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BRISTOL BAY BOROUGH AND DILLINGHAM CENSUS AREA, ALASKA
BOROUGH CO-HOST NEEDED!

Welcome to to the Alaska GenWeb Project. I'm Vikki Gray, your Alaska State Coordinator. Please feel free to make this site your own. You are welcome to submit any data, photos, or other information that you think would be helpful for genealogical researchers. Items can be submitted as Word documents, Excel Documents, or scans.

I would really like to find a co-host for this Borough - preferably someone with knowledge of the area. Web skills are desirable but not required. If you are interested please email me for more information. You can also visit our Volunteer Page to get an idea of different ways to help.

 
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
WHATS NEW? Easily determine what has been added to this site since your last visit.
  AIRCRAFT OWNERS Registered aircraft owners in Bristol Bay Borough and Dillingham Census Area
new BIBLIOGRAPHY Under development. Please submit any good local history sources that you are aware of.
BIOGRAPHIES Under development.
  BOAT OWNERSHIP A list of all boat ownership for boats registered in Bristol Bay - Dillingham. Sorted by vessel name.
CEMETERIES & FUNERAL HOMES Under development.
CHURCHES Under development.
  DEATHS Compiled from the US SS death index, courtesy of Sherri Bradley
DEEDS Beverly Morrow, Bristol Bay Recorder
550 West 7th Ave., Suite 1200,
Anchorage, AK 99501-3564
(907) 269-8876
(Fax) 269-6006
BRISTOL BAY RECORDING DISTRICT COVERS THE FOLLOWING AREAS:
Akokpak * Aleknagik * Aleknagik Lake * Bristol Bay * Clarks Point * Daly * Dillingham * Ekathiuk * Ekuk * Ekwok * Elilakok * Enakuk * Gechiang * Hagemeister Island * Igushik * Kanakanak * Kashiagamiut * Koliganek * Kulukak * Lewis Point * Manokotak * Mosquito Point * Nasaugiuk * Nelsonville * New Stuyahok * Nunachuak * Nunavakamut * Nushagak * Osviak * Owens * Portage Creek * Snag Point * Sparks * Tikchik Lodge * Togiak * Tuklung * Tunravik * Twin Hills * Ualik * Ungalikthluk * Warren * Wood River
Beverly Morrow, Kvichak Recorder
550 West 7th Ave., Suite 1200,
Anchorage, AK 99501-3564
(907) 269-8876
(Fax) 269-6006
KVICHAK RECORDING DISTRICT COVERS THE FOLLOWING AREAS:
Beacharof * Egegik * Egegik River * Hallersville * Hollis (Aband) * Kanatak * King Salmon * Koggiung * Kulik Lodge * Kvichak * Levelock * Libbyville * Lockanok * McCauley Cabin * Meshik * Nakeen * Naknek * Pederson Point * Pilot Point * Port Bailey * Port Heiden * Red Salmon * Savonoski * South Naknek * Thompson * Ugashik
Uncle Sam LOOKUPS We need you! Please visit this page to see how you can help.

MAPS

Nice collection of Alaska maps to help you with your research
MUSEUMS, LIBRARIES &
HISTORICAL SOCIETIES
Great source list!
NATIVE CULTURE MAP Shows the Native groups in Southern Alaska, courtesy of W. "Bill" Jones of Stratford, Florida
  NEWSPAPERS - CURRENT The Bristol Bay Times
NEWSPAPERS - HISTORICAL This shows what newspapers were available and when.
Dillingham Naknek
UPDATED! OBITUARIES Feel free to submit obituaries for posting!
PHOTOS Under development. Feel free to submit photos for posting.
  PIONEERS This has residents of the Bristol Bay Basin which also includes Lake and Peninsula Borough
Surnames A-L Surnames M-Z
  PROBATE AND COURT RECORDS  
QUERIES This goes to the Rootsweb query site, where you can post queries for this locality
RESOURCES City of Dillingham
PO Box 889, Dillingham, Alaska 99576 Phone 907-842-5225 / Fax 907-8425691
SURNAMES Research your family name through the Ancestry.com surname boards
TIMELINE OF ALASKA HISTORY A brief timeline to help you figure out what happened and when.
TOWNS, VILLAGES & POPULATED PLACES
Akokpak
History: Eskimo name reported in 1925 by U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). Description: on right bank of Nushagak River at mouth of Mulchatna River, 65 mi. NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Aleknagik
History: Eskimo village recorded as "Sel(eniye) Imyak" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 4), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). there were two villages, both named for the lake, the other being at the head of Lake Aleknagik. village have disappeared. Description: population 223, on SE shore of Lake Aleknagik, 17 mi. N of Dillingham; Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Anugnak
History: Eskimo village reported by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census in 1880. Description: on left bank of Ood River, 7 mi. N of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low
Cheching
(historical)
History: Eskimo name reported in 1949 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) applying to a village with a 1950 population of 54 people. Description: 1 mi. ESE of Cheching Mtn., 12 mi. SE of mouth of Ooksokwak River and 95 mi. SW of Bethel, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.
Clarks Point
History: The community was established in the 1920s as a cannery. The population was 25 in 1930; 22 in 1939; and 128 in 1950. The community was named for John Clark, who was the manager of the Alaska Commercial Company store at Nushagak Bay (Alaska Division of Community & Regional Affairs, Community Database, 2009). The Clarks Point post office was established in 1935. This is the site of the former Eskimo village or camp of "Sturarok," population 7, recorded in the 1890 Census (1893, p. 95). Description: population 138, at Clarks Point on E shore of Nushagak Bay, 14 mi. S of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Dillingham

