~~ 6th Alabama Infantry ~~
Rifles

According to Regimental returns as of December 20, 1862, the regiment either had or were issued 18 German Rifles - 1 Belgium Rifle  - 18 Austrian Rifles - 63  Mississippi Rifles - 102 Rifle Muskets - 26 Enfield Rifles - 112  Enfield Muskets - 84 Smoothbore Muskets

A further BTW, I was in Troy Saturday to visit a music shop and looked at the confederate monument. Interestingly, the soldier has a Springfield rifle [the sling attaches to the second swivel band, not the first as in an Enfield] and an Enfield bayonet [the Springfield used a scabbard-type bayonet holder that swung down and was shaped like a "C", while the Enfield used a frog] But they somebody at the Newton, Al. re-enactment (put on by the newly formed Co. H? of the 15th Ala) that Confederates used a frog for the Springfield bayonet. That same source told me that you could always tell the two bayonets apart because the Enfield had a rim right after the bend, while the Springfield does not. I was squinting into the sun to try and see if the bayonet had a rim on it, but couldn't tell. It was also real hot, so the mystery remains unsolved. Joe Paul 

Costs: Excerpt from a letter from the Ordinance Office to the Secretary of War

ORDNANCE OFFICE,
Washington, June 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON,
Secretary of War:

The cost of manufacturing rifle muskets is $13.93 per arm, including appendages, such as screw-drivers, wipers, spring vices, and bullet-molds. The Government has no foundry and purchases its cannon. The prices heretofore paid have been 6 cents per pound for iron cannon unchambered, and 6 cents for chambered; for bronze cannon, 46 cents per pound, except the mountain howitzer, for which 75 cents per pound is paid. No muskets have been purchased. For cavalry carbines, which are patented arms, the price is $30 each; and for cavalry pistols, Colt revolvers of the latest pattern, $25. The only work for supplying arms owned by the Government is the armory at Springfield. The present capacity of that armory can give a product of about 2,500 arms a month.

 

German Rifle - Suhl?

Looking for Description and picture

Belgium Rifle

Looking for Description and picture

"Model 1854 Austrian "Lorenz Rifle Musket

Model 1854 Austrian "Lorenz Rifle Musket"

54 & 58 Caliber - Looking for a description

The Forty-seventh Massachusetts have the Austrian rifle, made of poor material and badly constructed. I examined eight hundred of these rifles and I do not consider one hundred serviceable.
WM. S. ABERT,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Inspector-General U.S. Army

The arms which were used by my command were the Austrian rifle, an arm totally worthless, and condemned on different occasions, the locks of said guns having springs of so weak construction that many of the men had to snap the cock three or more times before the piece would discharge. The men also were provided with ammunition a good deal too large for the pieces; the caliber of the guns .58, and that of the ammunition .54.
CARLO PIEPHO,
Capt., Comdg. One hundred and eighth Regt. Ohio Vol.

"Model 1841 U.S. Percussion Rifle, "Mississippi Rifle"
Model 1841 US Percussion Rifle, "Mississippi Rifle"

Made by Harpers Ferry Armory; c. 1846-1855. Total produced about 25,296. 33" browned rifled 54 caliber round barrel. Made without provision for bayonet. Brass blade front sight and V-notch rear sight. Two barrel bands retained with barrel band retaining springs. Steel ramrod of trumpet head type, with brass tip. Brass mountings finished bright. Blued screw heads. Casehardened lock. Walnut stock with large patchbox on right side of butt. The "Mississippi Rifle" owes its name to the successful use of the weapon by a Mississippi regiment, under command of Jefferson Davis, in the Mexican War. In its period, military authorities regarded the model 1841 as the best of its type. First regulation rifle made in the percussion ignition system at the national armories

Richmond Armory Percussion Rifle-Musket

Richmond Armory Percussion Rifle-Musket

Made by Richmond Armory; c. 1861-1865. Total produced unknown. 40" round 58 caliber rifled barrel with cleanout screw on bolster. Front sight doubles as lug for angular bayonet. Two leaf rear sight. Three barrel bands retained with barrel band retaining springs. Iron ramrod with tulip shaped end. Iron mountings with brass buttplate and forend cap. Early production muskets used a lockplate with a distinctive full humpback design. Later production muskets used a lockplate with a lower humpback design. Metal parts finished bright except for the lock, which was casehardened. Walnut stock. The lockplates were made from forgings and dies that were intended to use the Maynard tape primer used on the U.S. Model 1855 rifled musket. The unused Maynard system caused the distinctive "humpback" design. The Richmond Armory Percussion Rifled-Musket was produced in larger numbers than all other Confederate longarms.

