Henry County, Alabama part of AHGP and ALHN

News Clippings from Local Newspapers

The Following News Articles from Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama to Ed Godbold who Contributed them for this Website April 11, 2006

From The Front Page Of The "Columbia Breeze" June 2, 1898

Miss Powers Captured
Sheriff Pilcher Carries Off Miss Vester Powers, Charged With Stealing A Heart
"Sheriff Joe M. Pilcher came down from Abbeville last Sunday armed with certain necessary papers issued by the Probate Judge authorizing him to take into custody Miss Vester Powers, one of Columbia's fair daughters, on a charge of "heart stealing". The papers were placed in the hands of Rev. N.R. Hamer, pastor of the Methodist church, for service, and at 3:30 o'clock, accompanied by Deputy Sheriff Williams, the gallant Sheriff appeared at the home of Mrs. E. S. Powers, mother of the young lady, where, after a few brief prelimmaries (sic) and in the presence of a few witnesses, the sentence of the law and of the church was duly pronounced by Rev. Hamer.
It is surmised that Miss Vester was a willing captive, although she may have made the counter charge that the sheriff had stolen her heart. Be that as it may, she is a pretty and accomplished young lady and the hearty good wishes of the people of Columbia follow her into captivity. Our sheriff has the reputation of being kind to his prisoners and The Breeze predicts that the bonds with which he has bound this gentle one will not be hard to bear."
ELG Note:
Vesta and Anna Colesta were fraternal twins. When Vesta was 13 years old her father, age 61, and her sister Kate Elizabeth, age 24, died within a week of each other in 1890. Her sister Short died at age 23 in 1897, then Lula died in 1900 at age 32 and Willie died in 1903 at age 41. Kate, Short and Lula all died of "consumption" (tuberculosis). In later years when Vesta would walk by the home of a a known tuberculosis sufferer, she would make her children hold their breath and run past the house. When her father became very ill, Vesta's mother opened her house to boarders in order to support the remaining family members. It was because of this that Vesta was to meet her future husband, Joseph Mitchell Pilcher.

Newspaper data and notes which follow provided by Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama
Columbia Enterprise, Columbia Alabama, Jan. 5, 1883. Contributed by Ed Godbold
Advertisement
E. S. Powers at his blacksmith, wagon and plow shop is prepared to execute orders in his line at short notice. Blacksmithing, in all its forms, repairing of wagons, buggies, carriages, plows, guns, pistols, etc. especially attended to. Shop, east of square.
Note: See Sanborn Map of Columbia(1885). Mr. Powers blacksmith shop is located on the south side of E. North street, just off South Main Street. At that time E. North street was not open to traffic, but was blocked by two buildings facing S. Main Street at the beginning of E. North street. The blacksmith shop was behind these two buildings and situated at an angle.

Columbia Enterprise, Columbia Alabama, Feb. 8, 1883
Advertisement
You can get your horse shod all around at Powers shop for a dollar cash. This means money down

The Observer; Columbia, Alabama May 16, 1883
Council Proceedings
E. S. Powers was allowed $3.00 for making a coffin for a colored child.

The Observer; Columbia, Alabama July 4,, 1883
Council Proceedings
E. S. Powers, work on calaboose, $1.00

Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 13, 1883
Home affairs
E. S. Powers returned on Thursday of last week from Montgomery where he attended the meeting of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M.

Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 1, 1887
Personals
Mr. ------- Teague is having a residence built on a lot this side of Mr. Powers .
Note: This is probably on the east side of South main street south of the home of Nat J. Oakley, later the Rice house and north of the house where Mr. Ed Powers is known to have lived.

Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 15, 1887
Council Proceedings
The following accounts were presented and ordered paid, viz: E. S. Powers 1.30

Columbia Enterprise, June 28, 1888
More Local News
E. S. Powers has had one or two severe attacks of bilious colic of late, and now is confined to his bed.

Columbia Enterprise, Aug. 23, 1888
More Local News
E. S. Powers' health has been in rather a precarious condition for sometime. though he is now much better.

