Country Doctors of Sebastian Co.



"The Country Doctor" poem

 

Dr. Alanson Allen
was born about 1791 in Vermont. He is listed as a physician on the 1860 Sugarloaf  Twsp. census records with wife Sarah.

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Dr. Ward Howard Bailey
was born around 1708 in Putnam County, New York, but came to Sebastian County, Arkansas in 1838 and stayed here for his entire life. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Source: "New Era" Fort Smith,Arkansas. 16 May 1877....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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William T. Blakemore
of Greenwood, Ark., is a native of Sumner County, Tenn., and was born in 1830, being the son of Lee C. and Charlotte (Johnson) Blakemore, and grandson of Thomas and Sallie (Douglass) Blakemore. Thomas Blakemore was a native of Virginia, and was one of the first settlers of Sumner County, Tenn., where he passed his last days. Lee C. Blakemore was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1800, and was of Scotch-Irish and English extraction. He was born in Sumner County in 1831, and afterward immigrated to the Territory of Arkansas, locating two miles from where Van Buren is now located. In 1832 he moved to Fayetteville, Washington County, where he received his final summons. He died in 1881. He was one of the first white men to settle in Northwestern Arkansas, and was a member of the State Legislature several sessions, being elected by the Democratic party. He was register of the land office of the State of Arkansas during President Pierce's administration, being appointed by President Pierce in 1853, and serving four years. He was justice of the peace for many years, and was a man of much influence in the community in which he lived. His wife, Charlotte (Johnson) Blakemore, died in 1851. After her death Mr. Blakemore married Mrs. Nancy Crawley, nee Wallace. She, too, is deceased, having passed away in 1857. Mr. Blakemore was the father of ten children, six now living. William T. was the fifth child in the order of birth. He was but a year old when his parents moved to Arkansas. He attained his growth on the farm, and in 1854 commenced the study of his chosen profession, his preceptor being Dr. William H. Douglas, of Memphis, Tenn. He was under the Doctor's advice for over two years, and in 1856 went to Nashville, Tenn., where he entered the University of Nashville, [p.1290] and attended one course of lectures. In the spring of 1857 he commenced his practice in Greenwood. Ark., Sebastian County, where he has since been located. During the late war he was in the service but two months, when he was discharged on account of disabilities. In May, 1858 he married Miss Nancy Trammell, who was born in Crawford County, Ark., in 1834, and who was the daughter of Dimis and Elizabeth Trammell. Mr. and Mrs. Blakemore are the parents of five children: Jesse Lee, M. D., graduated from Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tenn., in 1888, and is now second assistant in the insane asylum at Little Rock; Kate, wife of James B. Forrester; Bessie A., Ora C. and William F. In 1876 Dr. William T. Blakemore graduated as an M. D. at the Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville, Ky. He is one of the oldest physicians and surgeons in Greenwood, and is one of the leading practitioners of Sebastian County. He is a man whose character is beyond reproach, and whose good name is untarnished. He is a Democrat in politics, was postmaster at Fayetteville, Ark., for six months, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken the Blue Lodge, Royal Arch and Commandery degrees. He is also an Ancient Odd Fellow and an honorary member of the K. of H. He is a member of the Sebastian Medical Association, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South....... Source: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889.....submitted by Michael Brown, 18 Oct 1998

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Dr. William J. Brandon
physician and surgeon of Dayton, was born in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1837, his parents being Philip Brandon and Elizabeth Snell. The former was probably born in Alabama, and the latter was a native of Bedford County, Tenn., born in 1801. They were married in Alabama, whither Mrs. Brandon had removed with her people, and then went to Shelby County, Tenn., in 1830, where Mrs. Brandon died in 1864. Mr. Brandon was a farmer, and died in Alabama, while on a business tour, in 1842. The paternal grandparents of our subject were natives of North Carolina, and the grandfather, William Brandon, was a soldier in the Revolution, and of Irish parentage. The maternal grandfather, Stephen Snell, was of English descent, born in North Carolina, and served in the Revolution. He died in Texas in an early day. Our subject was left to help care for his widowed mother when a boy, and was the fourth of a family of five children. He attended the log schoolhouse in Western Tennessee, where he lived, and began the study of medicine upon attaining his majority. In 1859 he entered the Memphis Medical College, and after one course practiced with his former preceptor until 1861. He then joined the Fifteenth Mississippi Volunteer Infantry as lieutenant, but soon afterward became a soldier in the Twelfth Tennessee Cavalry, Company A. Confederate Army. In January, 1863, he was captured on the Mississippi and Tennessee line, near Colliersville, Tenn., but was afterward paroled. In 1863 he entered Bellevue Medical College at New York, and graduated from that institution the following year with high honors, since which time he has practiced his profession with success. In 1867 he married Medora Farned, a native of Mississippi, and daughter of Marshall Farned, by whom he has had two children. In 1868 the family removed from Mississippi to White County, Ark., in 1872 went to Texas and in 1881 came to Since 1882 the Doctor has practiced medicine and engaged in the drug business at Dayton with success, and he is also the owner of 300 acres of good land. He is a public-spirited citizen and a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was cast for Douglas in 1860. His wife is a Baptist in religion....... Source: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889.....submitted by Michael Brown, 18 Oct 1998

