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GOODSPEED'S
Desha County, Arkansas
BIOGRAPHIES

Transcribed by Louis Reitzammer from
Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Southern Arkansas
Goodspeed Publishing Company (1890)
 

Goodspeed's Desha County, Arkansas, History
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JAMES B. AMBURN, proprietor of the Hotel Saloon, and a farmer of Franklin Township, was born in East Tennessee in 1858, and is the son of Gabriel and Elizabeth J. (Haynes) Amburn, natives, also, of Tennessee. Gabriel Amburn moved to Louisiana in 1859, engaged in the blacksmith's trade, but of late years has been tilling the soil successfully in connection. He moved to Arkansas on January 8, 1870, settled where he now lives in Chicot County, and is now busily employed upon his farm. Although he is now getting along in years, and is quite well fixed in this world's goods, he still does a little smithing for his neighbors and himself. Of the four children born to his marriage, two only are now living: Robert F. H. and James B. Those deceased were named: Frankie L. (died at the age of five years), and Sallie Ann (died at the age of twenty-six years, and was the wife of S. M. Raborn, of Chicot County). The mother of these children died on July 19, 1889, at the age of sixty-six years. By a former marriage she became the mother of three children: Joe (now residing in Bowie, Montague County, Tex.), Elizabeth J. (widow of a Mr. Rogers), and W. B. F. (who resides at Point Comfort, Chicot County, Ark., and is an extensive planter). James B. Amburn was principally educated in Chicot County, Ark., but finished in Desha County. He began farming on his father's place at the age of twenty-two years, and rented land of him for two years. In 1882 he engaged as clerk for J. C. Crenshaw, and was with him but one year, when he went to Little Rock, and engaged in the dairy business for one year. In 1884 he embarked in the saloon business at Trippe Station, as partner of R. D. Crenshaw, but was there only one year, when he moved to Arkansas City (1885), following the same occupation as before. He has been very successful at this, has one of the finest bars in the city, and has a large trade. He is gentlemanly and courteous in his intercourse with the public, and extends a warm welcome to the stranger entering his place of business. He is also interested in farming, and owns a nice farm of 156 acres, in Chicot County, with forty acres under cultivation. He is also renting in his county a large plantation of 600 acres, known as the Duffin Place, and devotes much of his time to this farm, while he rents his own. He was married in September, 1888, to Miss Ida May Leverett, of Arkansas City. She was born in Desha County in 1865. Mr. Amburn is a member of the K. of  P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and is treasurer of the Uniformed Rank, Division 12. He is a member of the Grand Lodge of this State. He was elected coroner of the county in 1884, which position he filled in a satisfactory manner. He gives his hearty support to all enterprises that tend to develop the resources of his county, and is one of the thorough business men of the place.

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CAPT. JAMES A. ANDERSON, a planter and stock dealer, was born in Amite County, Miss., in 1830, being a son of John B. and Sarah (Way) Anderson, who were born in South Carolina, and there married, their union resulting in the birth of six sons and two daughters, only two of the family, James A. and Joseph W., now living. The father died in 1838, his wife preceding him to their long home in 1834. Capt. James A. Anderson was married in Louisiana in 1855 to Miss Susan Montgomery, and a family of eleven children has been born to them, of whom the following are living: Anna C. (wife of C. F. Wells, a merchant and planter, now doing business at Dermott, Chicot County, Ark.), Mary (wife of W. J. Raborn, a planter of Chicot County), James G., Philander S., Ellen D. and Sue. The mother of these children was born in Louisiana about the year 1835, was a worthy member of the Presbyterian Church, and was an excellent wife, mother and neighbor. Mr. Anderson was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in Company B, under Capt. W. D. Trotter, and served until the surrender in 1865. He was first second lieutenant of his company, but was afterward promoted to the rank of captain. He has been a resident of Arkansas since 1852, but first resided in Chicot County, and there purchased land. He built him a log cabin, improved his place, and is now, by his own exertions, one of the wealthy agriculturists of this portion of the State, being the owner of 1,200 acres of land, with 500 acres under cultivation. He is a Master Mason, and in his political views is a Democrat, his first presidential vote being cast for Zachary Taylor.

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DAVID C. ATKINSON. In giving a history of the worthy residents of Desha County, Ark., mention should not fail to be made of Mr. Atkinson, for he is a progressive tiller of the soil, and a man possessing many worthy qualities. He was born in the county in 1855, and is a son of John and Mary N. (Fossit) Atkinson, who were born in Tennessee and Arkansas, respectively, and his early life was spent on his father's farm, where he learned the details of farm work, and in attending schools. At the age of fifteen years he was sent to Tennessee to finish his studies, and when still but a youth in years, began to fight the battle of life alone as a farmer, and when the fact is mentioned that he has acquired 160 acres of fine land by his own excellent management and energy, he may be said to have been successful. He has forty acres cleared and under cultivation, on which he raises cotton and corn, and in addition to these products, is engaged in raising stock in a small way. He has always been interested in the welfare of his native county, and every worthy public enterprise finds in him a warm supporter. He is a Democrat in his political views, and socially is a member of the K. of  H. His union to Miss Celia G. Cromer was celebrated in 1879, she being a daughter of William and Matilda Cromer, both natives of the Blue-Grass State. Mrs. Atkinson is an earnest member of the Methodist Church, and her union with Mr. Atkinson has resulted in the birth of seven children, but one of whom is living: Willie D., Ida M., Johnnie, Eugene, Grover C., and two children unnamed, are dead.

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DR. HARVEY N. AUSTIN is an eminent physician and surgeon of Silver Lake Township, but his practice is not alone confined to this locality, but extends over a large area where his skill and talent have been the means of restoring many to health and happiness. He was born in Oxford County, of Canada West, March 9, 1837, and is a son of Henry Austin, a native of New York, who was born in 1790 and died about 1877. He resided in his native State until about fifteen years of age, then removed with his parents to Canada West, and there attained manhood, and made his home until his death, being the owner of a handsome property, which he had accumulated by farming, at the time of his death. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary J. Ross, was born in the Emerald Isle in 1809, and when a child of seven years, was brought by her parents to Canada, where she was reared, educated and married. Her death occurred at Woodstock, Canada, in 1875. They became the parents of four sons and four daughters: William W. (a resident farmer of Oxford County, Canada), Helen (the wife of David Hulet, a farmer of Canada), Harvey N., Edwin (a farmer residing near Niagara Falls, in New York), Minnie (wife of J. W. Buckley, a resident of New York City), John H. (a real estate agent of St. Augustine, Fla.), Elizabeth (the deceased wife of John Combs), and Harriet (the deceased wife of Henry Taylor). Dr. Harvey N. Austin attended the common schools of Canada, but completed his education in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. He began the study of medicine in Canada with Dr. J. W. Smith, and for two terms attended lectures in the University of Michigan, after which he graduated from the Albany Medical School. At a still later period he attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York, of which noted school he is also a graduate, taking his degree in 1865. He has begun practicing, however, in 1860, after graduating at Albany in 1859, his labors in the "healing art" being first carried on at Lancaster, Mo., where he remained until the Civil War broke out. In June, 1861, he joined the Confederate army as regimental surgeon of the Third Missouri State Militia, and was on hospital duty the most of his service. After the war he settled at Stiles, Iowa, but in 1870 came to his present location, where he has since made his home with the exception of three years, which were spent in the northern part of the State, one year spent at Mulberry and two at Eureka Springs. He is doing an exceptionally fine practice, and holds an enviable place in the estimation of all who know him, both professionally and socially. His wife was born in Arkansas County, Ark., in 1850. Her union with the Doctor was consummated April 29, 1880, and both are active members of the Episcopal Church. The Doctor is a Democrat and a Master Mason.

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WILSON F. BESSELLIEU, of the firm of Gates & Bessellieu, of the 'Arkansas City Journal,' was born in Monticello, Drew County, Ark., in 1865, and is the third of ten children born to the union of William F. and Mattie (Henningway) Besselleiu, the father a native of South Carolina, and the mother of Mississippi. William F. Bessellieu is an M. D. by profession, and has been located in Monticello, where he practiced, for many years, since 1860. He has not practiced now for some time on account of an injury received from a fall from a horse. He filled the office of county assessor for a number of years, and was a man who merited the respect and esteem of all. Of the ten children born to his marriage, seven are now living. Elizabeth (wife of John Tardy), Wilson F., Willie S., Annie L., Mary, Wiley and Collie. Mr. and Mrs. Bessellieu are both members of the Baptist Church at Monticello. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and K. of  H. Wilson F. Bessellieu was educated in Monticello at the graded school, and at the age of eighteen years entered the printing establishment of James Cothan, on the 'Monticellion,' remaining there three years. He came to his present office in 1887, worked for the proprietor of the 'Journal,' and in 1888 bought one-half interest in the 'Arkansas City Journal,' which he is now engaged in editing, in partnership with David A. Gates. This paper has the largest circulation of any county paper in the State, and its proprietors are young men of ability and progressive ideas. This firm does the county work for this and Chicot Counties, being the official organ for each county. Mr. Bessellieu is a rising young man, and by his courteous and pleasing address has become very popular. He is one who labors for the good of his county, and extends his aid to any and all enterprises that tend to the development of the same.

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ROBERT H. BEITH is a man of advanced views, and is a successful planter and merchant of Laconia, Desha County, Ark. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1825, and is a son of James and Ann (Hamilton) Beith, who were also born in that land. His advantages were good, and he remained in Scotland until 1846, or until twenty-one years of age, then emigrated to Canada, but in the spring of 1847 came to the United States. The first two years were spent in traveling over the country looking for a suitable location, and for a short time worked as a clerk in St. Louis, after which he went to New Orleans, and began boating on the Mississippi River, which business he continued until the opening of the Civil War. After the cessation of hostilities, he settled in Desha County, Ark., which county has since been his home, his occupation being that of a merchant and planter, in both of which he has been remarkably successful. His mercantile establishment embraces a stock of goods worth about $2,500, and he has land to the amount of 1,600 acres, of which 350 are cleared and in a good state of cultivation. He was married in Memphis, Tenn., in 1856, to Miss Martha Hening, and by her has had a family of seven children: James, Mary A., Robert H., Veronica, William, Martha and Joseph. James, Martha and Mary A. are deceased. Robert, William and Veronica are married and live in homes of their own, but Joseph still resides with his father. Mr. Beith is a Democrat in politics, and is interested in all enterprises for the public weal, supporting them, if worthy of support, both by his influence and liberal contributions of money. He and his wife are Presbyterians in faith.

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WILLIAM A. BIRCH is a merchant and farmer now doing business at Tillar, Ark., the style of the firm with which he belongs being Henry Bros. & Birch. Since February he has been associated with Dishongh & Tillar, at Winchester, Drew County, Ark. Mr. Birch was born near Lake Village, in Chicot County, Ark., March 22, 1840, and is a son of William and Pherbia (Haskins) Birch, the former a Kentuckian born about 1813. He was of Scotch-Irish descent, a carpenter by trade, and emigrated from his native State to Arkansas with his parents when a small boy, and was here reared and married, the last event taking place in 1837, his wife being a daughter of Cyrus and Leanah (Ward) Haskins. He died at Point Comfort, Chicot County, February 27, 1867, and his wife in 1844 at the age of twenty-two years. A family of three children was born to them: William A., Calvin (deceased), and Hiram (deceased). After the death of the mother of these children Mr. Birch married Mrs. Adaline Sullivan, the widow of Warren Sullivan, of Chicot County, their marriage taking place in 1857, and their union resulting in the birth of three sons and one daughter, Thomas W. being the only one now living. Alonzo, Joshua and Priscilla are deceased. Mrs. Birch died on March 5, 1867. William A. Birth began life for himself as a farmer on his father's land in the spring of 1866, and continued to till the property until 1876, when he purchased land of his own, and now has a nicely improved farm of 116 acres, on which is a good frame residence, barns and tenant houses, all of which have been acquired since the war, as during that time he lost all his property to the amount of $27,000. May 10, 1861, he enlisted in the Mounted Riflemen, a company made up at Lake Village, under Capt. Jacob McConnell, and with him he participated in the battles of Oak Hill, Farmington, Murfreesboro, Richmond (Ky.), Chickamauga, and all the engagements from Rocky Face Ridge to Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville and Bentonville. He was paroled at Meridian, Miss., May 10, 1865. January 3, 1867, he was married to Miss Mary J. Scott, a native of Louisiana, born on July 27, 1849, being a daughter of David H. and Eliza (Estill) Scott. Mr. Birch's union resulted in the birth of the following children: Andy, Hiram, Austin, Edwin and Leon living, and David, Ruth and Myrtle dead. Mr. Birch, in addition to managing his farm, is engaged in general merchandising, and carries a stock of goods valued at $5,000. He belongs to the Masonic order, Bronson Lodge No. 113, the K. of H., Tillar Lodge No. 3215, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he is a steward in the same. Mrs. Birch's father and mother were born in Ohio and Kentucky, respectively, and the former was engaged in farming throughout life. His wife is related to Capt. James Estill, who was massacred by the Indians at the present site of Estill Station, Ky.

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CHURCHILL H. BLACKBURN. The agricultural affairs of Desha County, Ark., are ably represented, among others, by the subject of this sketch, who comes of a prominent old family, the Blackburns of Kentucky, some members of which family have for generations been well-known planters and stockmen of the famous Kentucky Blue Grass regions, of whom Col. Edward M. Blackburn, the father of Churchill H., is one of the foremost. He was born in that State in 1787, and died at the ripe old age of eighty-three years, having become, during his long life, well and prominently known for many miles around. He was educated for the profession of law, but this not being congenial to his tastes, he abandoned it to become a tiller of the soil, and found that the excellent education which he had received was essential to the successful conduct of his chosen calling. He was one of a large family of children, and all his brothers were professional men. Church, one brother, became an eminent physician; Luke and William became noted attorneys; Jonathan was also a lawyer of prominence, and George was a Baptist minister of note. Col. Edward M. Blackburn was married to Miss Lavinia Bell, also a Kentuckian, and by her became the father of the following children: George E. (born July 6, 1810, received an excellent education in his youth, graduating from Transylvania College, of Lexington, Ky., when nineteen years of age, and after leaving school adopted farming as his calling, and spent the greater part of his life in his native State, but died in Washington County, Miss., in 1853, at the age of forty-three years), John B. (died in infancy), Frances A. (was born in 1813 and died in Desha County, Ark., several years since), Luke P. (was born in 1815, received excellent educational advantages, and started out in life for himself as a physician; he became prominent in politics, and was elected governor of Kentucky, which capacity he served with distinction. During the yellow fever epidemic in Cuba, he was employed by the English Government as a medical expert to examine and report as to the best methods of treating that fearful scourge, and in this as in all other cases, he discharged his duties faithfully and well. In every walk in life he was true, honest and upright, and he wielded a powerful influence for good over all with whom he came in contact. He died in Louisville, Ky., in 1887, at the age of seventy-three years), Edward L. (was born in 1817 and died in infancy), Mary P. (was born in 1819, and became the wife of Judge Morris of Chicago, dying in 1885), Elizabeth J. (was born April 3, 1821, and became the wife of Gen. T. B. Flournoy, who distinguished himself in the Confederate army, dying in 1861; his widow resides in Greenville, Miss.), William F. (was born in 1823, was a graduate of Oxford College, and chose the law as his profession, and although he died quite young, he had become well known as a lawyer of prominence, Henry B. (was born in 1825, was also a graduate of Oxford College, and became a well-known and prominent physician, this calling receiving his attention for fifty years; he died when about sixty-two years of age), Churchill H. (was next in order of birth, and was born in Woodford County, Ky., in 1827, a short sketch of his life is given below), Edwin M. (was born in 1829, graduated from Transylvania College, and chose the medical profession as his calling; he made an enviable reputation for himself as a surgeon, giving that part of his practice the most of his attention; he pursued his investigations for four years in Europe, and although he died at the untimely age of thirty-six years, he had become eminent; his death occurred in Natchez, Miss.), Breckenridge L. (was born in 1832, graduated from Danville College, and prior to his death, which occurred in Memphis, Tenn., he had acquired a large practice, and was a well-known attorney), James W. (was born in 1834, also graduated from Danville College, and although he is now engaged in planting, on the old homestead in Woodford County, Ky., he is a lawyer by profession and is a well-known politician of that State, having represented his county in the State Legislature, once in the House and once in the Senate), Joe E. Stiles (was born in 1838, graduated from Danville College and became a lawyer; he has attained great prominence, not only in his profession but as a public man, and besides representing his county in the State Legislature, was a member of the United States Senate for six years; he is a man who wields a wide political influence, for he possesses a brilliant intellect, much personal magnetism, and is of dignified and commanding bearing, and fully deserves the popularity and honor which he has gained). Churchill H. Blackburn, the immediate subject of this memoir, spent his youth in his native State, and his knowledge of the world of books was acquired from a private tutor. When almost twenty years of age he was united in marriage to Miss Frances J. Hale, and immediately began life for himself as a merchant, in Frankfort, Ky., continuing there for two years, when he abandoned this work to devote his attention to agriculture, this occupation receiving his attention for five subsequent years. At the end of this time he came to Laconia, Desha County, Ark., purchased a farm, and was engaged in tilling the soil until the opening of the war, his attention being also given to merchandising. In 1862 he joined the Confederate service, Company B, Shank's regiment, Shelby's brigade, and took part in the battles of Helena, Little Rock and numerous skirmishes, but at the end of two years was detailed for scouting duty, and in this capacity served until the final surrender, at which time he returned home to recuperate his shattered fortunes. He resumed his former occupations and gradually fortune smiled on his efforts, and he is now the owner of 500 acres of fine land, and has under cultivation about 350 acres, which will average about 300 bales of cotton each year. He also raises some stock, but has found his greatest profit in cotton. He contributes liberally of his means in the support of worthy movements, but only takes a quiet interest in political matters, although he always votes the Democratic ticket. He is a man who would be an acquisition to any community, for, throughout his career he has endeavored to follow the teaching of the Golden Rule, and has kept his illustrious name pure in the sight of God and man. A family of four children has been born to this union. Henrietta (wife of Capt. J. T. Warfield, the present sheriff of Desha County), Fannie (deceased), Lullie (at home), and Jilson (an enterprising young man, in business for himself). Mrs. Blackburn's parents, Louis and Letitia (Flournoy) Hale, were Kentuckians.

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CHARLES B. BLACKBURN. It is without doubt true that the life of any man is of great benefit to a community when all his efforts are directed toward advancing its interests and if he lives according to the teachings of the Golden Rule, he cannot fail to win the love and respect of all who know him. Such a man is Mr. Blackburn, who is prominently identified with the mercantile and farming interests of Desha County, Ark. He was born in Chicot County, Ark., in 1845, and is a son of George C. and Isabella P. (Buck) Blackburn, native Kentuckians, their families being among the oldest and most aristocratic of the Blue Grass State, Senator Joe Blackburn being a brother of George C. The immediate subject of this memoir was reared in Woodford County, Ky., having been taken there by his father when quite young, and like so many of the substantial citizens of this country at the present time, he was initiated into the mysteries of farming from his earliest youth, and this has since been one of the callings to which his attention has been directed. He was not favored with many opportunities for attending school, owing to circumstances over which he had no control, and at the early age of sixteen years, in 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, Malcolm's company, Price's escort and took an active part in the following engagements: Arkansas Post, Poison Springs, Jenkins' Ferry, Pine Bluff, besides a great many skirmishes in which his command was constantly engaged. He was captured on one occasion, but on account of his extreme youth was released and allowed to return to his command. He served throughout the entire war and surrendered at Shreveport, La., returning to his home in Arkansas. Being of an enterprising and rather restless disposition, he did not long remain here however, but went to Memphis, Tenn., where he spent one year in clerking in a large business house of that city, at the expiration of which time he returned to his native State and settled down to business, opening a mercantile establishment in Laconia, in 1868, with what success may be inferred when the fact is mentioned that he now carries a stock of goods valued at $5,000 and does an annual business of $50,000. Being accommodating and perfectly honorable and upright in his dealings with his patrons, he has become well known and very popular, and in his agricultural enterprises he has been no less successful, as he now owns 2,300 acres of admirable farming land, and has 1,200 acres cleared and under cultivation. His land yields on an average of 750 bales of cotton per year, and other farm products can be raised in abundance. He gives some attention to the propagation of stock, but does not enter extensively into this industry. Although not an active partisan he votes the Democratic ticket and is always interested in the success and welfare of his party. Public-spirited and deeply interested in the welfare of his county, all enterprises for the upbuilding of the same find in him a warm advocate and a hearty supporter, institutions of learning, especially, finding in him a liberal contributor. He has shown his approval of secret organizations by becoming a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a member in good standing in his lodge. His marriage to Miss Cynthia Monroe, was consummated in 1875, she being a daughter of Ben and Martha (Halaway) Monroe, native Kentuckians. They have reared a worthy family of four children: Georgia E., Clifton S., Eddie M. and Mary M. Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn are a genial, hospitable and sincere couple, and are held in high esteem by all who know them.

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WILLIAM W. BOWLES, the oldest resident of this portion of Desha County, and one of the representative citizens of the same, was born in Flavanna County, Va., in 1832, and is the son of Oscar and Elizabeth E. Bowles. Oscar Bowles came to this county in 1835, making the trip in a flatboat from Virginia, and landed where Arkansas City now stands, when there were but about four acres cleared and one log cabin. He brought with him the slaves belonging to John R. Campbell, and was overseer for the last-named gentleman and sons for seventeen years. There were other similar improvements in this section of the county, and Mr. Bowles opened for Mr. Campbell the first farm in this part of the county, which was at that time a vast wilderness, and game abounded in vast numbers throughout the entire country, and what few white male inhabitants there were here at that time were mainly hunters and raftsmen. After leaving the employ of Mr. Campbell, Mr. Bowles and Charles Campbell purchased a farm of land of a Mr. Johnson, one of the early settlers, and immediately engaged in cultivating the soil, remaining in partnership from 1850 to 1860. During the war Mr. Bowles moved his and Campbell's Negroes back on Crooked Bayou, where they remained for one year, and then Mr. Campbell took his Negroes to Texas. After the war Mr. Bowles returned to his farm and resumed agricultural pursuits, in which he was quite successful. His death occurred in 1874, when he was drowned by going through a crevasse in the levee in a dugout. His widow still survives, makes her home in Arkansas City on her own property, and as she was born July 3, 1812, she is now seventy eight years of age. The father was born in Nelson County, Va., March 31, 1811. William W. Bowles was principally educated at Washington College, Tenn., and November 26, 1859, he was married to Miss Elmira McMullen, a native of Alabama, but who came with her parents to this county when a little girl. Mr. Bowles has always followed planting and stock raising, making a specialty of the latter occupation. He is the owner of about 665 acres of good bottom land, with about 100 acres improved, with fair buildings, etc., and aside from this he is the owner of a desirable residence in the city. In 1861 Mr. Bowles enlisted in the Confederate army as a private in Company G. Twenty-third Arkansas, and served east of the Mississippi. He was with Gen. Price, and was at the evacuation and battle of Corinth and the surrender of Port Hudson. He was at the siege of Port Hudson, was here captured, but was paroled after being held a prisoner for only three and a half days. He came home and was exchanged in the fall of 1863, and in 1864 he joined a scouting company in this section, but was not in active service the last six months on account of his eyes, which were injured at Port Hudson. The first three years after the war Mr. Bowles was engaged as bookkeeper and salesman for Cabbell, Sappington & Armour as a lumber dealer and sawmill man at Cypress Bend, and received $75 per month. He had only his place and one mule left to commence work with after the war, and his mother-in-law and wife were weaving and making their own clothing, consequently he accepted the above-mentioned position. Mr. Bowles and wife were the parents of nine children, five of whom are nor living: Mary E. (wife of J. W. Davis, the present postmaster of Arkansas City), Joseph S., William J., John A. and Jessie E. Mr. Bowles is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Branson Blue Lodge No. 113. Politically he is a Democrat in his tendencies. He was constable of Desha and Chicot Counties for four years, and also held the office of justice of the peace for a like number of years in the same counties.

