Towns, Villages & Populated Places

 

FAIRBANKS NORTH STAR BOROUGH - (SE FAIRBANKS CENSUS AREA FOLLOWS FAIRBANKS NORTH STAR BOROUGH)
Aurora
No info available. Located on USGS Fairbanks D-2 map.
Aurora Lodge
Established in 1902 when the U.S. Army Signal Corps located the Salcha telegraph station about three miles from the mouth of the Salcha River. The Salchaket post office (from the Indian name "Salchakaket" i.e. "mouth of the Salcha") was located at the mouth of the Salcha in 1909; discontinued in 1926 (Ricks, 1965, p. 55). The trading post and roadhouse are shown on maps as "Munsons" and recently "Aurora." Description: along the Richardson Highway at junction of Salcha and Tanana Rivers, 40 mi. NW of Big Delta, Tanana Low.
Bjerrmark
suburb S of Fairbanks at N terminus of Richardson Highway, Tanana Lowland
Bluff
Local name derived from nearby Moose Creek Bluff.
Description: On Richardson Highway, 19 miles southeast of Fairbanks, Tanana Low.
Broadmoor
Local name, also called South Bjerremark because it was part of the Bjerremark Homestead before it was subdivided. The name was published in 1955 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: residential suburb, 5 mi. SW of Fairbanks, on S bank of Chena River adjacent to Fairbanks International Airport, Tanana Low.
Chatanika
Mining settlement established about 1904, and railroad station when the Tanana Valley Railroad was completed in 1907. The Chatanika post office was established in 1908. Its population was 63 in 1930 and 106 in 1940. It was named after the stream. Description: population 30, 2 mi. E of junction of Cleary Creek and Chatanika River, 20 mi. NE of Fairbanks, Yukon-Tanana High.
Chena (historical)
Name derived from the Chena River and reported in 1903 by T. G. Gerdine and R. B. Olive (in Prindle, 1905, pl. 16). The village was called "Chena Junction" because it was the south terminus of the Tanana Valley Railroad; however, it was incorporated as "Chena" in 1903. A post office was established in 1903 and discontinued in 1918 (Ricks, 1965, p. 10). With the growth of Fairbanks, Chena disappeared and had only 18 persons in 1920. Description: on N bank of Tanana River, 1 mi. W of mouth of Chena River and 7 mi. SW of Fairbanks, Tanana Low.
Chena Hot Springs
Local name derived from the Chena River near headwaters of which the hot springs are located. The springs were reported in 1907 by C. C. Covert, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the name was reported in 1912 by Ellsworth and Davenport (1915, p. 59), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: summer population 10, 8.5 mi. WSW of Far Mtn. and 80 mi. SW of Eagle, Yukon-Tanana High.
Chickaloon
Village, named for the Chickaloon River, was established about 1916 as terminus of the Matanuska Branch of The Alaska Railroad in this coal-rich region. The Chickaloon post office operated from 1918 to 1922 and 1931 to 1933 (Ricks, 1965, p. 11). Its population was 28 in 1930. Description: on Chickaloon River, 26 mi. NE of Palmer, Talkeetna Mts.
Clear Creek Park
Local name derived from Clear Creek and published in 1955 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: on right bank of Clear Creek, 5 mi. SE of Fairbanks, Tanana Low.
College
So named because it is the location of the University of Alaska; published in 1927 U.S. Postal Guide. Description: mile 467.1 on The Alaska RR., population 175, 3 mi. NW of Fairbanks, Tanana Low.
Dennis Manor
local name reported in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographers. Description: 5.5 mi. E of Fairbanks, on S bank of Chena River; Tanana Low.
Dogpatch
Name reported in 1954 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: 3 mi. N of College and 5 mi. NW of Fairbanks, Yukon-Tanana High
Ester
Mining camp name derived from Ester Creek, and reported by in 1908 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). According to Kitchener (1954, p. 297), the mining camp existed before 1905. The Berry post office was located here for a while; name changed to Ester post office in 1965. See Berry. Description: 2.5 mi SE of Ester Dome and 8.5 mi W of Fairbanks, Yukon-Tanana High.