Columbia Enterprise, Nov. 8, 1888
Council Proceedings
Ordered paid........E. S. Powers, 3.75

Columbia Enterprise, Jan.17, 1889
More Local News
We are very sorry to learn of the sickness of Mr. E. S. Powers, and trust he may soon recover his wanted health.

Columbia Enterprise, March 27, 1890
OUR SICK
Mr. Ed Powers has been quite sick, but is able to perambulate at this writing.

The Columbia Recorder, July 3, 1890
PERSONALS
Mr. Charles Glenn of Iola, Florida arrived Sunday in Columbia , with the family of his uncle, Mr. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, July 10, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Rosa Powers of Blakely has been in the city for the past week visiting relatives

The Columbia Recorder, September 4, 1890
NOTICE
To the Confederate Veterans of Henry County
(Request to attend a mass meeting of veterans to organize a Confederate Veterans Association of Henry County)
(List of veterans......E. S. Powers.......).

The Columbia Recorder, October 2, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Lou Powers of Blakeley spent several days with relatives in town last week.

The Columbia Recorder, November 6, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Lou Powers of Blakeley spent several days last visiting the home of her brother. Mr. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, November 13, 1890
THE SICK
The condition of Mr. E. S. Powers and daughter Miss Kate remains unchanged. They each have many friends who are interested in their welfare and who would rejoice beyond measure to see them restored to their former health.

The Columbia Recorder, November 20, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Gertrude Powers, of Newton , is in the city visiting the family of her uncle, Mr. E. S. Powers. May her stay in this her old home be filled with much pleasure.

Newspaper data and notes which follow provided by Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama and Contributed by
Ed Godbold
Columbia Enterprise, May. 3, 1888
A Picnic and Fish Fry
The ladies and gentlemen met last week and a time and place was designated for the picnic and fish fry. Woods Mill was selected as the place and May 4, 1888 as the day. W. C. Koonce, A. A. Thompson and ....Armstrong were appointed to provide fish.
Judge Walker will arrange with A. C. Fulmore for hack fare for a round trip. Mrs. Powers will provide the cooking utensils, lard, etc.

Columbia Enterprise,September 5, 1889
Will Take Boarders
I will take boarders at 75 cents per day, during court week,---Mrs. E. S. Powers

Local News And Comment
Mr. E. S. Powers is having some improvement made on his dwelling

Columbia Enterprise,October 24, 1889
This And That
Gentlemen wanting board, can get same by applying to Mrs. E. S. Powers

Columbia Enterprise,November 14, 1889
BOARD
Board at a private house can be obtained at $12.50 per month by calling Mrs. E. S. Powers.

More Local News
The Columbia Recorder, August 7, 1890
Mrs. M. E. Dunn of Newton is in the city the guest of her sister, Mrs. E. S. Powers. She was for many years a resident of our town and as one who has alike witnessed Columbia in her youth and watched her rapid strides to progress, will ever receive a cordial welcome to her midst.

The Columbia Recorder, November 6, 1890
PERSONALS
Mrs. M. E. Dunn, after a visit of some time to the family of her sister, Mrs. E. S. Powers, left Monday for her home in Newton.

The Columbia Recorder, November 27, 1890
PERSONALS
Mrs. Campbell and son, Willie Campbell of Geneva, spent several days in Columbia recently, visiting Mrs. E. S. Powers, the sister of Mrs. Campbell.

The Columbia Recorder, December 18, 1890
CARD OF THANKS
I desire to take this method of expressing my sincere thanks to the citizens of Columbia, for the many acts of kindness rendered me during the late sickness of my husband and daughter, and I hope I may be able some day to repay them.
Very respectfully, Mrs. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, January 29, 1891
PERSONALS
Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Williams spent several days with the family of Mrs. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, February 12, 1891
BOARDING HOUSE
Mrs. E. S. Powers extends a cordial invitation to the public to stop with her during court week. meal and Lodging at reasonable rates.