Model 1842 U.S. Percussion Rifle Musket

Model 1842 US Percussion Rifle-Musket

Made by Harpers Ferry Armory and Springfield Armory; c. 1856-1859. Total produced about 14,182. Same as the 1842 U.S. Percussion Musket, but features a 69 caliber rifled barrel. Slightly more than 10,000 were fitted with long range sights, the balance were issued without them.

Model 1855 U.S. Percussion Rifle-Musket

Model 1855 US Percussion Rifle-Musket

Made by Harpers Ferry Armory and Springfield Armory; c. 1857-1861. Total produced about 59,273 (Harpers Ferry Armory; 12,158) (Springfield Armory; 47,115). 40" round 58 caliber rifled barrel with cleanout screw on bolster. Front sight doubles as lug for angular bayonet. Early models have long range rear sight, later models have two leaf rear sight. Three barrel bands retained with barrel band retaining springs. Steel ramrod with tulip shaped end and swelled shank at forend cap. Iron mountings, with brass forend cap (in 1859, the forend cap was changed to iron). Metal parts finished bright. Lock contains a Maynard primer system. Walnut stock without patchbox (in 1859, a patchbox was added on right side of butt). Staple arm of the civil war. First U.S. martial arm firing the Minie bullet in 58 caliber.

Model 1861 U.S. Percussion Rifle-Musket

Model 1861 US PErsussion Rifle-Musket

Made by Springfield Armory; c. 1861-1862. Total produced about 265,129. 40" round .58 caliber rifled barrel with cleanout screw on bolster. Front sight doubles as lug for angular bayonet. Two leaf rear sight. Three barrel bands retained with barrel band retaining springs. Steel ramrod with tulip shaped end and swelled shank at forend cap. Iron mountings. Metal parts finished bright (rear sight sometimes blued). Walnut stock. The Model 1861 was the standard musket in use during the civil war. A major improvement over the Model 1855 was the elimination of the Maynard primer system. This model served as the pattern for most arms made for war use. Approximately 1,000,000 were manufactured by the Springfield Armory and private contractors.

Model 1863 U.S. Percussion Rifle-Musket, Type I and Type II

Model 1863 US PErcussion Rifle-Musket, Type I and Type II

Made by Springfield Armory, c. 1863 (Type I) and 1864-1865 (Type II). Total produced was about 273,265 for Type I and 255,040 for Type II. 40" round 58 caliber rifled barrel. Front sight doubles as lug for angular bayonet. Two leaf rear sight on Type I and single leaf rear sight on Type II. Three split type barrel bands secured with screws on Type I and three solid barrel bands secured by flat springs mounted in the stock on Type II.. Steel ramrod with tulip shaped end, straight shank on Type I and either tulip head type or knurled and slotted head type on Type II.. Iron mountings. Metal parts finished bright excepting case hardened lock. Rear sights are sometimes blued on Type I. Barrel bands and some other parts are occasionally blued on Type I.. The addition of finishes such as case hardening and blueing on the Type I is a departure from previous U.S. martial longarm production. Bluing eliminated on some parts of the Type II. The Type II is the last regulation U.S. martial arm of muzzle-loading design.

Enfield Percussion Rifle-Musket

Enfield Percussion Rifle-Musket

Made by Enfield (British) Armory. Total imported unknown. 33" tapered round 577 caliber rifled blued barrel. Lug on right side of muzzle for saber bayonet. Blued steel base and blade front sight. Blued long range (800 yards) rear sight. Two split type blued barrel bands secured with screws. Steel ramrod with slotted type head. Brass furniture finished bright. Casehardened lock and hammer. This longarm was preferred by confederate armies and also used by the federal armies during the civil war.

Enfield Percussion Musket

Enfield Percussion Musket

Made by Enfield (British) Armory. Total imported unknown. 39" tapered, round .577 caliber rifled, blued barrel. Blued front sight doubles as lug for angular bayonet. Blued long range (800 yard) rear sight. Three split type blued barrel bands secured with screws. Steel ramrod with slotted type head. Brass furniture finished bright. Casehardened lock and hammer. Walnut stock. This longarm was purchased and frequently used by both federal and confederate armies.

