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WADE HAMPTON CENSUS AREA
TOWNS, VILLAGES AND POPULATED PLACES
Akumsuk History: Eskimo camp reported in 1952 by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The same year U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) reported the name as Mumsuk. Description: on N bank of Lamont Slough, 2 mi. S of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Alakanuk History: Eskimo village reported in 1899 by G. R. Putnam, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Its population was 61 in 1939 and 140 in 1950. A post office was established here in 1946 (Ricks, 1965, p. 3). Description: population 278, at E entrance to Alakanuk Pass, 6 mi. SW of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Arolokovik History: Former Eskimo camp or settlement reported in 1899 by G. R. Putnam, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Description: "on right bank of Yukon River," Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Bill Moores History: This was a landing and riverboat woodyard reported in 1899 by R. L. Faris, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). He also gave the Eskimo name, "Konogkelyokamiut," for this locality, implying the existence of an Eskimo camp or village here. Description: on left bank of Apoon Pass, 26 mi. NE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Black History: Little is left of this village which was reported about 1896 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) as "Kipniak." It is primarily used as a fishing camp by Eskimo living on the Black River. Description: site of Eskimo village, on S bank of Black River, 1.5 mi. S of its mouth and 39 mi. SW of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Chakaktolik History: Eskimo village name, supposed to mean "many animal bones." Description: population 32, on banks of Kashunuk River at mouth of Chakaktolik Creek, 52 mi. W of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Chaniliut History: Eskimo village reported by the twelfth census enumerator in 1899 who spelled the name "Chineleat." In 1940 it consisted of a church, school, and several cabins on both sides of the slough. Description: On Chaniliut Slough near the entrance into Apoon Pass, Yukon Delta, 2 mi. SE of Pastol Bay, 39 mi. NE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwum Delta.
Chevak History: This village, reported by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1948, is fairly new because of the abandonment of "Old" Chevak and the relocation of its population to "New" Chevak. The name refers to "a connecting slough" on which old Chevak was located. A post office was established at "New" Chevak in 1951 (Ricks, 1965 , p. 10).
Description: population 315, on right bank of Ninglikfak River, 17 mi. E of village of Hooper Bay, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Chulloonawick History: Name published in 1952 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as Choolunawick; village Certificate of Incorporation (1974) shows Chuloonawick. Description: on Gukyuk Slough 17 mi. NE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Emmonak History: Kwiguk post office name changed to Emmonak in 1961 (Ricks, 1965, p. 19). Description: On the N bank of Kwiguk Pass, 7 mi NE of Alakanuk.
Fish Village History: Eskimo settlement that had a population of 27 in 1940. Description: on right bank of Kwikpak Pass, 26 mi. SE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Hamilton History: The North American Transportation and Trading Company established a supply post and riverboat landing here about 1897, named for Charles H. Hamilton, assistant manager of the company. Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), recorded in 1844 an Eskimo settlement or camp at or near this place spelled "Aungua-mut" on an 1850 map.
Description: population 35, on right bank of Apoon Pass, 21 mi. NE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Hooper Bay History: The Eskimo name for this old village is "Askinuk," as first reported by E. W. Nelson, U.S. Signal Service, in December 1878. The 1880 census shows "Askinak" with 175 Eskimo and the 1890 Census shows "Askinaghamiut," numbering 138, living in 14 dwellings. A post office was established here with the name "Hooper Bay," in 1934 (Ricks, 1965, p. 27). USC&,GS, in 1951, reported the present-day Eskimo name "Na-par-ag-a-miut," "stake village people," for Hooper Bay. Description: population 460, on Hooper Bay, 20 mi. S of Cape Romanzof, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Igiak (historical) History: This name has appeared on maps, but it is doubted that a village of this name was located here. It is near an archaeological site called "Tellamishuk." The name may refer to a site 20 miles NE called "Igiayarok."
Description: 5 mi. N of Hooper Bay, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Ingrakaklak History: Eskimo village reported in 1898 as Ingrakaghamiut by USC&GS (Hodge, 1907, p. 609).