The Columbia Recorder, February 12, 1891
PERSONALS
Mrs. E. S. Powers was called to Blakely last week to attend the sickness of Miss Lou Powers. She was accompanied by her son, Eddie.

The Columbia Recorder, August 27, 1891
POWERS BOARDING HOUSE
Boarders for court week. Good accommodations, wholesome fare. Rates reasonable. Apply to; Mrs. E. S. Powers Main street and corner street leading to lower river landing. Note: The house was located at the NE corner of S. Main street and Hancock street. Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Tillery's house now(1990) is on the site and replaces this house

The Columbia Recorder, Dec. 24, 1891
First Class Boarding Houses
Are carried on by Mesdames, Powers, Alford, and Teague, any of whom will furnish the traveler with good wholesome food and a clean bed.

The Columbia Breeze, October 6, 1892
Personals
Mrs. Powers moved to Dothan last week where she will engage in the boarding house business. The Breeze wishes her much success.

The Columbia Breeze, November 24, 1892
Personals
Mrs. Willie Teague, daughter of Mrs. E. S. Powers, was called to her mother's bedside at Dothan last week. She is quite ill with typhoid fever.

The Columbia Breeze, January 19, 1893
Personals
Mrs. Powers and Mrs. Bower of Dothan spent several days in the city last week, visiting relatives and friends.

The Columbia Breeze, January 19, 1893
Local Leaflets
Mrs. Powers since her return from Dothan has been doing quite a nice business in the boarding house line.

The Columbia Recorder, August 27, 1891
Teague Boarding House
I am conveniently located on the east side of the square, near the court house. Would like to have several boarders during court week. Your patronage is solicited and satisfaction guaranteed.---Mrs. Willie Teague
(see Vesta notes)

The Columbia Breeze, November 24, 1892
Personals
Mrs. Willie Teague, daughter of Mrs. E. S. Powers, was called to her mother's bedside at Dothan last week. She is quite ill with typhoid fever

The Columbia Breeze, January 19, 1893
Personals
Miss Gertrude Powers of Newton, is in the city visiting Mrs. Willie Teague

Columbia Enterprise, March 27, 1890
OUR SICK
E. K. Teague is confined to his bed.

The Columbia Recorder, January 8, 1891
Personals
Mr. E. K. Teague made a prospecting trip to Texas recently, returning home much more in love with Alabama than ever.

Newspaper data and notes which follow provided by Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama
Columbia Enterprise, Feb. 2, 1888
Officers of I. O. G. T. Lodge Note: Temperance Lodge
last Friday night being the time to elect officers of the Lodge to serve for the next three months, the following were duly elected:
...........Miss Kate Powers, Dept. M......................

Columbia Enterprise, May 17, 1888
Personals
Misses Kate Powers and Loura Williams left Tuesday morning for Geneva, in company of Messers. W. H. Bell and T. M. Espy to take in the Senatorial contest. Where would the world be without a woman now?

Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 13, 1888
Local News
"The Drunkard's Fate" was performed at the College Hall last Friday night by the mem bers of the Templar Lodge(a temperance lodge) at this place to a large and appreciative audience. All of the performers did themselves creditably...........Misses Kate Powers and Ida Hooten as presenters, were a success.......

Columbia Enterprise, Jan. 31, 1889
Good Templar New Officers
.....Miss Kate Powers, VT.......

Columbia Enterprise, August 15, 1888
Personals
Miss Kate Powers left Monday to take charge of a school in the Bruner settlement, a few miles from town,. We wish her much success in her undertaking.

Columbia Enterprise,October 3, 1889
Personals
Miss Kate Powers left Monday to resume the exercises of her school, which she had suspended for several weeks on account of sickness.

Columbia Enterprise,October 3, 1889
Personals
Miss Kate Powers will close her school with this week. She has proved to be a faithful and efficient teacher, so we hear.

Columbia Enterprise, February 27, 1890
Personals
T. M. Skipper and wife(Bidie Espy Skipper) and Miss Kate Powers left Tuesday for a short visit to Abbeville.