History: Named in 1904 for William Paul Dillingham, 1843-1923, Governor of Vermont, 1888-90 and U.S. Senator, 1903-23. In 1903, Dillingham conducted an extensive tour with his Senate subcommittee through Alaska. This was the first comprehensive investigation of Alaska by a Congressional committee, and Senators Dillingham and Nelson became for many years the Senate's authorities on Alaska. This location was originally occupied by a Eskimo village recorded as "Ah-lek-nug-uk," by Ivan Petroff in the 1880 Census and as "Kanakanak" in the 1890 Census; it was also known as "Chogim." The post office of Killingham was extablished on Snag Point in 1904, (Ricks, 1965, p. "Nelsonville," 3 miles to the SW. About 1944 the name "Dillingham" was transferred to this site. Dillingham is now the principal settlement and sourc e
Description: population 424, on S coast of Snag Point at head of Nushagak Bay, 360 mi. SW of Anchorage, Bristol Bay Low.

Touristy Description: This community of 2,347 is situated on the edge of the wilderness, just south of Wood-Tikchik State Park, the largest state park in the country. Dillingham is located 327 miles southwest of Anchorage and is surrounded by rolling tundra with ridges of spruce and birch trees.

Dillingham is a full service community that welcomes both the commercial fishing industry and a sizeable number of tourists during the summer. Visitors are drawn by the recreation opportunities in Wood-Tikchik State Park and the area’s reputation for having some of the best sportfishing in Alaska. All five species of Pacific salmon along with freshwater rainbow trout, arctic char and Dolly Varden are abundant in the Wood and Tikchik systems of lakes and rivers.

Wood-Tikchik State Park is spread over 1.6 million acres and named for its two separate systems of large, interconnected clear-water lakes. Bordered by the Nushagak lowlands on the east and the Wood River Mountains to the west, the two systems of lakes span a variety of terrain and are renowned for their diverse beauty. Other than 11 fishing and hunting lodges in and around the park, Wood-Tikchik is an undeveloped wilderness that attracts kayakers, canoers, rafters and boaters. Visitors are usually totally self-sufficient and reach the park by air taxi from Dillingham or charter boat from the village of Aleknagik on Lake Aleknagik, 25 miles north of Dillingham and connected to the city by road.

Also famous for walruses is Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary, a group of seven craggy islands and their adjacent waters located in northern Bristol Bay southwest of Dillingham. Best know among the Walrus Islands is Round Island, the largest haul-out grounds in Alaska, where each summer 15,000 male walruses haul out on exposed, rocky beaches to stake out their territory for the upcoming mating season. Other wildlife is also plentiful on this remote island including Steller sea lions, migrating whales, orcas, puffins and thousands of other seabirds.

Strategically situated at the head of Nushagak Bay and along the mouth of the Wood and Nushagak rivers, Dillingham has become the economic and transportation hub of western Bristol Bay. Thanks to the rich fisheries of Bristol Bay, Dillingham is the fastest growing community in the region, supporting 230 commercial fishing licenses and four fish processing plants whose workers double the city’s population in the summer.

Dillingham is also the hub for many of the air taxis that operate within Togiak National Wildlife Refuge. The 4.7-million-acre refuge encompasses pristine rivers, clear mountain lakes and steep sloped mountains, stretching from the restless Bering Sea to the treeless tundra uplands of the Ahklun and Wood River Mountains. The main activities in the refuge are float trips and sport fishing as Togiak offers some of the finest salmon and trout fishing in Alaska as habitat to all five Pacific salmon species. The refuge also provides habitat for at least 201 staging, migrating or breeding bird species while brown bear, moose and caribou attract sport hunters to the area. Along Togiak's coastline up to 12,000 male walrus may haul out on Cape Pierce at one time.

