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ALASKA GENWEB PROJECT

LAKE AND PENINSULA BOROUGH

Welcome to to the Alaska GenWeb Project. We are Ray Ensing and Heather Tallbot, Co-hosts of your Lake and Peninsula Borough. All that means is that we handle the computer end of things. Please feel free to make this site your own. You are welcome to submit any data, photos, or other information that you think would be helpful for genealogical researchers. Items can be submitted as Word documents, Excel Documents, or scans.
 
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Button WHAT'S NEW? Easily determine what has been added to this site since your last visit
Button AIRCRAFT OWNERS A list of all FAA registered planes in Lake and Peninsula Borough
BIBLIOGRAPHY Under development. Please submit any good local history sources that you are aware of.
Button BIOGRAPHIES Under development.
Button BOAT OWNERSHIP A listing of all boats registered in Lake & Peninsula Borough
Button CEMETERIES & FUNERAL HOMES Under development.
Button CHURCHES Under development.
Button DEATHS Extracted from the Social Security Death Index
DEATH INDEX (A-J) DEATH INDEX (K-Z)
Button DEEDS Beverly Morrow, Aleutian Recorder
550 West 7th Ave., Suite 1200,
Anchorage, AK 99501-3564
(907) 269-8876
(Fax) 269-6006
  Kvichik Recording District Covers:
Beacharof * Egegik * Egegik River * Hallersville * Hollis (Aband) * Kanatak * King Salmon * Koggiung * Kulik Lodge * Kvichak * Levelock * Libbyville * Lockanok * McCauley Cabin * Meshik * Nakeen * Naknek * Pederson Point * Pilot Point * Port Bailey * Port Heiden * Red Salmon * Savonoski * South Naknek * Thompson * Ugashik
 

Iliamna Akokpak Recording District Covers:
Iliamna Amakdedori * Ashivak * Augustine * Chenik * Dutton * Fish Village * Igiugig * Iliamna * Iniskin * Kakhonak * Kakhonak Bay * Kamishak * Kijik * Kokhonak * Lake Iliamna * Newhalen * Nondalton * Pedro Bay * Pile Bay * Port Alsworth * Severson * Tanalian Point * Tuxedni Bay

LOOKUPS AND VOLUNTEERS We need you! Please visit this page to see how you can help.
Button MAPS All kinds of maps
Button MUSEUMS, LIBRARIES & HISTORICAL SOCIETIES A great way to start your research.
Button NATIVE CULTURE MAP Shows location of the various Native populations in Southern Alaska
Button NEWSPAPERS - HISTORICAL A list of what newspapers were available for various time periods.
  Aniak Bethel
  Dillingham Naknek
  Sand Point
New OBITUARIES Feel free to submit any obituaries that you have.
Button PHOTOS Under development. Feel free to submit photos for posting.
Button PIONEERS Under development.
New PROBATE AND COURT RECORDS  
Button QUERY / MESSAGE BOARDS These are a valuable resource and all genealogists need to learn how to use them.
Button RESOURCES Lake And Peninsula Borough, AK
PO BOX 495
King Salmon, AK 99613-0495
Phone: (907)246-3421
Fax: (907)246-6602
Button SURNAMES Research your family name through the Ancestry.com surname boards
Button TIMELINE OF ALASKA HISTORY A brief timeline to help you figure out what happened and when.
Button TOWNS, VILLAGES & POPULATED PLACES
 
Chekok
(historical)
History: Eskimo village, now abandoned, listed in the 1880 Census as "Chikak," with a population of 51. Description: on N shore of Iliamna Lake, 3 mi. NE of Chekok Point and 21 mi. E of Iliamna
 
Chignik
Aleut village probably established as a fishing village and cannery named for Chignik Bay. The 1890 Census lists it as "Chignik Bay" with a population of 193. Its population was 224 in 1939 and 253 in 1950. The Chignik post office was established in 1901. Description: population 99, on E coast Alaska Peninsula at head of Anchorage Bay
 
Chignik Lagoon
Local name recorded in 1964 in the Community Gazateer of Alaska. Chignik Lagoon post office was established in 1962 (Ricks, 1965, p. 11). Description: on E coast Alaska Peninsula on N shore of Chignik Lagoon, 5.7 mi. NW of Chignik
 
Chignik Lake
Local name recorded in 1964 in the Community Gazeteer of Alaska. Description: population 107, on Alaska Peninsula, at E end of Chignik Lake 13 mi. W of Chignik
 
Egegik
population 150, on S bank and near mouth of Egegik River on N coast of Alaska Peninsula, 38 mi. SW of Naknek, Bristol Bay Low.
Description: population 150, on S bank and near mouth of Egegik River on N coast of Alaska Peninsula, 38 mi. SW of Naknek
 