The Columbia Recorder, July 10, 1890
Barbecue In Dothan
Misses Kate and Lula Powers, accompanied by Mr. Welton Boyston, took in the barbecue at Dothan last Friday(July 4).

The Columbia Recorder, July 17, 1890
MISS KATE POWERS VISITS NEWTON RELATIVES
Miss Kate Powers left last Thursday via the Midland Railroad for a visit to relatives at Newton. She has many friends, who regret her absence even for a season, but who hope her stay in the lovely city of Newton may be fraught with much pleasure. A certain young man now finds his sentiments very appropriately expressed in the song, " What's this dull town to me?" slightly re-echoing the second line to suit the existing circumstances.

The Columbia Recorder, July 31, 1890
More Local News
Miss Kate Powers, who has been spending several days with relatives in Newton, returned to her home in Columbia on last Wednesday-Newton Messenger

Newspaper data and notes which follow provided by Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama and Contributed
by Ed Godbold
Columbia Enterprise, Jan. 12, 1888
Personals
Miss Lula Powers returned home last week from an extended visit to relatives at Iola, Fla.

Columbia Enterprise,November 21, 1889
PERSONALS
Mr. E. S. Powers and daughter, Miss Lula, spent several days in Blakely this week visiting relatives.

Columbia Enterprise,January 9, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Lula Powers left on Saturday nights' boat for a visit to relatives and friends in Florida.

Columbia Enterprise, March 13, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Lula Powers, who has been absent sometime on a visit to relatives at Iola, Florida returned home last week.

The Columbia Recorder, August 7, 1890
LOCAL NEWS
Miss Lula Powers is now visiting relatives and friends at Iola, Fla.

Columbia Enterprise, May 17, 1888
Personals
Miss Short Powers is visiting relatives in Blakely this week.

The Columbia Recorder, July 3, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Short Powers left last Monday to visit relatives at Dothan.

The Columbia Recorder, April 16, 1891
VISIT TO HILTON, GA.
Several couples of young people walked over to Hilton Station Sunday afternoon and returned on the evening train: Miss Short Powers, Tom Crawford; Miss Dannie Williams, Zach Walker; Miss Marie Bell, Will Apling; Miss Annie McGriff, Wood Beach. A bit of romance, wasn't it!
End of Colonel Adams News Items...

The Vernon Clipper
March 5 1880
Contributed by Veneta C. McKinney
Source: Microfilm - AL Department of Archives and History
From Abbeville Register- HENRY NEWTON, near Beulah, Hnery Co., poisoned his wife last week. She died
We learn from the Abbeville Register that a man by the name of HENRY NEWTON, residing near Beulah, in Henry County, poisoned his wife one day last week, by giving her some strychnine in a dose of salts. She died in about three hours after the poison was administered. The cause for this act of infamy is said to be that Newton’s mother-in-law refused to give him certain cows she had promised – until he had made a home of his own. He had only been married about six month. When he saw that his infamous work had succeeded Newton escaped, and has not since been heard from. The citizens of the community are greatly enraged at the crime, regarding it as one of the most horrible and dastardly ever perpetrated. There was not the shadow of excuse for it. The young wife is represented to have been a lady of lovable disposition, confiding nature and highly esteemed by all who knew her. The people in the community where the crime was committed are in the highest condition of resentment and threaten to lynch the murderer as soon as he can be secured.

Dothan Eagle - Thursday, January 17, 1918
Contributed by Ginger
Deaths Caused By Fridays Storm
As a result of the cyclone that struck Cowarts Friday afternoon at 2 oclock there are 11 known dead. 8 of whom were killed at Cowarts as follows:
Marion PARKER, Mae FENDER, Vivian KITCHING, Hulette BOX, Sunbeam BRACKIN, Bernice MORRIS, Floyd GASHAW, Prof. J W KITCHING, teacher of Cowarts school.
At Webb, Golas JONES was killed. His wife and daughter were seriously injured and Mrs. Jim WEEMS was killed. It is reported that one of her legs was pulled from her body.
At Haleburg the storm went between the village and the Chattahoochee River, and hit the Gilbert neighborhood, killed Clay McKISSACK, and caving in the chin of Dr. PARKER. No other deaths reported that can be verified.- Dothan Eagle
NOTE from Ginger
***Mrs. Jim WEEMS was Byrd Harp WEEMS, daughter of Rebecca Jane STARLING HARP & William "Bill" F. HARP and wife of James Alexander WEEMS.