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DAVID O. BOWLES, planter, Arkansas City, Ark. Mr. Bowles is one of the oldest settlers of Franklin Township, and is a man who has the respect and esteem of all acquainted with him. He is a native-born resident of Desha County, born in 1838, and is the son of Oscar and Elizabeth (Melton) Bowles, natives of Nelson and Flavanna Counties, Va., respectively. Oscar Bowles came to this State in 1832, and bought land adjoining that upon which Arkansas City is now standing. He came here in company with C. W. Campbell, and the latter bought the land upon which the city now stands. They tilled the soil upon adjoining farms for a number of years, and in the forties entered into a partnership in stock raising. This partnership existed until the death of Mr. Campbell in 1866. They owned and operated a large farm in this township, known now as the Roston farm, and this they worked very successfully. They were large stock-raisers of cattle, horses and mules. Mr. Bowles was not a politician although one among the most popular men of the county. He was captain of the militia here previous to the late unpleasantness, and afterward filled the office of justice of the peace. He continued his agricultural affairs until his death, which occurred in 1874, when he was drowned while crossing a crevasse in the levee near old Chicot City. His widow still survives him, and is seventy-eight years of age, and makes her home with her granddaughter, Mrs. Lizzie Trippe, of Arkansas City. Mr. and Mrs. Bowles were the parents of four children: W. W. (a planter and stock-raiser of Franklin Township, and who now resides in the city), D. O., Mary E. (deceased wife of a Mr. Dickson), and J. M. (deceased). D. O. Bowles was educated principally in Desha County, at Chicot City, where, previous to the war, the planters of this county had built a school, and at the age of seventeen years he became assistant to his father on the plantation. He acted as general superintendent, and managed the hands, etc. At the age of twenty-two he entered the Confederate service in company H, Churchill's First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, McNair's brigade, and served first in the Western army, and was first in the battle of Oak Hills. He was captured at Elk Horn Tavern and sent to Alton, Ill. He was sent South in the latter part of the summer of 1862, reported to his old command, and entered the Army of the Tennessee. He participated in the battles of Barboursville, Perryville, Knoxville, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and was in all the battles from Dalton, Ga., to Atlanta. During the winter of 1864 or 1865 he was serving in the Secret Deciphering Department for the Confederate army from Dalton to Atlanta, and was ordered to report to the war department at Richmond, Va., four days previous to the time when Gen. Hood had taken command of the army in place of Gen. J. E. Johnston. Mr. Bowles was commissioned captain, and while serving in that capacity from the war department was ordered to report to Gen. E. Kirby Smith in command of the Western army, then stationed at Shreveport, La. He was then ordered by Gen. Kirby Smith to operate in the secret service department on the Mississippi River, but only filled this position for a short time, when Col. Carlton appointed him as adjutant of his regiment. This position he held until the close of the war. His command was paroled at Pine Bluff, and although Mr. Bowles did not surrender, he, like all other good men, has accepted with a good grace the termination of the war. He returned home, engaged in tilling the soil in Drew County, where he was married in 1866 to Mrs. C. F. Henningway, widow of Gen. Henningway, of South Carolina, who was the uncle of one of the supreme judges of Arkansas. She is the daughter of Mr. Zoffjke, a Polander, who was a manufacturer of pianos and organs at Detroit, Mich., and afterward at Cincinnati, Ohio. The mother was born in Hamburg, Germany, and came to this country when three years of age. She died in 1879 and Mr. Joffjke in 1878. Mrs. Bowles became the mother of three children by her first marriage: Charles, Theodore and Wilson. By her marriage to Mr. Bowles she became the mother of four children: D. O., Jr., C. Augusta (wife of Dr. J. M. Carter, of Augusta, Ga.), Ora and Olga (the last two attending school at Jackson, Miss.). In 1874 Mr. Bowles came to this county and followed farming for two years, and in 1876 was elected mayor of the town. He has held every position in the city within the favor of the people, from marshal to mayor, and has also served as deputy sheriff of this part of the county for a number of years. Mr. Bowles has under cultivation about 260 acres of land on which is produced about 100 bales of cotton annually. He has a good gin and a nice frame residence. Mrs. Bowles is a member of the Baptist Church. The mother of our subject has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1833, and is one of the first members of that church organized in this city. She is a conscientious Christian woman, and although quite advanced in years is still actively engaged in church work. She will long be remembered for her great piety and the good she has done in the church.

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JOHN B. BROWN. In the early settlement of the State of Pennsylvania, among the families who were closely identified with its material affairs, and associated with its progress and development, were the Browns, who were of German origin. A respected representative of this family, to be found in Desha County, Ark., is the subject of this sketch, who was born in Franklin County, Penn., November 30, 1846, being a son of Jacob S. and Jane (Brotherton) Brown, also natives of that county and State, the former born in 1816. They died in their native State, the father passing from life in 1872, and the mother in 1850. To them a family of two sons and two daughters was born, only one son and one daughter now living, of whom John B. is the eldest. Emma J. resides at Chambersburg, Penn. Those deceased are: J. Porter (who was killed by the Indians, on the plains, in 1865), Florence (who was the wife of George J. Baisley, of Franklin County, Penn.). John B. Brown remained in Franklin County, Penn., until nineteen years of age, receiving a common school education, and at the age of twenty years began life for himself at sawmilling, and was afterward in the transfer business between St. Louis and East St. Louis, and afterward followed merchandising in the former city. In 1869 he came South, and settled in Desha County, Ark., at the mouth of the Arkansas River, and here was married on January 2, 1878, to Mrs. Lucretia Edgington, widow of Alfred A. Edgington, who died in Desha County, on January 10, 1873. Mrs. Brown is a native of Todd County, Ky., and is a daughter of George W. and Susan (Stark) Boyd, who settled in Jefferson County, Ark., in 1850, the father dying at Pine Bluff six years later, and the mother at the same place in 1859. They left a family of six sons and four daughters, of whom Mrs. Brown is the ninth child and youngest daughter. She was the mother of three sons and three daughters by her first husband, the names of those living being as follows: Jilson P., Hunter S., Desha F., and Alfred Lucretia (a daughter). Those deceased are Maud S. and Newton. Mr. Brown's success in his farming operations is well merited, and having given this occupation his attention the greater portion of his life, he is now the owner of a fine farm of about 400 acres, partly cultivated, it being well adapted to the raising of cotton and corn, and he also gives much attention to the stock business. He is a Democrat in politics, has been sheriff of Desha County, and has had charge of the sheriff's business in the Watson District of the county. Socially, he is a member of the K. of H. Mrs. Brown is of Irish descent, and traces her ancestry back to the early colonists of Virginia.

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WILLIAM H. BURNETT is a prosperous general merchant of Desha County, Ark., and by his superior business management and efficiency has added much to the material interests of Pendleton and the surrounding country. He also conducts his plantation, and each year cultivates about 150 acres. He was born in Desha County, Ark., and is the offspring of one of the early settlers of the county, Lemuel F. Burnett. The latter was a Pennsylvanian, born August 4, 1810, of German parents, but was reared in Ohio, and removed from that State to Arkansas in 1833, while it was yet a Territory, although for several years before he became a permanent resident he followed the business of a trader. By occupation he was a gunsmith, having served an apprenticeship at that trade in Steubenville, Ohio. After settling in Arkansas he began working at his trade and also followed merchandising and farming, and by his indefatigable industry, enterprise and good management, he accumulated a handsome property. He now resides in Arkansas County, Ark., and although eighty years of age, he is still hale and healthy. He is an active Democrat, and has long been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Coose, was born in Tennessee, September 30, 1820, and is still living in the enjoyment of good health. Her father, N. C. Coose, was probably born in Tennessee. She is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and is an earnest and conscientious Christian. She and Mr. Burnett were married in Arkansas, in 1839. Their union was blessed in the birth of fifteen children--twelve sons and three daughters--only five of whom are living. Mattie (wife of Jonathan N. Almond, a farmer of Arkansas County, Ark.), Elizabeth (wife of Samuel A. Morgan, also of that county), Lemuel F. (a merchant and planter of Desha County), James N. (also following these occupations in the county), and William H. The rest of the children died in infancy. William H. Burnett was reared in Desha County, and although his early educational advantages were very poor indeed, in later years he succeeded in obtaining a good practical business education, and is now one of the leading business men of the county. He began doing for himself when twenty-two years of age, as a merchant at Burnett's Landing on the Arkansas River, but for some years has been doing an annual business of about $75,000. He owns a large tract of woodland in the county, and on his property is erected a steam cotton-gin, which has a capacity of about 6,000 pounds of lint cotton per day. The different occupations to which he has given his attention have resulted satisfactorily, and he is well known to the residents of Desha County as an upright, honorable and successful man of business. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, is a member of the K. of H., and politically, is a Democrat, and has held the position of notary public of his county, and is present postmaster of Watson. He was married June 7, 1882, in New Orleans, La., to Miss Florence Johnson, a native of Charleston, S. C., a daughter of Charles Johnson. She died October 28, 1885, having become the mother of two sons and one daughter: Charles W., Linnie F. and Alfred E. (who died in 1883 in infancy). His second marriage was solemnized in Memphis, Tenn., December 13, 1887, to Miss Sallie McDaniel, and her marriage with Mr. Burnett has resulted in the birth of a son: Luther, who died in infancy. He was so unfortunate as to lose this wife by death, April 12, 1889, her death being mourned not only by her immediate family, but by all who knew her.

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MRS. DIANA B. CAVENAGH is the widow of William C. Cavenagh. She was born April 15, 1834, being a daughter of Col. Richard J. and Diana (Buckner) Hamilton, both natives of Kentucky, the former born in 1800 and the latter in 1804, their union taking place in 1820. Col. Hamilton was educated near Louisville, Ky., and became a lawyer by profession, which calling received his attention all his life, the city of Chicago, Ill., being the field of his labors. He held all the offices which the city could bestow upon him, and in 1858 ran for governor of the State against Col. Richardson, and was defeated by a small majority. He was a Knight Templar Mason, and at the time of his death, December 24, 1861, he was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. His wife was a daughter of Col. William B. and Elena Buckner, and bore her husband the following family: Sarah A. (the wife of Henry A. Mitchell. a resident of Groton, Conn.), Ellen (the wife of Dr. John H. Kenon, a resident of Chicago, Ill., she being the first white child born in that city), Diana B. (Mrs. Cavenagh), Henry E., Richard N. (deceased), Sidney B., Pauline (deceased), and Pauline (named for her sister). The mother of these children died April 24, 1834, being a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their daughter, Diana B., was first married November 1, 1855, to Breckenridge Blackburn, who was born in Woodford County. Ky., February 26, 1832, and was educated in Louisville, Ky., for the profession of law, which occupation received his attention all his life. He served in the late Civil War, and was major of the first company that went out from Memphis, Tenn., but at the time of his departure from that city he held the rank of captain, being afterward promoted. He presented the first Confederate flag to Gen. Forrest's brigade in Forrest Square. of Memphis, Tenn., and during his term of service was in the battles of Shiloh, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge (in which engagement he lost his right arm), Arkansas Post, and at one time was captured and taken prisoner to Camp Chase, and after being kept in captivity for eleven months was exchanged. He then took up the practice of law in Memphis, Tenn., and there died of that dreadful scourge, yellow fever, on October 21, 1867, being an earnest member of the Presbyterian Church at the time of his death. To himself and wife a daughter was born: Mary E., who was born September 17, 1856, in Chicago, and on August, 8, 1877, became the wife of Walter A. Jones (an architect by calling), who was born in Memphis, Tenn., in 1855, and died on August 8, 1878. Mrs. Cavenagh was married to Dr. William C. Cavenagh, December 14, 1877, he being a native of Dublin, Ireland, born December 24, 1826, and educated in Trinity College of that city, and in 1849 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Mississippi. After remaining in that State a short time he removed to New Orleans, and after practicing there for three years moved to Memphis, Tenn., where he practiced the healing art until his death, being a very successful practitioner. He joined the Southern array as a surgeon in 1861, in which capacity he served until the close of the war, then returned to his home in Memphis and practiced medicine until his death, August 30, 1880. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, the K. of H., the Catholic Knights of America and the A. 0. U. W. He was, as is his widow, a member of the Catholic Church.

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GREENE W. CLARK, planter. Brought up to life of a farmer, Mr. Clark has since continued that calling with care and perseverance, and is well-known as a successful tiller of the soil. He was born in Ashley County, Ark., May 11, 1845, and is a son of Philip and Nancy (Holyfleld) Clark, who were born in North Carolina and South Carolina, in 1809 and 1810, respectively. The father removed from his native State to Mississippi in an early day, and was there married, coming in 1837, to Arkansas, and settling in Chicot County, where he entered land, built a log-cabin and began improving his property. He died in 1853, and his wife in 1870, having become the parents of ten children, the subject of this sketch being the only one now living. Greene W. Clark was reared in his native State, and January 22, 1866, was united in marriage to Miss Nancy E., the daughter of Isaac and Mary J. Currell of Chicot County, who was born in this State in 1846, and they have become the parents of three sons and four daughters, William 0. and Mary C. being the only ones now living. March 27, 1862, Mr. Clark enlisted in Company G, Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry, and served until 1863, when he was taken prisoner at Port Hudson, and after being exchanged, in the latter part of 1863, he joined Company A, Third Louisiana Cavalry, and during his service was in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Port Hudson, Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, serving until the final surrender. He then returned to his home and friends. Since 1879 he has been devoting his attention to railroad contracting and merchandising, being associated in the latter business with Charles H. Halley, of Halley, Ark. He is a Democrat, a member of the K. of H., and is in every respect a public-spirited citizen. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.

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CHESLEY C. CLAYTON, planter, cotton-ginner and county surveyor, of Desha County, Ark., was born in Arkansas County, Ark., February 7, 1831, being a son of James S. Clayton, who was born near Charleston, S. C., July 24, 1804. He emigrated from his native State to Kentucky, from that State to Tennessee, thence to Arkansas, in 1828, settling in what is now known as Lincoln County, and for two years made his home at Arkansas Post. He was a river captain, and ran a boat from Little Rock to New Orleans, and in the latter city died in 1833. He was married to Miss Lina Williams, a native of Kentucky. born in 1807, and died February 26, 1833, having borne a family of three sons and a daughter, Chesley C. being the only one of the family now living. He has always resided in the State of Arkansas, and in 1855 was married to Miss Lucy Dollahite, by whom he became the father of three sons and a daughter, all of whom are deceased, with the exception of James K. The mother passed from life in Arkansas, October 11, 1863, an earnest member of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Clayton's second union was consummated in Desha County, Ark., December 12, 1865, his wife, Miss Addie W. Hamlet, being a native of North Carolina, born December 30, 1840, and a daughter of William and Frances W. Hamlet. Mr. and Mrs. Clayton have five children: Sebastian C., Willie C., Stinson V., Graland and Lee A. In January, 1844, Mr. Clayton enlisted in Company A, under Col. Charles Carlton, and was promoted to quartermaster of his regiment. He was at one time captured and kept a prisoner for thirty minutes, after which he was released, and returned to his regiment, serving until the close of the war, and surrendering at the mouth of the White River. After he returned home he engaged in farming, and from 1874 to 1879 was engaged in merchandising at Selma. He was the founder of Tillar, in 1878, and that year opened a mercantile establishment at this place, which he conducted successfully until 1851, at which time he sold his stock of goods and purchased a cotton-gin and grist-mill at Tillar, of which he is now one half owner, the style of the firm being Tillar & Clayton. He and his wife own a valuable and finely improved farm of 250 acres, and to the conduct of this he devotes considerable attention. He has always been a Democrat in his political views, and on this ticket was elected to the position of county surveyor, in 1885, which office he still continues to fill. He was deputy sheriff of Desha County for about two years, and has held the office of justice of the peace for some twenty years. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and Royal and Select Master Mason, belongs to Bronson Lodge No. 113, of Tillar, and is master of the Blue Lodge. His wife belongs to the Presbyterian Church. S. C. Clayton, a brother of Chesley C., was sheriff of Desha County for four years. He was born in Kentucky, December 26, 1826, and died in Desha County, in 1863. Another brother, James P., was born in Mississippi, November 19, 1829, and died in Arkansas City, March 24, 1882, having been clerk of that county for fifteen years. In 1800 he was elected to the State Legislature, and after serving one term, practiced law at Old Napoleon and Arkansas City and in the Federal court at Little Rock until his death; was county and probate judge for two years.

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S. M. COURTNEY, merchant, Arkansas City, Ark. Eminent success achieved through honorable endeavor, affords one of the greatest sources of pleasure to him who, in a retrospective view of life, traces his progress by such tokens as deserve admiration and esteem. Such an enjoyment is afforded in the fullest measure by S. M. Courtney, who is the son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Hardin) Courtney, the father a native of North Carolina, and the mother of Georgia. Stephen Courtney came to this State in 1856, from Woodbury, Meriwether County, Ga., and settled in Drew County, near Collins Station, and engaged in tilling the soil. He was the owner of quite a number of slaves, cleared about 300 acres of land, and there remained until 1872, when he moved three miles north of Collins, Ark., on another farm of 320 acres. There he resided until his death, which occurred on July 10, 1885, at Woodbury, Ga., while on a visit to his sister, Mrs. July Redding. He was buried by the side of his parents and sisters. He was twice married, first to the mother of our subject who bore him nine children, seven of whom still survive and are named as follows: Ellen (wife of G. B. Bullock), J. S. (resides near Collins), Mary (wife of Thomas R. Cole). Emanuel, W. A., S. M., M. E. and I. Simeon Courtney, (wife of W. T. Tool, of Monticello, Ark.). The mother of these children died February 14, 1879, and in 1880 Mr. Courtney was married to Mrs. A. M. West. who is still living and resides in Illinois. Emanuel Courtney, our subject's grandfather, was a native of Wadesboro, N. C., emigrating thence to Georgia in 1823. He had only two brothers, Stephen and Jackson. S. M. Courtney was educated in the common schools of his native county, and at the age of twenty-one years commenced business for himself as a merchant at Troy, Drew County. He was there engaged in the general mercantile business for three years, and then removed to Collins Station, where he conducted the same business for the same length of time. From there he moved to Monticello, but at the end of one year returned to Collins. and continued there for eight years. In May, 1887, he formed a partnership with R. D. Crenshaw, which continued for one year, and then Mr. Courtney bought out his partner's interest, and in 1888 the firm of Courtney & Ogburn was formed. They do a general mercantile business of about $65,000 annually. Mr. Courtney was married in 1875, to Mrs. E. E. Tool, daughter of Dr. J. H. Ogburn, and the fruits of this union have been six children--five sons and one daughter: Stephen 0., Harry H., Mamie B., John G., William W. and Eugene. Mrs. Courtney is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and also a member of the Ladies' Missionary Society at Arkansas City. Dr. J. H. Ogburn, Mrs. Courtney's father, was a native of Clarksville, Tenn., but emigrated from there to Clark County, Miss., about 1845. He married Miss Caroline Howze, who was a native of South Carolina. The fruits of their union were: Eugenia E., Nickolas, Bell, Mary E., C. J. and William M. Reuben D. Crenshaw is one of Desha County's most successful merchants and planters, and the manner in which he has acquired his present property is well worthy the imitation of the rising generation. He was born in Shelby County, Tenn., January 2, 1848, and is a son of David S. and Clara C. (Brown) Crenshaw, whose marriage was consummated in Tennessee, September 14, 1842. The father's birth occurred in Sumner County, of that State, on June 17, 1817, and in that State he died April 5, 1884, having been a farmer throughout life, and an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years. He was also a Mason. His union was blessed in the birth of ten children: Reuben D., John T., Susanna F. (wife of Robert Lack, now a resident of Fayette County, Tenn.), James C., Mary V. (deceased), George D., Llewellyn, William D., and Garland C. (deceased). Reuben D. Crenshaw commenced for himself as a merchant in Drew County, Ark., in 1872, and this occupation has followed ever since, but from 1876 to 1878 he was a resident of Chicot County. In the last-named year he came to Desha County, Ark., and in 1880 settled at Trippe Station, where he is now doing an annual business of $15,000. He also owns a good tract of land comprising eighty acres, and has about 470 acres in Tennessee. He was married in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1873, to Miss Mary L. Winston, a daughter of William and Mary (Brown) Winston, and by her had a family of two sons and three daughters: Winston, Mary L., Reuben C., Louis D., and Garland (deceased). The mother of these children was born in Tennessee, September 7, 1851, and is an earnest and devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Her father was a Virginian, who was taken to Tennessee by his parents when a small boy, and died there in 1851. His wife died in 1856, both having been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Crenshaw is a prominent resident of the community in which he resides, and is interested in all good works. He has held the office of justice of the peace in Chicot, as well as this county, and has been postmaster of Trippe for the past ten years, and a member of the local school board for four years. Socially he is a member of Monticello Lodge of the K. of H., and Valley Lodge No. 21, Arkansas City, of the K. of P. His grandparents, Reuben D. and Lucy (Thompson) Brown, were born in Virginia, January 10, 1777, and January 17, 1784, respectively, and died in Sumner County, Tenn., 1848, and Tipton County, Tenn., in 1860. They were married in 1801. The paternal grandfather, Garland Carr Crenshaw went to California in 1849, and a brother of his, John T., was elected by the miners of California to the first Legislature ever held there. Dr. James C. Crenshaw, a brother of the subject of this sketch, was born in Shelby County, Tenn., October 19, 1854, and when twenty years of age began for himself as a clerk in a dry goods house, and was afterward railroad agent for two years. After following merchandising on his own responsibility for seven years he entered a medical college at Louisville, Ky., from which he was graduated in 1875. His first practice was as assistant physician in the Insane Asylum. Little Rock, in 1886-87. He then spent some time in Memphis, after which he came to Desha County. Ark., where he has since made his home, being an active medical practitioner of this region.

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JOHN W. DAVIS, postmaster of Arkansas City, and one of the leading hardware merchants of the city, was born in La Grange, Mo., in 1854, and is the fifth of a family of six children born to the union of Franklin and Mary A. (McNeil) Davis, natives of Kentucky and Mississippi, respectively. The father moved to Missouri in 1850, settled in Lewis County, fifteen miles from La Grange, and there cultivated the soil and followed stock-raising. In 1852 he went to California, and, although he remained only one year, during that time was engaged in mining. He returned to Missouri, and in 1857 moved to this State and settled in Napoleon, where he was engaged in merchandising, and also kept hotel. Here his death occurred in the latter part of 1858. Previous to leaving Mississippi, where he had resided for some time, he had been sheriff of Hinds County. He was a prominent man, and a pioneer settler of La Grange, Mo., was also an early settler of Napoleon, and was a soldier in the War with Mexico, being an officer in the same. He had been a member of the Masonic fraternity for a number of years, and was a prominent member of that body. His wife died in 1876. She had been a member of the Episcopal Church for many years, and was a consistent Christian. a good mother and a warm friend. John W. Davis was educated in this county, was reared in the city of Napoleon. Ark., and at the age of eight years was thrown on his own resources. At the commencement of his career he was collector on a wharf-boat for $8 per month, and from that time until he was twenty-one years of age, was in various occupations. From the age of sixteen to nineteen he was learning the tinner's trade, of which he has since made a profession from time to time, and from nineteen to twenty-one he filled the position of deputy sheriff of the county. After that he cultivated the soil for three years. and when twenty-five years of age, or in 1881, he engaged again in the tinner's trade at Arkansas City in partnership with Charles Harding, under the firm title of Davis & Harding. They continued together for two years, when Mr. Davis bought his partner's interest in the business and conducted it alone for two years, after which William Tobias became his partner, under the firm name of Davis & Tobias. This company carries everything to be found in a first-class hardware store, and are doing an immense business for the population of the county, $10,000 annually. Mr. Davis is an enterprising business man, and in 1885 was appointed postmaster of Arkansas City, which office he has since filled in a very satisfactory manner and with credit to himself. He commenced life quite a poor boy, but by his honesty and industry he has surmounted all obstacles, and is considered one of the much-esteemed and respected citizens of the city. His marriage took place in 1886, to Miss Mollie A. Bowles. a native of this county, and the daughter of W. W. Bowles. the oldest living native citizen of this portion of the State. Mrs. Davis has always seconded the efforts of Mr. Davis, and to her he owes, in a great measure, his success in life. She is a lady of high social standing, and one of superior business capacity. Mr. Davis is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and of the Grand Lodge, Arkansas jurisdiction, and is a member of the Endowment Rank, Section 673. He is the owner of his business house and residence, and is one of the leading business men of the city. He favors all laudable enterprises for the good of his city and county, and contributes liberally to the same.

