THE BACKTRACKERã

 

VOLUME II                                            April 1973                                                NUMBER II

Contents and Policies .............................................................................................................1

New Members......................................................................................................................2, 3

List of Exchanges....................................................................................................................3

1834-35 Carroll County, Arkansas Tax List.....................................................................4, 5, 6

This is the Personal Tax List of Carroll County Arkansas, for the years 1834-

1836. It was submitted by James Logan Morgan.

 

The Dabney Families - “In Memory Of“...................................................................................7

“In Memory of the Dabney Families of Northwest Arkansas” by Donna Cooper

is about Dr. William P. Dabney, 1842-___. He married Miss Martha Sears of

Macon County, Missouri, in 1866. Their family history is included.

 

Franklin Co. Arkansas News Clippings...............................................................................8, 9

The diary of Mrs. T. H. Moore is continued again in this issue covering the

dates of June 12, 1899 to October 14, 1901. They are followed by entries

dated from March 2, 1881 to March 2, 1885.

 

Index to Crawford County, Arkansas Biographies..........................................................11, 12

The Index is from Goodspeed’s Biographies of Northwest Arkansas 1883.

Page 12 also has “Bits and Pieces about Crawford County”. From the

creation of the county in 1820, it also has the 1821 Officers, 1823 Officers,

and early settlers (1/2 page long).

 

Obituaries from The Springdale News.............................................................................13, 14

The dates of these obituaries are September 1971 to March 1972. They only

include individuals born before 1910.

 

“As I Remember It”, Vera Key.......................................................................................15, 16

Vera Key talks about the early days in Rogers, Arkansas, beginning with the

first house built in Rogers.

 

Addington Family Notes...................................................................................................17, 18

This article begins with William Riley Addington and Martha Lucinda Smith,

his wife of Gilmer County, Georgia, and their seven children and their

migration to Benton County, Arkansas, where William died in 1863.

 

Tate Credentials - Benton Co., Ark. Dodson Cemetery.........................................................18

The Tate Credentials covers the Credentials of Mitchell Tate, Minister, from

Marriage Book A, page 73, Benton County, Arkansas.

 

The Dodson Cemetery is located between Hwy. 71 South and Hwy. 102 West

in Benton County, Arkansas. Names found here are: Harris, Leib, Dodson,

Richards, Boucher, Russell, and Shaffer.

 

Query Section..............................................................................................19, 20, 21, 22, 22a

Index.....................................................................................................................................24

This Surname Index is the original index from the Backtracker.

 

 

 

 

                      INDEX

NAME

PAGE

 

 

 

 

ADAMS

9

 

ADDINGTON

17, 18

 

ALBERT

13

 

ALLAN

13

 

APPLEGATE

15

 

ARRINGTON

8

 

BARNES

23

 

BASHAM

12

 

BEANE

12

 

BILL

8, 9

 

BLACKBURN

8, 9, 15

 

BOUTCHER

18

 

BRADFORD

12

 

BROWN

8, 14

 

BRYAN

8

 

BRYANT

15

 

BUCKLES

13

 

BURRIS

13

 

CALLISON

16

 

CARTER

8, 9, 17, 18

 

CHERRY

14

 

COHEA

14

 

COLBURN

9

 

COOPER

7, 23

 

COVEY

17

 

COX

14

 

CREADY

9

 

CZOLGOSZE

8

 

DABNEY

7

 

DAVID

13

 

DAVIS

8

 

DODSON

18

 

DOUGLASS

9

 

DUNAGIN

18

 

DUNCAN

17

 

DYER

12

 

EDWARDS

16

 

EICHENBERGER

8, 9

 

ELLIS

7

 

ELSEY

8, 9

 

ESTES

13

 

EVANS

14

 

FELKER

15

 

FLEEMAN

9

 

FORD

13

 

FOUST

13

 

FRANKE

13

 

GAMMILL

13

 

GARMAN

13

 

GARNER

9

 

GARRETT

13

 

GEHRMANN

13

 

GILLIAM

13

 

GLASS

13

 

GLENN

13

 

GODLEY

13

 

GOODING

13

 

GOODMAN

13

 

GORE

13

 

GOSNELL

9

 

GOULD

13

 

GRAYDON

13

 

GREEN

13, 18

 

GREER

8, 9

 

