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OLD SCHOOLS PROJECT

School Photographs below

  7 Wagon Road, Asheville, NC 28805

annmuffley@home.com


Photos of Old Sulphur School courtesy of Patricia Dill



Notice the flag.

Anyone have any names to go with this photograph?

Speech entitled, "Memorial to our dead" given by Walter C. Harris in June 1940

As written with original spelling:

In preparing this memorial to our dead, my subtopics are: influence, the unseen presence of the dead, imortalityk, death and the preparation for death.

Most of my subject matter has been taken from the Bible, famous authors, poets, and preachers.  I have written out the entire these so that I may keep my quotations correct and at the same time be more careful in the selection and choice of my own language.

Influence:

Everyone of us cast a shadow. There  hangs about us a strange indefinable something - which has its effect on every other life on which it falls.  It goes with us wherever we go.  It is not something we can have when we want
to have it and then lay aside when we wish as we lay aside a garment. 

It is something that always pours out from our life., like light from a lamp, like heat from a flame, like perfume from a flower.  This influence does not end at the grave. Everyone of our departed friends have had and still have an influence on our lives and it is by this influence we remember them. 

A great preacher once said, "The serene silent beauty of a noble life is the most powerful influence in the world next to the might of the spirit of God. Prov. IV, 18 say7s The path of the just is as a shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day. 

A famous poet expresses the thought in these words.  The smallest bark on life's tumultuous ocean will leave a track behind for evermore.  The slightest wave of influence set in motion.

oOo

Intro: Dear Don,  I thought that I'd like to put into computer print the original speech notes of Walter C. Harris in memory of former schoolmates and read at Sulphur Springs Homecoming the 4th Sunday in June, 1940.


1940 Homecoming Shindig at Sulphur Springs School

A 1867 article found with Mrs... J. A. Donald's things (date? which publication?)

Dateline March 18, 1867:

  "On March 18, 1867, the Arkansas General Assembly passed a law levying a tax of 20 cents on each one hundred dollars worth of property in the state for the purpose of establishing a common school system.  This was the beginning of the present system of supporting common schools in Arkansas by taxation. 

Two years later, School District No.11, one of the first was formed, embracing the Sulphur Springs locality.  A log house, with split log seats, was erected and called the Harris School House.  At first, teachers were paid by tuition, by free boarding and by farm commodities.  The little log school house was replaced several times, and, about 30  years ago, the present building was erected. 

The district has been swallowed up by consolidation, but the school house, renamed the Sulphur Springs School House, because of a large spring nearby that furnishes an everlasting water supply, remains as a community gathering place. 

From School District No.11, have come teachers, preachers, lawyers, doctors, and useful citizens in every walk of life," says Mr.. Harris, "those who  have walked decks of many ships on the seven seas and fought on most of battlefields in World Wars I and II. 

They have demonstrated what the abilities of the Ozark natives sometimes called 'hill billys' can do.  I like to brag about the talent of this bunch of natives who came from Sulphur Springs, in old District No.11." Mr.. Harris affords the explanation of why these back hills of Franklin county have contributed so bountifully by sending forth there men and women to the nation. 

"There was a long line of splendid teachers at Sulphur Springs, down through the years (of which he was one)  and they instilled in the students a desire for honorable achievement.  And, the people who lived here were tied together in love and respect, thus creating a fine environment for our young people.  It is this feeling that causes us to maintain our annual home-comings and gives so much richness to them."

Note: For those of you following information about old churches, The Sulphur Springs School was less than a 5 minute walk from the present Enon Primitive Baptist Church building.

annmuffley@home.com, 7 Wagon Road, Asheville, NC 28805


1940 Homecoming Shindig at Sulphur Springs School

Speech entitled, "Memorial to our dead" given by Walter C. Harris in June 1940

Unedited, As written with original spelling:

In preparing this memorial to our dead, my subtopics are: influence, the unseen presence of the dead, imortalityk, death and the preparation for death.

Most of my subject matter has been taken from the Bible, famous authors, poets, and preachers.  I have written out the entire these so that I may keep my quotations correct and at the same time be more careful in the selection and choice of my own language.

Influence:

Everyone of us casta a shadow. There  hangs aabout us a strange indefinable something - ;which has its effect on every other life on which it falls.  It goes with us whereever we go.  It is not somethinhg we can have when we want
to have it and then lay aside wehen we wish as we lay aside a garment. 

It is something that always pours out from our life., like light fram a lamp, like heat from a flame, like perfume from a flower.  This influence does not end at the grave. Everyone of our departed friends have had and still have an influence on our lives and it is by this influence we remember them. 

A great preacher once siad, "The serenc silent beauty of a noble life is the most powerful influence in the world next to the might of the spirit of God. Prov. IV, 18 say7s The path of the just is as a shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day. 

A famouis poet expresses the thought in these words.  The smallest bark on life's tumultous ocean will leave a track behind for evermore.  The slightest wave of influence set in motion.

oOo