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COL. J. W. DICKINSON, planter and attorney, Arkansas City, Ark. No name is entitled to a more enviable place in the history of Desha County than the one that heads this sketch, for it is borne by a man who has ever been honorably and usefully identified with the interests of this county, and with its advancement in every worthy particular. The Dickinson family is an old and honored one, and the ancestors, who were early settlers of New York, were also ably represented in the Revolutionary War. Col. J. W. Dickinson owes his nativity to Madison County, Tenn., where his birth occurred in 1832, and is the son of W. B. and Margaret (Reid) Dickinson, both natives of North Carolina. The mother died in 1855 and the father in 1870. They were the parents of six children--five sons and one daughter--only three of whom are now living: H. L. (who resides at Milan, Tenn.), Maggie (now the wife of Dr. S. H. Donaway) and the Colonel. The ones deceased were: Dr. B. F. (who was an eminent physician and surgeon, and who filled that position in Gen. Vaughan's brigade for the Confederate service in 1862-65, he it was who amputated Gen. Vaughan's foot on the battle-field at Franklin during the hottest of the engagement; he died in Arkansas City in 1879, after a residence here of six years; aside from his practice he was also a very successful merchant). W. B. (who died in Sikeston, Mo., in 1863, and was hospital steward, and a prominent physician). and W. W. (who died in 1857, and who was a school teacher by profession). Col. Dickinson was reared and received the rudiments of an education in Madison County, but subsequently attended school at Bethel College, Carroll County, and later finished his education at Clinton, Ky., graduating at the age of twenty years. He then began teaching, and first entered upon his duties as an educator at Bluff Springs, Gibson County, Tenn., and was principal of the school at that place from 1852 to 1863. In 1863 and 1864 he was on his plantation a few miles from where he taught school, and in 1865 he moved to Memphis, Tenn., where he was engaged in the commission business under the firm name of Dickinson & Co. He remained here until 1873, and in 1874 he moved to Arkansas City, where, in connection with planting, he also practiced law, a profession of which he had made a study a number of years previous. In fact, he had studied for the law, but during his younger days preferred teaching, and was never actively engaged in his legal practice until coming to Arkansas City. Col. Dickinson, though one of the most prominent as well as popular men in the county, has never sought any particular political preferment. He was elected treasurer of Chicot County, in 1876, and served in that office for two years in a highly satisfactory manner. In 1879 he represented Chicot County in the Lower House, and was the first man to bring up the bill for the erection of an insane asylum, which bill was passed, but was vetoed by Gov. Miller on account of its location at Hot Springs. Hon. H. M. McVeigh introduced and passed the same bill two years later. During the late war the colonel volunteered his services and was made major of the Sixth Tennessee Infantry, but circumstances afterward transpired which prevented him from serving. The colonel was married in 1855 to Miss Mary L. Wright, of Tennessee, and the daughter of Levi and Mary (Shaw) Wright, who were early settlers of Tennessee. The former died in 1861 and the latter in 1850. To Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson were born seven children, three of whom are now living: J. W., Jr., (mayor of the city), W. W. (who is president of Dickinson Hardware Company at Little Rock), and C. F. (who is attending school at Little Rock). Col. Dickinson can be numbered among the large land owners of the county, and has several large plantations, well improved and well stocked. He is one of the largest taxpayers in the county. He is a liberal contributor to all worthy enterprises for the development of city or county, and is a public-spirited citizen. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and B. A., Arkansas City Lodge No. 296. In politics he is Democratic. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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J. W. DICKINSON, JR, merchant, Arkansas City, Ark. This young but eminently successful business man was born in Memphis, Tenn., in 1862, and there he received the principal part of his education, although he afterward attended school at Pine Bluff for some time. When eighteen years of age he commenced assisting his father, Col. J. W. Dickinson [see the sketch preceding], who was then editing the Arkansas City Journal, as local editor, and also became interested with him in agricultural affairs for several years. At the age of twenty-one years he embarked in his present business, and handles a full line of groceries, plantation supplies. etc., and is doing a good business. He first started out by himself, but was afterward associated with J. R. Butler, under the firm name of Butler & Dickinson, for about eight or ten months. Mr. Dickinson then sold out to his partner and in 1885 opened his present business. He receives a liberal patronage from the best local custom, is kept busy supplying the wants of the trade, and he has established a first-class reputation for excellent goods, close prices and honorable, straightforward dealing. Mr. Dickinson is energetic and enterprising, and possesses rare business ability. He was married on March 2, 1886, to Miss Eunice A. Godwin, a native of Chicot County, Ark., and the daughter of A. and E. M. (Ferguson) Godwin, natives of California and Kentucky, respectively. She is also a niece of John B. Godwin, of Memphis, Tenn. To Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson was born one child, Effie M. (deceased). Mr. Dickinson was elected mayor of Arkansas City in 1885, and has succeeded himself in every election since that time, being one of the youngest mayors in any city in the South. Judging from his popularity, he is likely to hold the office as long as he cares to be troubled with it. He is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge, No. 21.

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WILLIAM B. DUMAS is of French lineage, and is an example of what can be accomplished when industry and perseverance hold sway. His farming and stock-raising operations, as well as his mercantile and manufacturing interests, have resulted most satisfactorily, and be is now one of the wealthiest and best known citizens of the county. He was born near Paris, Henry County, Tenn., June 12, 1841, his parents, Jeremiah and Louisa (Dismukes) Dumas, having been born in North Carolina and Davidson County. Tenn., in 1807 and 1809, respectively. The father was a farmer, an Old Line Whig in politics, and for many years prior to his death was a minister of the Missionary Baptist Church. In his business operations he was very successful, and at the time of his death which occurred in Henry County, Tenn., in 1859, left a handsome fortune to be divided between his widow and children. His relict is now living in Henry County, Tenn., is the wife of John Gilbert, of Carroll County, Tenn., whom she married in 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Dumas were married in 1828 in Davidson County, and in time a family of eleven children clustered about their hearthstone, only five of their family being alive: William B., Thomas J., Lutie E. (wife of Morris Southerland, of Paris. Tenn.) Joseph T. (a wealthy farmer and stock-raiser of Tennessee), and Don D. (a resident of Henry County, Tenn., and a farmer and stock-raiser). Those deceased are Martha, Mary, James, Winfield S., Mary I. and Bettie. William B. Dumas was reared and educated in his native State, his early advantages for acquiring learning being exceptionally good. He attended the Cumberland University of Lebanon, Tenn. Upon the opening of the Rebellion, he, May 14, 1861, enlisted in Company B, Wigfall Grays, Fourth Tennessee Infantry, and was in Bragg's and Johnston's divisions, and took part in the battles of Shiloh, Belmont, all the skirmishes in and around Corinth, after which he was transferred to the engineers' department, and was in many more skirmishes and small engagements. He was paroled on May 15, 1865, at Paducah, Ky., and returned home. He began farming for himself at the age of twenty-five years, after the Civil War, and has been more or less interested in agricultural pursuits ever since, being now the owner of 940 acres of fine land in the Arkansas Valley, and cultivates about 300 acres, 150 acres being in a fine state of cultivation, cotton and corn being raised thereon in large quantities. He raises considerable cattle, and is the owner of about twenty-five head of horses and mules, and on his property is a large steam cotton-gin, which brings him in a paying annual income. He is also largely engaged in the timber business, manufacturing staves for the Eastern and Northern markets, and as this industry is admirably handled it is proving very profitable. Mr. Dumas is also a successful merchant of Dumas, and carries a stock of goods valued at from $3,000 to $5,000. From Henry County, Tenn., he removed to Shelby County in 1868, and in 1870 came to Arkansas and settled in Desha County, where he now resides at the town of Dumas, which place is on the Little Rock. Mississippi River & Texas Railroad, and was named in his honor, as he was the first, and is now a prominent resident of the place. He was married in February, 1866, in Gibson County, Tenn., to Miss Elizabeth Edmonds. a native of that State. and a daughter of Preston B. Edmonds. She died July 13, 1876, having become the mother of one son and four daughters, Lutie H. being the only one living. The rest are Arthur P., Ida B., Allie I. and Bettie. Mr. Dumas' second marriage took place in Desha County, December 29, 1887, to Miss Margaret V. Childress, a native of Drew County, and a daughter of Charles S. and Victoria C. (Crute) Childress. She was born on February 8, 1805, and has borne her husband two sons, both of whom are deceased. Mr. Dumas is a Democrat in politics, and takes a prominent and active part in all his party's movements and campaigns, and was a member of the State convention which nominated the present governor of Arkansas. He has been surveyor of Desha County for a number of years. has also been constable and deputy sheriff of his township, has filled the position of school director for many years, and in the discharge of the duties incumbent upon these offices he has acquitted himself with honor and distinction. He is a man who has the confidence and respect of all, and his word is as good as his bond. He is a member of the K. of H., and his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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DAVID A. GATES, attorney, Arkansas City, Ark. Mr. Gates. one of the eminent young attorneys of Arkansas City, and one of the proprietors and editor-in-chief of the Arkansas City Journal, was reared in Drew County, Ark., where he received a good common-school education. In 1870, at the age of eighteen years, he entered the State University, at Fayetteville, Ark., and graduated from that far-famed institution of learning in 1884, being valedictorian of his class. He then engaged in teaching school, which occupation he continued successfully until June, 1885, then, having a natural inclination to engage in legal practice, he took up the study of law, reading under Wells & Williamson, of Monticello, and was admitted in the Supreme Court. in October, 1886, by Chief Justice Cockran. Since that time he has practiced in this city, and in June, 1888, he formed a partnership with James Murphy in the law department. He is a young man of brilliant attainments, and is foremost in the ranks of the legal luminaries of this city. He, with W. F. Bessellieu, are the proprietors and owners of the Arkansas City Journal, which is Democratic in its tendencies, and has a large circulation in this and surrounding counties. Mr. Gates was married in June, 1888, to Miss Kate Matthews. of Monticello, Ark. She is the daughter of S. J. Matthews, the ex-county judge, and ex-county and circuit clerk of Drew County. In 1888 Mr. Gates was appointed by President Cleveland to select a reservation for the Umatilla Indians. in Northeastern Oregon, on which he was engaged from February to June, 1888. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 20 K. of H., Tillar Lodge, No. 3215, and K. of P., Valley Lodge. His parents, David A. and Sarah (Howell) Gates. were natives of Tennessee. The father moved to Texas, in 1854, and was there interested in merchandising until 1861, when he enlisted in the Confederate army, was made captain of a company. and was killed in the battle of Mansfield, La., April 8, 1864. He and wife were the parents of six children, only two now living: Mrs. A. C. Stanly (of Drew County). and David A., Jr. The mother of these children died in 1861; she was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The elder Gates was a member of the A. F. & A. M.

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CHARLES H. GIFFORD. The mercantile business of Watson, Ark., is ably represented by Mr. Gifford, who has rapidly and surely made his way to the front ranks among the enterprising merchants of the county. Born in Fall River, Mass., on January 20, 1832, he is a son of Robert and Sarah A. (Gardner) Gifford. the former's birth having occurred in Rhode Island in 1804. He was a machinist by trade, and in 1831 he was married in Providence, and there made his home for thirteen years, at the end of which time he emigrated to Arkansas. and settled on the Arkansas River, twenty-five miles above Napoleon, in Desha County, which place was his home at the time of his death, although his death occurred in Providence, R. I., in 1846, while there on a visit. His widow died in March, 1865, in Desha County. A family of two sons and five daughters was born to them, Charles H. being the only one now living. Those deceased are: Eliza, Charlotte, Alma. Emily, Rebecca and Isaac. Charles H. Gifford was a resident of Rhode Island until he reached his twelfth year, at which time he removed with his parents to Arkansas, his early educational advantages being limited to the common schools. When fifteen years of age he began life for himself as a farm laborer. but gave up this work in 1848 to become a salesman in a grocery store, which position be retained for nearly two years. He next farmed on the Arkansas River for two years, after which he again began clerking, becoming a salesman in a general store. In 1879 he opened his present establishment in Watson, and now carries a stock valued at from S3,500 to $4,000, and is the owner of eighty acres of land in the river valley, of which about fifteen acres are under cultivation. He was married in Desha County, Ark., March 27, 1850, to Miss Melissa Stokes, a native of Tennessee, and to them ten children were born: John W. (a farmer of the county), and Mattie (wife of Benjamin Caulk, a farmer and merchant of the county) being the only ones alive. Those deceased are: Otwa, Lafayette, Charles V. Gifford, Charles H. Gifford, Jr., Alma, Emily, Robert and Minnie M. The mother of these children passed from life in 1871, and in May of the following year Mr. Gifford wedded Mrs. Annia Cox, widow of Bufford Cox. She was born in Tennessee, and her union with Mr. Gifford resulted in the birth of five children, Josie, Lulu and May, only, being alive. Cyrus and Shelby are dead. Mr. and Mrs. Gifford are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and in his political views he is a Democrat, although not an active partisan. He is liberal and charitable to the extent of his means, is a citizen of much worth, and is respected and esteemed by all.

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MRS. E. M. GODWIN, widow, Arkansas City, Ark. Mrs. Godwin's husband. Allin Godwin, was a native of North Carolina and the son of Handy Godwin. He came to Arkansas in 1860, settled in Monticello, Drew County, and engaged in farming for three years. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army, and after the battle of Shiloh was discharged on account of wounds received at that disastrous engagement. He returned home, and in 1862 was married to Miss E. M. Ferguson, the daughter of W. T. and Saline (Neal) Ferguson, natives of Kentucky and Missouri, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson were married about 1839, and became the parents of but two children: Charles C. (who resides in California), and our subject, Mrs. Eunice M. Godwin. Mr. Ferguson came to this State about 1840, settled in Chicot County, and was one of the largest planters of the same, working about 500 acres and owning quite a number of slaves. He died in 1863, and Mrs. Ferguson many years previous, or in 1845. Mr. Godwin, the husband of our subject, died November 28, 1889, and was quite wealthy at the time of his demise, owning 1,280 acres of land, with 339 acres adjoining Monticello. In all he had about 400 or 500 acres under cultivation, had a good house, outbuildings, etc., and was also the owner of a good steam-gin. Mrs. Godwin was among the earliest settlers in this county, coming here in 1843, and became one of the most successful and enterprising citizens of the same. She was educated in the Female College at Frankford. remaining there for two years, and she also attended for one term a graded school in Louisiana. By her marriage to Mr. Godwin. she became the mother of six children: Addie M. (wife of Henry Townsend, who is a druggist in Arkansas City [see sketch], Eunice A. (wife of J. W. Dickinson, Jr., of Arkansas City), W. H., Charles B. (deceased), Leonard W. and Betsey G. Mrs. Godwin is a lady of education and refinement, and is a liberal supporter to all laudable enterprises. 


COL. B. F. GRACE, attorney, Arkansas City, Ark. Col. Grace, one of the oldest legal practitioners of the county, and a lawyer of thorough preparatory training, both literary and professional, was born in the Blue-Grass State in 1828. His parents, Preston and Jane (Kilgore) Grace, were natives, respectively, of North Carolina and South Carolina, the father a brick-mason and contractor by occupation. Col. B. F. Grace moved to Arkansas in 1851. He had previously graduated at Princeton, Ky., and after coming to Arkansas studied law with Grace & Murry, being admitted to the bar at Pine Bluff in 1855. He then located at Napoleon, practiced there for some time, then moved to Watson, and then came to this place when the county seat was moved here. He has served as county judge of Desha County, but has never meddled very much with politics. He joined the Confederate army in 1862 as a private, was promoted to the rank of quartermaster sergeant, and filled that position until the close of the war. He participated in the battle of Prairie Grove, the fight at Van Buren, was with Gen. Taylor through Louisiana, was at the battle of Alexandria, and took a prominent part in many minor engagements. In 1864 he was ordered to Louisiana to purchase supplies for the army, and was thus engaged when the war closed. When Judge Grace first came to Napoleon to practice his profession a prosperous community surrounded the town, and there were many large land suits. The principal part of the large cases were of a criminal character, and the docket generally contained from three to 400 cases. Napoleon was at that time filled with a fine class of settlers, though there were constantly passing through a number of traveling gamblers, who gave the law-abiding citizens considerable trouble. The Government had a very fine marine hospital located there, but owing to the caving in of the town in 1863 not a vestige of the place is left. From there Col. Grace moved to his farm, three miles from where Napoleon once stood, and practiced at Watson, the second county seat of Desha County. In 1879 he was instrumental in getting up a petition to move the county seat from there to Arkansas City, and was successful in this venture. In 1880 he moved to this town, and still retains a large practice. He was married, in 1853, to Miss Amanda Boyd, a native of Harrodsburg. Ky., the daughter of G. W. Boyd, who was born in Rockingham County, Va., and who came to this State in 1850, settling at Pine Bluff. He was one of the pioneer merchants of that place, and died there six years later. His wife, who was a native of Lexington, Ky., also died in Pine Bluff. Mrs. Grace is a member of the Episcopal Church.

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WALTER C. HALLEY is a retired planter now engaged in the hotel and grocery business at Pine Bluff, Ark. Although born in Marion County, Georgia, in 1837, he has been a resident of Arkansas since he was eleven years of age, and has always been identified with the interests of the community in which he has resided. He is one of four surviving members, the others being Martha A. (widow of J. A. Mason), Mary F., (wife of Benjamin McGehee), and Samuel F., of a family of eighteen children born to Dr. Samuel and Sarah A. (Lumpkin) Halley, both of whom were born in Georgia, the former in January, 1801, and the latter about 1804. The father was an eminent medical practitioner, and followed this calling for thirty or thirty-five years. He was captain of a company in one of the early Indian wars, was a Master Mason, and after coming to Arkansas in 1848, identified himself with the interests of Bradley County, and was an earnest advocate of and a stockholder in the railroad from Eunice to Warren, making the first speech in favor of its being built. He first removed from his native State of Georgia to Alabama, and then came to Arkansas, where he was in the active practice of his profession at the time of his death, November 13, 1802. Walter C. Halley was married January 25, 1869, to Miss Addie Vining, a daughter of Thomas Vining, of Desha County, she being born in the State of Mississippi, March 31, 1846, and died February 19, 1870, being in full communion with the Baptist Church at the time of her death. Mr. Halley's present wife, formerly Miss Eddie T. Jones, was born in Arkansas County, Ark., in 1868, their union taking place in 1886. She is a daughter of William and Maggie Jones, of Arkansas County, Ark., and is a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In 1862 Mr. Halley enlisted as a private Company B, infantry service, and was on duty until 1865, when he was captured by the Federals and put in prison at Memphis, Tenn. Later he was paroled and came home and took up his former engagement of farming. He also followed saw-milling until 1871 when he gave up this work to engage in the grocery business at Chicot City, Ark., at which he has been doing well. He owns 200 acres of good farming land, with 130 acres under cultivation, and being a man of enterprise and push everything has prospered well to which he has turned his attention. He is a Democrat, and holds the position of worshipful master in the Arkansas City Lodge No. 296, of the A. F. & A. M. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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CHARLES H. HALLEY is a prosperous merchant and planter of Desha County, Ark., and although he has only resided here since 1884, he is recognized as one of the leading citizens, and fully deserves the success which has attended his efforts. He was born in Bradley County, Ark., in 1853, and in 1877 was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Ward, a daughter of A. J. and Ellen (Howell) Ward, she being a native of Pope County. Ark., born March 8, 1857. They have two children: Charles 0. and Hilary W. Mr. Halley received good advantages in his youth, and was educated at Locustdale. Va., and after reaching a suitable age turned his attention to planting and stock dealing, and these occupations have received his attentions nearly all his life. In 1870 he began merchandising at Mulberry, Franklin County, Ark., and after remaining in business at that place for two years he sold out, and next became a railroad station agent. From 1878 to 1884 he was conductor on a passenger train on the Little Rock, St. Louis & Texas Pacific Railroad. Since the last-named date he has been in the mercantile business at Halley Station, in partnership with Greene W. Clark. Mr. Halley is the owner of a fine farm of 127 acres with 100 acres under cultivation, and on this property is erected a fine steam cotton- gin and grist-mill. He also owns a mill and gin at Heard Station in Chicot County. He is a man of much enterprise, public spirit and intelligence, and is by nature generous and liberal minded. He is a member of the K. of P. Mr. Halley's father-in-law, A. J. Ward, was treasurer of Crawford County, Ark., for ten years; has held the highest rank in the Masonic fraternity and I. O. O. F., and his death, which occurred in 1881, was lamented by all. His wife died August 20, 1889, an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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HUGH L. HENRY is a member of the mercantile firm of Henry Bros., of Tillar Station, Ark. He was born in Madison County, Tenn., in 1852, and is a son of John L. and Martha (Ross) Henry, the former of whom was born in the Old North State in 1818, and emigrated from South Carolina to Madison County, Tenn., at an early day, where he followed the occupation of merchandising and farming, these occupations receiving his attention throughout life. In 1861 he removed from the State of Tennessee to Arkansas, purchased land in Chicot County, and here was engaged in farming until his death in 1865, a member of the Masonic fraternity. His wife was born in Tennessee in 1821, and died in 1889, having borne him a family of seven children--three sons and four daughters: Thomas R., Mary C. (wife of James H. Herron), Mattie L. (wife of S. T. Duncan), Frame W., Hugh L., Caroline L. and Sarah J. Both parents were members of the Presbyterian Church. Hugh L. Henry was married, in 1870, to Miss Mary L. Smith, and by her has had a family of three sons and three daughters, only one daughter and two sons of whom are now living: Tommie R., Frank T. and Lacy T. Mr. Henry and his brother, Frame W., are the owners of 1,145 acres of land and well improved. He is a member of the K. of H., Arkansas City Lodge No. 3215, and also belongs to the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21. His wife is an earnest and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a lady much esteemed by all.