Fairbanks
Founded in 1901 when a trading post was established here by E. T. Barnette, First called "Barnettes Cache," the name was changed in 1902 to honor Charles Warren Fairbanks, 1852-1918, Senator from Indiana and later Vice President of the United States under Theodore Roosevelt. The town began as the supply center for the mining region to its north after gold was discovered by Felix Pedro in 1902, and has since become the commercial and transportation hub of north and central Alaska. Its population was 3,541 in 1910, 1,555 in 1920, 3,455 in 1939, and 5,771 in 1950. The Fairbanks post office was established in 1903. Description: On the Chena River, Tanana Low.
Fox
Former mining camp established before 1905. The Fox post office was established in 1908; discontinued in 1947 (Ricks, 1965, p. 21). Its population was 25 in 1950. Description: on right bank of Fox Creek as it enters Goldstream Creek valley, 10 mi. NE of Fairbanks, Yukon-Tanana High.
Graehl
Originally a townsite listed in 1916 Polk's Gazetteer; the village has been annexed by the city of Fairbanks. Description: of Fairbanks, on N bank of Chena River, E of Garden I., Tanana Low.
Hamilton Acres
No info available. Located on USGS Fairbanks D-2 map.
Harding Lake
No info available. Located on USGS Big Delta B-6 map.
Highland Park
Local name reported in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographers. Description: 12 mi. SE of Fairbanks, on S side of Richardson Highway, N of North Pole, Tanana Low
Lemeta
Local name reported in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographers. Description: population 1,015 residential suburb 1 mi. N of Fairbanks, Tanana Low
Moose Creek
No info available. Located on USGS Fairbanks C-1 map.
Musk Ox
No info available. Located on USGS Fairbanks D-2 map.
North Pole
History: Local name of a community incorporated in 1953.
Olnes
Mining supply village and former RR. station on the Tanana Valley RR., reported in 1907 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Olness post office was established in 1908, discontinued in 1910, and then reestablished as "Olnes" in 1922; finally discontinued in 1925. According to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) it was named for a miner who spelled his name "Olnes" (complete name not available). Description: 16 mi. N of Fairbanks, Yukon-Tanana High.
Pleasant Valley
No info available. Located on USGS Big Delta B-6 map.
Richardson
Former village and post office established in 1906 and named for Major Wilds P. Richardson, USA, first President of the Board of the Alaska Road Commission (ARC), who "established a sled road between Valdez on the coast, and Fairbanks, the largest settlement in the interior, a distance of 370 miles." (Brooks, 1953, p . 425-26). Eventually, the Tanana River changed its course and the erosive effects forced the people to move. The post office was discontinued in 1943 (Ricks, 1965, p. 54). Description: on right bank of Tanana River, 18 mi. NW of Big Delta, Tanana Low
Slaterville
Local name reported in 1950 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographers. Description: population 611 (1950), residential suburb on Garden I., N of Fairbanks, Tanana Low
South Fairbanks
in S section of Fairbanks; Tanana Low.
Standard
Local name derived from Standard Creek, listed in a timetable in 1922. Description: on The Alaska RR. 25 mi. SW of Fairbanks, Yukon-Tanana High.
Totem Park
No info available. Located on USGS Fairbanks D-2 map.
Westgate
Name probably derived from its being at the west end of the city adjacent to the airport. Description: subdivision now within corporate limits of city of Fairbanks, on S bank of Chena River, Tanana Low.
SOUTHEAST FAIRBANKS CENSUS AREA
Alcan
No info available. Located on USGS Nabesna C-1 map.
Big Delta
History: Village established in 1904 by the U.S. Army Signal Corps as the Mccarthy (or Mccarty) Telegraph Station. The Washburn post office was established here, or near here, and operated from 1905 to 1913. The Big Delta post office operated from 1925 to 1959, from which the village received its present name. Its population was 155 in 1950. Description: At the junction of Delta and Tanana Rivers, 73 miles southwest of Fairbanks.
Charlieskin Village
History: Local name reported by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1954. Description: on Charlieskin Creek, 5.5 mi. S of Northway Junction, Alaska Range
Chicken
History: mining camp and post office established in 1903. is a common name for the ptarmigan. 1930. Description: on right bank of Chicken Creek 1 mi. N of Mosquito Fork, 58 mi. SW of Eagle; Yukon-Tanana High
Delta Junction
History: Established as a road construction camp about 1919, but has developed into a fairly large village in recent years primarily because of its strategic locality at the junction of two major highways. It was originally called "Buffalo Center" because it is near the site of the winter range for a herd of American bison established in 1927. Description: On the E side of the Delta River, 9 mi SSE of its confluence with the Tanana River at Big Delta, Alaska Range.