Model 1816 U.S. Flintlock Musket (Converted to percussion)

Model 1816 US Flintlock Musket (Converted to percussion)

Made by Harpers Ferry Armory and Springfield Armory; c. 1861-1840 then converted (by private contractors) to percussion; c. 1840-1860. Total quantity converted unknown. 42" round 69 caliber smoothbore barrel. No front or rear sight. Bayonet lug on top of barrel at muzzle. Three barrel bands retained with barrel band retaining springs. Steel ramrod with button shaped head. Iron mountings. Metal parts finished bright, browned, or combination; the lockplate casehardened. The conversion ("French Style" or commonly known as "drum and nipple") consisted of removing all external lock parts then plugging all threaded holes; a drum type bolster (with nipple) was then threaded into the enlarged touchhole; then, the hammer was replaced with one that resembled a civilian fowling piece. This method was believed to have been performed through the early 1850s.

Model 1842 U.S. Percussion Musket

US Percussion Musket

Made by Harpers Ferry Armory and Springfield Armory; c. 1844-1855. Total produced about 275,000 (Harpers Ferry Armory; 103,000) (Springfield Armory; 172,000). 42" round 69 caliber smoothbore barrel. Bayonet lug on bottom of muzzle of barrel. Blade front sight mounted on front barrel band, no rear sight. Three barrel bands retained with barrel band retaining springs. Steel ramrod with trumpet shaped head. Iron mountings. Metal parts finished bright. Walnut stock with a comb. First regulation musket made in the percussion ignition system at the national armories. Last smoothbore U.S. arm made in 69 caliber. First U.S. weapon made at the Harpers Ferry and Springfield Armories with fully interchangeable parts.

C. S. ARMORY, Richmond, September 22, 1864.

Col. J. GORGAS,
Chief of Ordnance:

COLONEL: I beg to present for your information a list of rifle muskets manufactured North, and their places of manufacture:

  1. Springfield U.S. rifle, manufactured at Springfield, Mass.
  2. Philadelphia U.S. rifle, manufactured at Philadelphia, Pa.
  3. Bridesburg U.S. rifle, manufactured at Bridesburg, Pa.
  4. Park, Snow & Co. U.S. rifle, manufactured at Meriden, Conn.
  5. Colt U.S. rifle, manufactured at Hartford, Conn.
  6. Whitney U.S. rifle, manufactured at Whitneyville, Conn.
  7. Wm. Muir & Co. U.S. rifle, manufactured at Windsor Locks, Conn.
  8. Norwich U.S. rifle, manufactured at Norwich, Conn.
  9. L. G. & Y. U.S. rifle, manufactured at Windsor, Vt.
  10. Providence Tool Company U.S. rifle, manufactured at Providence, R. I.
  11. E. Robinson U.S. rifle, manufactured at New York.
  12. U. A. Co. U.S. rifle, manufactured at New York.
  13. Remington U.S. rifle, manufactured at Ilion, N.Y. Watertown U.S. rifle, manufactured at Watertown, Mass.
  14. Wm. Mason U.S. rifle, manufactured at Taunton, Mass.
  15. Eagleville Company U.S. rifle, manufactured at place not known.
  16. Norfolk U.S. rifle, manufactured at Norfolk, Va.

Among the old arms received in this armory for repairs during the current month I have noticed the above arms from a variety of manufacturing establishments, all of them made after the U.S. '55 model and all interchanging with the Richmond rifle musket except in lock-plate and mainspring, which have been altered in the Northern arms.

I suppose there are in the North (including breech-loading) not less than thirty-eight armories, all on a large scale, and their total product probably will not fall short of 5,000 arms per day.

I am, colonel, your very obedient servant,

S. ADAMS,  Master Armorer.


On Feb. 5, 2003, James D. Allen, creator of this website passed away
There is no doubt that he would want the work on the
6th Alabama Infantry to go on.
With that in mind, this site is dedicated to him.
We miss you, Jimmy.



Home ~ Unit History/ Maps ~ Company Rosters ~ Battles/Timeline ~  Pictures
~
Bibliography ~ Officers ~ Brigade-Commanders ~ Letters / Documents ~ Uniforms ~
Alabama Regiments - Links and Contacts

Copyright by Carolyn Golowka
2003-2006

Last Updated: Tuesday, February 14, 2006