 by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service
Description: on W shore of Kuskokwim Bay at mouth of Ishkowik River, 24 mi. W of Quinhagak, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kuskovak History: Eskimo village reported by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, who passed near it in January 1879; he spelled the name "Kuskovakh." Its population in 1880 was 24. This may be the same place listed as "Kuskohkagamiut" in the 11th Census in 1890 with 115 people, but because of another village with a similar name on the left bank of the river, it is difficult to determine which place is meant. Description: on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 6 mi. SW of Eek I. and 53 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon"Kuskokwim Delta.
Kvigatluk
(historical)
History: Site of an Eskimo village or camp visited in January, 1879 by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, who spelled it "Kvigathlogamute," that is "Kvigathlok people." Description: E of Kyigayalik Alke, 26 mi. NW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwethluk History: Eskimo village mentioned by Eakin (1914, pl. 1), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who spelled it "Kwiklak." The spelling evolved to "Quithlook" in 1923 and to "Kwethluk" in 1938. Its population was 186 in 1939 and 242 in 1950. The Kwethluk post office was established in 1947 (Ricks, 1965, p. 38). This may be the same village reported in 1879 by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, as "Kuilkhlogamute," or "Kuilkhlok people." In the 1880 U.S. Census, Ivan Petroff used Nelson's spelling on his map but spelled it "Kuljkhlugamute" in the text. In 1880, the population of the village was 75. Kwethluk was incorporated as a city on May 9, l975. Description: population 325, on left bank of Kwethluk River, E of its junction with Kuskokuak Slough, 11 mi. E of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwigillingok History: Eskimo village reported as "Quillingok" on a map in the 1927 Annual Report of the Governor of Alaska. 146 in 1940 and 245 in 1950. Description: population 344, on W shore of Kuskokwim Bay, 17 mi. SW of Kulvagavik, 37 mi. SW of Kwinhagak; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwik
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, reported as "Kweegamute" with a population of 43 in the 1890 Census (1893, map) and as "kwigamiut" (p. 111) according to Hodge (1907, p. 747), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Description: on S coast of Nunivak I., 2 mi. N of Cape Mendenhall, Nunivak I.
Kwik
(historical)
History: Small Eskimo settlement, now abandoned, listed by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census, in 1880, as "Kooigamute" and "Kwigamute" with a population of 215. The name means "river (Kuik)." Description: on right bank of Kuskokwim River, W of mouth of Gweek River, 7 mi. NE of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Lime Village History: Native village listed in the 1939 census as "Hungry Village" with a population of 38; 29 persons in 1950. It is presently referred to as "Lime Village," named for the nearby Lime Hills. Description: On the S bank of the Stony River near junction of Hungry Creek, 2 mi E of the Lime Hills and 62 mi upstream from the village of Stony River.
Lomavik
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, listed by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census in 1880 with a population of 81. Petroff received his information from E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, who was there in January 1879 and who spelled the name "Lemavigamute," meaning "Lomavik people." In 1890 the village population was 53, of whom 29 were Eskimos. Description: on left bank of Kuskokwim River, 14 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Lower Kalskag History: this name is listed as "Kaltkhagamute," having a population of 106, in the 10th Census, in 1880. the name "Kal-tchagamut" on his 1898 field sheet, but places the village on the right bank of a slough 1.5 mi. west of the present village called "Lower Kalskag." abandoned; the poeple have moved to Lower Kalskag and Kalskag. The Russian (Greek) Orthodox Church maintains a mission here which probably accounts for its separation from Kalskag. Description: population 122, on right bank of Kuskokwim River 2.2 mi. SW of Kalskag and 27 mi. W of Aniak; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Mekoryuk History: Eskimo village shown on a 1937 manuscript map of Nunivak Island. U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) reported a summer camp here in 1874, and it may be the same place shown on ear ly maps as "Koot."