GRIM

13

 

GRIMES

23

 

GRISSON

13

 

GRUBB

13

 

GULICK

13

 

GUMM

13

 

HADDOCK

18

 

HAIL

9

 

HALE

13

 

HALL

9, 13

 

HAMM

8

 

HAMMOND

13

 

HANCOCK

7

 

HANEY

13

 

HANKS

14

 

HANN

14

 

HANNA

14

 

HANSBERRY

8

 

HARGUS

14

 

HARLAN

14

 

HARMON

14

 

HARRALSON

14

 

HARRIS

14, 18

 

HARTENBOWER

14

 

HARTMAN

14

 

HATHAWAY

14

 

HATHORN

14

 

HATTABAUGH

14

 

HAYES

14

 

HEATHCOCK

14

 

HELLSTERN

14

 

HENDERSON

14

 

HENDREN

17

 

HENLEY

9, 14

 

HENRY

14

 

HICKEY

8

 

HINSHAW

17

 

HOFFMAN

18

 

HOKE

14

 

HOLLAND

14

 

HOLLENSWORTH

14

 

HOOVER

14

 

HORTON

14

 

HOTZ

14

 

HOWARD

14

 

HUBBARD

23

 

HUCKABY

17

 

HUDSON

8

 

HUGGINS

14

 

INGRAHAM

14

 

INGRAM

14

 

INSKER

13

 

JACKSON

14

 

JAMES

14

 

JENNINGS

9, 18

 

JOHNSON

14

 

JONES

8, 14

 

JORDAN

13

 

KEY

15, 16

 

KING

8

 

KLEBER

14

 

KRUEGER

13

 

KUYKENDALL

12

 

LEE

14

 

LEIB

18

 

LEONARD

13

 

LITTLETON

8

 

LITURAL

18

 

McCLELLAND

17

 

McDOWELL

13

 

McILROY

9

 

McKINLEY

8

 

McLEOD

13

 

McNEIL

16

 

McRUNELS

13

 

MACON

14

 

MADLOCK

13

 

MANSFIELD

8, 9

 

MARTIN

12

 

MASHBURN

13

 

MASON

14

 

MILLS

12

 

MITCHELL

18

 

MONROE

9

 

MONTAGUE

9

 

MOON

8

 

MOORE

8, 9

 

MORTON

13

 

MURDOCK

16

 

NAYLOR

8

 

NICHOLS

8

 

NORTON

9

 

OLIVER

8

 

PARNELL

14

 

PICKETT

12

 

POINDEXTER

9

 

REYNOLDS

9

 

RICE

16

 

RICHARDS

18

 

RICHARDSON

8

 

RITHERFORD

18

 

ROGERS

16

 

ROUGHTON

16

 

RUSH

12

 

RUSSELL

8, 18

 

SADLER

9

 

SCOTT

13, 14

 

SEARS

7

 

SHAFFER

18

 

SIKES

15

 

SMITH

8, 17

 

SMOOT

12

 

SPIKES

16

 

STANLEY

13

 

STEELE

9

 

STROUD

13, 16

 

SUMMER

12

 

SWINNEY

14

 

TATE

18

 

TAYLOR

8

 

THOMPSON

17

 

THREET

14

 

TOLLESON

9

 

VANWINKLE

16

 

VICKERY

7

 

WALKER

7

 

WEBB

9

 

WEEDEN

9

 

WHITTENBURG

13

 

WILLIAMS

8, 9

 

WOODFIN

17

 

WORTHEM

9

 

WRIGHT

12

 

 


“AS I REMEMBER IT”

 

MISS VERA KEY

 

By Caroline Roughhton

 

Miss Vera Key, a long-time resident of Rogers, was the guest speaker at the February meeting of the N. W. Ark. Genealogical Society.  Following are some highlights of her talk about the early days in Rogers.

 

“Early settlers came from Tennessee, including my great-grandfather, because they heard about the abundance of streams and trees, and they came to homestead.  By 1881, there was a population of some 20,000 across the county.  Most of the hamlets were located near springs or streams, which were the lifeline of the community.  Most roads were from one stream to another.