The Marion County Patriot, August 30, 1889
The Marion County Patriot, No. 34
August 30, 1889
Page Three
A Quick Marriage
Mr. C.E. James of Henry County, Alabama attended camp meeting at Buck creek camp ground, Schley County, Ga. He met for the first time Miss Inez Wilkerson, of Terrell County, Ga. He proposed to her, was accepted and on Sunday morning, the 25th instant, he claimed her as his bride. The ceremony was performed by Rev. R.F. Williamson. Miss Williamson’s father is a nephew of the late Ben Hill, United States Senator. Mr. C.E. James is a bridge contractor on the Alabama Midland Railroad. They married in five days after they first met.
Contributed by Carla Miles

Thanks to Ed Godbold for contributing the following news articles
December 16. 2004
Edward Short Powers came to Henry County before 1850.

The Columbia Recorder
December 4, 1890
Obituary of Edward Short Powers
Mr. Powers Dead
Again has one of Columbia's families been visited by the hand of affliction and the death angel has swooped down bearing away one of her old and tried citizens, Mr. E.S. Powers, who for many years has been suffering from a complication of diseases, on Monday evening departed this life. He had for many years been a resident of Columbia, and by his life-long integrity and indisputable honor, had acquired a name among her people which none can deny. For many years his sufferings have been intensely great, so that death, usually a source of awe and terror, came to him burdened down as he was by disease as a sweet relief.
Relatives and friends cannot refrain from grief even though they see the wisdom of this visitation, but all will alike, at some days, be it early or late, see that they must bow in humble submission saying "thy will be done". To the grief stricken wife who has so faithful and tenderly watched by his bedside, for days, months and years, we would say grieve not. But hope for that glorious meeting which God reserves for his children in the sweet beyond. The sorrowing daughters and little son, the loving sister all alike have the sympathy of an entire public. He was interred in the cemetery at this place Tuesday afternoon in the presence of a large number, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. W.M. Burr.

The Columbia Recorder, January 22, 1891
A Tribute Of Respect
Whereas, the great Architect of the Universe, in his all-wise province, has seen fit to call from labor to refreshment our highly esteemed and worthy brother E. S. Powers, who died Dec. 1st, 1890, in the 62nd year of his age; and
Whereas, in the life of Brother Powers, we can trace many characteristics to make up the true character of a true Mason and honorable gentleman, be it,
Resolved, 1st: That in the loss of Brother Powers, this Lodge has lost one of its oldest and most worthy members.
Resolved, 2d: That we tender to the family of our deceased Brother our heartfelt condolence in this their sad bereavement. In the midst of life we are in death, and may we be taught by the ever present scythe of time to so live that when we are summoned to join the innumerable hosts who have gone before, we may pass away like one who draws the drapery of his couch about him and lies down to pleasant dreams. While our Brother may have faults (as none are perfect) let us throw around his memory the broad mantle of a Mason's charity
Resolved, 3rd: That our Lodge be draped in mourning the usual time, and that a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the minutes of our Lodge, tendered to the family of the deceased and furnished to the Columbia Recorder for publication.
C. E. Walker, T. P. McGriff, H. Purcell, Committee
Columbia Lodge No. 135, A. F. & A. M., Columbia, Ala, Dec. 22, 1890

Newspaper data and notes which follow provided by Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama
Columbia Enterprise, Columbia Alabama, Jan. 5, 1883
Advertisement
E. S. Powers at his blacksmith, wagon and plow shop is prepared to execute orders in his line at short notice. Blacksmithing, in all its forms, repairing of wagons, buggies, carriages, plows, guns, pistols, etc. especially attended to. Shop, east of square.
Note: See Sanborn Map of Columbia(1885). Mr. Powers blacksmith shop is located on the south side of E. North street, just off South Main Street. At that time E. North street was not open to traffic, but was blocked by two buildings facing S. Main Street at the beginning of E. North street. The blacksmith shop was behind these two buildings and situated at an angle.