Description: On the N shore of Nunivak Island at mouth of Shoal Bay, 4 mi S of Cape Etolin
Mellicks Trading Post History: Named for the owner, "Nick" R. Mellick, former postmaster at Sleetmute. (In 1923 the Alaska Road Commission reported Smeaton's Trading Post here. William M. Smeaton was postmaster at Sleetmute) from 1926 to 1933. Description: on W bank of Kuskokwim River 1 mi. S of Sleetmute, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Mumtrak
(historical)
History: This Eskimo village was first mentioned by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census in 1880 as "Mumtrahamute" or "Mumtrah people." Its population in 1880 was 162; it was the same in 1890. It was abandoned about 1930 after the people moved to Goodnews. Description: on Goodnews Bay at mouth of Goodnews River, 0.2 mi. SE of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Napaimiut History: Eskimo and Indian village listed in the 1880 Census with a population of 60; its population was 23 in 1890; and 111 in 1930. Description: population 10, on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 28 mi. E of Aniak; Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts
Napakiak History: Eskimo village reported as "Napahaiagamute" by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, in December 1878; the 1880 Census gave the village population as 98. The name was spelled "Napahayagamiut" in the 1890 Census, but J. E. Spurr and W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), showed the name as "Napachiakachagamut" from information received in 1898 from J. H. Kilbuck, a Moravian missionary. The village population had increased to 139 in 1950 and the Napakiak post office was established in 1951 (Ricks, 1965, p. 44). Today, the village has a church, a school and about 12 dwellings. Napakiak was incorporated as a city on October 19, 1970.Description: On right bank of Kuskokwim River, 10 mi. SW of Bethel; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Napakiak
(historical)
History: See Napakiak; village. Description: on right bank of Johnson River near its mouth, 14 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Napaskiak History: Eskimo village shown on an 1867 USC & GS map as "Napasiak" located on the right bank of the Kuskokwim River. In the 1880 Census Ivan Petroff lists "Napaskiagamute" with a population of 196. In 1890 "Napasheagamiut" contained 97 persons; in 1939, 67, and in 1950, 121. The present spelling of the name was first used in 1898 by J. H. Kilbuck, Moravian missionary. In 1956 the village had a Russian Orthodox church, school and about 30 dwellings (Oswalt, 1963, map and p. 11). Napaskiak was incorporated as a city on October 12, 1971. Description: On left bank of Kuskokwim River at mouth of Napaiskak Slough, 6 mi. S of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nash Harbor History: Eskimo village shown on a 1937 manuscript map of Nunivak Island; name derived from that of the cove. Description: population 49 (1950), on SW shore of Nash Harbor, 32 mi. SW of Cape Etolin, on Nunivak I.
Newtok History: Newly established Eskimo village reported in 1949 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Its population in 1950 was 69. See Old Kealavik. Description: population 129, on Kealavik River N of Nelson I., 36 mi. NE of Cape Vancouver, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nightmute History: Eskimo village listed in the 1939 Census with a population of 78; 27 in 1950; and 237 in 1960. moved west to a new location named Toksook Bay.
Description: population 127, on Nelson I.; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nunachuk History: listed with a population of 44 in the 1950 Census.
Description: 2 mi. E of Kyigayalik Lake and 30 mi. NW of Bethel; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nunapitchuk History: Eskimo village listed with a population of 121 in 1939, 125 in 1950 and 327 in 1960. This village has two groups of buildings sometimes referred to as Nunapitchuk No. 1 and Nunapitchuk No. 2. Description: on the right bank of the Johnson River, 26 mi. NW of Bethel, Yukon Kuskokwim Delta.
Nunapitsinchak History: Eskimo settlement, of about 10 buildings, reported in 1951 by US@C&GS. Description: on right bank of Kwethluk River, 13 mi. E of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nvortulermiut
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village; according to US@C&GSIN 1951 now abandoned two or three sod huts used occasionally as a fish camp. Its population was 10 in 1939 . Description: on Nelson I. 7 mi. S of Nightmute and 100 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon Kuskokwim Delta.
