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ARKANSAS AHGP ARCHIVES
Fulton County
1889 Mammoth Springs Business Directory
McKenney Publishing Co.



MAMMOTH SPRINGS

Is situated in the north edge of Fulton County, Arkansas, on the line of the Fort Scott and Memphis Railroad, 140 miles south of Springfield, Missouri, and 145 miles north of Memphis, Tennessee.

A thriving town of 400 inhabitants, nicely located on an elevated plain on the banks of the “phenomenal" Mammoth Springs. The country surrounding is rolling—-the bluffs well covered with timber-—while the valley is fertile and produces small grain and vegetables of all kinds in abundance. Cotton is also raised in large quantities, and from four to six thousand bales are annually shipped from this place. Fruit of a superior class is raised in large quantities, especially grapes, peaches, and apples. The climate and soil is well adapted to fruit raising, and in the near future this will be one of the leading shipments from this county. The opening for a large cannery is first-class, and the opportunity now offered will insure remunerative results.

The famous spring is the leading feature of the city. Here is to be found 1,000 horse-power flowing in one majestic stream from the bowels of the earth, issuing every minute 65,000 cubic feet of water. A marine dam of stone has been erected 400 feet rig with a base of 17 feet and 8 feet at the top, securing a power sufficient to run immense factories. The stream has a fall of 127 feet in seven miles, and leave splendid openings for manufacturing all along the line. Factories are negotiating for plants at this time, and in the near future there will be a chain of looms and wheels on this stream employing many thousands of hands. The surrounding county produces cotton in large quantities, and the inducements for cotton factories are unsurpassed The city is building up in good shape, mostly of brick manufactured here, granite stone may be had in abundance for the same purpose. Thee town supports one weekly paper under the propriortorship of editor Culp, who looks well after the interests of his patrons and the business interests. There are three hotels, Chapman, Crescent, and Spring River, all under the supervision of accommodating landlords. A cotton gin with a capacity of 8,500 to 4,000 pounds daily is in constant operation during the season. The climate is unsurpassed, and healthful water abundant and pure. In short, Mammoth Springs has everything needed to give her a phenomenal growth inside of a few years. There are daily mails, express and telegraph communications Schools of a high order are here to he found, and churches for all.

ARCHER DANIEL & CO, general merchants and cotton dealers, Main
Burron J M, atty-at-law
Carter, J S, pool room and refreshment stand, Main
Crescent Hotel, Geo F Chilcott propr, Main
Deadrick D S, M D, dealer in mineral land and mining stocks
Dill T H, grocery, Main
Hamilton —, real estate dealer and collector
Isreal A B, blacksmith, woodwork, repairing engines and boilers and general repair shop
Laird R W, cotton gin, Main
Lloyd W H, watchmaker and jeweler, Main
Mammoth Springs Hotel, H P Chapman propr, Main
Mammoth Springs Monitor, W H Culp editor and proprietor
Jones A H, meat market
Santhoff E E, fine boot and shoemaker, Main
SPRING RIVER HOTEL. A J Emmerson propr, Main
TROY REV, pastor Methodist Episcopal Church South
Trumbo G H, proprietor Mammoth Spring Sale and Exchange Barn and Livery Stable
Tunstall E L, postmaster and physician and surgeon, Main
Tunstall & Francis, proprietors Mammoth Spring Drug Store
WOLF & WOOD, groceries and drugs and dealers in produce and patent medicines, Main











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