Fish Village
Local name reported by P. S. Smith (1917, pl. 1), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
Description: on W bank of Newhalen River, at S end of Sixmile Lake, 1.5 mi. S of Nondalton
 
Hallersville
Name of a village published on the 1941 Cannery Map of Alaska. Several cabins are here, but there is no permanent population. Description: on left bank of Kvichak River, 60 mi. E of Dillingham
 
Igiugig
Name of a seasonal fishing village used by Eskimos from Levelock and other villages near Kvichak River (Bia 1966). Igiugig post office was established in 1934, discontinued in 1954 (Ricks, 1965, p. 28). Description: on left bank of Kvichak River, 0.5 mi. W of Iliamna Lake and 46 mi. SW of Iliamna
 
Iliamna

Eskimo village reported on a 1935 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) map of Alaska. Before 1935 this name was applied to a village located at another site. After the move the old village became known as "Old Iliamna." Iliamna (now Old Iliamna) obtained a post office in 1901; the post office moved to the present location and retained its name. Description: N or Iliamna Lake, 56 mi NW of Augustine Island.

Touristy Description: Located 30 miles south of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Iliamna is one of the gateways to the 5,625-square-mile preserve but its principal attraction is Lake Iliamna. With a length of 75 miles and 20 miles wide, the lake covers 1,000 square miles and is home to the largest sockeye salmon run in the world. Other world-class fishing includes Dolly Varden, arctic char, lake trout and grayling.

Iliamna is a small community situated on the northwest shore of Lake Iliamna, the largest lake in Alaska and second largest fresh water lake in the United States after Lake Superior. Originally an Athabascan village near the mouth of the Iliamna River, the community was moved to its present location around 1935 and today the mainstay of the economy for many of the 95 residents are the fishing and hunting lodges in and around Lake Iliamna and Lake Clark.

From Iliamna’s gravel airstrips or floatplane bases, charter flights transport visitors to a wide variety of fly-in fishing and wilderness lodges, ranging from rustic to luxurious. The lake is connected to Bristol Bay by the Kvichak River, through which some marine mammals such as harbor seals and beluga whales can travel. Iliamna sometimes boasts a resident population of harbor seals.

 
Ivanof Bay
Cannery reported in 1954 by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) (p. 292). The Ivanof post office was established in 1952, discontinued in 1954 (Ricks 1965, p. 29).
Description: population 15, on Alaska Peninsula, at N end of Ivanof Bay, NE end of Kupreanof Peninsula
 
Kakhonak
Eskimo village with a population of 28 listed in 1890 Census by A. B. Schanz. Description: on S shore of Iliamna Lake, 23 mi. S of Iliamna
 
Kaluiak
(historical)
name listed as a "native village" by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census, in 1880. that the only village in the area was on Mitrofania Island, though no name was given. recent maps and therefore location is approximate. Description: on S shore of Chignik Bay, E of Anchorage Bay and NE of Chignik
 
Kaskanak
This Eskimo village was first mentioned by Ivan Petroff in the 10th Census of 1880 as "Kaskinakh village." It was called "Kaskanakh village" in the 1890 Census. The name was spelled "Kaskanak" in 1890 by A. B. Schanz in Frank Leslie's Newspaper. The population in 1880 was 119; in 1890, 66; it is no longer permanently occupied. Description: on right bank of Kvichak River, 85 mi. NE of Dillingham
 
Kijik
(historical)
Former Eskimo village reported as "Kichik," population 91, by Ivan Petroff in the 1880 Census, but located on his map on the east shore of Lake Clark. 1890-91 Leslie Expedition "Kilchikh" was the permanent village, located about 9 miles up the Kijik River, and "Nikhkak" was the salmon season fishing village on the shore of the lake. (1904b, p. 329), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), recorded two spellings, "Keeghik," derived from the Eskimo name for Lake Clark, and "Nikhak." p. 682 and 687) lists "Kichik," Eskimo village, and "Kilchik," Indian village, both with the 1880 Census population of 91; also (1910, p. 70) "Nikhkak" population 40 in 1891 and about 25 in 1904. Description: on W shore of Lake Clark near mouth of Kijik River. Suffered measles epidemic in 1902.
 