Ekiligamut
(historical)
History: 2 mi. N of Togiak Village, on right bank of Togiak River, 44 mi. E of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Description: 2 mi. N of Togiak Village, on right bank of Togiak River, 44 mi. E of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Ekilik
(historical)
History: on right bank of Togiak River, 45 mi. E of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts. Description: on right bank of Togiak River, 45 mi. E of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Ekuk
History: population 40, Ekuk Spit, on E shore of Nushagak Bay, 16 mi. S of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Ekwok
History: On the right bank of the Nushagak River, at junction of Klutuk Creek, 42 mi NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Elilakok
History: Eskimo camp or small village reported in 1910 by H. C. Fassett, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF), as "Ah-lai-luk-ah." The present spelling was first used in 1925 by U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). The site is now abandoned. Description: on left bank of Nushagak River, 5 mi. S of Nunachuak and 62 mi. NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Igushik
History: Eskimo village listed in the 1880 U. S. census with a population of 74; 28 in 1930; and 16 in 1940. Description: S of mouth of Igushik River, 30 mi. SW of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Kanulik (historical)
History: Eskimo village reported by Ivan Petroff in 1880 Census. Its population in 1880 was 142; in 1890, 54; it is now abandoned. Description: at head of Nushagak Bay, 2 mi. NE of Nushagak and 6 mi. SE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay. Low.
Kashiagamiut
History: Former Eskimo village or camp mentioned by Ivan Petroff in the 1880 census as "Kissiak;" published in 1884 as "Kissaiakh." It was recorded "Kashaiyagamut" on an 1898 field sheet by W. S. Post, but was published as "Kashaiagamut" (Spurr, 1900, map 10), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The population in 1880 was 181; in 1940, 33. Description: on right bank of Togiak River, 1.3 mi. E of Nayorurun River, 57 mi. NE of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Kassianmute
(historical)
History: This Eskimo village, which had two dance houses, was first mentioned by Ivan Petroff in the 10th U.S. Census. The name means "Kiassian people." Its population in 1880 was 615, in 1890 it was 50; it is now abandoned. Description: on right bank of Togiak River, 5 mi. SW of Kashiagamiut and 50 mi. ENE of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
King Salmon

History: the King Salmon post office was established in 1949 at King Salmon Air Force Base. Description: population 227, on the right bank of Naknek River, on Alaska Peninsula, 14 mi. SE of Naknek; Bristol Bay Low.

Touristy Description: A former military base during World War II, today King Salmon is a community of 409 residents located on the north bank of beautiful Naknek River. Located 284 miles southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, King Salmon is a service center and the gateway to Katmai National Park with a healthy percentage of government and transportation employees. The wide open, often treeless landscape that surrounds King Salmon gives it a quiet, edge-of-the-world appeal. While inaccessible by road, during the summer months King Salmon can also be reached by jet service from Anchorage - a perk of having been established as an Air Force Base during World War II.

Most visitors pass through King Salmon on their way to Katmai National Park and Preserve. Renowned for the Valley of 10,000 Smokes, the moon-like landscape of which is the result of the Mount Katmai eruption, the 4.2-million-acre national park is also one of the most popular places in Alaska for bear viewing. Throughout the summer visitors fly into the park, many on day trips from Anchorage, to watch giant brown bears snag salmon mid-air in Brooks River from an observation tower just 30 yards away. The outstanding fishing at Brooks Camp and at wilderness fishing lodges scattered throughout the park attracts sport anglers from around the world.

King Salmon is also the gateway to the numerous fly-in fishing and adventure camps and lodges on the Alaska Peninsula as well as wildlife viewing expeditions headed to Becharof National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge and McNeil River State Game Sanctuary. Within town, information about all the parks along with displays and a small video room is available at the King Salmon Visitor Center next to the terminal that is staffed by both the National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service staff. Other than the parks, the most interesting tour in the area is by road to the village of Naknek, the site of the world’s largest sockeye salmon run from mid-June to the end of July.