Donnelly
History: Established as a telegraph station about 1904 by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, and a stage station on the Fairbanks-Chitina trail. Description: on Richardson Highway, 26 mi. S of Delta Junction, Alaska Range
Dot Lake
History: Commercial and Indian settlement established about 1954 on the highway at an emergency landing field. Description: population 56, on The Alaska Highway at Dot Lake, 40 mi. NW of Tok, Tanana Low.
Dot Lake Village
No info. Located on USGSMount Hayes C-1 map.
Dry Creek
No info. Located on USGS Mount Hayes C-2 map.
Eagle
History: Established as a log house trading station called "Belle Isle" by Moses Mercier about 1874 and operated intermittently until its development as a mining camp in 1898 (Kitchener, 1954, p. 255). The village, then with a population of about 800, was platted and named "Eagle City" for the American eagles nesting on nearby Eagle Bluff (Henning, 1965, p. 204). The Eagle post office was established in 1898 and the Valdez-Eagle telegraph line was completed in 1903. The U.S. Army established the "Eagle City Camp" in 1899 at Eagle and a year later Fort Egbert was built; abandoned in 1911. The population of Eagle was 383 in 1900; 178 in 1910; 98 in 1920; 54 in 1930; 73 i n 1939; and 55 in 1950.
Description: population 92, on left bank of Yukon River at mouth of Mission Creek, 6 mi. W of Alaska-Canada boundary, Yukon-Tanana High
Eagle Village
History: Han Kutchin Indian village associated with nearby Eagle, which was the original site of this Indian village before the mining camp was established there. The early village was called "Johnnys" by "the whites" because its chief was known as "John." See Eagle. Description: on left bank of Yukon River, 3 mi. E of Eagle, Yukon-Tanana High.
Healy Lake
No info available. Located on USGS Mount Hayes D-2 map.
Jack Wade
History: mining camp named by miners for Jack Wade, prospector; reported in 1903 by T. G. Gerdine (in Prindle, 1905, pl. 16), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). post office was established in 1901 and maintained until 1948 (Ricks, 1965, p. 29). 1940. Description: on Wade Creek, 46 mi. S of Eagle; Yukon-Tanana High
Kathakne
History: Indian name reported by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1955. Description: on NE shore of Fish Lake, 3 mi. E of Northway, Alaska Range
Nabesna Village
History: Nabesna Indian village reported by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1945. This may represent the same people that once occupied a village called "Khiltats" at the mouth of the Nabesna River (Hodge, 1907, p. 679). Description: on W bank of Nobesna River 6 mi. SW of Northway Junction, Alaska Range
Northway
History: Northway was first built as a link in the Northwest Staging Route during World War ii, and still serves as an important airport.
Northway Junction
No info available. Located on USGS Tanacross A-2 map.
Tetlin
History: Lieutenant Allen (1887, p. 77) wrote "We reached 'Tetling's' June 12, 1885 * * * six men * * * four women, and seven children, occuping two houses situat ed on a deep, clear stream, the outlet of a lake * * *." Apparently named for the local tyone or chief "Tetling." Lieutenant P. G. Lowe (Glenn and Abercrombie, 1899, p. 370), USA, wrote: "On August 29, 1898 we stopped at 'Tetling,' and were met by Chief David * * *. 'Tetlings' consists of four log houses * * *." In 1942, at the recommendation of Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Board on Geographic Names (BGN) officially changed the spelling to "Tetlin" to agree with that of the river. Description: population 122, on Tetlin River, 4.5 mi. E of Tetlin Lake and 20 mi. SE of Tok, Yukon-Tanana High
Tetlin Junction
History: Local name published by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1951. Named because it marks the junction of two important highways in the Tetlin Indian Reservation. Description: On the N side of the Tanana River, at junction of Alaska and Taylor Highways, 8 mi E of Tok Junction and 13 mi NNW of Tetlin, Yukon-Tanana High
Tok
History: Tok, which took its name from the nearby stream, developed since the building of the Alaska and Glenn Highways in the 1940s. The U.S. Customs and Immigration office is located here. Description: Located at the junction of Alaska and Glenn Highways, 8 km (5 mi) southwest of the junction of Tok and Tanana Rivers, and 19.3 km (12 mi) southeast of Tanacross, Alaska Range.

 

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