Description: on W coast of Tin Can Point, 13 mi. SW of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Ingrihak History: Eskimo name published in the 1880 census as Inghameth and Ingahame a population of 63. USC&GS reported in 1951 that 4 or 5 native families live Ingrihak. According to Hrdlicka (1943, p. 235) the old village site is located farther inland. Description: on right bank of Yukon River, 8.5 mi. S of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Johnnys Village History: Name of an Eskimo settlement reported in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: on right bank of Yukon River, 10 mi. NW of Pitkas Point and 50 mi. NW of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kakamut History: Eskimo name reported by Captain C. W. Raymond, USA, in 1869, as "Kochkogamute." U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) called it "Kochkomut" in 1898. This was a small settlement in 1916, consisting of about three cabins. It has the same number today. Description: on N bank of Yukon River, 15.5 mi. SW of Russian Mission, Yukon-Kuskokwim delta.
Kako Landing History: Local name published on a 1922 manuscript chart of the Yukon River. Description: on S shore of Kako Lake, 4.7 mi. N of Russian Mission, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kalak History: Eskimo name shown on a 1916 fieldsheet by R. H. Sargent, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Sargent shows four cabins there in 1916, but recent maps show only one. Description: on right bank of Yukon River, 0.3 mi. upstream from Pilot Station, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kanapak History: Eskimo name for a fish camp reported by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1949.
Description: on right bank of Kashunuk River, near mouth of Mankakvik Creek, 37 mi. W of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kashunuk Village (historical) History: Abandoned Eskimo village first reported by E. W. Nelson, U. S. Signal Service, who visited there in December 1878. He reported 20 houses and a population of 100-200. In the 1880 Census, Petroff wrote "Kashunok" and reported a population of 125. The 1890 Census called it "Kashunahmiut" and gave a population of 232. In 1951 a U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) field report noted this place was completely abandoned but several sod huts and the ruins of a frame church still remain on a low mound just east of the village. The triangulation station Kashu, 1951 is located in the village. The adjective "Old" is now generally used locally as part of the name. Description: at mouth of Kashunuk River, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kazhutak History: Eskimo village reported in 1899 by G. R. Putnam, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS), who wrote it "Kazhutakamiut," "Kazhutak people."
Description: on left bank of Yukon River, 25 mi. WNW of Pitkas Point and 50 mi. SE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Knockhock (historical) History: Eskimo village abandoned in favor of New Knockhock. Description: on E bank of Black River, 46 mi. S of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kogomiut (historical) History: Former Eskimo village reported about 1938 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Description: on Bering Sea coast, 9 mi. NE of Black River and 8 mi. SW of Waklarok, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kotlik History: Eskimo village listed in 1880 Census with a population of 10; in 1890, it was 31; in 1920, 83; in 1930, 14; in 1940, 35; in 1950, 44; and, although the 1960 Census lists 57 inhabitants, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) gives the population as 116. Description: population 116, on E bank of Kotlik River, 0.3 mi. S of Apoon Pass and 35 mi. NE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kravaksarak Kwiguk D-5


Kutmiut History: This name is first mentioned by W. H. Dall (1870, p. 275) who wrote, "Ten miles from the mouth (of the Kun) is a native settlement, known as Kuttenmut." The people at Scammon Bay told Orth, in 1965, the name means "people of the Kun," and the name is sometimes used locally for the village of Scammon Bay. Description: site of Eskimo village, on left bank of Kun River, 2.7 mi. east of village of Scammon Bay, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwigorlak History: Eskimo fish camp shown on a 1937 manuscript map by "Father Delon" reported by USC&GS in 1949. Description: at junction of Big and Kashunuk Rivers, 45 mi. W of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwiguk History: Eskimo village reported in 1899 by G. R. Putnam, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). post office