Kokhanok
No info available
 
Kvichak
Eskimo name "reported by the early Russians" and published in 1898 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). See Kvichak River. Description: on E bank of Kvichak River, on Alaska Peninsula, 17 mi. NE of Naknek
Lake Clark National Park and Preserve Touristy Description: Lying only 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, Lake Clark National Park and Preserve holds some of Alaska's finest scenery; an awesome array of mountains, glaciers, granite spires, thundering waterfalls, waved-washed coastline, and the largest lake in the state. The 5625-sq-mile park stretches from the shores of Cook Inlet, across the Chigmit Mountains, to the tundra covered hills of the western interior. The centerpiece of the park is spectacular Lake Clark, a 42-mile-long turquoise body of water ringed in by mountains. But the Chigmits, where the Alaska Range merges into Aleutian Range, is home to Mt Iliamna, 10,016 feet, and Mt Redoubt, 10,197 feet, two active volcanoes that in 1990 were seen tossing ash into the air from Anchorage. Despite its overwhelming scenery and close proximity to Alaska's largest city, less than 5,000 visitors a year find their way to Lake Clark.

Lake Clark is home to a full complement of subarctic wildlife species. Land mammals include brown and black bears, moose, the Mulchatna caribou herd that numbers more than 100,000, Dall sheep and wolves. Harbor seals, beluga whales, Steller's sea lions and sea otters are seen along the coast while the rivers and lakes feature outstanding fishing for salmon, Arctic char, Arctic grayling, Dolly Varden, northern pike, lake trout, and rainbow trout.

Visitors who take the time to arrange a trip into the national park are often a mix of anglers, river runners and experienced backpackers. Within the park are three designated National Wild Rivers - Chilikadrotna, Tlikakila and Mulchatna Rivers - that have long been havens for rafters and paddlers in inflatable canoes and kayaks. Sport anglers are attracted to the park because Lake Clark's watershed is one of the world's most important producers of Bristol Bay red salmon, contributing a third of the annual harvest.

Many activities - backcountry hiking, camping, flightseeing, kayaking and rafting - require careful planning and a commitment of time in this vast wilderness. But because of the park's location to Alaska's largest city, many visitors interested in fishing, flight seeing or wildlife viewing arrive just for a day on a float plane, returning to Anchorage before dark.

 
Levelock
Eskimo village named "Kvichak" reported by early Russian explorers and mentioned in 11th Census in 1890. A post office called "Levelock" was established here in 1939 (Ricks, 1965, p. 39). Description: population 88, on right bank of Kvichak River, 58 mi. E of Dillingham
 
Meshik
No info available
 
Mitrofania
(historical)
"Native" village, shown on a U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF) Chart (1890) and reported as abandoned in U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) Alaska Coast Pilot (1947, v. 2, p. 293). Description: between Kuiukta and Mitrofania Bays, on S coast of Alaska Peninsula, 24 mi. SW of Chignik
 
Nakeen
Local name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1954 Coast Pilot (p. 505). Description: on W bank of Kvichak River, 1.5 mi. N of Telephone Point and 14 mi. N of Naknek
 
Napaimute
(historical)
Former Eskimo village or camp reported in the 1890 Census as "Napaimiut" with a population of 11. Description: on south shore of Iliamna Lake 1 mi. W of Kakhonak and 22 mi. S of Iliamna
 
Nauklak
(historical)
Former Eskimo village recorded in 1898 as "Naouchlagamut" by J. E. Spurr and W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who obtained their information from the chief of Savonoski. Description: on Alaska Peninsula, in Katmai National Monument, about 15 mi. E of Naknek Lake
 
Newhalen
Eskimo name of a village listed in the 1890 Census as "Noghelingamute" or "people of the Noghelin," population 16. (1893 p. 164). The present spelling is an anglicization of the name. There evidently were two villages of these people on Newhalen River in 1890; see Noghelin Painga. Description: population 63, on N shore of Iliamna Lake, at mouth of Newhalen River, 2.5 mi. S of Iliamna
 
Nondalton
Tanaina Indian name recorded on a 1909 field sheet by D. C. Witherspoon, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Nondalton post office was established in 1938 (Ricks, 1965, p. 47). See Sixmile Lake. Description: population 205, on W shore of Sixmile Lake, 15 mi. N of Iliamna
 
Pedro Bay
Village listed in 1950 Census with a population of 44. A post office was established here in 1936 (Ricks, 1965 , p. 50). Description: At the head of Pedro Bay, 38 mi. NW of Augustine Island
 
Perryville
Tthis "native" village was established to provide for people who were driven away from the vicinity of Mount Katmai by the eruption of 1912. including a store and school (Coast Pilot, 1947, p. 297). was originally called Perry, but later was referred to as Perryville, probably to conform with the post office that was established there in 1930 (Ricks, 1965, p. 50).
Description: population 111, on S coast of Alaska Peninsula 19 mi. E of Stepovak Bay
 