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ABERCROMBIE HOLMES is a wealthy planter residing near Dumas, Ark., but was born in De Soto County, Miss., July 20, 1841, and there would have received excellent educational advantages had not his school days been terminated by the breaking out of the Rebellion. He was a student in the University of Mississippi, during the early part of the war, and there became a member of the University Grays, which company was made up of his fellow-students, but was afterward transferred to the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry, commanded by Col. William H. Jackson, who afterward became a general. He was in the service during the entire war, and fought in the battles of Corinth, in and around Atlanta, Fort Pillow, Peach Tree Creek, Franklin, and was in all the engagements in which Gen. N. B. Forrest participated. He was in many campaigns and saw much of the hard side of army life. He was furloughed at Okalona, Miss., after the battle of Franklin, and was captured while on a brief visit to his parental home, and was confined in a Federal prison in the Garvin Block in Memphis, Tenn., for two months. He was then sent to Vicksburg to be exchanged, and while there the war terminated. After receiving his parole, he returned to his home in Mississippi, and continued to make his home with his parents until January, 1867, at which time he settled on his present farm in Arkansas. In November of the same year he was married in Desha County, to Miss Lethia Pickett, a native of Smith County, Tenn., and a daughter of Col. Edward Pickett, now a resident of St. Louis. She is also a niece of Gen. Pickett, a famous Confederate officer during the late war. To Mr. and Mrs. Holmes a family of nine children have been born: Claudia V. (wife of L. W. Proctor. deputy sheriff of Desha County, residing at Walnut Lake), Finley, Marcia L., Abercrombie (junior), Ruth, Burke D. and Paul K., being those who are living. Those who have passed from life, are Garland Cleveland, who died in 1887, and a child that died in infancy. The mother of these children passed from life August 1, 1886, and Mr. Holmes took for his second wife Miss Lundie L. Tillar, a Virginian, though reared and educated in Arkansas, their union being consummated in February, 1889. Mrs. Holmes is a sister of Maj. J. T. W. Tillar, her family being one of the most prominent in Southeastern Arkansas. Mr. Holmes is the owner of 640 acres of fine land, and has 320 acres in high state of cultivation, the principal products being corn and cotton. He also raises some fine Jersey and Durham cattle, also some horses of a good grade. On his farm is a cotton gin which has a capacity of 2,000 pounds of lint cotton per day, and this, as well as the products of his farm, brings him in a handsome yearly income. He is a thorough and practical farmer, and every enterprise to which he has given his attention has been attended with satisfactory results. Socially he is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the K. of H., and in his political views is a Democrat, being always found at the front when his party needs his services. He has been justice of the peace for eight years. and is now notary public of Desha County. He belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and his wife to the Methodist. His parents' history is given in the sketch of Nathaniel Holmes.

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NATHANIEL HOLMES. In endeavoring to trace the genealogy of Mr. Holmes, we find that his grandfather, Finley Holmes, came originally from Ireland when about twenty-one years of age, and settled near Columbia, S. C., where he became in time a wealthy and successful planter. His son, who also bore the name of Finley, was born near that city March 24, 1802, and followed in his father's footsteps at the time of his death, which occurred in Mississippi September 24, 1885, being the owner of about 6,000 acres of land in Desha County and 3,000 in Jefferson County. His wife, Emily G. (Raines) Holmes. was born in Montgomery County, Ga., July 29, 1806 and was a daughter of Thomas Raines, who had been a captain in the Revolutionary War, and a granddaughter of Maj.-Gen. James Abercrombie. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes were married in Jones County, Ga., about 1823, and in time a family of twelve children gathered about them: Francis (a farmer of De Soto County, Miss.). Abercrombie (a farmer of Desha County. Ark.), Nathaniel, Winfield W. (a farmer of Desha County), Georgianna J. G. (who was first married to Thomas Woods and is now the wife of William W. Butts, a farmer of De Soto County, Miss.), and Martia (who first married B. D. Treadwell, and is now the wife of Moses W. Beardsley, of Memphis. Tenn. The following members of the family are deceased: Dr. Robert R. (who died in 1878). Alpheus C. (who died in 1879), Finley (who was accidentally killed by a gunshot in 1849), Dr. Laurencius (in 1886), Thomas (in 1803 while serving in the Confederate army) and Emily G. (in infancy). Nathaniel Holmes was born near Horn Lake Depot, Miss., June 22, 1843, and received a fair education in the academies of his native county of De Soto. Upon the opening of the Rebellion he, in May, 1861, enlisted in Company A, Memphis Light Dragoons, and was in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Thompson's Station, Holly Springs, besides many small engagements, and July 9, 1863, was captured near Vicksburg, and after being incarcerated in Gratiot Street Prison in St. Louis for about a month, he was removed to Camp Morton. Ind., where, for eighteen months he underwent all the privations and hardships incident to prison life. He was paroled at Richmond, Va., May 1, 1865, and was at home preparing to re-enter the service when news reached him of Lee's surrender. After the close of the war, when twenty-two years of age, he began farming for himself in Desha County, on land which his father had previously purchased, and is now largely engaged in planting and raising cattle. He owns 880 acres of fine land at and near Walnut Lake, and has 450 acres under cultivation well adapted to the growth of corn, cotton, and the grasses, the principal crops, however, being corn and cotton. His marriage to Miss Flora V. Tillar was celebrated in Drew County, Ark., June 22, 1877, she being a native of that county, born March 24, 1859, and a daughter of Maj. J. T. W. Tillar, a very prominent and wealthy citizen of that county. Mr. Holmes and his wife have had three sons and two daughters: Thomas Tillar (born September 6, 1879), Nettie P. (born September 2, 1881), and Ida L. (born December 3, 1886). being the only ones living. Gordon and Clifton R. died in infancy. Mr. Holmes and his wife are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, actively interested in all good work in and out of the church, and he belongs to the K. of H., and is a Democrat in his political views. He is a member of the local school board, a strong advocate of education, and is liberal in the support of the same.

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JEREMIAH HOPKINS, farmer. In sketching the life of this gentleman, it is but just to say that his good name is above reproach, and that he has won the respect and esteem of all who know him. His birth occurred in Chicot County, Ark., in 1835, but his parents, Solomon and Margaret Hopkins, were born in South Carolina and Tennessee. respectively. Jeremiah has always lived in the State of Arkansas. but as good schools or, in fact, schools of any kind, were very few in his youth, he did not receive many advantages for acquiring an education. He remained with his father, assisting him on the farm until the latter's death, in 1865, at the age of sixty years, and as he was then thirty years of age, he took the entire management of affairs into his own hands. In 1867 Sallie A., the daughter of Jesse and Tabitha J. Harrall, natives of North Carolina, became his wife, but she died in 1870, leaving her son, William J., who is now at school in Selma, but was then only a few days old, to the care of his father. The latter remained a widower two years, then married Tabitha J., a sister of his first wife, and their union resulted in the birth of six children: John T., Frederick 0., Sallie A., Louis J., Eliza B. and James A. The last three children are deceased. Mr. Hopkins was so unfortunate as to lose this wife, in 1884, and his third and last union took place in 1886, his wife, Mary E. Smith, a daughter of Levi and Lucinda Smith, living only three years after marriage, her death occurring in May. No children were born to this union. Mr. Hopkins has 200 acres of his fine 540 acre farm under cultivation, but does not give much attention to the propagation of stock, raising only enough for his own use. He is a patron of education and all good works, is a member of the Methodist Church, a Mason, and in his political views is a Democrat.

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JOHN HUTCHINS, M. D. Among the people of Desha, as well as the surrounding counties, the name of Dr. Hutchins is almost a household word, for he has been an active practitioner of Desha County since 1883, and during his career as a practitioner of the "healing art" he has won the confidence of all and the respect of his medical brethren. He was born in Adams County, Miss., in 1843, and after attending the common schools of his native State for some time, he was sent to Princeton, N. J., and was attending college there at the breaking out of the war, and although he lacked two years of finishing his course, he dropped his books and returned home. His father then sent him to La Grange, Tenn., where he attended school until after the fall of Fort Donelson, when he again left school, returned home, and this time joined Company B, Tenth Mississippi Regiment, under Col. Smith, and took an active part in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Franklin and Nashville, after which he was on detached service until after the battle of Atlanta, when he rejoined his regiment, and was with Hood in his Tennessee campaign. After this he was taken sick and was furloughed home until he recovered, and upon regaining his health he rejoined the army, and surrendered at Galesboro, N. C., April 26, 1865. After his return home he entered the University of Louisiana at New Orleans, and in 1868 was graduated from the medical department of that institution. He entered upon his practice in Adams County, Miss., but in 1871 came to Chicot County, Ark., opening an office at Lake Village. where he remained one year, and from that time until 1883 resided in Drew County. He has since been a resident of Desha County, and has built up a large and paying practice, his services being required among the best people of the county. In 1878 Miss Melissa, a daughter of Thomas C. and Elizabeth E. (Cherry) Harrell, became his wife. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and the Doctor is a Democrat. Although the Doctor has only been a resident of the county about seven years, he has fully identified himself with its interests, and his purse is ever found open in support of any good cause. His parents, John 0. and Aubin M. Hutchins, were born in Mississippi and Virginia respectively, and the father was an extensive planter by occupation. He was a man of fine intellect, and wielded much influence among the residents of Adams County, but since 1879 he has been a resident of Louisiana, and although seventy-two years of age is still hale and hearty. His father also bore the name of John, and was also a native of Mississippi, born in 1766, and became quite wealthy for that period. The Indians inhabited the State at that time, and Mr. Hutchins was often considerably troubled by their depredations, so much so that the settlers would band together and engage in fights with them. Notwithstanding the hardships and trials which he was obliged to undergo, he lived to the ripe old age of eighty-five years. "Honor to whom honor is due," and to these sturdy pioneers is undoubtedly due the credit of having brought the country to its present perfection, for, by their intrepidity and courage, they paved the way to future civilization.

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JOSHUA B. JACKSON is a native of Chester District, S. C., his birth occurring on August 25, 1840. His father, Lemuel Jackson, was also born in that State in 1800, and died there in 1846, having been fairly successful in the pursuit of agriculture throughout his life. He was a prominent Democrat, and in the year 1840 represented his parish in the State Legislature; was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and also belonged to the I. O. O. F. His wife, who was formerly Miss Jane S. Blake, was born in the Palmetto State, in the month of July, 1804, and was reared, educated and married there, and still makes that State her home, having become the wife of Josiah Jardan. Her union with Mr. Jackson resulted in the birth of four sons and five daughters, five of the family now living, named as follows: John (a farmer of Chester County. S. C.), Emily (wife of James McFadden, an agriculturist of York County, S. C.), Martha J. (who first married Samuel Ferguson, and is now the wife of David Hyatt, of Lancaster County, S. C.), Lucy C. (who was first the wife of David Boyd, and is now married to William T. Wylie, of York County). and Joshua B. Jackson (the youngest of those living). The following children are dead: Dempsey R. (who died during the war, in the hospital at Richmond, Va.). and three children who passed from life in infancy. Joshua B. Jackson was reared, and obtained a common-school education in his native State, and owing to the early death of his father, he was compelled to make his own way in the world. When eighteen years of age, he began for himself as a farm hand, and this has been his business through life, his efforts meeting with a fair measure of success. He has some fine bottom land on the Arkansas River, and has about seventy-five acres in a fine state of cultivation, his principal crops being corn and cotton. He was married in South Carolina, February 4, 1869, to Miss Mary E. Porter, a native of Chester District, and a daughter of William S. and Martha J. (Cherry) Porter. She was born October 3, 1849, and her marriage resulted in the birth of two sons and three daughters: Walter P., Effie J., Lee, Mary B. and Lemuel C. In May, 1861, Mr. Jackson enlisted in the Confederate army, joining Company K, Third Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, and was in the Army of Northern Virginia, participating in the seven days fight at Richmond, Sharpsburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Petersburg, Chickamauga, and in various small battles and skirmishes. He surrendered at Appomattox Court House, and was there paroled, returning to his home in South Carolina, where he remained until 1871, at which time he removed to Arkansas and settled in Bradley County. After remaining here two years, he spent two years in Drew County, and has since been a resident of Desha County. He is a member of the K. of H., is a Democrat in politics, and takes an active interest in the political welfare of his county and State. He has been a prominent member of the Old School Presbyterian Church since 1872, and his wife is a member of the same. He has been a director of the common schools of his community for many years, and is an industrious and honorable citizen, highly respected and esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Jackson is of Scotch Irish descent, and his wife is of Irish-Dutch lineage, and her maternal grandfather was born on board a vessel sent from Ireland to America.

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WILLIAM T. JACKSON was born in Jackson County, Tenn., September 29, 1864, and is a son of Andrew and Caroline Jackson, also Tennesseeans, the former's birth occurring in 1834 and the latter's in 1840. Mr. Jackson was a farmer by occupation, a Democrat in his political views, and passed from life in his native State in 1800, mourned by many friends and acquaintances. His widow now resides in Desha County. Ark., and is the wife of John W. Cheatham. William T. Jackson is one of three children born to his parents, the other two members of the family being Charles and Richard, both residents of Desha County. From the time of his birth up to nine years of age, William T. Jackson resided in the State of his birth, but at that time was taken to Arkansas, which State has since been his home. His advantages were quite limited in his youth, and at the early age of sixteen years he was compelled to begin the battle of life for himself, and first worked as a farm laborer, and tilling the soil has since been his occupation, at which he is doing well. He was married, September 15, 1886, to Miss Rachel Evans, a native of Arkansas, but he was called upon to mourn her death August 19, 1887, she having borne a daughter that died in infancy. His second marriage was consummated August 1, 1889, to Mrs. Nannie T. Stillwell, widow of Asher C. Stillwell, who died August 10, 1880, and a daughter of Abraham F. and Tabitha (Clark) Hudson, a native of Fayette County, Tenn., born September 26, 1854. Mr. Jackson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, his wife belongs to the Christian Church, and both take an active interest in church work and are liberal contributors to feasible enterprises so far as their time and means will allow.

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J. S. JOHNSON, present county treasurer, Arkansas City. The name that heads this sketch is borne by one of the well known and respected residents of Franklin Township, who, like many other settlers in the county, came originally from Louisiana, where his birth occurred in 1854. His parents, Ami and Mary (Burland) Johnson, were natives, respectively of Ohio and Virginia. The father came to Louisiana at a very early day, in fact so early that the place where he settled was covered with cane. He was a carpenter by trade and followed this occupation until his death in 1857. The mother died in 1884. Of the seven children born to their marriage, only one, J. S., is living. The latter was reared and secured a fair education in Catahoula Parish, La., and when fourteen years of age began for himself. He spent the early part of his life on board a steamboat on the Ouachita River and tributaries and filled all the positions from cabin-boy to pilot, holding the last-named position the last four years he was on the boat. He came to Chicot County, Ark., located in Arkansas City and worked as clerk for J. M. Whitehill for some time. He afterward worked for a Mr. Helm, and in 1882 engaged in the grocery business for himself, continuing at the same until 1887. Mr. Johnson has filled the office of city recorder, and in 1888 was elected treasurer of the county. Previous to this he had served as deputy sheriff for some time. His marriage nuptials were celebrated on November 21, 1878, to Miss Ella Clayton, daughter of Capt. John M. Clayton, of Louisiana. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are the parents of seven children: Hattie M., Nora N. (deceased), Earl 0., Gertrude P., Joseph C., Norman N. and James H. Although a comparatively young man, Mr. Johnson is one of the wide-awake and enterprising citizens of the county. He is a member of the Valley Lodge No. 21, K. of P., and is a member of the Uniformed Rank, Division 12. He and Mrs. Johnson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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MRS. MARY J. JOHNSTON is the widow of William T. Johnston, and a daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Burnett) Sellers. She was born in Memphis. Tenn., September 18, 1851, and on April 4, 1870, was married to Thomas L. Pleasants, of Indiana, who was born November 30, 1841, and to their union a family of two children was born: Walter T. and Mattie (wife of Edward J. Graves); this daughter was born on March 20, 1872, and was married on November 1, 1887, being now the mother of a little daughter named Ethel L. Thomas L. Pleasants was a merchant of Luna, Chicot County, Ark., and died on June 29, 1874, his widow marrying William T. Johnston, on June 14, 1878. The latter was born in Butler County, of the Blue-Grass State, May 20, 1851, and he and wife became the parents of a daughter, Jennie Eudora, who was born in Memphis, Tenn., November 2, 1882. Mr. Johnston, in addition to following the occupation of merchandising at Laconia, was engaged in conducting a plantation, and for several years kept books for his father-in-law at that place. He was a man possessing many worthy traits of character, and his death, which occurred on September 7, 1889, was not only lamented by his immediate family, but by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Johnston's father and mother were born in Ohio and Kentucky, September 11, 1820, and January 24, 1830 respectively, their union taking place at Memphis, Tenn., in 1848. The mother passed from this life October 27, 1888, and was, as was her husband, who died August 2, 1883, an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. A family of four children was born to them of whom Mary J. (Mrs. Johnston). and Josephine (the wife of Charles Warfield, a planter and ginner of Laconia, are the only ones living.

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JOSEPH H. JONES, farmer, was born in Davidson County, Tenn., in the city of Nashville, on February 27, 1836, and is a son of Uriah Jones, a native Virginian, who was born in 1808, and died in Desha County, Ark., in 1873, whither he had come in 1841, his first location, however, being in Arkansas County, where he became a wealthy farmer. His wife, formerly Miss Sarah Henderson. was born, reared and married in Tennessee, the latter event being in 1832 or 1833. She died about 1842, having borne a family of five children--two sons and three daughters--Joseph H. Jones being the only one of the family now living. John died in Arkansas in 1842. Amanda, died in 1878, Elizabeth, died in 1879, and Addie. died in 1873. Joseph H. Jones has resided in Arkansas since he was six years of age, but his early advantages were limited, owing to the newness of the country at that time. When eighteen years of age he began farming for himself in Desha County, and this occupation has since received his attention, he being now the owner of 100 acres of good land near the Arkansas River, of which eighty acres are under cultivation, devoted to cotton and corn. He was married in Maury County, Tenn., October 8, 1869, to Miss Maggie Brown, a Tennesseean, and a daughter of Ira Brown, and by her has had a family of seven children--three sons and four daughter--Irene. Sallie, Gordon, Luther, Maggie, Grover Cleveland and Ella, dead. In May, 1861, Mr. Jones joined Company D, Capt. McGregor's First Arkansas Regiment, and was in the battles of Manassas, Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga and all the battles from Dalton to Atlanta. He surrendered at Jonesboro, N. C., and was paroled. He was in the Army of the Tennessee with Gens. J. E. Johnston and Braxton Bragg, and during his service was several times wounded, once in the right hand at the battle of Atlanta, losing his third finger. After the war was over he returned to Arkansas, and, as above stated, has devoted his time and attention to the peaceful pursuit of farming, giving some attention also to the raising of cattle. He is a man of quiet habits, but of an honest and generous disposition., and is highly esteemed by his many acquaintances and friends. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and take an active part in church work. Mr. Jones is a Democrat, has held the office of justice of the peace of Red Fork Township for three years, and socially is a member of the Masonic fraternity and K.of H.

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DOUGLAS JORDAN. Perhaps there is no man within the limits of Desha County, Ark., who is better known as a successful farmer than Mr. Jordan, for he is recognized as a man of progressive spirit, energy and clear perception, and his enterprises have in nearly every instance resulted satisfactorily. He was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1856, and was there reared to manhood, his educational advantages extending over the early part of his life. He entered Hazlewood College when he was twelve years of age, and was a constant attendant of that institution until he was sixteen years of age. at which time he graduated with first honors. After his return home he assisted his father until he attained his majority, and owing to the excellent education that he had received and his knowledge of agricultural life, he was at that time well-fitted to commence life for himself. After managing a plantation for two years in his native State he came to Desha County, Ark., and for five years was the manager of a large estate belonging to Mr. Keene, of New York. Upon the death of his employer, in 1885, he rented the same farm, and managed it for himself for five years longer, then purchased a farm of his own, erected thereon a residence, and since that time has been cultivating his own land. He owns 500 acres, but has only a small portion of it cleared and under cultivation, but rents enough tillable land to keep him busy during the year, raising on an average 300 bales of cotton each season. He gives considerable attention to the raising of stock, in which industry he has been quite successful. He was married, in 1881, to Miss Nannie Placher, a daughter of Cornelius and Isabella (Darden) Placher, of Tennessee, and by her has a family of three children: Emily R., Mary I. (deceased), and Mylie D. Mr. Jordan is an active Democrat, and during the last election made a most creditable race for sheriff of his county, but is not alone interested in politics, as all worthy enterprises receive his hearty support. He and wife are worthy members of the Christian Church. His parents, Mylie and Charlotte (Galay) Jordan, were born in North Carolina and Illinois, respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1823. In 1841 he removed to Montgomery, Tenn., and there became in time a successful planter. He was married, in 1854, and he and wife became the parents of eight children: Douglas, Margaret L., Sarah J., Mary, Alice, Annie, Nellie and Turnley, all of whom are married with the exception of Nellie and Turnley, who still live with their parents. The father is a member of the Methodist Church, is still residing near Clarksville, Tenn., and although sixty-six years of age he is remarkably well preserved. He is a prominent Mason, having taken all the degrees in that ancient order, and having lived a strictly honorable and useful life; he is honored and esteemed by all, and has a record of which he may justly be proud. He has been a church member since quite a young man, and has lived a consistent Christian life, and has endeavored to follow, in every respect, the teachings of the Golden Rule. His wife is now fifty-one years of age, is a member of the Christian Church, and an exemplary lady in every respect.

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KNOX KNOWLTON, M. D., is well known throughout Desha and surrounding counties as a physician and surgeon of prominence, and is an acknowledged leader among his medical brothers. His birth occurred in the county in which he now resides, in 1833, and he is a son of Abraham and Huldah (Hastings) Knowlton, the former a native of Connecticut, and the latter of Massachusetts. Dr. Knowlton, up to the age of nineteen years, received but very little education, but having always been desirous of becoming a well-informed man, he, at that age, went to Ohio and attended a school of that State for one year, after which he entered the St. Louis University, his career in both these institutions being marked by rapid progress. He was compelled, however, to leave the latter institution, after a short attendance, on account of ill health, and returned home where, after a short rest, he began his medical studies, and later attended lectures in St. Louis, graduating the second term. After practicing a short time, he went to New Orleans, attending lectures in the University of Louisiana, and thus favored with excellent preparatory training he was enabled to enter upon a successful career, and the practice of medicine received his attention until the opening of the war. In 1862 he entered the Confederate service as surgeon of the Fifteenth Tennessee, Donaldson's brigade, Cheatham's division, Polk's corps, and served as such throughout the war, surrendering at Greensboro, N. C., in April, 1865. After returning to his native State and practicing his profession for a short time, he gave up his profession for the occupation of farming, and so excellent was his management that he in time became the owner of 440 acres of rich land, 240 acres of which are under cultivation. He also gives some attention to stock-raising. Although he has taken no particular interest in politics, he usually votes the Democratic ticket, and the cause of education always receives his hearty approval and support. Other worthy enterprises find in him a liberal patron, and as a man and citizen he ranks among the first in the county. In 1872 Miss Huldah, a daughter of David and Julia (Dumas) Alexander, natives of Kentucky and Virginia, respectively, became his wife, and by her he has had an interesting family of three children: Abraham, Stephen D. and Mary B., all of whom are attending school.

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ALFORD KNOWLTON (colored) is successfully engaged in tilling the soil on his farm, which embraces 352 acres of tine land, of which 180 acres are in an excellent state of condition and will average about 135 bales of cotton per year. Mr. Knowlton deserves much credit for the admirable way in which he has surmounted the difficulties which have strewn his pathway through life, and by his ceaseless industry, united with a strong and determined effort to succeed in life, has acquired his present property. He owns an excellent steam cotton and grist mill combined, and is regarded as one of the leading representatives of the colored race in the county, being honest, industrious and thrifty. Not only is he respected and esteemed by his colored brethren. but also by the white residents of the community, and this sketch is published by the request of many of his white neighbors. Educational institutions, as well as churches, find in him a liberal patron and a hearty supporter, and he is public spirited in every respect and deeply interested in the welfare of his county and State. He is a native of Desha County, Ark., his birth occurring on July 15, 1833, and on January 20, 1867, he was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Blackburn, a native of Kentucky, by whom he has a family of ten children--seven daughters and three sons--eight of this family being now alive: Melissa (the wife of Peter Johnson. a planter living in Desha County), Lillie, Ella, Hattie, Jennie, Katie, Oregon and Norman.