Columbia Enterprise, Columbia Alabama, Feb. 8, 1883
Advertisement
You can get your horse shod all around at Powers shop for a dollar cash. This means money down

The Observer; Columbia, Alabama May 16, 1883
Council Proceedings
E. S. Powers was allowed $3.00 for making a coffin for a colored child.

The Observer; Columbia, Alabama July 4,, 1883
Council Proceedings
E. S. Powers, work on calaboose, $1.00
Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 13, 1883
Home affairs
E. S. Powers returned on Thursday of last week from Montgomery where he attended the meeting of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & A. M.

Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 1, 1887
Personals
Mr. ------- Teague is having a residence built on a lot this side of Mr. Powers . Note: This is probably on the east side of South main street south of the home of Nat J. Oakley, later the Rice house and north of the house where Mr. Ed Powers is known to have lived.

Columbia Enterprise, Dec. 15, 1887
Council Proceedings
The following accounts were presented and ordered paid, viz: E. S. Powers 1.30

Columbia Enterprise, June 28, 1888
More Local News
E. S. Powers has had one or two severe attacks of bilious colic of late, and now is confined to his bed.

Columbia Enterprise, Aug. 23, 1888
More Local News
E. S. Powers' health has been in rather a precarious condition for sometime. though he is now much better.

Columbia Enterprise, Nov. 8, 1888
Council Proceedings
Ordered paid........E. S. Powers, 3.75

Columbia Enterprise, Jan.17, 1889
More Local News
We are very sorry to learn of the sickness of Mr. E. S. Powers, and trust he may soon recover his wanted health.

Columbia Enterprise, March 27, 1890
OUR SICK
Mr. Ed Powers has been quite sick, but is able to perambulate at this writing.

The Columbia Recorder, July 3, 1890
PERSONALS
Mr. Charles Glenn of Iola, Florida arrived Sunday in Columbia , with the family of his uncle, Mr. E. S. Powers.
The Columbia Recorder, July 10, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Rosa Powers of Blakely has been in the city for the past week visiting relatives

The Columbia Recorder, September 4, 1890
NOTICE
To the Confederate Veterans of Henry County
(Request to attend a mass meeting of veterans to organize a Confederate Veterans Association of Henry County)
(List of veterans......E. S. Powers.......).

The Columbia Recorder, October 2, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Lou Powers of Blakeley spent several days with relatives in town last week.

The Columbia Recorder, November 6, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Lou Powers of Blakeley spent several days last visiting the home of her brother. Mr. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, November 13, 1890
THE SICK
The condition of Mr. E. S. Powers and daughter Miss Kate remains unchanged. They each have many friends who are interested in their welfare and who would rejoice beyond measure to see them restored to their former health.

The Columbia Recorder, November 20, 1890
PERSONALS
Miss Gertrude Powers, of Newton , is in the city visiting the family of her uncle, Mr. E. S. Powers. May her stay in this her old home be filled with much pleasure.

Newspaper data and notes which follow provided by Colonel L. H. Adams, Jr., Columbia, Alabama
Columbia Enterprise, May. 3, 1888
A Picnic and Fish Fry
The ladies and gentlemen met last week and a time and place was designated for the picnic and fish fry. Woods Mill was selected as the place and May 4, 1888 as the day. W. C. Koonce, A. A. Thompson and ....Armstrong were appointed to provide fish.
judge Walker will arrange with A. C. Fulmore for hack fare for a round trip. Mrs. Powers will provide the cooking utensils, lard, etc.