Pile Bay Village
Local name derived from Pile Bay; published in 1952 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Description: On the E shore of Iliamna Lake, at the hed of Pile Bay, 36 mi ESE of Nondalton
 
Pilot Point
Aleut and Eskimo village with a cannery and post office that was maintained at intervals from 1933 to 1951. The name was reported in 1900 by Lieutenant Commander J. F. Moser, U.S. Navy (USN), commander of the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF) steamer Albatross, as "Pilot Station," named for the Ugashik River pilots stationed there. The name was changed in 1933 when the Pilot Point Post Office was established. Of 120 Aleuts, one family survived the flu epidemic of 1918; the village was populated by Eskimo in 1923. The population was 114 in 1939; 76 in 1963. Description: On the E shore of Ugashik Bay, on the N coast of Alaska Peninsula, 7 mi NW of Ugashik Bay
 
Port Alsworth

Village and airfield. The Port Alsworth post office was established in 1950 (Ricks, 1965, p. 52). Description: Near the mouth of the Tanalian River on the SE shore of Lake Clark at Hardenburg Bay, 22 mi. NE of Nondalton

Touristy Description: Port Alsworth is community of 125 residents, located on the east shore of Lake Clark, just 100 miles southwest of Anchorage. Being that it is the only village within the vast wilderness of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, extending across 5,625 square miles of the Alaska Peninsula, Port Alsworth serves as a major gateway for adventurous souls seeking a wilderness experience in the national park.

The spectacular scenery surrounding Port Alsworth is quintessential Alaska: tundra-covered hills, an array of mountains, glaciers, coastline, the largest lakes in the state and two active volcanoes. The centerpiece of the area is spectacular Lake Clark, a 42-mile-long turquoise body of water ringed in by mountains. But the national park is also where the Alaska Range merges into the Aleutian Range to form the Chigmit Mountains and is home to Mount Iliamna, at 10,016 feet, and Mount Redoubt, at 10,197 feet.

Visitors who take the time to arrange a trip into the national park are often a mix of anglers, river runners and experienced backpackers. There are no roads and few trails in the park but there are three designated National Wild Rivers that have long been havens for rafters and paddlers in inflatable canoes and kayaks. The park's watershed is one of the world's most important producers of Bristol Bay red salmon, contributing a third of the annual harvest, and anglers arrive from around the world to hook a hard-fighting sockeye, often as daytrips from Anchorage. Lake Clark also has a scattering of remote, isolated lodges, most accessible from Port Alsworth, where you can truly escape into a pristine wilderness for a few days without having to sleep on the ground.

Port Alsworth has lodging, raft rentals and other visitor services as well as a National Park Ranger Station with displays and videos on the park and a limited selection of maps and books for sale. A foot trail, one of the few maintained trails in the park, heads 2.5 miles from the village to serene Tanalian Falls.

 
Port Heiden
This settlement was formerly an Eskimo village spelled "Mishik" by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1902. miles north. 1915. 1930.
Description: population 74, on N shore of Alaska Peninsula, on N shore of Port Heiden, 20 mi. W of Aniakchak Crater
 
Savonoski
(historical)
Name reported in 1898 by J. E. Spurr and W. S. Post, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), who obtained it from Reverend A. Petelin. Spurr also reported it as "Ikkhagamut." Savonoski was abandoned after the Katmai area eruptions on June 2-6, 1912.
Description: site of Eskimo village, on Alaska Peninsula, near mouth of Savonoski River, at head of Iliuk Arm Naknek Lake, 21 mi. NW of Mount Katmai
 
Seversens
Local name published in 1923 by Alaska Road Commission (ARC), as "Severn's Roadhouse," and in 1933 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as "Seversens." Description: on Roadhouse Bay, on N shore of Iliamna Lake, 1 mi. E of Iliamna
 
Ugashik
Eskimo village listed by Ivan Petroff in the 1880 Census as "Oogashik," population 177; 154 in 1890; 84 in 1930; 55 in 1939; and 48 in 1950. The Ugashik post office was maintained here intermittently from 1932 to 1963 (Ricks, 1965, p. 67). Description: village, on NW coast of Alaska Peninsula, on E bank of Ugashik River, 9 mi. from its mouth
Button VITAL STATISTICS Handled by the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics. Under Alaska law, all Vital Statistics records are strictly confidential until they become public records. Births become public records 100 years after the event; deaths, marriages, and divorces become public records 50 years after the event.
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YEARBOOKS
This is an area where volunteers can be of great help. If you have an old yearbook, scan it in and send it to the Borough Coordinator.

Should you have any questions, please email the Borough Coordinator.

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This page was last modified: Wednesday, 07-Nov-2012 05:52:56 MST  

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