was established here in 1920. Description: population 358, on left bank of Kwiguk Pass, 3 mi. NNW of Akumsuk; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwikak History: This is the site of a village reported by USC&GS in 1898, as "Kwikagamiut," or "people of Kwikak." Description: on Bering Sea coast, 6.5 mi. SW of Black, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwikluak History: Eskimo village which, according to Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1842-44, was mentioned in 1832 by Alexander Glazanov. Zagoskin spelled it "Kvikhlyuak." G. R. Putnam, USC&GS, recorded the name "Kaoklorokamiut" in 1899. Description: on S bank of Kwikluak Pass, Yukon Delta, 12.5 mi. SW of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Kwikpak (historical) History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, reported in 1879 by USC&GS as "Kwikpakamiut," meaning "Kwikpak people." "Kwikpak" is the Eskimo name for one of the major distributary channels of the Yukon River; it is a name often applied to the Yukon itself. This may be the same as the village of Kwikpuk reported in 1899 by USC&GS at about 624000N1635500W. Description: on N bank of Kwikpak Pass, 22 mi. N of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Lamont History: This is the fish camp of an Eskimo family named Lamont; reported in 1952 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Description: on S bank of Lamont Slough, 4.5 mi. SE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Marshall History: On July 15, 1913, gold was discovered on Wilson Creek by EL Mack ensuing stampede. The camp was located on a channel of the Yukon River because of the convenience for a riverboat landing. A post office called "Fortuna Ledge" was established here 1915 (Ricks, 1965, p. 21). The camp was named for Thomas Riley Marshall, 1854-1925, Vice President of the United States in the Woodrow Wilson administration, 1913-21. See Wilson Creek (Stuck, 1917,p197). Description: Located on the east bank of Poltes Slough, north of Arbor Island, on the right bank of Yukon River, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Mountain Village History: Eskimo village listed with a population of 136 in 1920; 76 in 1930; 128 in 1939; and 221 in 1950. located at the foot of the first mountain met with going up the Yukon." Description: population 300, on N bank of Yukon River, 52 mi. SE of Kwiguk; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nakhliwak
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, reported in 1899 by R. L. Faris, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS), as "Nachliwagimiut." This name is often applied to nearby Chaniliut, but cartographic usage has reapplied the name to a few existing cabins in the described location. Description: on S bank of Apoon Pass, 1 mi. W of Pastol Bay and 40 mi. NE of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
New Fort Hamilton Kwiguk C-6
New Hamilton History: The North American Transportation and Trading Company in 1899 established a supply depot here at a small Eskimo settlement called "Nanvaranok" after the adjacent stream. The trading company, however, called its depot and trading post "New Fort Hamilton." See Hamilton. Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), shows an Eskimo village at or near this place called "Ninvaug." Description: on right bank of Nanvaranak Slough near its mouth on Kwikpak Pass, 18 mi. E of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
New Knockhock History: Eskimo village with a population of 122 in 1950. See Knockhock. Description: On the right bank of the Black River, 45 mi. S of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, 12 mi. NW of the Kusilvak Mountains and 38 mi. W of Mountain Village.
Nililak History: Eskimo campsite reported in 1952 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Description: on S bank of Kwikluak Pass, Yukon Delta, 14 mi. SW of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta;
Nokogamiut
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, reported in 1899 by R. L. Farris, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS)
Description: on E coast of Nokogamiut I., near mouth of Kawanak Pass and 20 mi. N of Kwiguk, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nokrot (historical) History: Former Eskimo village, reported as "Nokrotmiut," meaning "Nokrot people," in 1898 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Description: on Norton Sound, 2.2 mi. NE of Point Romanof and 29 mi. SW of St. Michael, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Nunam Iqua History: Yup'ik name meaning "end of the tundra". Description: Corporate name was changed from Sheldon Point to Nunam Iqua, March 6, 2000.