Koggiung
History: Eskimo village listed by Ivan Petroff in the 1880 Census with a population of 29; 133 in 1890; and 533 in 1900. Its increase in population was due to the establishment of several canneries. The Koggiung post office operated from 1935 to 1946. Description: on E bank of Kvichak River at Graveyard Point, on Alaska Peninsula 9 mi. N of Naknek, Bristol Bay Low.
Kokwok
(historical)
History: Eskimo village or camp mentioned by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census of 1880 as "Kukuak." It was called "Kok-wok-ha-mut," meaning "Kok-wok people," on a 1910 manuscript map by H. C. Fasset, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). F. H. Waskey, a local resident, reported in 1931 that the name "Kokwok" was nearer the Eskimo pronunciation than "Kakuak or "Kakwok." The population of the village was 104 in 1880; 45 in 1890. The village is now abandoned. Description: on right bank of Nushagak River, near mouth of Kokwok River, 36 mi. NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Koliganek
Description: population 100, on left bank of Nushagak River, 65 mi. NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Libbyville
History: Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1947 Coast Pilot (p. 521). This village is the site of a Libby, McNeill, and Libby Co. cannery. Description: on N coast of Alaska Peninsula, 3.5 mi. NW of Naknek, Bristol Bay Low.
Manokotak
History: Eskimo village reported in 1948 by US@C&GS. Its population was 120 in 1950; a post office was established here in 1960 (Ricks, 1965, p. 41). Description: population 149, on left bank of Igushik River, 22 mi. SW of Dillingham, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Mosquito Point
History: This was originally an Eskimo village called "I-gi-ahk", recorded on a 1910 manuscript map by H. C. Fasset, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). The local name "Mosquito Point" was reported in 1937 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and published by Mertie (1938, pl. 1), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In 1937 this village consisted of 40 white people. A territorial school was there. It is no longer permanently occupied.
Description: Incomplete record. N of Aleknagik, at SE end of Lake aleknagik, 18 mi. N of Dillingham, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Naknek

History: originally an Eskimo village reported about 1821 by Captain Lieutenant M. N. Vasiliev, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), who gave its name as "Naugeik." Sarichev (1826, map 3), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), reported it as "Naugvik." "Naknek" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 4), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). built a post called "Fort Suvarov" at or near the village, named after the nearby point of land. village name as "Kinghiak." 111 in 1920; 173 in 1930; 152 in 1939; and 174 in 1950. Naknek post office was established in 1907. for its "Red Salmon" canneries. Description: population 249, on N bank of Naknek River near its mouth, on N coast of Alaska Peninsula, 56 mi. SE of Dillingham; Bristol Bay Low.

Touristy Description: Accessible via road through King Salmon, Naknek is a small community of 554 residents on the north bank of the Naknek River, adjacent to the northeast end of Bristol Bay and the world’s richest sockeye salmon fishery. Fishing is Naknek’s lifeblood and its strategic location is why the village supports six salmon processors that draw several thousand seasonal workers each summer.

Naknek comes alive during the red salmon run from mid-June to the end of July. Almost 70 percent of the world’s sockeye salmon is caught in Bristol Bay and Naknek is in the heart of it with 20 million fish passing through. Thousands of people flood the area during the fishing season, sending millions of pounds of salmon down the 15.5-mile road to King Salmon where jets whisk away the fresh fish to restaurants and markets in the rest of the country.

The abundance of salmon attracted Yup'ik Eskimos and Athabascan Indians to the region more than 6,000 years ago and Russians traders by 1821. The first salmon cannery opened on the Naknek River in 1890 and by 1900, there were 12 canneries in Bristol Bay. At the time land acquired by the Russian Orthodox Church through the Homestead Act on the north bank of the Naknek River was the first plots recorded in Naknek. Squatters setting up shelters on the church property were eventually sold lots in what evolved into present-day Naknek.

The Russian Orthodox St. John the Baptist Chapel in Naknek, reportedly constructed in 1886, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Naknek is also home to the Bristol Bay Historical Museum, featuring archaeology, history and Native culture, and documents Naknek's history as one of the largest commercial salmon fishing and canning headquarters in the world. The museum building is the original Fisherman's Hall, an early meeting place for fishermen.