Nyac History: Tish mining camp, established about 1915, received a post office, named Nyac, in 1926 (Ricks, 1965, p. 48). The name is derived from the initials of the New York Alaska (Gold Dreding) Corporation. a7 Nyctea Hills a3 on Nelson I., 11 mi. N of Kinarak Lake and 87 mi. W of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. a4 604300N1642000W Description: population 54, on right bank of Tuluksak River, 40 mi. SW of Aniak, Kilbuck Kuskokwim Mts.
Oknagamut
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village, meaning "people (village) on the other side of river;" reported as "Ukhagmyut," by Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1842-44. In 1879 W. E. Nelson, U. S. Signal Service, recorded "Okhagamute." Ivan Petroff's 1880 Census report lists a population of 130. The spelling "Oknagamut" was established by US@C&GS in 1897 on the authority of Reverend J. H. Kilbuck, Moravian missionary. Description: on N bank of Kuskokwim River 1.8 mi. E of Kalskag and 18 mi. W of Aniak, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Old Village
(historical)
History: Name of a former native village; reported by Capps (1935, pl. 2), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maps indicate an abandoned site with three or four buildings. Description: on right bank of Telaquana River, 0.5 mi. W of Lake Telaquana and 72 mi. NE of Nondalton, Alaska Range
Oscarville History: About 1908 Oscar Samuelson settled at Napaiskak for a few years and then moved across the river where he opened a store and remained as a trader until his death in 1953. After the Oscarville store opened, a few Eskimo families settled near it, forming a village (Oswalt, 1963, p. 10). The village population was 11 in 1939 and 27 in 1950. Description: population 51, on right bank of Kuskokwim River, 5 mi. S of Bethel, Yukon- Kuskokwim Delta
Oskawalik History: Eskimo or Indian camp (Eskimo name) reported in 1913 by Brooks and Eakin (1914, pl. 1), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as "Osakawalit."
Description: on right bank of Kuskokokwim River opposite mouth of Oskawalik River, 8 mi. SW of village of Crooked Creek and 34 mi. W of Sleetmute, Kilbuck= Kuskokwim Mts.
Oyak
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village name, "Oyagamut," obtained in 1898 from missionary John H. Kilbuck by J. E. Spurr and W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: on E shore of Kuskokwim Bay at mouth of Oyak Creek, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Paimiut History: This is a common Eskimo name, meaning "people of the stream's mouth," published in Russian in 1861 by P. Tikhmeniev, presumably from information received from Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1842-44. Ivan Petroff lists "Paimute," population 50, in the 1880 Census. It may be the same place Captain Raymond (1871, p. 25), USA, calls "Kuyikanuikpul." The village was originally located across the river, but was moved to higher ground about 1915. Hrdlicka (1943, p. 225) reports four villages with this name, in this vicinity, occupied at different seasons. Description: on N bank of Yukon River, 22 mi. SW of Holy Cross, Nulato Hills.