 

“The first and only house in Rogers was the B. F. Sikes log cabin located on Arkansas Street between Elm and Poplar.  Mr. Sikes had arrived here in 1853 with his father and brother, J. W. Sikes.  J. W. stayed, but B. F. returned with his father to Tennessee, but came back here in 1873.  J. W. was a very influential man, and he began teaching school because he taught school in Tennessee before he came to Rogers.  He became a surveyor and later a lawyer.  He lived to be 100 years old.  He had joined the army and was in the battle up around Pea Ridge, and later lost an arm in Georgia.  We all rather idolized him because he was the one man that we knew who had been a soldier and had lost an arm.

 

“The Frisco Railroad began surveying for a road, and on May 10, 1881, the first train of officials stopped here.  At the time the railroad came in, this was known as the Post Office of Cross Hollows.  Mr. Sikes kept all the mail that that the stagecoach brought in, in a small cubbyhole desk.  One of the camps for soldiers during the war was located at Cross Hollows, and there was also a big still there.  After the railroad came, the name of the town was changed to Rogers, after the Mr. Rogers who was the Vice-President of the Frisco Railroad.

 

“In August, 1881, the first passenger train went through Rogers.  The early settlers said that people came from miles away to see it.  They couldn’t imagine anything rolling along without some animal pulling it, or how it could stop or start.  The mules and the horses were very frightened of it.  After the railroad came through, people began moving in like flies.

 

“My great-uncle, J. A. C. Blackburn, had married one of Peter Van Winkle’s daughters, and had bought Mr. Van Winkle’s sawmill and 15,000 acres near War Eagle.  This mill supplied a great part of the finished lumber for the first homes in Rogers.  All down First Street from Walnut to Cherry, soon built up with frame buildings.

 

“The voluntary fire department was housed in the livery stable, and most of the first merchants belonged to this fire hose brigade.  These merchants were quite prosperous, and soon the frame buildings were torn down and the big brick buildings were put in.

 

“Mr. W. C. Bryant had a hardware and furniture store on First Street, where Sears is now.  Mr. Bryant was the only undertaker here for many years.  Mr. Applegate had his drug store in that block, and Mr. W. R. Felker had a bank, in which all of the counters were made of Italian marble.  The H. L. Stroud family had come in early and started a dry goods store, and their first store was on the corner of First and Walnut Streets.  There was a grocery store belonging to Howard Edwards which stayed open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., and he would deliver a nickel’s worth of groceries anytime you called him.

 

“The building on the south corner of First and Walnut Streets was a bank owned by Mr. Spikes.  His daughter, Lillian, was our postmistress for 15 years and was also one of our teachers.  She passed away in 1971.  Up above this store was the opera house.  How well I remember attending one of the first operas there when I was just a little child.  I don’t remember the name of the opera, but there was a scene in it where they were going to saw a woman in half.  I became very scared, and my father had to take me home because I was screaming so much.

 

“Mr. Tom McNeil had gone out on a limb and started selling automobiles in Rogers.  He first took over the livery stable for his place of business and kept us all frightened to pass the door for fear someone would come dashing out in one of those cars.  One of the first cars sold was to Dr. Rufus Rice.  The Doctor and his car really scared the horses and stirred up the dust, for this was really a dusty town.  Mr. Callison began business and established an undertaking, furniture, wallpaper, and picture framing business.  He soon bought one of those automobiles for a hearse.  Everyone talked about how fast he drove to the cemetery.  When you saw a funeral procession, first came the hearse, then the few cars, and then the horses and buggies.  Everyone was very indignant at this fast pace they were driving and the dust they were creating.

 

“When we first got telephone service in Rogers, Miss Anna Murdock was the telephone girl, and when you would ring Miss Anna, you wouldn’t need to tell her the number; you would just say, ‘Please give me the Blackburn residence’, (or whoever you were calling).  And if a man called his wife and couldn’t find her at home, he would leave the message with Miss Anna to tell his wife when she came home.

 

“Along the early twenties, there was much feuding and fighting about paving the streets of Rogers.  The people were very much divided on the issue, because there would have to be a bond issue passed, and people were afraid that they wouldn’t be able to pay it, as this was about the time of the depression.  But, finally the bonds passed, and they began the brick paving down by the Presbyterian Church.  That brick paving has really been a good deal for us, as it is still standing up well.  Later, after people began to see what it meant to get rid of the dust, they started on additional paving.

 

“The town of Rogers has had lots of ups and downs, and those early days were surely the ups.”


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