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C. F. KROEGER, merchant and baker, Arkansas City, Ark. Mr. Kroeger was born in Germany in 1853, and is the son of C. F. and Wilhelmina (Bolmeyer) Kroeger, natives also of Germany. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died in his native country in 1885. The mother came here in 1886. C. F. Kroeger, Jr., came to this country in 1872, landing in Castle Garden, N. Y., and came direct to St. Louis, thence to Arkansas City, Ark., in 1873, although there was no town at that time here, and was for two years engaged in his trade, engineer, for Capt. Whitehill. In 1874-75 and 1876 he worked on a farm he had rented of Capt. Whitehill, near Louisville, but in 1877 he returned to this city and engaged again with Capt. Whitehill, with whom he remained until 1880. He was married to Miss Mary Meffert, of Louisville. Ky., and after this union he worked for Capt. Whitehill for one year. He then engaged in the bakery business, continued at this one year, after which he sold out and engaged at work with the railroad company at the elevator as engineer. Here he continued for about five years, and was also engaged in the confectionery and grocery business a portion of this time. In December, 1886, he lost his business by the fire which destroyed the greater portion of this town, but in 1887 he rebuilt, and in 1888 added the saloon business. He enjoyed an annual business in his grocery department of about $6,000, but sold out in 1890; his saloon business yielded him annually about $7,000. Mr. Kroeger has two residences in Huntington, Miss., and four business houses in this city. Although he started with little or nothing, and has met with many reverses, he has never been discouraged, and always manages to find his way to the front. To his marriage have been born five children, two of whom are now living: William and Sophia. Mr. Kroeger is a member of the Lutheran Church, and his wife a member of the Catholic Church. Both are esteemed and respected by all acquainted with them.

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W. E. LAMBE, Arkansas City, Ark. Mr. Lambe, an esteemed and respected business man of Arkansas City, was born in Chicot County, Ark., and is the youngest of seven children born to the marriage of Neesom and Louisa (Davis) Lambe, natives, respectively, of England and Louisiana. Neesom Lambe, who was a physician and chemist, came to America when about twenty-five or thirty years of age, and was here married about 1830. Later he was engaged in the practice of his profession at Grand Lake. Ark., where he received his final summons in 1854. He was moderately wealthy at the time of his death, and engaged in the mercantile business, also owning some real estate. Of the seven children born to his union, only three are now living: F. J. (resides in Sunflower County, Miss.), Mary N. (wife of Samuel Frederick, of Louisville, Ky.), and W. E. After the death of her husband Mrs. Lambe married Dr. John Thompson, of Ohio. Previous to her marriage to Dr. Lambe she had married a Mr. Brasher. She died in 1860. W. E. Lambe became acquainted with the details of farm life at an early age, and during the time while occupied with the duties of the farm attended also the common schools of Chicot County. At the age of eighteen years he started out to fight life's battles for himself, and first began farming on rented land, which occupation he continued for four years. After this he engaged in the carpenter's trade, which he followed for about five years, and for one year he was also in the photographer's business. In 1876 he moved to Arkansas, engaged in the liquor business for about six months, and later sold out and moved to Washington County, Miss., where for some time he was in the saloon business. In 1878 he was again at work at the carpenter's trade, which he continued until 1881, when he again embarked in the liquor business at Bolivar County, Miss. After remaining there until 1886, he came to Arkansas City, where he has since been engaged in the traffic of liquor, and has been unusually successful, his annual sales amounting to about $7,000. Mr. Lambe is the owner of considerable city property, consisting of houses and lots, all the result of careful management and good business ability. He is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and is also a member of the Uniform Rank of that order. In 1889 he was elected alderman of the city.

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SAMUEL LENOX. In the northwestern part of Desha County, Ark., near the Arkansas River, on a beautiful lake which bears his name, lives Mr. Lenox, the subject of this memoir. The State of Arkansas is only one year older than he, his birth having occurred on the place he now occupies September 1, 1837, and he is a son of John H. and Eliza A. (Pullen) Lenox. The former was born December 24, 1801, probably in Tennessee, and as a farmer accumulated a fair share of this world's goods, so that upon his death, October 18, 1844, he left his family well provided for. He was one of the first settlers of Arkansas, coming from his native State in 1820, and settled in what was then Jefferson County, but is now Desha County, purchasing a home on the Arkansas River, and near what is now Lenox Lake. Here he resided until his death. He was married in Little Rock, Ark., December 3, 1835, his wife having been born in Raleigh, N. C., October 7, 1805, but was reared in Jefferson County, Ark., whither she came with her parents when a child, their names being John W. and May Elizabeth Pullen. They were prominent among the early settlers of the State and Mr. Pullen was sheriff of Jefferson County, for a number of years. To Mr. and Mrs. Lenox a family of three sons and a daughter was born, Samuel being the only one now living. Those dead are John J., Jackie G. (a daughter) and John Henry. Samuel has spent the most of his life on the place where he now lives, and his early educational advantages were fair for a new country, as he obtained an academic education, finishing his course at Fayetteille. At the age of twenty-three he began for himself as a farmer, and this work has continued to receive his attention, he being now the owner of a beautiful and comfortable home and a farm comprising 600 acres of fine bottom land, 300 acres of which are in a high state of cultivation and seeded to grasses and clover, fifty acres being given to the latter. Cotton, corn and small grains are the other staple products. Mr. Lenox is largely engaged in raising horses, mules, cattle, sheep and hogs, and has about 100 head of horses and mules. and is increasing this business each year. He has an excellent steam cotton-gin on his land, which was erected at a cost of $3,000, and has a capacity of 4,000 pounds of lint cotton per day. His acquaintance extends over a large area, and everywhere he is honored and respected for his many virtues, his charity and humanity being only bounded by his time and means. He has been married twice, first in Little Rock, Ark., July 20, 1860 to Miss Maggie J. Field, a daughter of Judge William H. and Mary A. (Flournay) Field. who were among the best and most intelligent people of the State. Mrs. Lenox died September 22, 1864, having borne two children: Hume F. (who died November 23, 1887), end Addie F. (residing with her father). September 10, 1860, Miss Florence H. Field, a sister of his former wife, was united to him in marriage, and to them two sons were born: Samuel H. and Silas H. (who died August 20, 1870). Mr. Lenox was so unfortunate as to lose his second wife January 2, 1870, and he is now residing with his two surviving children: Addie F. and Samuel H. (on his farm). Although an active Democrat in politics, he has never aspired to office.

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M. J. LUDLAM is one of the successful agriculturists of Desha County, Ark., and, although his farm is not as large as some, it comprises 160 acres of fertile land, eighty acres of which are carefully tilled, and therefore yields a better crop than many larger farms. He also finds the sale of his stock an excellent source of revenue, and therefore this branch of industry receives considerable of his attention. He was born in 1831 in Sandusky County, Ohio, but his parents, William and Mary (Brown) Ludlam, were born in York State and came to Desha County. Ark., in 1833. Here the early life of the subject of this sketch was spent, but his early educational advantages were not good, owing to the scarcity of schools at that day. After remaining with his father until twenty-three years of age he began tilling the soil for himself, starting out in a very modest way, as his capital was quite small. He continued his farming operations until 1862, then joined the Confederate service, becoming a member of Dobbin's regiment, but was soon after captured and taken to Helena, Ark., where he was kept a prisoner for three months. Upon being released he returned home and resumed business, and has acquired the above-mentioned property. He is one of the county's most worthy citizens, and is much esteemed and respected by the people of the community in which he resides. Although he votes the Democratic ticket he does not take an active interest in politics. His marriage to Miss Jennie D. House took place in 1872, she being a daughter of William and Alice House, natives of Newfoundland. Their union was blessed in the birth of the following children: Annie K., Alice B., Edmund G. and William K. The first two children are deceased, as is also their mother, whose death occurred in 1882. Mr. Ludlam and his surviving children live alone.

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ABNER McGEHEE, merchant and farmer, McGehee, Ark. Eminent success, achieved through honorable endeavor, affords one of the greatest sources of pleasure to him who, in a retrospective view of life, traces his progress by such tokens as deserve admiration and esteem. Such an enjoyment is afforded in the fullest measure by Abner McGehee. This gentleman was born in Alabama in 1851, and is the eldest child born to the union of Benjamin and Sarah (Noble, nee Vanhoose) McGehee. Benjamin McGehee moved to Arkansas in 1858, settled a few miles east of where his son Abner now resides, bought an unimproved farm of several hundred acres, erected his dwelling, and became one of the most successful agriculturists of the county. He is by profession a surveyor, and has followed this in connection with farming since coming to this State. [See sketch of Benjamin McGehee.] Abner McGehee was educated in the common schools of Desha County. and at the age of twenty-one years started out to fight life's battles for himself as a farmer. He first rented laud for two years, and then bought his present property, which consisted of 160 acres, all in the woods. He has since improved the place, erected a fine dwelling, and has added to the original tract until he now has 2,640 acres, with 300 acres under cultivation. He raises annually about 110 bales of cotton, besides corn, etc., enough to run his farm, and some to sell. He also raises hogs and cattle for his own use, has a fine cotton-gin, and gins about 250 bales, besides his own raising. He opened his present business in 1877 or 1878, with a cash capital of $1,000 (borrowed capital), and at the same time engaged in selling ties from the timber off his farm, to the Little Rock & Texas Railroad, now a branch of the Missouri Pacific. He now does an annual business of $12,000 in the mercantile line, and is also engaged in contracting on different railroads. At present he has the contract of cutting out the right of way for the H. C. A. T. R. R., and contracts largely for ties and wood. He was married in 1876 to Miss Jennie Dickinson, of Drew County, and the daughter of Wiley and Mary A. (Downey) Dickinson, who were born January 10, 1811, and September 18, 1810. respectively. Her parents were married on July 25, 1839, and to their union were born seven children, Mrs. McGehee being the only one now living. The ones deceased were named as follows: Martha E., Marietta, Sarah E., Joseph P., James F. and Wiley. The father of these children died in 1859, and the mother in 1866. The land on which Mr. McGehee is now living was a portion of the immense body of land entered previous to the late unpleasantness by Chester Ashby from the State, and held by him at $20 per acre, one-third down and the rest to be paid for in different payments, with 10 per cent interest. The land which Mr. McGehee bought in 1876 only cost him $1.66-2/3 cents and $2 per acre. It is now worth about $40 per acre, and rents for $6 an acre. This land produces from one-half to one bale of cotton per acre, and from twenty-five to forty-five bushels of corn to the acre. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McGehee: James D., Nettie, Abner Jr., Benjamin, Scott and Mary E. Mr. McGehee has never aspired to office in the county, but takes an active interest in the politics of the county and State. He is a Democrat. He is a liberal contributor to all educational and religious enterprises, and although his early education was rather limited, he takes much pride in giving his children every advantage. He was appointed postmaster in 1880, and is station agent on the railroad. His business house is 40x80 feet in dimensions, and in this he carries about a S6,000 stock of general plantation supplies. His father-in-law, Mr. Dickinson, was married twice, the first time on March 10. 1831, to Miss Anna Hughes, who bore him four children: William E. (deceased), John A. (deceased), Mariah J. (deceased), and Sarah (wife of a Mr. Fields).

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ALEXANDER H. McNEILL is a native of Coahoma County, Miss., born May 26, 1841, and in growing up was instructed in all the details of farm life, and his years of unremitting toil have resulted in the accumulation of a fine property. He is a son of Hector and Ann Caroline (Frere) McNeill, who were born in North Carolina, September 24, 1808, and St. Mary Parish, La., July 4, 1813, respectively. They were married in New Haven. Conn., while attending college, and in 1850 removed to the State of Arkansas, which place continued to be their home until their respective deaths, the father dying in Desha County, August 3, 1872, and the mother December 6, 1880. Mr. McNeill was a farmer by occupation, a Whig in politics until the dissolution of that party, after which he became a Democrat. His wife was of French descent, a daughter of Alexander and Katherine (Hennen) Frere. and her union with Mr. McNeill was blessed in the birth of five sons and one daughter, two of whom are living: Agnes C. (wife of Robin Bynum, residing in Memphis. Tenn.), and the subject of this sketch. Those deceased are Angus F., Hector. Jr., a second son Hector end Waters H. Alexander H. McNeill was reared in Arkansas from the time he attained his ninth year, and his education was acquired in Davidson College, North Carolina. At the age of twenty-three years he began for himself, as a farmer, and although educated for the bar, he has never practiced that profession. In June, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army, becoming a member of Company I, Third Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, and was with Gens. Stonewall Jackson and Henry R. Jackson in the Army of Virginia. He was at Sharpsburg, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chickamauga, Knoxville, Spottsylvania Court House, Cold Harbor, and the battles around Petersburg and Richmond. He was slightly wounded at Gettysburg by a minie-ball and the concussion of an exploded shell; was captured in Virginia in 1865, but soon managed to make his escape. He surrendered at the close of the war, and was released on parole, immediately returning home, July 12, 1864, he was married, in Caroline County, Va., to Miss Mary Taylor, a native of King and Queen County, Va., a daughter of Lunsford and Lucinda (Greenstreet) Taylor who died many years since in that State. To Mr. McNeill's marriage a family of nine children has been born, four of whom are living: Lemuel C., Adrian H., Mary C. and Angus H. Those deceased are Alexander H., Lucy A., Waters F., Mary A. and Adrian. Mr. McNeill owns an excellent farm of 205 acres in the valley of the Arkansas River, and has eighty-five acres under the plow, the principal products therefrom being corn, hay and cotton. He is also to some extent engaged in the stock business. He is a Democrat, has been county assessor, and is now filling the position of deputy circuit clerk, his office being at Watson, one of the county seats of Desha County. He is highly esteemed by those with whom he associates, is an honorable and progressive Christian gentleman, and his business, as well as his family relations, are exceptionally happy. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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SAMUEL MARKS, merchant. Arkansas City, Ark. In scanning these sketches 'biographique' of Desha County, one fact must strike the reader with peculiar force--the high standing attained by its business men. No city in this part of the State has such a thoroughly qualified business population as has Arkansas City, and Mr. Marks is a leading light among the number. His birth occurred in Louisiana in 1857, and he is the second of eight children--five sons and three daughters--born to the union of H. and Hannah (Baszinsky) Marks, natives of Prussia. The father came to this country in 1839, settled in East Carroll Parish in 1846, and engaged in merchandising. which he continued there until 1861. He then moved to New Orleans, followed the same business, and in 1870 took up his residence at St. Louis. He is now retired from active business. The mother came to this county about 1850, and is related to the Baszinkys of Vicksburg, Miss. Her father was a rabbi of the Jewish Synagogue. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Marks, seven are now living: Isaac, Samuel, Hiney (a physician of St. Louis), Adolph, Solomon and Louis. Bertha and Tillie are at home. Mr. and Mrs. Marks are now residing in St. Louis. and both are members of the Jewish Synagogue. Samuel Marks was educated in New Orleans, graduating from the New Orleans Central High School in 1872, and at the age of twenty-one he commenced business for himself in Louisiana. After remaining there a short time, he moved to Wellsville, Mo., and after a residence there of two years moved to Pine Bluff in 1884. In 1885 he moved to Arkansas City, established his present business and is one of the prominent and wide-awake men of that city, doing an annual business of about $60,000. His stock is confined to dry goods, boots and shoes, gents' furnishing goods, etc. He employs about five men in his establishment and does a strictly cash business. He owns his business house which is 40x100 feet, fronting on the main street of the city and also fronting the river and railroad. Mr. Marks was married in June, 1881, to Miss Fannie Aubruey of Wellsville, Mo., and the daughter of Nelson Aubruey, The fruits of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Marks are two children: Vivia and Eunice. Mr. Marks is a member of the I. O. O. F., Wellsville, Lodge No. 359, and is also a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, at Arkansas City, Ark. He has been keeper of records and seals for three terms, and is secretary of the Arkansas City Water Works Company. He is also secretary of the school board of this place. Mr. Marks and two brothers, Solomon and Louis. have a large store at Huntington, Miss., the same line as is carried in the establishment at Arkansas City, and do an annual business of about $35,000. This business was established in the early part of 1889, and is paying them well.

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JOHN W. MAULDING belongs to that sturdy, honest and independent class, the farmers of Arkansas, and is now engaged in cultivating an estate comprising 240 acres of land. 130 acres of which are under cultivation, and well adapted to the purposes of general farming. He was born in Chicot County, Ark. in 1857, and being reared to the occupation of farming by his father, it is not to be wondered at that he chose this as his life calling, and has made it a success. In 1884 he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Hattie Owens. who was born in Drew County, Ark., in 1862, and by her he has two bright, and interesting little children: Matie and Vernie. Mr. Maulding is the friend of all feasible public enterprises, and so far as his means will allow, contributes liberally to their support. He is a Democrat in his political views, as was his father, Alex Maulding, before him. The latter was born in Louisiana and moved from his native State to Arkansas, where he was engaged in tilling the soil until his death in 1859. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and was a man whom to know was to respect. He was married to Miss Mary B. Neill, a native of Boone County, Mo., and by her became the father of three children, John W., the subject of this sketch, being the only one now living.

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HON. JAMES M. MERRITT, a successful and prominent educator of the State of Arkansas, was born in Jones County, Ga., November 10, 1828, and is a son of William and Jemimah J. (Halley) Merritt, who were born in North Carolina in 1793 and Georgia in 1802, respectively. The father participated in some of the early Indian wars, and when a young man removed to Georgia, where he was married, and made his home until 1848, when he removed with his family to Bradley County, Ark., and purchased and entered land to the amount of 280 acres, on which he built a log-cabin, and settled down to clearing the land. They were among the early settlers of this region, and became well known and highly respected. They were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died in Bradley County, Ark., in 1806 and 1857, respectively. A family of eight children was born to them--six sons and two daughters--the following of whom are now living: James M., Julius C., Madrich W. and Jane (the widow of John N. Brooks). She resides in Chicot County. The maternal grandparents of these children were Nathaniel and Martha (Jacobs) Halley, of Georgia. James M. Merritt, their son, was educated in the common schools of his native county, and in the year 1844 started out in life for himself as a teacher, and this occupation has received his attention nearly all his life, his success as an educator being remarkable. He is a leader in this calling, and the youths of the present day who are so fortunate as to receive instruction under him are well fitted on leaving school to successfully battle with the world. His wife, formerly Miss Elizabeth Brooks. was born in Talbot County, Ga., in 1829, and is a daughter of Allan and Maria (Bullock) Brooks, of Georgia. She has borne Mr. Merritt three sons and one daughter, the following of whom are living: William W., Benjamin F., and Maria (who is now residing in Pine Bluff, the widow of John Pettit). Augustus is deceased. When the war of the Rebellion had been in progress two years Mr. Merritt enlisted in Company G, under Capt. John Meek, and was on active duty until the close of the war, receiving his parole at Mendon, La. He is a Republican in his political views, was tax assessor of the county in 1873 and 1874, and in 1873 was elected to the State Legislature from Bradley County, Ark., and discharged his duties in this body with ability. He belongs to the Masonic lodge, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His son, Benjamin F. Merritt, is a well-known planter and lawyer of Desha County, but his birth occurred in Bradley County, October 16, 1853. He was reared to a farm life, and finished his education in St. John's College, Little Rock, attending that institute during the terms of 1874-76, and the following year was admitted to the Chicot County bar, and entered upon the practice of his profession. In 1882 he was elected to the position of county judge, and served during 1883-84, and upon retiring his constituents could view his career there with satisfaction and pride. He is a wealthy real estate holder, and owns 720 acres of excellent land of which 175 acres are under cultivation. devoted to cotton and corn. He belongs to the K. of P., Valley Lodge No 21. On January 1, 1880, he was married to Miss Lizzie Owen, of Carroll Parish, La., a daughter of William S. and Sarah Owen. Mrs. Merritt was born in Louisiana in 1856, and died on November 3, 1880, having been an earnest member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1883 his union with Miss Mary R. Rogers took place. She was born in Mississippi April 14, 1800, and has borne Mr. Merritt a family of two children: James C. and Alice E. Her parents are Joseph and Nancy (Macon) Rogers, of Brookville, Miss.

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WILLIAM A. MOSBY is deservedly numbered among the prosperous farmers of Desha County. He was born in Kentucky in 1827, and is a son of Joseph and Louisiana (Young) Mosby who were born on Blue-Grass soil and in South Carolina respectively. William A. Mosby spent his youth in Kentucky, but owing to his father's early death he received but few educational advantages as he was obliged to assist his mother who was left with small means, and like a dutiful son he remained with and cared for her until her death. In 1852 he came to Desha County, Ark., and began tilling the soil, and by dint of hard labor and economy he is now far beyond the reach of want being the owner of 320 acres of land, sixty of which are cleared and under the plow. He also raises considerable stock. In 1863 he enlisted in the Confederate service, participating in the following engagements: Helena, Poison Springs, Pine Bluff, Pilot Knob, Mark's Mill, Jefferson City, Boonville, Independence, Newtonia, Fayetteville and numerous others. In 1866 he was married to Miss Sarah A., a daughter of E. and Nicy Jordan, natives of Mississippi. and by her he has a family of four children: William A., Martha E., Nicy and Joseph D., all of whom are living and reside with their father. Mr. Mosby and his wife are members of the Baptist Church, and he is a Master Mason and in his political views a Democrat. As far as his means will allow he contributes to all worthy enterprises, and as a man of strict integrity, peaceable and law-abiding, he is esteemed and commands the respect of all by whom he is known.

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JAMES MURPHY, attorney, Arkansas City, Ark. Mr. Murphy is now numbered among the influential and esteemed residents of Arkansas City, and justly so, for all will admit that he is a man who can be depended upon, one who endeavors to do his duty in every-day affairs of life, attending to his duties in a manner not calculated to attract unusual attention, but with a persistency and attentiveness that has redounded largely to his success, both professionally and personally. His parents, Daniel and Mary (Crowley) Murphy, came direct from Ireland to this country, about 1830 or 1831, and settled in Philadelphia, Penn. The father was there engaged in various business and industrial enterprises, and in 1848 removed with his family to Arkansas, settling near Little Rock, where he engaged in farming and stock-raising. He died in Little Rock, in 1863, during the occupation of that place by the United States forces. Of the seven children born to his marriage, only two are now living: James and W. J. The former was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1829, and came to Arkansas about February 22, 1848, living with his father, near Little Rock, for a short time. He had received the principal part of his education in the high schools of Philadelphia, and in 1850 he went to Little Rock, where he filled the position of deputy postmaster for some time, and until the post-office was burned, when he came very near losing his life. After this he took charge of the post-office at Pine Bluff, under Joseph Merrill, remaining there until 1856, when be moved to Desha County, where he received the appointment of local mail agent at Napoleon, Ark. This position he resigned just previous to the late war, and on February 15, 1860, he married Miss Sallie H. Mayson. He subsequently built a saw-mill back from Napoleon, on the Arkansas River, and this conducted for a number of years. In 1860 his brother, Daniel J. Murphy, at that time circuit clerk of Desha County, resigned the office and entered the first Confederate company of artillery from Napoleon, as first lieutenant of the company, commanded by Capt. H. C. West. After his brother resigned the above-mentioned position, James Murphy was elected to fill the office, and served continuously from 1860 to 1873. While in this office he was admitted to the bar, at Napoleon. in 1869 or 1870. having studied law previously under Judge J. C. Murray, at Pine Bluff. In 1874 he commenced practicing law, and in 1881 removed to Arkansas City. Mr. Murphy is also engaged in tilling the soil on the Arkansas River, in this county. The Judge is among the largest land owners in this county, owning several thousand acres, and is one of the largest stockholders in Desha Land & Timber Company, they being the owners of about 50,000 acres. He takes very little interest in politics, outside of local affairs, and has never aspired for office since vacating the clerk's office. The Judge and D. A. Gates are engaged in the practice of law together, in Arkansas City, and do a vast amount of legal business, standing among the leading lawyers of Southern Arkansas. Mrs. Murphy is the daughter of the late Judge Ramsey L. Mayson, of South Carolina, and granddaughter of the late Hon. Felix Grundy, of Tennessee, attorney-general of the United States during President Jackson's administration. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy are the parents of three children, all daughters, and both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the Catholic Knights of America, and was supreme representative at the last supreme council held at Chattanooga, Tenn., in May, 1889. He was also one of the three delegates from the State to the late Catholic Congress, held in Baltimore, Md., in 1889.