Columbia Enterprise, September 5, 1889
WILL TAKE BOARDERS
I will take boarders at 75 cents per day, during court week,---Mrs. E. S. Powers
LOCAL NEWS AND COMMENT
Mr. E. S. Powers is having some improvement made on his dwelling

Columbia Enterprise, October 24, 1889
THIS AND THAT
Gentlemen wanting board, can get same by applying to Mrs. E. S. Powers

Columbia Enterprise, November 14, 1889
BOARD
Board at a private house can be obtained at $12.50 per month by calling Mrs. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, August 7, 1890
MORE LOCAL NEWS
Mrs. M. E. Dunn of Newton is in the city the guest of her sister, Mrs. E. S. Powers. She was for many years a resident of our town and as one who has alike witnessed Columbia in her youth and watched her rapid strides to progress, will ever receive a cordial welcome to her midst.

The Columbia Recorder, November 6, 1890
PERSONALS
Mrs. M. E. Dunn, after a visit of some time to the family of her sister, Mrs. E. S. Powers, left Monday for her home in Newton.

The Columbia Recorder, November 27, 1890
PERSONALS
Mrs. Campbell and son, Willie Campbell of Geneva, spent several days in Columbia recently, visiting Mrs. E. S. Powers, the sister of Mrs. Campbell.

The Columbia Recorder, December 18, 1890
CARD OF THANKS
I desire to take this method of expressing my sincere thanks to the citizens of Columbia, for the many acts of kindness rendered me during the late sickness of my husband and daughter, and I hope I may be able some day to repay them.
Very respectfully, Mrs. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, January 29, 1891
PERSONALS
Mr. and Mrs. Wiley Williams spent several days with the family of Mrs. E. S. Powers.

The Columbia Recorder, February 12, 1891
Boarding House
Mrs. E. S. Powers extends a cordial invitation to the public to stop with her during court week. meal and Lodging at reasonable rates.

The Columbia Recorder, February 12, 1891
Personals
Mrs. E. S. Powers was called to Blakely last week to attend the sickness of Miss Lou Powers. She was accompanied by her son, Eddie.

The Columbia Recorder, August 27, 1891
Powers Boarding House
Boarders for court week. Good accommodations, wholesome fare. Rates reasonable. Apply to; Mrs. E. S. Powers Main street and corner street leading to lower river landing. Note: The house was located at the NE corner of S. Main street and Hancock street. Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Tillery's house now(1990) is on the site and replaces this house

The Columbia Recorder, Dec. 24, 1891
First Class Boarding Houses
Are carried on by Mesdames, Powers, Alford, and Teague, any of whom will furnish the traveler with good wholesome food and a clean bed.

The Columbia Breeze, October 6, 1892
Personals
Mrs. Powers moved to Dothan last week where she will engage in the boarding house business. The Breeze wishes her much success. (ELG note-Daughter Willie Teague must have run her out of business)

The Columbia Breeze, November 24, 1892
Personals
Mrs. Willie Teague, daughter of Mrs. E. S. Powers, was called to her mother's bedside at Dothan last week. She is quite ill with typhoid fever.

The Columbia Breeze, January 19, 1893
Personals
Mrs. Powers and Mrs. Bower of Dothan spent several days in the city last week, visiting relatives and friends.

The Columbia Breeze, January 19, 1893
Local Leaflets
Mrs. Powers since her return from Dothan has been doing quite a nice business in the boarding house line.