Platinum History: Mining village reported to have been named in the 1930's by Sam Cotten, a former miner, for the platinum deposits in the vicinity. In 1937 Platinum was Alaska's newest boomtown with a population of 50, two trading posts, a roadhouse and a post office which was established in 1935 (Ricks, 1965, p. 51) . Adjoining it was a Eskimo village, now abandoned, named "Agvik," reported to mean "small stone to Sharpen Knives,: The Eskimo name was obtained about 1951 at Goodnews by J. M. Hoare, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In 1950 the population of Platinum was 72, and the village was the center of most of the commercial activity in t he area (U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1954, p. 516). The population was 43 in 1960 and 55 in 1970. Platinum was incorporated as a city on February 13, 1975. Description: population 55, near mouth of Small River on Goodnews Bay, 11 mi. SW of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Quinhagak History: The name of this Eskimo village was reported as "S(elo) Koingak," meaning "Koingak Village," by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). Ivan Petroff in the 1880 Census reports it as "Quinehahamute," and in the 1890 Census it is "Quinhaghamiut." The name is shown by W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), on a 1898 fieldsheet as "Quinhagamut." In 1919 G. L. Harrington, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), suggested that the name probably means "new formed river," which refers to the constant changing channel of the stream on which the village is located. The population of the village in 1880 was 83; in 1890, 109; in 1910, 111; in 1920, 193; and in 1930, 230. A post office was established here in 1905 (Ricks, 1965, p. 54). In 1954 the town had a Moravian mission, a store and a government school. Quinhagak was incorporated as a city on February 13, 1975. Description: At the mouth of the Kanektok River on the E shore of Kuskokwim Bay, 46 mi. NW of Goodnews, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Red Devil History: Mining town named for the mercury mine near which it is built; published in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). A post office was established here in 1957. Description: population 152, on left bank of Kuskokwim River at mouth of Red Devil Creek, 6 mi. NW of Sleetmute, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Sleetmute History: Eskimo village mentioned in 1907 by Gordon (1917, p. 109-119), who spelled it "Sikmiut." "Sleitmut") was published by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1913 and reported to mean "stones people" or "whetstone people." village was 133 in 1930; 86 in 1939; and 120 in 1950. Description: population 122, on E bank of Kuskokwim River 1.5 mi. N of its junction with Holitna River, 78 mi. E of Aniak; Stony River low.
Stony River History: Indian village that began with a trading post and riverboat landing to supply the mining area to the north. This settlement, originally called "Moose Village" was located near the mouth of Moose Creek, but subsequently has moved to this location about 1.5 miles upstream. The Stony River post office was established in 1935 (Ricks, 1965, p. 61). See Moose Village. Description: population 75, on N bank of Kuskokwim River 0.9 mi. N of its junction with Stony River, 20 mi. NE of Sleetmute, Stony River Low
Toksook Bay History: Eskimo village established in 1964 when most of the population of Nightmute moved to this new location.
Description: On Nelson Island, 6.5 mi SE of Tanunak; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Tuluksak History: Eskimo name meaning "raven (?)" published by Tikhmeniev in 1861 as "Tul'yagmyut," presumably from information obtained by L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1842-44. In the 1880 Census Van Petroff lists the name as "Tuluksak," population 150. Tuluksak was incorporated as a city on October 28, 1970. Description: population 137, on S bank of Tuluksak River, 48 mi. SE of Russian Mission, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Tundra History: Former Eskimo village or camp recorded on a 1923 map, locality has not been definitely identified. Description: Incomplete record. On N shore, near Takslesluk Lake, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Tuntutuliak History: Eskimo name reported to mean "many caribu". Description: 3 mi NW of the confluence of the Kinak River with the Kuskokwim River, 45 mi SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Tununak History: Eskimo village which was visited in December 1878 by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, and reported as "Tununuk," population 6; listed as "Dununak" in the 1890 Census, population 48; 65 in 1939; and 112 in 1950. A Roman Catholic mission was established here in 1891. Description: On Nelson Island, 6 mi NE of Cape Vancouver.
Ukak History: Former Eskimo village, abandoned before 1945, now used as a summer camp; reported as "Ookagamiut," by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, who visited the village in December 1878. Ivan Petroff, in the 1880 Census, recorded "Ookagamute," population 25; 15 in 1939. Some maps have erroneously located this village on the Ningaluk River. See Unakak. Description: on NW coast of Nelson Island, 27 mi. NE of Cape Vancouver, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Umkumiute History: This is an Eskimo summer camp or village that had a population of 99 in 1950. Umla Island a3 between Sanak and Caton Is., one of Sanak Is., Aleutian Range Description: on Nelson I., on Kangirlvar Bay, 9 mi. SE of Cape Vancouver, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Whitefish Lake History: Local name reported in April 1966 by the postmaster at Stony River. Recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maps indicate only a cabin at this site.
Description: At the W end of Whitefish Lake, 67 mi N of Nondalton and 76 mi SE of the village of Stony River, Lime Hills.

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