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FRANK NADY, another example of that energy, industry and perseverance, when intelligently applied, have accomplished for those of foreign birth who have seen fit to locate within the limits of this county. He possesses advanced ideas and progressive principles regarding agricultural life, and the estate which he now owns embraces 1,000 acres of fine bottom land, about 250 acres of which are in a high state of cultivation, well adapted to the raising of corn, cotton and grasses. His steam cotton-gin is valued at from $1,500 to $2,000, and has a capacity of 3500 pounds of lint cotton per day. He is also considerably interested in the raising of horses, cattle and other stock, and in every enterprise to which he has given his attention his efforts have met with flattering success, and when the fact is known that all his property has been acquired since the war, it will be seen that his time has not been uselessly or idly spent. He is a Frenchman by birth, having been born in that republic May 6, 1833, being a son of Frank Nady, who was also born in France and removed from his native land to the New World in 1844, settling in Arkansas County, Ark. He was a soldier under Napoleon Bonaparte for nine years prior to leaving France, was at the battle of Waterloo, and was in all the engagements of that famous campaign. He died the year following his arrival in Arkansas, having been a devout member of the Catholic Church for many years prior to his death. His wife died within two or three months after the death of her husband. Three of their eight children are now living: Lucile (widow of a Mr. Sweeney, is now residing in Arkansas County), Constance (the widow of a Mr. Wallace, also resides in Arkansas County) and Frank. Those dead are Eugene, Jasette, Angelique, Charlotte and Charles. Eugene was in the French army for seven years prior to his removal to America. Angelique died in New Orleans, and the rest died in Arkansas County. Frank Nady was about ten years of age when brought to the United States, and therefore the most of his education was received in this State, but it must be acknowledged that it was of a rather meager description. Owing to the early death of his parents, he began life for himself as a farm laborer at the early age of fourteen years, and this occupation has received his attention ever since with the above-mentioned results. When the Civil War broke out he was overseer on a large Arkansas River plantation, but this work he abandoned to take up the Confederate cause in May, 1862, becoming a member of West's battalion, and was in the artillery service during the war taking part in the battles of Prairie Grove, Pleasant Hill and many smaller engagements. He returned home in June, 1865 and was here married, May 8, 1871, to Mrs. Emily J. McCan, a native of London, England, born on Oxford Street June 14, 1830, a daughter of John and Amelia Elizabeth (Smith) Storr, both of whom are now dead, the former's demise occurring in New Orleans in 1846, and the latter's in New York in 1852. They emigrated to the United States in 1834, and up to the time of the father's death resided in New Orleans, after which his widow married William Reeves, of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Nady have had one child born to them, Robert Lee, who died February 9, 1889, at the age of seventeen years and nine months. Mr. Nady is a Catholic in his belief, and his wife is an Episcopalian. having been christened in the Church of England. He is a Democrat in his politics, although not a strict partisan, and is a Master Mason.

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REV. WILLIAM F. NEWTON is the owner of one of the finest estates in Arkansas. which comprises 1,200 acres of land, 500 acres of which are cleared and under cultivation. Ever since locating in this county he has enjoyed the reputation of being, not only a substantial and progressive farmer, but an intelligent and thoroughly posted man in all public affairs. His name has always been synonymous with honorable, upright dealing, and he fully deserves the reputation he has gained. He was born in Lawrence County. Tenn., in 1828, being a son of Smith and Elizabeth (Johnston) Newton, both of whom were born in South Carolina and removed to Tennessee at an early day, settling in Lawrence County, where they were married about 1827. After this event they moved to Fayette County, which they made their home for thirty years, then located in another home, where they spent their declining years, dying in 1874, at the age of sixty-six and seventy-four years, respectively. The father was a man of many sterling traits of character, and upon his death, besides leaving a valuable property, left his children an example of a well-spent life. William F. Newton spent the most of his youth on his father's farm, becoming thoroughly familiar with the details of farm work, and at the age of twenty years began acting as overseer on a large plantation. In 1847 he was married to Miss Jane Appleberry, a daughter of Richard and Mabel (Nolan) Appleberry, Virginians, and the following children were born to them: Virginia C., John F., Arthur D., Anna T. and Elizabeth J., the eldest two children, only, being alive, The mother of these children passed from life in 1858, and in October of the same year Mr. Newton wedded Mary E. Pinat, offspring of Philip and Emily Pinat, and a family of six children was born to them: Thomas D., Mary E., Richard and George L., living; and Lou E. and James A. deceased. The mother of these children was called to her long home in 1874, and the following year Mr. Newton married his third and present wife, Mrs. Isabella (Hopkins) Hunt, a daughter of Solomon and Margaret Hopkins, the former born in North Carolina and the latter in Tennessee. In 1863 Mr. Newton enlisted in the Confederate service, Company E, Thompson's battalion, and took part in the battles of Fredericktown, Ironton, Arcadia, Jefferson City. Independence, Big Blue, Newtonia, Springfield. California and Mexico, Mo.; Boonville, Pea Ridge, Cane Hill, Mark's Mill, and numerous others. January 28, 1863, he was captured and taken to Pine Bluff, where he was kept a prisoner until the final surrender. He has been a resident of the State of Arkansas since 1858, and has accumulated a fine property. He first started as an overseer, then became interested in the mercantile business, being in partnership with another gentleman, but in 1860 became sole proprietor and continued until the breaking out of the war, when he was financially ruined by the burning of a large quantity of cotton which he had purchased on credit and valued at $20,000, the fire being kindled by Confederate soldiers. He now gives some attention to stock-raising and also cotton-ginning, but the most of his time is spent in managing his property, the hard work being left to others. He has been a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for seventeen years. his wife and family also being members of this church. He is a Mason, and in his political views is a Democrat, but is not an active partisan.

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JOSHUA W. PARKER is a farmer and mechanic, and like all his countrymen is intelligent and enterprising. He was born in Lincolnshire, England, on January 28, 1820, and is a son of Will and Ann (Smith) Parker, who were also born in that country. Joshua W. was reared in his native land, and received good advantages, his education being acquired in the schools of England. When twenty-one years of age he began working for himself as a blacksmith and machinist, continuing at this work until 1852, at which time he emigrated to America, landing in New York City in the month of April, 1852. The first year of his stay here was spent in traveling over the country looking for a suitable location in which to settle, and after having spent two years in Kentucky engaged in railroad contracting, he went to Memphis, Tenn., and did the first blacksmithing in the Benjamin Phelon Foundry on Poplar Street, remaining there three years. Since that time he has resided in Desha County, Ark., but was first a resident of Laconia, where he opened a planing factory in January, 1856, continuing this business until the breaking out of the war. He was doing a thriving business, but was completely ruined during that time, all his hard earned property being destroyed. He was taken prisoner at one time by the Federal soldiers, but after being retained for a few days was released, but found himself without a dollar in the world, a few short hours having sufficed to blight his prospects and destroy the accumulations of years. After the close of the war he began to farm on rented land, and continued steadily to "pursue the even tenor of his way" until he has retrieved his fallen fortunes and accumulated a handsome competency. In 1870 he purchased his present splendid farm, which comprises 860 acres of line farming land, and has 460 acres cleared and under cultivation, raising thereon about 400 bales of cotton annually, his land being also well adapted to raising the cereals. He also owns a one-half interest in the fine cotton-gin at Laconia, his partner being Charles Warfield, which mill has a capacity of 4,000 bales each year. Mr. Parker is deeply interested in the welfare of his adopted county, and is one of her most useful citizens, as he is honest and upright in all his dealings, enterprising, and a supporter of worthy enterprises. Miss Martha A., the daughter of Tecumseh and Jane (Smith) Bell, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Mississippi, became his wife in 1867. Mr. Parker has always been a member of the Episcopal Church. He is a grandson of Admiral Peter Parker, who was defeated at Sullivan's Island in 1776; also a nephew of Sir Sidney Smith Bath, a British admiral.

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DR. STEPHEN J. PEOPLES is a physician of acknowledged merit in Desha County, Ark., and during his years of practice has done skillful work in alleviating the pains and ailments to which the human body is heir. A native of Gibson County, Tenn., he was born September 20, 1840, and is a son of George Peoples, a Scotchman by descent and a native of Tennessee, born in 1809. He was a merchant and farmer at Shady Grove, a small town in Gibson County, Tenn., but died at Hot Springs, Ark., while there for his health, in 1867. His wife, Nancy Jordan, was born in Tennessee, in 1818, a daughter of Burton Jordan, and died at Humboldt, Tenn., in 1887. Of seven children born to their union, three are now living: Mattie E. (wife D. H. C. Moore, a resident of Humboldt, and a successful lawyer), Mary J. (widow of A. G. Campbell of Austin, Tex.), and Dr. Stephen J.; Nathan B. (died in 1867), George (in 1872), Bettie (in 1881), and Francis (in 1860). Dr. Stephen J. Peoples, was reared in Gibson and Carroll Counties, Tenn., and in that State received an exceptionally good education, being an attendant at Bluff Spring College, in which institution he made rapid progress. After reading medicine with Dr. J. P. King, of Shady Grove, during 1857-58-59, he entered the Nashville Medical College, and after attending this institution during 1859-60-61, he graduated with high honors. Upon leaving his alma mater he returned home, and joined the Confederate army in Desha County, becoming a member of Company D, First Arkansas Regiment, and was in Holmes' division of the Army of Virginia, and was appointed assistant surgeon in Fagan's regiment. in 1862, which position he held until April, 1863, when he was detailed to return to Arkansas to recruit the cavalry forces of the Confederacy. He raised a company in Desha and Jefferson Counties, which was attached to Col. Carlton's regiment, of which he became lieutenant-colonel, and was in the battles of Manassas, Corinth, Arkansas Post, Jenkins' Ferry and Poison Springs, besides many sharp engagements and skirmishes of less note. While in Missouri with Gen. Price, he was slightly wounded, and was afterward captured on the Arkansas River, near Red Fork, by a scouting party from Pine Bluff, under the command of Capt. Davis, and was incarcerated in the Federal prison, at Little Rock for eight months, or until the close of the war, at which time he was paroled, and returned home to Desha County. Here he entered upon the practice of the medical profession, and as he has ever commanded the confidence of all with whom he has come in contact, he has a large and lucrative practice. He gives considerable attention to tilling his farm of 210 acres on the Arkansas River, his principal crops being cotton and corn. He was married at Red Fork, Ark., October 15, 1868, to Miss Sallie M. L. Jones, a native of Arkansas County, Ark., born December 6, 1849, a daughter of John L. and Matinza (Drake) Jones, the father having been born in Virginia, and removed to Arkansas, in 1828, settling at Arkansas Post, where he became prominent, and filled the office of sheriff of Arkansas County, for twelve consecutive years. He died in 1852, and his widow in 1881. Dr. and Mrs. Peoples are the parents of five living children: Lillian L. J., Josie J., J. Edward S., Georgena W. and St. Claire J. Two children are dead: Mai A., who died in January, 1884, and Bertram whose death occurred in 1885. Dr. Peoples and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and in his political views he is a Democrat, and during the sessions of 1877-78, he represented Desha County, in the State Legislature. He was a member of the County Medical Board, and for two years, during 1881-82, he was president of this society.

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REUBEN A. PICKENS. As a man of business Mr. Pickens' name and fame is co-extensive with Desha County and the surrounding country for, ever since starting out in life for himself, he has been engaged in the mercantile business either for himself or as a clerk. He was born in Fayette County, Tenn., October 14, 1852, and is a son of William H. Pickens, who was probably born in Mississippi, his birth occurring August 14, 1821, and died in Attala County, of that State, December 22, 1883. His wife, a very estimable lady, was born in Tipton County, Tenn., but was reared in Fayette County, being a daughter of Reuben and Susanna (Hunter) Stanley, both of whom were Virginians, the former's death occurring December 22, 1851. Mr. and Mrs. Pickens were married near Sommerville, Tenn., September 30. 1849, and in time a family of two sons and six daughters was born to them: Martha D. (wife of R. S. Wright, a machinist and miller of Drew County), Reuben A., Lucy K. (wife of Samuel M. Kellam, a farmer of Drew County), and William S. (a salesman at Tillar, in Drew County). The following children are deceased: Margaret J., Mary R., and twin daughters, Sarah M. and Susan A., who died in infancy. Mrs. Pickens removed to Arkansas in 1869 and settled in Drew County, but is now living with her son Reuben A., at Walnut Lake in Desha County. The latter's youth was spent in Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas and his educational advantages were fair. When twenty-three years of age he began farming for himself, but only continued a short time, when he became a salesman in a mercantile establishment. In January, 1882, he began for himself, opening an establishment at Tillar but after remaining there one year he went to Texas on a prospecting tour, but returned to Arkansas and settled permanently at Walnut Lake, where he has since made his home. He conducts business under the firm name of R. A. Pickens & Co., and the stock of goods is supposed to be worth between $5,000 and $8,000. They do an exceptionally good business for a small place, and are perfectly honorable in all their dealings with their patrons. This firm also owns 400 acres of fertile land near the town and the sixty acres which are under cultivation are devoted to the raising of cotton and corn. Mr. Pickens owns a handsome residence in Walnut Lake besides other valuable town property. He has been married twice, first in Drew County, Ark., January 3, 1878, to Miss Susan Potts, a native of Louisiana, although reared and educated in Arkansas, but March 8, 1883, he was called upon to mourn her death, she having borne him a family of three children: Burton C., Kate M. and Eddie S. The latter died November 1, 1882. His second marriage took place September 1, 1887, to Miss Lucy M. Bickers. She was born in Arkansas County, Ark., and is a daughter of John W. and Dolly J. (Mallory) Bickers, the father, a Virginian, died in 1860, and the mother, a native of Tennessee, died in 1874. Mr. Pickens supports the principles of the Democrat party and socially is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the I. O. O. F., the K. of P. and the K. of H., occupying a prominent and useful position in these orders. He takes an abiding interest in educational matters, and has been a member of the local school board for a number of years.

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D. O. PORTER, saloon-keeper, Arkansas City. Mr. Porter, proprietor of the Senate Saloon of Arkansas City, was born in Chester County, S. C., in 1851, and is the third of a family of four children, the result of the union of W. A. and Martha (Cherry) Porter, natives of South Carolina. W. A. Porter was a wheelwright by trade, and manufactured buggies, carriages, etc. This shop was located in Landsfoot, where he died in 1853, and where his widow survived him until 1886. Their children are all now living: W. A. (resides at Pendleton), Mary E. (wife of J. B. Jackson), D. 0., and E. M. (who resides in this county, and is engaged in the lumber business). D. 0. Porter was educated in South Carolina and in Drew County, Ark., whither he came in company with his mother in 1869. He commenced for himself as the manager of a farm for A. W. Blackemore, when twenty-five years of age. having, previous to that time, remained with his mother, conducted the plantation for Mr. Blackemore for four years, and then took charge of a plantation for Quilling & Goza for two years. After this he rented a plantation and ran the same for one year at Pendleton, and then became manager of Dr. Taylor's place for some time at South Bend, Lincoln County, where he remained until coming to Arkansas City, in 1884. He then engaged in the saloon business at this place, and does an annual business of from $6,000 to $8,000. He has been successful in all his enterprises, and is a first-class business man. At the present time he is one of the aldermen of Arkansas City, and was elected to this position in April, 1889. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party.

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MAURICE W. QUILLING is a native of Louisiana, born in Union Parish on January 14, 1846, being a son of Dr. Daniel K. and Mary A. (Goza) Quilling, who were born in Kentucky and Mississippi, respectively, the latter's birth occurring November 18, 1828. They both removed to Louisiana in early life, and in this State their marriage was consummated in 1845. The father became well known as a prominent physician. and passed from life near Frankfort, Ky., November 21, 1854, his wife dying May 11, 1884. Two sons and one daughter were born to them: Maurice W. and Walter W. being the only ones living. Emma F. died in 1875. Maurice W. Quilling received his education in Louisiana, and upon reaching the age of nineteen years became a salesman in a general mercantile establishment at Goza Landing on the Mississippi River, but a year later established a store of his own at that place, and has ever since been engaged in that business with the exception of a short period when he was in the stock business. He removed from Louisiana to Springfield, Mo., thence live years later (in 1872) to Desha County, Ark,, taking up his abode near where he now lives. His mercantile establishment at Pendleton embraces a stock of goods valued at from $5,000 to $8,000 of a varied assortment, which cannot fail to satisfy every want of his patrons. He has also another establishment three and one half miles from Pendleton, at Silver Lake, where he does a large business also, the firm name being Quilling & Bro. He is a successful planter of the county, and is the owner of 600 acres of land besides an interest in other lands, and is cultivating 500 acres, the principal crops being corn and cotton. He is enterprising and progressive in his views, is courteous and obliging to his patrons, and as a result commands a handsome income from his business. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate Army in Company F, Wood's cavalry, and was in the Army of the Tennessee, and took part in the battles of Jackson, Gainesville. Meridian and many smaller engagements and skirmishes in the cavalry service. He served from the time of his enlistment until the close of the war, and was paroled at Gainesville, Ala., in May, 1865. He is a Democrat in politics, and takes an active interest in the doings of his party, and on this ticket he was elected to the position of sheriff and served during 1884-85. He was also notary public for a number of years, and is now postmaster at Pendleton, a position he has held almost continuously for the past fifteen years. He belongs to the K of H. He was married in Desha County, June 24, 1874, to Miss Bettie Dollahite, a native of Henry County, Tenn., born near Paris August 7, 1855, a daughter of Cornelius C. and Marcilla T. (Capill) Dollahite, who were born, reared and married in North Carolina, and removed to Tennessee in December, 1859, and from there to Desha County, Ark., in 1872, where they are at present living. Mr. and Mrs. Quilling are the parents of three sons and two daughters: Maurice W., Mary D., Daniel K., Emma and Malcolm S.

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J. GEORGE REITZAMMER, merchant, Arkansas City, Ark. Among the prominent citizens and successful merchants of Arkansas City, the above name appears with prominence. Mr. Reitzammer was born in Germany in 1846, and took passage for America in 1871, landing at New York City. From there he went to Cincinnati, where he remained for some time, and in 1873 he went to Louisville, where he was engaged in the bakery business. He was not very successful, and in 1882 he came to this county and city, where he established the same business he had followed in Louisville. He had very little money on his arrival in this city, but by close application to his business, and by honest, upright conduct, he has amassed quite a fortune, and won the respect and esteem of all acquainted with him. He owns his place of business, several private residences in the city, and 100 acres of fine land. He is also doing a good grocery business of from $10,000 to $15,000. He has been one among the many successful men of this city, in 1887 Mr. Reitzammer drew $15,000 from the Louisiana State lottery, but this does not go into his general business, and is not intended to be mentioned as a portion of his success in this county. He was married in 1875, at Louisville, Ky., to Miss Annie Reinhardt. and they are the parents of six living children: J. G., Eddie, William, Reinhardt, Louie and Leonard. Mr. and Mrs. Reitzammer are both members of the Lutheran Church, and Mr. Reitzammer is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and a member of the Uniform Rank. Division 12. He is also a member of the A. 0. U. W., of Louisville, Ky., No. 10. Politically, he is a Republican. His parents. John and Barbara (Goos) Reitzammer, were natives of Germany, where the father is still residing. engaged in agricultural pursuits. The mother died in 1881. They were the parents of eight children, six now living, and J. George being the only one now in America.

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COL. O. H. P. RICHARDSON, attorney, Arkansas City, Ark. Col. Richardson, by virtue of his ability as a jurist and his victories at the bar, is eminently worthy of a place in our record of successful men, and the history of his life is an important and honorable part of that of his State and country. He was born in Morgan County, Ill., in 1838, and is the eldest of eight children born to Dr. R. F. and Sarah (Simmons) Richardson, natives respectively of North Carolina and Kentucky. Dr. Richardson moved to Illinois at an early day, located in Morgan County, but moved from there to Kaskaskia, where he practiced his profession until the breaking out of the Mexican War, when he served as surgeon in Doniphan's regiment. Returning home after the war he remained at Kaskaskia for a short time and then removed to Liberty, Randolph County, where he remained for one year. He then removed to Jackson, Mo., and was here located for two years, when he moved to Pleasant Hill, in which place he remained until 1851. From there he moved to El Dorado, Ark., thence three years later to Hillsboro, and in 1856 he was elected State Swamp Agent, which position he held for two years. when he again located at El Dorado. There he remained until the breaking out of the war when he again returned to Hillsboro, and was at that place and in the vicinity during that eventful period. Afterward he again returned to El Dorado, remained there until 1871, and then moved to Washington County, Tex., where he is residing at the present time and still continues his practice, although in his eighty-fourth year. The mother of our subject died in 1859, and the Doctor was afterward married to Mrs. Rainey, a daughter of James Aikin. She was drowned in the Mississippi River below Red River Landing, in 1871. She and the Doctor were on their way to Cape Girardeau. Mo., when the boat on which they had taken passage sank in the river. They were the parents of two children: William and Fannie (wife of J. C. Norman, of Hamburg, Ark.) The Doctor was married in 1873 to a widow, whose maiden name was Summers. They are the parents of four children. The Doctor has nine children living, three by his first wife: 0. H. P., Maria F. (now Mrs. J. C. Norman, of New London, Ark.), and Robert D. (who resides in Hamburg, engaged in merchandising). The Doctor has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church from 1849. Col. 0. H. P. Richardson received the principal part of his education in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., attending school at Jackson for two years. He then went with his father to Union County, attended school at El Dorado and Hillsboro, and although prepared to enter college did not do so. He studied law at El Dorado under J. H. Carlton and was admitted to the bar in 1860. In 1861 he joined the Confederate army and was elected lieutenant in Company A, First Arkansas Regiment Infantry (Fagan's). He served in the Army of Virginia for twelve months and took part in all the engagements of the same. He participated in the first battle of Manassas. Rogersville, and was then sent to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and was in the Nineteenth Arkansas, serving as first lieutenant of Company D, under Cols. Dawson and Hardie. Col. Richardson was acting as adjutant of his regiment for a time. He was engaged in the battle of Jenkins' Ferry and Mansfield for two days. and was taken prisoner at Arkansas Post. sent to Memphis, but here he succeeded in making his escape. After this his command was reorganized, and he was put in Lappin's brigade, Churchill's division. He was paroled at Marshall, Tex., and after returning home was engaged in steamboating from Camden to New Orleans for three years. In 1873 he was at Hampton, Calhoun County, where he practiced law, and where he was elected to the Legislature in 1879. In 1886 he came to Desha County, Ark. In 1860 the Colonel took the census of Union County, and there were 12,000 people, and more negroes than white. While in Calhoun County, Col. Richardson was county and probate judge from 1882 to 1886, but since moving to this county he has devoted himself to his profession. He has been twice married, first in 1867 to Miss Susan F. Watts., daughter of H. L. Watts, and to this union were born five children, only two now living: Robert H. and Lillian. Two of the children died while small, and one, Mollie, died in 1880, at the age of sixteen years. Mrs. Richardson died in 1881. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Col. Richardson was married the second time, at Camden, Ark., to Mrs. Virginia Carington, nee Smead, a native of Magnolia, Columbia County, Ark., and the sister of H. P. Smead, of Columbia County. She was the mother of one son by her former marriage, Hamilton P. Col. Richardson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and his wife of the Episcopal Church. He is a fellow-craft Mason.