The Columbia Recorder
December 11, 189O
Obituary of Kate Elizabeth Powers
A veil of unalterable sadness enveloped our fair town last Saturday, penetrating many hearts and causing grief which it were vain to attempt to banish. The death angel who has been hovering near for many months has descended and with his remorseless scythe, cut down one of Columbia's fairest and sweetest flowers, Miss Kate Powers. While just emerging from maidenhood to womanhood, with life with its beauty stretched before her in a glistening panorama filled with the golden nectar which youth alone can impart, felt disease which spares not one, laid hold of this loved young lady with a relentless clasp and now in a few months, God calls her soul, saying "I love thee, I love thee, pass under the rod". Under the existing circumstances it seems doubly hard to the sorrowing ones to yield their claim, but Christ, who guides this dear spirit through the gloom and conveys it to a better and fairer land, will comfort these left behind, in this their darkest hour.
O! Ye weary ones and sad ones-
Droop not, faint not, by the way;
Ye shall join the loved and lost ones
In the last of perfect day.
In addition to many fond relatives whose hearts are saddened by this event, a host of friends and associates, male and female, those of her childhood days and those who have stayed by her in later years, witnesses of her pure and sweet life, these are likewise burdened with grief, at the thought that she whom we have all loved has gone from us forever. But though she has passed deaths gloomy river her sweet face will yet live in our memory and in our love will live forever. The burial service was conducted Sunday afternoon by Rev. Mr. Culbreath in the presence of a large body of friends and relatives. To all, the dear ones stricken with grief by this untimely departure, we offer the deepest sympathy and may this beloved daughter and sister prove a ministering angel to guide them into Paradise.

The Columbia Breeze
November 8, 1900
Obituary of Lula N. Powers
Miss Lula Powers died yesterday morning of consumption after an illness of over two years. Since January she has been confined to her bed. She was in her 32nd year. The funeral will take place this morning.

The Columbia Breeze
February 4, 1897
Obituary of Short Florence Powers
A SAD DEATH
One of the saddest deaths that has occurred in Columbia for a long time was that of Miss Short Florence Powers, daughter of Mrs. Vesta Powers, on Sunday evening last about 7 o'clock. Miss Powers was a victim of that dreaded disease, consumption, and for many months had been confined to her home and for the past three months had been confined to her bed, patiently waiting for the end. She died resigned, and even happy, glad to be released from her sufferings, and with a sweet, firm faith in a happier future beyond this life. She was about twenty years of age, and leaves a mother, three sisters and a brother to mourn her untimely death. Her father and an elder sister died a few years since. The funeral took place Monday evening and the remains were followed to the grave by a large number of friends.

From The Front Page Of The "Columbia Breeze" June 2, 1898

Miss Powers Captured Sheriff Pilcher Carries Off Miss Vester Powers, Charged With Stealing A Heart

"Sheriff Joe M. Pilcher came down from Abbeville last Sunday armed with certain necessary papers issued by the Probate Judge authorizing him to take into custody Miss Vester Powers, one of Columbia's fair daughters, on a charge of "heart stealing". The papers were placed in the hands of Rev. N.R. Hamer, pastor of the Methodist church, for service, and at 3:30 o'clock, accompanied by Deputy Sheriff Williams, the gallant Sheriff appeared at the home of Mrs. E. S. Powers, mother of the young lady, where, after a few brief prelimmaries (sic) and in the presence of a few witnesses, the sentence of the law and of the church was duly pronounced by Rev. Hamer.

It is surmised that Miss Vester was a willing captive, although she may have made the counter charge that the sheriff had stolen her heart. Be that as it may, she is a pretty and accomplished young lady and the hearty good wishes of the people of Columbia follow her into captivity. Our sheriff has the reputation of being kind to his prisoners and The Breeze predicts that the bonds with which he has bound this gentle one will not be hard to bear."

"Vesta and Anna Colesta were fraternal twins. When Vesta was 13 years old her father, age 61, and her sister Kate Elizabeth, age 24, died within a week of each other in 1890. Her sister Short died at age 23 in 1897, then Lula died in 1900 at age 32 and Willie died in 1903 at age 41. Kate, Short and Lula all died of "consumption"(tuberculosis). In later years when Vesta would walk by the home of a a known tuberculosis sufferer, she would make her children hold their breath and run past the house. When her father became very ill, Vesta's mother opened her house to boarders in order to support the remaining family members. It was because of this that Vesta was to meet her future husband, Joseph Mitchell Pilcher."

 

Henry County, Alabama

 

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