Ohogamiut History: Eskimo name "Okhnagamiut," meaning "village (people) on other side (of river)." field sheet by R. H. Sargent, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: population 50, on right bank of Yukon River 22 mi. SE of Marshall; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Old Kealavik (historical) History: Former Eskimo village reported in 1949 by USC&GS as "A sod hut village on the Kealavik River very recently abandoned in favor of New Kealavik. See Newtok." Description: on Kealavik River near Newtok, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Pastolik History: Eskimo settlement reported in 1842-44 by Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN); it was recorded by him as "Pashtol." gives the name in 1867 as "Pastolik". in 1890 was 113. Pastolik." Description: on right bank of Pastolik River, 40 mi. NE of Kwiguk; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Pikmiktalik History: Small Eskimo village mentioned in 1842-44 by Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, IRN, who spelled the name "Pikhmikhtalik." The Russian Hydrographic Dept. spelled it "Piemiektaligmiut" in 1852 on Chart 1455. Lieutenant Zagoskin recorded a population here of 45 Eskimos in 4 houses. The 1880 Census listed a population of 10. Description: population 14 (1940), on S bank of Pikmiktalik River, 8 mi. E of Point Romanof and 23 mi. SW of St. Michael, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta
Pilot Station History: Local name, probably given by riverboat pilots, shown on a fieldsheet by R. H. Sargent, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), dated 1916. The present location of the site name has been moved about 0.3 mi. to where Sargent shows a village called Potiliuk. Description: population 219, on right bank of Yukon River, 2 mi. NE of Hills I. and 26 mi. W of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Pitkas Point History: Eskimo village reported by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1898. "named Pitka whose store was a branch of the Northern Commercial Company's station at Andreafski." and 84 in 1950. Description: population 28, near junction of Andreafsky and Yukon Rivers, 40 mi. NW of Marshall; Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Razboinski (historical) History: Russian name meaning "robber" given by the Russians for this former Eskimo village. The Eskimo name "Kinegnagamiut" was listed with a population of 92 in the 1890 Census. Description: Incomplete record. On right bank of Yukon River, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Ribnaia (historical) History: Russian name meaning "fish," for a former Eskimo village reported as "Ruibnai," population 40, in the 1880 Census by Ivan Petroff (1881, p. 57) and as "Rybnia" (ibid., 1884, p. 12). Description: on right bank of Yukon River, SW of Russian Mission, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Russian Mission History: The Eskimo name for this village was reported by Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1843 and published by P. Tikhmeniev, in 1861, as "S(elo) Ikogmyut," possibly meaning "people of the point." It is listed by I. Petroff in the 1880 census as "Ikogmute," with 143 inhabitants; the 1890 Census lists 140. Baker (1906, p. 321), lists Ikogmute", with a population of 350 Eskimo in 1902. This village was the location of a Russian Orthodox Mission (sometimes called "Pokrovskaya Mission)," established in 1851, the first in the interior of Alaska (Oswalt, 1963, p. 6). The designation "Russian Mission" supplanted the Eskimo name about 1900. Russian Mission was incorporated as a city on October 28, 1970. Description: village, on right bank of Yukon River 25 mi. SE of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Saint Marys History: Andreafsky was established about 1898 or 1899 as supply depot and winter quarters for the Northern Commercial Company's riverboat fleet. It is difficult to determine now whether the village received its name from the Andreafsky River or whether the village name was instrumental in changing the river name which was earlier called "Clear River." One report says, however, that the "place received its name from the "Andrea" family who settled here in the early days and built the Russian church." The village's post office name was changed in 1955 to "Saint Marys," after the Roman Catholic Mission here. See Andreafski Redoubt. Description: On the W shore of Andreafsky River, 6.4 km (4 mi) ENE of Pitkas Point and 29 km (18 mi) E of Mountain Village, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Scammon Bay History: The post office, established in 1951, is primarily responsible for standardizing this name on maps as Scammon Bay; named for the nearby bay. The village is known in Eskimo as "Mariak" and the people are referred to as Mariagamiut.
Description: population 115, at N foot of Askinuk Mts., on left bank of Kun River 1 mi. from its mouth, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Sheldon Point See Nunam Iqua
Stuyahok History: Name of mining camp shown on recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maps. Description: in Ilivit Mountains, near head of Stuyahok River, 22 mi. NE of Russian Mission, Nulato Hills
Takshak History: Eskimo village reported as "Takchag-miut" by Lieutenant L. A. Zagoskin, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), in 1842-44. In 1949 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) reported this village abandoned, however, the 1950 Census listed a population of 39. It may be a summer village or camp. Description: on point of land between Five Day and Poltes Sloughs, 6 mi. NW of Marshall, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Willow Creek History: This camp was established about 1916 when extensive mining operations began on the stream "Willow Creek." Description: camp for the Willow Creek Mine, on W bank of Willow Creek 7.5 mi. SE of Marshall, Nulato Hills.

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