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VAN R. RYAN, farmer, was born at Napoleon, in Desha County, Ark., March 10, 1843, and is the younger of two sons, the other member being Victor W., who died at Pocahontas, Ark., November 1, 1862, a member of T. C. Hindman's Confederate Legion, born to Stephen V. R. and Mary A. (Malpass) Ryan, the former of whom was born in New York State, about 1804. He was reared in the Buckeye State, and there received his rudimentary education also, but afterward entered and graduated from the United States Military Academy, at West Point, being a class-mate of Jefferson Davis. He was left an orphan when very young, and was reared by a paternal uncle, who, after he had graduated, advised him to go West, which he did, and for many years was in the service of the Government in Arkansas, as surveyor and Indian agent. He went to South America about 1845, since which time his family has known little or nothing of him. His wife, whom he married at Napoleon, Ark., May 10, 1839, was born in Jasper County, Ga., February 22, 1823, a daughter of John and Nancy (McDowell) Malpass, whose ancestors were South Carolinians and Georgians. In June, 1845, Mrs. Ryan was married in Arkansas County, to Mark Sims, a native of Georgia, born May 28, 1813, and died January 4, 1863, becoming, by him, the mother of a son and two daughters: William M. (who died in 1848), Mattie J. (who died December 13, 1874). and Ann Elizabeth (who died in 1853). The mother is still living, and makes her home with her son, Van R. He received fair educational advantages, in the schools of Desha County, and Newport, Ky., and being desirous of becoming a well-informed man, he applied himself diligently to his books, and by the time he was seventeen years of age, he was eminently capable of battling his own way in the world. At that age he became an overseer on a river plantation, continuing until the opening of the Rebellion, when he dropped all work to espouse the Confederate cause, and in May, 1862, became a member of Company D,. under Capt. D. McGregor, James Fagan's First Arkansas Infantry Regiment. Govan's brigade, Pat Cleburne's division, Hardee's corps, Army of the Tennessee, and was a participant in the battles of Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, and other hardfought skirmishes. In the battle of Chickamauga he was wounded, September 19, 1863, by a minie-ball, in the right ankle joint, and four days later the leg was amputated below the knee. He was never paroled, discharged nor mustered out of service, but after the cessation of hostilities he returned home, July 6, 1865, and was soon after, in August, elected sheriff of Desha County, which position he held until the reconstruction period, in 1868. He then purchased a farm and began tilling the soil, although he also served as deputy sheriff under his successor for five years. He now cultivates annually about 250 acres of land, the principal crops being corn, cotton and hay. and on his two farms are erected two good cotton- gins, which have proved quite profitable. He has given considerable attention to raising horses, cattle, sheep and hogs, and every enterprise to which he has given his attention has succeeded far beyond his expectations. He is an intelligent, progressive and industrious farmer, and is liberal and charitable to all worthy enterprises. He was married in Desha County, April 11, 1880, to Miss Sallie J. Watkins, who was born in the county in 1862, a daughter of Richard W. and Sallie J. (Browning) Watkins, the father having been a Todd County Kentuckian, and now resides in Desha County. Mrs. Ryan died November 15, 1880, her death being deeply lamented by all who knew her. Mr. Ryan married her sister, Adelia W., December 27, 1883, but he was called upon to mourn her death also, January 31, 1889, she having borne him three daughters: Emily Louise, Mary Varina and Sallie Adelia. Mr. Ryan belongs to the K. of H., and politically is a Democrat, and in 1880 served as census enumerator of Red Fork Township.

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LOREAN SAIN is one of the wealthiest real estate holders in Desha County, Ark., and is an excellent example of what energy, industry and perseverance will accomplish. He was born in Lincoln County, of the Buckeye State, in 1829, being a son of John and Susan (Hall) Sain, who were born in Ohio and Pennsylvania, respectively. They removed to Desha County, Ark., in 1839, and in this new country Mr. Sain set energetically to work to make a home for his family, but did not live to carry out his intentions, as his death occurred in 1842. He was a farmer and mechanic by occupation, and had he lived would have undoubtedly become a wealthy man, for he possessed all the requisites necessary to success in life. Lorean Sain was compelled to begin life for himself when very young, owing to his father's untimely death, and the only educational advantages he received was a short attendance in the public schools of Cincinnati. Inheriting many of his father's sound ideas regarding agriculture, he determined to make that his calling through life, and his operations in this direction have resulted very satisfactorily, and he is now the owner of 5,000 acres of excellent farming land of which 1,000 acres are cleared and in a good state of cultivation, yielding on an average of 350 bales of cotton each year, and 4,000 bushels of corn. He has two excellent steam cotton-gins on his property, each averaging twenty bales of cotton per day, and is also extensively engaged in the raising of stock, which industry is proving quite remunerative. He was married in 1859 to Miss Martha Jackson, a daughter of D. and Polly Jackson, natives of Georgia, and by her has had a family of eight children: Susan, Carrie, Molly, John S., James, Peter and Lorean; another child died in infancy unnamed, and Susan is also deceased. The mother of these children passed from life in 1881. Mr. Sain is a Democrat, is a member of the Blue Lodge in the Masonic fraternity, and is a patron of all measures of morality, education, temperance. etc., and is ever among the foremost in a reliable, uplifting movement, contributing liberally of his wealth to their support.

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THOMAS SCOTT is one among the many well-to-do farmers of Desha County, Ark., and although born in County Londonderry, Ireland, in 1820, he has lived sufficiently long in the United States to have the interests of his adopted country thoroughly at heart. His parents, Thomas and Jen Scott, were both of Scotch extraction, but were also born in the Emerald Isle. The immediate subject of this sketch grew to manhood in his native land, but upon reaching his twenty-first year he came to the conclusion that the New World afforded much better opportunities for a young man of energy and determination to rise in the world, and subsequent events have proved his surmises to have been correct. In 1841 he landed in the city of Philadelphia, Penn., and having received a thorough English education, he was well equipped to begin life in a new land, and began clerking in railroad offices in the city of Brotherly Love, where he remained for about two years. Upon resigning this position, he began dealing in cattle, this occupation receiving his attention until 1848, at which time he came West, and settled in Desha County, Ark., which place has since been his home, with the exception of the time spent in the army, which comprised the period between 1863 and the close of the war. He was with Gen. Price, and took part in the battles of Mark's Mill, Sulphur Springs, Jenkins' Ferry, but after the last-named engagement was taken sick and unfitted for further duty. In 1865 he offered himself as a candidate for treasurer of Desha County, being elected by a good majority, and the duties of this important position he ably discharged for eight years, refusing further re-election. He has been exceptionally successful in all his business operations, and owns 1,800 acres of land, 300 acres of which are cleared and under cultivation, and yielded, during 1889, about 150 bales of cotton and a fine crop of corn. Mr. Scott is to some extent interested in the propagation of stock, and on his farm is erected a fine grist-mill and steam cotton gin, which bring him in a large sum annually. The farm is finely improved, and shows every indication of thrift and industry. He is one of the county's foremost citizens, is public spirited, and possesses many original ideas on the subject of farming, as well as on many other subjects. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the I. O. O. F., is a Democrat in his political views, and is a member of the Methodist Church, as was his wife, for a number of years prior to her death, which occurred in 1877. She was formerly a Miss Mary A. Mosby, and her marriage with Mr. Scott took place in 1855. Their children are: Jane, Mary, Micajah R., George T. and Thomas, two of whom are dead. The three living ones reside in the county, near their father.

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CLIFTON R. SHEPARD was born in Scott County, Ky., in 1832, and is a son of Thomas J. and Amanda (Smith) Shepard, both of whom were born on Blue-Grass soil. The father was born in 1809, and was reared in his native town of Georgetown. He commenced life for himself as a jeweler, and this occupation continued to receive his attention throughout life, although he was engaged in other pursuits at different times in which he was quite successful, accumulating a large property before his death. His marriage was consummated in 1829, and a family of three children was born to himself and wife: Clifton R., Elizabeth (who died in childhood), and Elizabeth (named for her sister, who died at the age of eight years). Clifton R. Shepard spent his early life in the State of Kentucky, and while growing up attended school quite regularly, obtaining a good practical education, so that on starting out in life for himself at the age of twenty-three years he was well fitted to cope with the world. He continued to follow mercantile pursuits in his native town until 1858, at which time he went to La Fayette County. Mo., and opened a grocery store, but remained here only a short time, going next to Ogle County. Ill., where he went to farming. The year 1860 found him in Desha County, Ark., and until the opening of the Civil War he conducted a mercantile establishment with good success, but at that time he dropped his labors to take up arms for his country, becoming a member of Joe Shelby's brigade, and served throughout the entire war, surrendering at Shreveport, La. Upon returning home he found that all his property had been destroyed, and he was compelled to commence the battle of life anew, and began devoting his attention to agriculture, which occupation has proved successful under his skillful management. He is now the owner of 830 acres of excellent land, and has 275 acres cleared and under cultivation. producing about 175 bales of cotton each year. The raising of stock also receives some attention. Mr. Shepard is a Democrat, but takes no active interest in politics, but is a member of the local school board, and is always ready to further enterprises of an educational nature. He is public spirited, a liberal contributor to all good works, and is a man whom all respect and esteem. In 1858 he was married to Miss Lavinia Blackburn, a daughter of George C. and Isabella (Buck) Blackburn [see sketch of Charles B. Blackburn], and by her became the father of five children: Isabella, Thomas C., Charles. and two children who died in infancy, the mother also passing from life in 1866. After remaining a widower for four years Mr. Shepard espoused Miss Mary Monroe, a daughter of Dr. Ben and Martha (Holliway) Monroe, natives of Kentucky. A family of four children have been born to them: Ben M. (who is now in Jefferson College), Pattie (who is attending the Jesamine Female College), Charley B. (who is attending school at home), and Patrick H. (at home).

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ROBERT W. SMITH, saloon owner, grain dealer and miller, Arkansas City, Ark. Among the many prominent and successful business men of Arkansas City stands the name of the above-mentioned gentleman, who is one of the much respected and esteemed citizens of Arkansas City. Robert W. Smith was born in Alabama in 1843, is the son of G. W. and C. A. (Hackney) Smith. natives of Tennessee, and the grandson of William and Elizabeth (Hulston) Smith. who were married in Sullivan County, East Tenn., on November 21, 1810. William Smith died on March 21, 1847, in Alabama, and his widow died at Henderson, Tex., on September 28, 1868. G. W. Smith was a successful agriculturist, and moved to Texas in 1849, where he was one of the pioneer settlers of Rusk County. He engaged in farming and stock-raising, and although he was a carpenter by trade, he spent the greater part of his life engaged in tilling the soil, at which he was very successful. He was married on December 27, 1838, in Tallapoosa County, Ala., and died January 25, 1852. Mrs. Smith died in Henderson, Rusk County, Tex., on October 20, 1868. G. W. Smith was a man universally respected for his straightforward conduct, his established integrity and great honesty. Of the seven children born to his marriage, only three are now living, though four lived to maturity: Elizabeth J. (died at the age of eleven years, at Henderson. Tex.), W. L. (died at the age of seventeen years, at McKenzie Institute, Tex.) W. C. (resides in New Mexico, engaged in stock-raising), J. M. S. (is editor of a newspaper in Mississippi). and J. C. (who was born July 14, 1849, in Henderson, Tex., and died November 2,1889, at the residence of his brother, R. W. Smith, of Arkansas City; he was a printer by trade, came to Arkansas City on October 21, 1877, and on the 10th day of November of the following year, he, in partnership with Mr. George W. Beck, now of the Arkadelphia Herald, purchased the Arkansas City Post, and established the Arkansas City Journal; they ran the paper for two years and then sold it to Col. J. W. Dickinson. He was a Master Mason of good standing, having joined that order in Belton, Tex., and was universally liked. Robert W. Smith received the rudiments of an education in the common schools of Henderson, Rusk County. Tex., and at the age of fourteen years he entered college at Dangerfield. Tex., remained there two years, and although he did not graduate he received a superior education for the time he was attending school. He joined with the Southern cause in the late unpleasantness. and when but eighteen years of age, enlisted in Company F, First Regiment Volunteers, Texas Mounted Riflemen, under Gen. H. E. McCullough. He served with this company for twelve months, and although he had no battles with the Northern army, he had two quite severe engagements with the Indians. He was discharged April 20, 1863, came home, and the company was reorganized before May 14, 1863. Mr. Smith was in Company B, Independent Scouts, and upon arriving at Little Rock, he was placed in McKee's squadron, and was on duty from Van Buren, Mo., to Little Rock, and from that place to this portion of the State. He was engaged in a very severe fight at Van Buren, with Gen. Jeff Thompson in command, and on Christmas day. 1863, he returned to Little Rock, in charge of prisoners, where he remained for some time. In 1863 he was sent to Gaines Landing, on the Mississippi River, where he was detailed to watch gunboats, etc., and serve as advance picket from here. He was ordered to Arkadelphia, and later engaged in the battles of Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, Duble Bridges, and one other battle where Gen. Thomas Green was killed. Later he was sent to Waterproof, on the Mississippi River, to capture a gunboat to transfer a portion of the army to the east side of the river, but found the boat too well manned. They contented themselves, however, by taking some prisoners who were foraging on the land, but during some excitement all the prisoners succeeded in making their escape. From there his command was ordered to Pine Bluff, but found that place in the hands of the Union forces, and the command was then ordered to Texas, where he received a furlough to go home. In the spring of 1865 he was ordered to the Brazos River, when his command was paroled. He came home and learned the trade of carriage painter at Henderson, Tex., and remained there for some time. He was there married to Miss S. M. Hicks, who only lived about twelve months after her marriage, her death occurring in 1867. In 1885 Mr. Smith was married to Miss F. F. Dunaway of this county, and to them have been born two children: Hicksey (deceased) and Etta C. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Smith is a Mason, a member of Riverton Lodge No. 296, is also a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, Uniform rank of same Lodge No. 12. Mr. Smith is a K. of H., and is also a member of the K. & L. of H. After leaving Henderson, Tex., Mr. Smith moved to Bolivar County, Miss., farmed for two years, and in 1873 came to Arkansas City, then a small place, and engaged at his trade of painting. In 1875 he first opened his saloon business, and since then he has also been engaged in the wholesale flour and grain business, and various other enterprises. He now owns one of the finest residences to be found in the city, and his business house, besides owning several other business houses, a number of vacant lots, and he is one of the most enterprising men of this section. He is captain of the Hook and Ladder Company of the city.

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DR. C. P. SMITH, physician and surgeon, Arkansas City, Ark. The name that appears above will be at once recognized by nearly all of those of this community, for it is borne by a man who is ever ready to minister to the sick and afflicted, no matter of what class or condition. He was born in Woodville. Miss., on September 15, 1846, and is the second of a family of three children, the result of the union of Hon. C. P. and Catherine Smith. C. P. Smith was a man of education and prominence, was an attorney of considerable note in Mississippi, and he had represented his county in the Legislature, being a member of that body when in his nineteenth year. He was chief justice of Mississippi at the commencement of the late war, and was filling that honorary position at the time of his death, which occurred in 1862. He had been three times married, and was the father of eleven children, four of whom are now living: Henderson (is a planter and resides in Mississippi), Mrs. Thomas M. Wetherill (of Baton Rouge. La.) Maud (resides at Jackson, Miss.), and Dr. C. P. The Smith family was a prominent one in Mississippi, and some of the descendants of Hon. C. P. Smith have become quite noted as authors. Mrs. Wetherill's daughter, Julia K., who is now the wife of the proprietor of the New Orleans Times Democrat, wrote quite an interesting novel entitled "Wings." The mother of our subject died in 1848 or 1849. Dr. C. P. Smith was educated in a private school at Jackson, Miss., and his last preceptor was the Rev. Mr. Wheat of Mississippi. When starting out for himself the Doctor first embarked in the drug business, which he followed for six years, during which time he studied medicine. He then entered the University of Louisville in 1868, graduated from this in 1873, and first acted as assistant physician in the hospital, Vicksburg, Miss., where he remained for twelve months. He subsequently located at Chicot, Chicot County, Ark., remained there until 1874, and then came to Arkansas City when that city was but a village. He has been a witness to the rapid growth of that place, and has seen it burned out and washed away. In 1881, during the big fire at that place, the Doctor lost several thousand dollars, and he was afterward burned out twice, losing considerable at one of them. During all the disasters that happened to this city, the Doctor has always been found at his post, and ready and anxious to assist in all laudable enterprises. On first coming to this State his practice extended over a radius of twenty miles, and through a sparsely settled country, frequently devastated by overflows. During 1875 he was surgeon-in-chief from this point to Watson, a distance of about twenty-five miles. The Doctor has been president of the Board of Physicians and was a member to the State Board of Health, appointed by Gov. Churchill. Dr. Smith is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and is also a member of the Uniform Rank of that order. He is a member of the Episcopal Church. In February, 1863, he joined the Confederate army, Fifty-first Alabama Regiment Cavalry, and was attached to the staff of Gen. W. T. Martin who commanded the first division of Wheeler's cavalry. He participated in the battle of Shelbyville, and was captured at that place and sent to Nashville, Tenn., and later from there to Louisville. Ky., then to Camp Chase, then Fort Delaware, and was released by special pardon by President Johnson on May 31, 1865, after being held a prisoner for nearly two years. He passed Fourth of July, 1863, at Camp Chase, and was at Fort Delaware when President Lincoln was assassinated. He was in the medical department on that memorable day, and all the prisoners who had any liberties were again placed in the barracks.

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WILLOUGHBY P. SMITH is giving his attention to merchandising and planting, and in both these occupations has met with a more than ordinary degree of success, for he gives strict attention to all minor details, and being enterprising in his views keeps out of the beaten path. His birth occurred in Monroe County, Mo., in 1851, being a son of Epaphroditus and Elizabeth Smith, also natives of this State, the father's birth occurring in Callaway County, in 1822. His early life was spent at farm labor in his native State, and this occupation received his attention after he had started out in life for himself at the age of twenty-one years. He soon after accepted a position as agent of a steamboat line, but a short time after engaged in merchandising at St. Anbert, Mo., continuing here three years. In 1847 he settled permanently in Monroe County, Mo., where he opened up a farm, and has since made his home, and as a man of fine intellect, sound judgment and prominence he has become well known. He is now sixty-seven years of age, and is still hale and hearty. He was married in 1847 to Miss Elizabeth Davis, of Missouri. and the following children were born to them: Willoughby P., Thomas W., Henry W., William B., Deborah J., Nannie E., and Bettie B. William B. is the only one of the family deceased. All the sons are farmers except Willoughby P., and his brother, Thomas W. The latter first started out for himself in 1876, and went to California, remaining five years, at the end of which time he returned east and began working with his brother. The rest of the family are living on the old homestead in Monroe County, Mo., with the exception of a sister, who is married and living in Moberly, Mo. Willoughby P. Smith came to Desha County, Ark., in 1874, where he followed the occupation of clerking until 1880, then formed a partnership with C. P. Blackburn in the merchantile business, but for some time has been doing business entirely on his own account, and carries a stock of goods valued at $3,000. His sales amount to $25,000 per annum, and he is well known over the county as a wide-awake and prosperous merchant. He also gives considerable attention to agriculture, and has under cultivation about 500 acres of land, which yields about 400 bales of cotton each year. His place of business is in the little town of Laconia, on the Mississippi River, and he has entire charge of the wharf interest at the landing. He is a Democrat, and although not active, was appointed postmaster in 1878, and held the position three years. He is at present one of the school directors of his district, and has always been interested in educational matters, and, in fact, all worthy enterprises. He has lived an honorable, upright life, and in all his relations with the public his many sterling qualities are fully recognized. In 1880 Miss Mary G. Flournoy, a daughter of George and Fannie (Blackburn) Flournoy, became his wife, and in time the mother of his four children: George F., Bessie D., Frankie B., and Shepard.

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H. ALFRED STROUD is a native of Desha County, Ark., his birth having occurred here November 20, 1855, his parents, Calvin and Betty (Wolverton) Stroud, having been born in Warren County, Tenn., and Scott County, Miss., respectively. In 1841 Calvin Stroud settled in Desha County, and here was married in 1852, his and his wife's death also occurring here, the former dying June 12, 1876, and the latter March 5, 1865, leaving a family of two sons and two daughters to mourn their loss, only three of the family now living: Alfred, Hadley (a farmer, of Desha County), and Frances (wife of Capt. Fred Miller, a sea captain, and a resident of San Francisco, Cal.). Mary E. and Marshall are dead. Mr. Stroud was a farmer and stock-raiser by occupation, and was for many years justice of the peace in Desha County. He was married three times, Alfred being the child of his second marriage. The latter's educational advantages were appreciated to the fullest extent, and while finishing his education in an academy of Arkansas, his course was marked by rapid progress. When nineteen years of age he began farming and trading for himself, and with what success, may be inferred when the fact is mentioned that he is a joint owner in a farm of 315 acres in the Arkansas River valley, 212 acres of which are under cultivation, well adapted to the raising of corn and cotton. He is also engaged in managing a mercantile establishment at Watson, and contributes liberally of his means to charitable and worthy causes. He is of Scotch-Irish and Dutch descent, and his early ancestors took a prominent part in the War of 1812. He is a Democrat, and takes an active part in the political campaigns of his party. He was first married April 3, 1881, to Miss Maggie Winters, a native of Tennessee, and a daughter of William and Martha A. Winters, but she died June 7, 1885, having borne four children--one son and three daughters--all of whom died before their mother. His second marriage took place July 1, 1887, to Miss Lizzie Cheatham, a native of Desha County, and a daughter of David and Lizzie Cheatham, the former of whom died July 24, 1874. Mr. Stroud has one child by his present wife, Minnie Ola, born December 2, 1888. Mr. Stroud is very fond of fine horses and of hunting deer. This latter sport occupies him not a little, deer being plentiful in this portion of the country.

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HON. HENRY THANE, circuit clerk and ex officio county clerk of Desha County, Ark. There is, in the development of every successful life, a principle which is a lesson to every man following in its footsteps--a lesson leading to higher and more honorable positions than the ordinary. Let a man be industriously ambitious, and honorable in his ambitions, and he will rise, whether having the prestige of fortune or the obscurity of poverty. We are led to these reflections by a study of the life of the subject of this sketch. Henry Thane was born in Germany on February 10, 1850, and is a son of Franz Thane, who was also a native of that country. The elder Thane came to the United States in the year 1852, and located in Massac County. Ill., and there his death occurred in 1802. Henry Thane was early taught the duties of farm life in Massac County, Ill., and received his education in the common schools. In 1866 he went to Warrenton. Mo., where he attended school for two years. He then went to Clay County, and after a residence there of one year, went to Memphis, Tenn., where he was employed for three years with the Bolenbuse Ice Company. In 1872 he came to Arkansas, locating in Chicot County, and was engaged in merchandising until 1876, when he sold out. He then moved to Arkansas City, then in Chicot County, and is now in Desha County. He had, however, studied law previous to this time, and in 1879 was admitted to the bar. After locating in Arkansas City, be began practicing his profession. and soon built up a good practice. He was justice of the peace for one term, was town mayor of Arkansas City for three terms, and was the first mayor who succeeded in ridding the town of the lawless element that always infest prosperous river towns. He was postmaster for five years under President Hayes' and President Arthur's administrations. In 1882 he was elected to the State Senate, and served one term of four years. In 1886 he was elected to his present office, and re-elected in 1888. He was again re-elected in 1890, receiving the unanimous vote of both political parties. Honesty of purpose and rectitude of conduct in the discharge of his official duties in the various offices he has so creditably filled, have gained him the esteem and approbation of his constituents. He was married in 1873, to Miss Fannie A. Tidswell, of Warrenton, Mo. Miss Tidswell was a daughter of Thomas J. Tidswell, a merchant of Warrenton, and was born in London, England. April 7, 1850. To his accomplished and faithful wife, Mr. Thane owes a great deal of his success in life. The result of this union has been the birth of two children: Nellie M. and Fannie A. Mr. Thane is a Republican in his political views, and has been a member of the Republican State Central Committee, and chairman of the Republican County Central of Desha County for a number of years.