Nelsonville
History: named about 1944 for Senator Knute Nelson, 1843-1923, Governor of Minnesota 1893-95, and U.S. Senator, 1895-1923. member of Senator Dillingham's subcommittee, made an extensive tour of Alaska in 1903. "Dillingham," and an Eskimo village called "Keek-sel-hak" was recorded on a 1910 manuscript map by H. C. Fassett, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). 1944 the name "Dillingham" was transferred to Snag Point where the Dillingham post office had been since 1904; the name "Nelsonville" came into use about this time. a section of Kanakanak. Description: on right bank of Nushagak River, 3 mi. SW of Dillingham; Bristol Bay Low
New Stuyahok
History: Located on the site of the Eskimo village of "Stuyarok", New Stuyahok was listed in the 1950 Census, population 88. New Stuyahok post office was established in 1961 (Ricks 1965, p. 45.) Description: population 145, on right bank of Nushagak River, 10 mi. NE of Ekwok and 52 mi. NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Nulatok
(historical)
History: Former Eskimo village, population all, reported by Ivan Petroff in the 10th census in 1880. Description: on right bank of Nayorurun River, 5 mi. N of its junction with Togiak River and 56 mi. NE of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Nunachuak
History: Eskimo village reported in the 1930 Census with a population of 32 and in 1940, 50. Description: on left bank of Nushagak River below its junction with Nunachuak Creek, 64 mi. NE of Dillingham, Bristol Bay Low.
Nushagak
History: former Eskimo village established as a trading post about 1819, called by the Russians "Aleksandrovsk," probably for Alexander Baranov, Governor, under whose orders the post was founded. the transfer of Alaska to the United States the settlement was referred to as "Fort" or "Redoubt Alexander" until a post office, called "Nushagak" after the river, was established in 1899 1.5 mi. N of here at Carmel. (Ricks, 1965, p. 48). 268 in 1890; 74 in 1910; 16 in 1920; 43 in 1930; and 7 in 1958. Nushagak was the principal village of several located nearby. 1918 epidemic (probably measles) decimated the population.
Description: at Nushagak Point, on E shore of Nushagak Bay, 6 mi. S of Dillingham; Bristol Bay Low
Portage Creek
No information available. Located on USGS Naknek D-6 map.
Savonoski
History: Name published in 1962 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). There is another Savonoski near the east end of Iliuk Arm Naknek Lake. Description: population 20, on S bank of Naknek River, on Alaska Peninsula, 5 mi. ESE of Naknek, Bristol Bay Low.
South Naknek
History: Eskimo and Aleut village listed in the 1880 Census with a population (including Kingiak) of 192; 93 in 1890. See Naknek. The South Naknek post office was established in 1937. Description: population 142 on S bank of Naknek River, on Alaska Peninsula, 1 mi. SE of Naknek, Bristol Bay Low.
Tikchik (historical)
Eskimo village reported with a population of 38 by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census in 1880; recorded as "Tuk-shik-ha-mut" on a 1910 manuscript map by H. C. Fasset, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). Suffered "great sickness" in 1899-1900 which decimated the population.
Description: on N shore of Tikchik Lake, E of Tikchik River and 65 mi. N of Dillingham, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Togiak
History: Eskimo village name reported as "S(elo) Tugiatak," or "Tugiak Village," by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 3); and as "S(leo) Tugiak" by Captain Tebenkov (1852, map 4) Imperial Russian Navy (IRN). In 1880 Petroff (1881, p. 48) recorded two villages, "Togiagamute," population 276 (94 in 1890) and "Togiak Station," population 28 (14 in 1890), both located, on his map, E of the mouth of the river, about 7 mi. apart. The southernmost, "Togiak Station" has been called "Owens," named, according to Frank Waskey, local trader and prospector for Johnny Owens who operated this important trading post. "Togiak Village" was published in the 1947 Coast Pilot (p. 530). The population was 71 in 1945 and 108 in 1950. Togiak was incorporated as a city on June 10, 1969. Description: population 220, at head of Togaik Bay, 2 mi. W of mouth of Togiak River and 43 mi. E of Goodnews, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Twin Hills
No information available. Located on USGS Goodnews Bay A-4 map.
Ungalikthluk
History: Eskimo name reported in 1948 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). Ivan Petroff showed a village symbol in this area on an 1881 map, but he failed to give a name.
Description: on left bank of Ungalikthluk River, 12 mi. SE of Togiak, Kilbuck-Kuskokwim Mts.
Wood River
History: located on site of Eskimo village of "Ah-lek-nug-uk," which was recorded on a 1910 manuscript map by H. C. Fassett, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF). Description: population 15, at junction of Wood and Nushagak Rivers, 2 mi. NE of Dillingham; Bristol Bay Low
Uncle Sam VOLUNTEERS We need you! Please visit this page to see how you can help.
VITAL STATISTICS Handled by the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics. Under Alaska law, all Vital Statistics records are strictly confidential until they become public records. Births become public records 100 years after the event; deaths, marriages, and divorces become public records 50 years after the event.
YEARBOOKS
This is an area where volunteers can be of great help. If you have an old yearbook or school photos, scan it in and send it to the Borough Coordinator.

Should you have any questions, please email the Borough Coordinator.

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