Admitted to The Union
1819
1868


Alabama is available for adoption. For deatails contact the District Administrator.
   Indigenous peoples of varying cultures lived in the area for thousands of years before European colonization. Trade with the Northeast via the Ohio River began during the Burial Mound Period (1000 BC-700 AD) and continued until European contact. The agrarian Mississippian culture covered most of the state from 1000 to 1600 AD, with one of its major centers being at the Moundville Archaeological Site in Moundville, Alabama.
   Among the historical tribes of Native American people living in the area of present-day Alabama at the time of European contact were Iroquoian-speaking Cherokee, and Muskogean Alabama (Alibamu),Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Koasati, and Mobile.
   The French founded the first European settlement in the present-day state at Mobile in 1702. Southern Alabama was French from 1702 to 1763, part of British West Florida from 1763 to 1780, and part of Spanish West Florida from 1780 to 1814.
   Northern and central Alabama was part of British Georgia from 1763 to 1783 and part of the United States Mississippi Territory thereafter. Statehood was delayed by the territory's lack of a coastline; when Andrew Jackson captured Spanish Mobile in 1814, he claimed that area for the US and gained passage to the gulf. Alabama was the twenty-second state, admitted to the Union in 1819. Its constitution provided for universal suffrage for white men.
   Alabama was part of the new frontier in the 1820s and 1830s. Settlers rapidly arrived to take advantage of its fertile soil. Planters brought slaves with them, and traders brought in more from the Upper South as the cotton plantations expanded. The economy of the central "Black Belt" was built around large cotton plantations whose owners built their wealth on slave labor. It was named for the dark, productive soil. Elsewhere poor whites were subsistence farmers. According to the 1860 census, enslaved Africans comprised 45% of the state's population of 964,201. There were only 2,690 free persons of color.
   In 1861 Alabama declared its secession from the Union and joined the Confederate States of America. While few battles were fought in the state, Alabama contributed about 120,000 soldiers to the American Civil War. All the slaves were freed by the 13th Amendment in 1865. During Reconstruction, the new state legislators created a public school system for the first time, as well as establishing some welfare institutions to help the people. Alabama was restored to the Union in 1868.
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Counties List

Various Pages


Placed here until the relevant county page is built
Alabama Marriage Index
1641 - 1944
 
These are some EXTREMELY large files. The names in the file are in no particular order. It is highly recommended that you use the search box above to search for someone. 

Mailing Lists and Query Boards

Alabama Mailing List

Genforum Alabama Query Board

General Alabama Genealogy Query Board

East Central Alabama Researchers Query Board

Genealogy and Historic Societies

The Alabama Genealogical Society, Inc.
Samford University Library
AGS Depository and Headquarters
800 Lakeshore Drive
P.O. Box 2296
Birmingham, AL 35229-0001

Montgomery Genealogical Society, Inc.
Query Board

Northeast Alabama Genealogical Society
P.O. Box 8268
Gadsden, AL 35904
E-Mail: admin@neags.com

Tennessee Valley Genealogical Society
New Memberships
P. O. Box 1568
Huntsville, AL 35807

Vital Records

Alabama Vital Records
P.O. Box 5625
Montgomery, AL 36103-5625
Phone (334) 206-2999
Record Request Forms
*Order Birth Records Online!
*Order Death Records Online!
They have birth and death records from
1908 to present and some scattered earlier records.

Marriage records are available from
the county clerks offices of each
individual county.

Surnames on Our Family Tree



Adjacent States



Georgia | Florida | Mississippi | Tennessee


Trails To The Past Special Projects



Join Trails To The Past Logo

Alabama Trails has several counties up for adoption. Counties with no administrator listed are available for adoption. If you find one that you would like to adopt e-mail the State Administrator.
Trails To The Past has several states and other projects available. To see what states and other projects might be available click either South-Central District or Trails To The Past.


[ Being a County or State Administrator is fun and rewarding. If you have an interest in the history of Alabama and the genealogy of it's residents please consider it. If you think "there is no way I can do this" there are many people ready, willing and able to help you. It's not near as difficult as you might think. ]
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Last Updated, Sunday, 28-Jul-2013 08:16:48 MDT
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© Tuesday, 29-Jul-2014 09:02:11 MDT by Alabama State Administrator