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HENRY TOWNSEND, proprietor of the City Drug Store, Arkansas City, Ark. Although a young man, Mr. Townsend is rapidly and surely making his way to the front among the energetic business men of this city, and although not yet thirty years of age he has built up a constantly increasing patronage, and by attending strictly to each minor detail of his chosen calling, can not fail to succeed. His stock is complete and always fresh, and his manner is so pleasant and agreeable that as a matter of course he is liberally patronized. His birth occurred in Covington, Tenn., in 1861, and he is the son of Peter and M. K. (Townsend) Townsend, natives also of the State of Tennessee. Peter Townsend followed agricultural pursuits in his early days, and was also proprietor of a large hotel in Covington, Tenn. In 1863 he moved to Memphis, Tenn., and there his death occurred in 1875. He was reared by wealthy parents, and previous to the war was quite wealthy himself. He was married about 1848 or 1849 and of the seven children born to his union only two are now living: Joseph (who is post-office inspector for the New England States with general headquarters at Boston, although his family resides at Covington, Tenn.), and Henry (the subject of this sketch). The mother of these children died in 1873. Both parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Henry Townsend was educated in the Memphis free schools, and when twelve years of age commenced life for himself, first as cash boy for William Frank at Memphis. When fourteen years of age he left this position and accepted one in the Woolen Mill of South Memphis, as superintendent of the carding machinery in the mill. There he remained until 1878, when he accidentally got his hand torn in the machinery. He then engaged in plumbing and gas-fitting with Murry & Martin, of Memphis, and was with this firm about two years. He subsequently engaged in agricultural pursuits on rented land in Tennessee. In 1880 he went to Chicot County, and accepted a clerkship for J. T. Crenshaw, general merchant, and remained with him for eighteen months. In 1882 he moved to Arkansas City, accepted a like position from J. C. Crenshaw, and continued with him for about three years. In 1885 he clerked for J. C. Winston in the mercantile business, which he continued until the latter part of 1886, when Mr. Winston embarked in the saloon business under the firm of J. B. Amburn & Co. Mr. Townsend sold his interest in the place, and on February 8, 1889, he engaged in the drug business on one of the principal streets of the city. He keeps everything to be found in a first-class drug store, and his stock is valued at about $2,000 with annual sales of about $7,000 or $8,000. Mr. Townsend was married in 1880 to Miss Adair M. Goodwin. of Arkansas City. Mr. Townsend was appointed deputy sheriff in 1888, still holds that position, and was elected city marshal in 1879. He is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and in his political views affiliates with the Democratic party.

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JAMES UMPHREY is well known to the people of this community as a successful agriculturist and stockman. He was born in Logan County, Ky., September 10, 1824, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Baker) Umphrey, both of whom were born in the Old North State. The father was a planter by occupation, and this occupation received his attention all his life. He was a soldier in the Creek War, and passed from life in his adopted State of Kentucky, his wife dying in Missouri in 1868, an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. James Umphrey received fair advantages in his youth, and at the early age of sixteen years began life on his own responsibility as a farm hand, and worked for his grandfather, James B. Bowling, of Kentucky, for four years. At the end of this time he emigrated from his native State to Arkansas (in 1851), and from that time until 1804 was in the employ of James M. Bowling, of Drew County. In 1880 he was married to Miss Ella, a daughter of Robert C. and Lucy (Temple) Bowling, of Russellville, Ky., she having been born in Logan County. Ky., in 1853. Her father, Robert C. Bowling, was born in Clarksville, Tenn., February 19, 1820, and in 1840 began the study of law with his uncle, Judge E. M. Ewing, and in 1842 graduated from the Transylvania College, Lexington, Ky., and at once commenced the practice of his profession. At the early age of twenty-five years his ability was recognized. and he was elected to the State Legislature, he being the youngest member of that body during the session, and in 1847 he was re-elected to the same position. During this time he kept up his legal practice, and upon the death of Judge Rogers a vacancy occurred on the circuit bench, which he was appointed to fill by Gov. Stevenson, and was twice re-elected to this position. He was elected an elector from the Third Congressional District of Kentucky by the Fillmore party, and was offered by the committee the electorship for the State at large. His marriage to Miss Temple occurred on January 7, 1845, a daughter of Rev. Benjamin Temple, a worthy Methodist minister, and by her became the father of two sons and four daughters. The eldest son, James R., is a planter in the South. Temple is a graduate of Cumberland University, and is an honored member of the legal profession at Russellville, Ky. Judge Bowling died on March 18, 1886.

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WILLIAM VARDEN is one of the prosperous small farmers of Desha County, Ark., and the estate which be is now engaged in tilling comprises 100 acres, of which fifty are under the plow. Being a native born resident of the county he has ever had the interests of the same at heart, and so far as his means would allow has contributed liberally to all feasible enterprises, such as churches, schools, etc. He is regarded by all as an upright, honorable and useful citizen, and in his social relations is agreeable, accommodating and kind. The most of the land which he has under cultivation he devotes to cotton and corn, but considerable attention is also paid to the propagation of stock. He was born in 1831, and he is a son of Timothy and Elizabeth Varden, natives, respectively, of the Old North and the Blue-Grass State. The early educational advantages of the subject of this sketch were very limited, and the schools were very scarce in Arkansas at this time, but, nevertheless, he is a well-informed man, and one whose judgment and advice is often consulted. He grew to manhood on his father's plantation, and upon reaching his majority, he began rafting on the Mississippi River, which occupation he continued until 1882, at which time he began giving agriculture his attention with the results above stated. In the year 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate service, becoming a member of Company E, Twenty-third Arkansas Regiment, under Col. Brooks, and took an active part in the battles of Prairie Grove and Backbone Mountain, after which he went with Col. Thompson to Mobile on detail duty, but at the end of three months returned to his command and remained faithfully at his post of duty until the close of the war. Since then he has been energetically to work to gain a competence for his family. In 1855 Adaline Kiger became his wife, but upon her death in 1860 she left him with two little children to care for: William H. and Elizabeth, both of whom are now dead. Mr. Varden's second marriage took place in 1860, his wife being a Miss Jane Wilson. They have six children: Mary F., Joseph A., Timothy, James W., Sarah E. and a child unnamed, who died in infancy. Timothy and Sarah E. are also deceased. The mother of these children died in 1871, and the following year he wedded his third and present wife, whose maiden name was Eliza Jane Condven, by whom he has the following family: Eliza E. (deceased), Eula L., Henrietta, Melissa E., Carrie B. and Georgie W. Mr. Varden is a Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Church.

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JOHN G. WARFIELD, sheriff and collector, Arkansas City, Ark. There is probably no man within the limits of Desha County who is deserving of more credit for the interest he has taken in its behalf than Mr. Warfield, and the brief facts here presented indicate to more than an ordinary degree the relations which he has borne to the county's development. He owes his nativity to Washington County, Miss., where his birth occurred in December, 1841, and is the fourth child born to the union of W. P. and Maria (Griffith) Warfield, the father a native of Kentucky, and the mother of Mississippi. W. P. Warfield came to this State in 1843, settled in Desha County, and was engaged in tilling the soil. He also followed the same pursuit in Mississippi, owning at the time he came here a large plantation near where Geeville, Miss., is now located. He opened up a large plantation in the northern part of this county, and cultivated the soil until the commencement of the war, when he lost all his negroes. This prevented him from continuing his planting, and in 1867 he moved to near Boonville, Mo., where he resided with his daughter until about 1879, when he moved to Louisiana and died at the home of his son in that State. John G. Warfield, the fourth of nine children--seven sons and two daughter--was reared in Desha County, and was educated by a private tutor at home. He subsequently attended school at Lexington Transylvania University, and was there for some time. From 1858 to 1859 he attended military school at Nashville, Tenn., and in 1861 he enlisted in Company C, Second Arkansas Regiment of Infantry, commanded by Gen. Hindman, and served in the Army of the Tennessee during the entire war. He entered the service as third lieutenant, was promoted to first lieutenant immediately after the battle of Shiloh, and was placed on staff duty with Gen. D. C. Govan. He was afterward promoted to the rank of captain, and with the exception of the battle of Franklin, participated with the Army of the Tennessee in all the principal engagements. He was twice wounded, first, at the battle of Shiloh in the right leg, and at the battle of Lovejoy's Station received a severe wound in the right arm. The army was surrendered at Salisbury, N. C. Mr. Warfield tried to get to the west side of the Mississippi River, but was captured and paroled at Augusta, Ga. He returned home in 1865, and engaged in agricultural pursuits. He had studied law previous to the war, and after peace was declared he resumed his studies, and was admitted to the bar in 1879 at Watson, the old county seat. However, he did not devote his entire time to his legal practice, after being admitted, but still continued to till the soil. Mr. Warfield has served as deputy sheriff of his county for two years, and in 1886 was elected the first time to the office of sheriff. So well did he fill this position, and so great was his popularity, that he was re-elected in 1888, filling the office to the satisfaction of both parties. He was married in 1869 to Miss Nettie Blackburn, daughter of C. H. and Fannie (Hail) Blackburn. C. H. Blackburn came to this State from Kentucky in 1854, settled in Desha County, near Laconia, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Warfield are the parents of three sons: John, Horace. and Henry. The eldest is clerking in Memphis, Tenn., and the other two are at home. Mr. Warfield is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and was a member of Morning Star Lodge No. 3, the third lodge organized in the State, and the first at Arkansas Post.

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CHARLES A. WARFIELD is identified with the progress and development of Desha County, Ark., and in the conduct of his farm he is meeting with substantial results. Personally he is respected and esteemed for his many estimable qualities, and as he was born and reared in Desha County. his friends have had every opportunity of judging of his character, and not a shadow has ever been advanced derogatory to his reputation. His birth occurred in 1852, and he is a son of William P. and Maria G. (Griffith) Warfield, natives of Kentucky and Mississippi, respectively. Charles A. Warfield's early advantages were not good, and at the age of twelve years he was sent to school at Roley, Tenn., where he remained two years, after which he entered the St. Louis University, remaining there also two years. Upon his return home he began the battle of life for himself as a clerk at Helena, being an employe of H. P. Coolledge, entering the employ of Bailey, Boondon, Summers & Co., and acted as a plantation manager for them for four years, after which he returned to Desha. County, and for nineteen months was a clerk for Baxter & Smith. After leaving the service of these gentlemen he began business on his own account, as a merchant in his native town of Laconia. At the end of five years he disposed of his stock and left Laconia, and for five years managed a farm in Phillips County. Ark., which belonged to A. Woodruff, of Memphis. Tenn. His next move was to Bolivar County. Miss., where he also had charge of a plantation, but one year later he returned to Laconia, and has since been connected with the agricultural interests of Desha County. He is managing a splendid farm, and on his land is an exceptionally good steam cotton-gin which gins about thirty bales per day, and about 2,000 bales a season. He is also interested in stock-raising, and is one of the representative citizens of the community in which he resides, and also Desha County. He is a Democrat, and has held the office of deputy sheriff, and is now notary public. In 1873 he was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Sellers, a daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Barnett) Sellers, natives of Kentucky and Ohio, and by her became the father of four children: Benjamin, Charlie, Willie and Amos, all of whom are at home except the youngest, who is at school.

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GUS WATERMAN. Prominent among the worthy citizens of Desha County, Ark., is Mr. Waterman, a resident of the town of Dumas, which is situated on the line of the Mississippi River and the Little Rock & Texas Railroad. He was born in Germany May 29, 1849, and like all his countrymen, is thrifty, honest, enterprising and energetic. His parents, Reuben and Frederika (Wiener) Waterman, were born in the Fatherland, the former's birth occurring about 1811, and their marriage in 1846, their union resulting in the birth of three sons and three daughters: Gus, Louis (is a merchant of Germany), Moritz (a merchant tailor and a resident of Germany), Minnie (wife of Dagobert Loevy, also residing in that country), and Franciska and Jennie (deceased). The maternal grandparents were Louis and Jane Wiener. Gus Waterman received good early advantages and possessing a naturally fine intellect he is now a man of far more than ordinary ability. When only seventeen years of age he determined to come to America, and first began life for himself as a salesman in a mercantile establishment in Waterville, Me. After remaining thus employed for five years he became a commercial traveler, first for a New York house then for a Memphis (Tenn.) establishment. In 1875 he began merchandising for himself on the Arkansas River at Pendleton, but in 1879 put aside work for a time to make a visit to Europe and on his return settled at Dumas, where he is now doing a large general mercantile business, his stock of goods being valued at from $10,000 to $12,000. He is also interested in farming and stock-raising to some extent, and owns a nice farm near the town in which he lives, besides some handsome town property, on which are erected cottages, livery stables, etc. He commands the confidence of the public at large to a remarkable degree, and is a liberal contributor to all enterprises which will advance the interests of his community, county and State. He was married in Memphis, Tenn., May 7, 1882, to Miss Rachel Ulman, who was born in Jackson, Miss., October 23, 1861. She was reared in Memphis and was a daughter of Mayer and Lizette (Seesel) Ulman, both of whom were born in Germany, the mother being now a resident of Memphis. The father died in 1885. To Mr. and Mrs. Waterman a family of four children has been born, three of whom are living: Laurence, Miles (who died in infancy), Frances and Jessie. Mr. Waterman is an uncompromising Democrat, and was postmaster of Dumas from 1882 to 1887, and was depot agent for a number of years. He belongs to the Hebrew Society I. 0. B. B., also the K. of H. and he and wife are members of the Hebrew Synagogue.

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MAJ. WILLIAM M. WATKINS, a well-known resident of Desha County, Ark., was born in Todd County, Ky., February 21, 1840, and is a son of Ballard Watkins, a native Virginian, who was born and reared in Prince Edward County, and like the most of the sons of the Old Dominion was a man of strong character, occupying a prominent position in the community in which he resided. He died in Desha County, Ark., in 1867, having removed thither in his latter days. His wife was a Miss Webb, a native of Nansemond County, Va., she being also reared and educated there, but her death occurred in Weakley County, Tenn., in 1848. After her death William M. Watkins went to live with his uncle, Dr. R. H. Webb, at Suffolk, Nansemond County, Va., and here entered the Episcopal High School, remaining until 1855, at which time, thinking the far and undeveloped West offered better opportunities to a young man, he removed to Arkansas, and settled at Napoleon, which place continued to be his home until 1860, at which time he returned to Virginia to complete his education and entered the University at Charlottesville, Va. It was but a short time after this until the bombardment of Fort Sumter and he immediately left school, returned to Arkansas and enlisted in the Confederate service as a private soldier in Company G, First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, and although scarcely more than a boy in years he proved to be a gallant soldier, and nobly did his duty in defense of the cause he espoused. He was in Col. Churchill's First Arkansas Regiment, Gen. Ben. McCulloch's army, and was in all the battles of Northwest Arkansas and Southwest Missouri, and after the battle of Elk Horn he was transferred to the medical department with Dr. C. M. Taylor, the medical inspector of the Trans-Mississippi Department. He was thus engaged until 1864, when he attached himself to the artillery service, becoming a member of West's battery, then operating in Louisiana, and here remained until the final surrender. In March. 1865, he was married to Mrs. Amanda Stigall, a daughter of Rev. James F. and Cynthia M. Truslow, the former a prominent minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Little Rock, and other points for fifty years. Mr. Watkins and his wife became the parents of four children, three of whom are alive: William T., Frank M., and Charlie R. Charlie M., the second child, died in Memphis, Tenn., in 1880. After the termination of the Civil War Mr. Watkins returned to Desha County. Ark., and began anew to build up his shattered fortunes, first embarking in the drug business in Napoleon, continuing during 1860-67, and at the same time was city marshal of Napoleon, but was removed from office under the reconstruction measures which were then being enforced throughout the State. He afterward became clerk in the auditor's office at LittIe Rock, but lost the position when he cast his vote for Seymour and Blair in 1868. He now resides at Red Fork, where he is a notary public, and where he is also engaged in a general rental and collecting business. He also farms, his principal crops being corn and cotton. Mr. Watkins is a refined, intelligent gentleman, and is one of the leading and influential citizens of his section of the country.

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J. M. WHITEHILL, merchant and farmer, Arkansas City, Ark. This popular business man and first-class agriculturist owes his nativity to Clarion County, Penn., where he was born in 1840, and is the son of David and Esther (Packer) Whitehill, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish parentage on the father's side. The mother was a member of the Quaker sect. Their family consisted of ten children, nine of whom are still living, and J. M., is the eldest. He was educated in his native county, and at the age of twenty-one years joined Company A, One Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a private, was promoted to the rank of sergeant, and served until June 17, 1865, having re- enlisted as a veteran. He was at the siege of Yorktown, Battle of Williamsburg, and took a prominent part in the battle of Seven Pines; was in seven days' battles in front of Richmond; from there he went to Suffolk; was in three battles on Blackwater River, went from there to New Berne, N. C., and was in Gen. Foster's famous raid. He was at the battles of Kingston, Whitehall and Goldsbury Bridge, when the bridge was burned; returning to New Berne, marched from there to relieve troops besieged at Little Washington on Tar River, and had a fight at Blounts Creek, N. C. He was then sent to Plymouth, N. C., to do garrison duty, and was detached as drill-master for several months. He was here engaged in several skirmishes, and at the siege of Plymouth. Mr. Whitehill with a detachment of his company, was put in charge of artillery at Fort Williams, and fired the last gun at that memorable battle. His commanding officer had only 1,700 men, while the besiegers had 10,000 men and forty pieces of artillery, and after a siege of three days the garrison was given up to the enemy. Mr. Whitehill was captured here and sent to Tarborough, N. C., thence via Wilmington, N. C., Charleston, S. C., Savannah, Augusta, and Macon, Ga., to Andersonville prison, arriving there May 3, 1864; remained there until September 10, 1864, when he was taken to Charleston, S. C., from there, October 3, to Florence Junction, S. C., and on February 20, 1865, via Greensboro, N. C., Danville and Goldsboro, to Richmond, Va., where he was quartered four days in the Pemberton building. He was here paroled and sent down the James River to the United States Hospital fleet, from there to Annapolis, Md., and on March 4, Mr. Whitehill was laid low with typhoid fever, which came very nearly terminating his life. After recovering sufficiently he obtained a furlough and went home, arriving at his destination in April, and remaining there until June. He then rejoined his command and was mustered out at Pittsburgh on June 17, 1865, after serving his country faithfully and experiencing many hardships. Returning to Pennsylvania, he was occupied in the oil and lumber business, also engaged in building boats until 1868, when he went to tow-boating coal from Pittsburgh to the Southern markets. In 1870 he embarked in the coal business with a company known as J. M. Whitehill & Co., and supplied steamboats on the Mississippi River, and its tributaries. He located at Island No. 82, and was engaged at that point until March, 1872, when he moved the coaling station to what is now Arkansas City. The place had been laid out, but very few improvements had been made until after Mr. Whitehill engaged in business at that place. He is now one of the prominent merchants of the city, and does an annual business of $50,000. Aside from this he is also engaged in agricultural pursuits, and is the owner of 900 acres of improved land with 3,000 or 4,000 acres of unimproved land. He owns considerable town property, and is interested in the ice business, waterworks and ferry, and steamboat landing. He is one of the most enterprising business men of the county, has been successful in all his ventures, and by his courteous and pleasing manners to his customers, controls a vast trade. Mr. Whitehill was married in 1869 to Miss Cornelia Bolin, a native of Kentucky, at New Albany, Ind., and to them have been born eight children--five now living: Joseph M. (under the instruction of Col. Cable, at the military school at Stanton, Va.), Flora, Cornelia, Esther and Jacob, the last four at home. Mr. and Mrs. Whitehill are members of the K. & L. of H. of Arkansas City Lodge No. 1289, and K. & L. of H. at Tyro, No. 228. In politics Mr. Whitehill is a Republican.

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DR. W. S. WOOLFORD, physician and surgeon, Arkansas City, Ark. The professional minds of physicians may be divided into two separate and distinct classes, aptly designated the perceptive and the memorative. To one class belongs those whose medicinal knowledge and perception depends upon memory, to the other, those who depend chiefly upon their own conscious resources and mingle with them their own judgment. To those acquainted with Dr. Woolford it is unnecessary for us to say to what class he belongs. He was born in Little Rock, Ark., July 8, 1856, and was left motherless at the age of six weeks. His parents, William and Susan (Jones) Woolford, were married in Arkansas. whither the father had emigrated from his native State, Tennessee, when a young man. After the death of his first wife he married her sister, and by her became the father of three children: Hunter (deceased. his death occurring in New Mexico in 1889), Lee (connected with the Iron Mountain Railroad), and Chester (who resides in New Mexico). William Woolford, father of our subject, was a printer by trade, and at one time was the editor of one of the leading papers of Little Rock. He died in that city in 1883. W. S. Woolford was reared by his grandparents in Kentucky, and received his education in the eastern part of that State in the common schools of his section. In 1882 he entered the medical college of Little Rock, graduating from the same in 1884, and later located at Lamar, on the Mississippi River, where he began practicing. He remained there less than a year, and then came to Arkansas City as local surgeon of this branch of the Missouri Pacific system, which position he still occupies. The Doctor has a large and increasing practice, is a physician of more than ordinary ability, and does not stand second in local representation to any physician of the county. His practice requires not less than four horses in the traveling that he does. He was married, in June, 1884, to a young lady of Emmitsburg, Md., and they are the parents of two children: Willie W. and Wood. The Doctor is a member of the K. of P., Valley Lodge No. 21, and his wife is a member of the Catholic Church.

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ALBERT WYNN is a well known resident and successful farmer of Desha County, Ark., and by his good judgment. progressive ideas and industry, has acquired his present property. He was born in Warren County, Ga., November 30, 1834, and is a son of James Wynn, also of that county, who was born about 1793, and died in 1857 in the State of Alabama, where he had removed in 1853. He was a farmer, and by his superior business qualifications was the owner of a handsome property at the time of his death. His ancestors were Virginians and of Welsh descent. His union with Miss Lackie Barksdale, a native of Georgia, and a daughter of Daniel Barksdale, resulted in the birth of nine children--three sons and six daughters--of whom are now living: Elizabeth (widow of Charles Calclough, residing in Alabama), Abner (a lawyer and farmer of Talladega County, Ala.), Albert (the subject of this sketch), and Emily (the widow of Henry Clyett, a resident of Alabama). Those deceased are Susan, Francis, Louisa, Mary and Alfred. Albert Wynn received his education in the common schools of Georgia, and in the Mercer University of Penfleld, Ga., and East Tennessee University of Knoxville, Tenn. He began the study of law in Warrenton, Ga., and later practiced there for two years, after which he turned his attention to trade until 1860, at which time he removed to Arkansas and settled in Desha County, where he now resides, being engaged in farming and stock-raising. He owns 900 acres of valuable land near the Arkansas River, and has 200 acres under the plow, the principal products of which are corn and cotton. He is raising horses and cattle very successfully, and in all his business operations he has shown himself to be a man of energy, determination and perseverance. In 1863 he joined Company I, Second Arkansas Cavalry, Trans-Mississippi Department, and was with Gen. Sterling Price on his raid through Missouri, taking part in all the battles of that campaign. He was captured in Arkansas, but soon made his escape and rejoined his command. He surrendered at Shreveport, La., and was there paroled and returned to the quiet pursuit of farming in Desha County. Miss Anna E. Cook, a native of Alabama, and a daughter of William Cook, became his wife in Talladega County, Ala., in 1887. She is a member of the Episcopal Church, and he is a Democrat and a Master Mason.

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