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J. W. Breedlove, M. D.
practicing physician of the regular school of physicians, at Fort Smith, Ark., was born in New Orleans, La., and is the son of J. W., Sr., and Maria E. (Winchester) Breedlove. The father went to New Orleans from Virginia in 1814, was a commission merchant, and was also a collector of customs at New Orleans under Gen. Jackson. He was the father of seven children, three now living, J. W., Jr., being the youngest of the family. He received a good classical education in the University of Nashville, Tenn., and afterward pursued the study of medicine, graduating from the University of Louisiana in 1849. He was for twelve years house surgeon of the United States Marine Hospital of New Orleans. He served four years in the Confederate army, and was medical inspector under Gen. Breckenridge. At the close of the war he returned to New Orleans, and became assistant physician in the quarantine station below New Orleans. After this he went to the “Lone Star State.” remained two years, and then in the fall of 1869 he came to Sebastian County, Ark., locating in Greenwood, where he practiced his profession until April, 1886, when he moved to Fort Smith. He has been a copartner with Dr. Southard two years. Dr. Breedlove was married in New Orleans to Miss Emma Rawlings, who was born in Kentucky, and whose father was a Mexican soldier. Dr. and Mrs. Breedlove are the parents of one child, Charles T., who is now in Baltimore pursuing dental studies. Dr. Breedlove is a Democrat in his political views, and is a member of Lodge No. 20 of the F. & A. M....... Source: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889.....submitted by Michael Brown, 18 Oct 1998

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Dr. Asbury L. Brewster
of the drug firm of McConnell & Brewster, and assistant physician and surgeon for the Kansas & Texas Coal Company, is one of the promising young men of Huntington. He was born in Lauderdale County, Miss., in 1857, and is a son of Christopher C. and Mary G. (Pogue) Brewster, natives of Florida and Alabama, respectively. They were married in Mississippi, where they attained their growth, and lived in that State until after the war. They then removed to Louisiana, and in 1868 came to Sebastian County, Ark., settling near the present site of Huntington, at what is now known as “Brewster's Chapel.” There Mr. Brewster owned a fine farm, upon which the family lived after his death in 1878 until the winter of 1887-88. Mrs. Brewster now lives in Huntington, and both she and her husband joined the Methodist Church when young. Asbury L. is the eldest of three sons and two daughters now living. He passed his boyhood upon a farm, and received but a common-school education. In 1878 he began the study of medicine, and in 1879 attended one course of lectures at the Louisville University in Kentucky. He graduated from the Vanderbilt University at Nashville in 1881, and has since practiced his profession with increasing success in the vicinity of Huntington. He owns eighty acres of land two miles from Huntington, which contains coal deposits. During the past year he established himself in the drug business. In politics he is a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was cast for Hancock in 1880. He is a member of Pulliam Lodge No. 133, at Witcherville, and belongs to the A. O. U. W. He worships at the Methodist Episcopal Church, South....... Source: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889.....submitted by Michael Brown, 18 Oct 1998

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Dr. Elmer Joeseph Brown
Born in 1883 in Lucas, Arkansas. Practiced medicine in Mansfield, Arkansas and surrounding community for over 50 years.
Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Peyton B. Coker
physician and farmer of Big Creek Township, was born in Bibb County, Ala., in 1835, and is a son of Robert and Sarah (Myers) Coker, natives of Lawrenceburg District, S. C., and Georgia, respectively. They removed from Alabama to Mississippi in 1847, where their respective deaths occurred in 1881 and 1887. Philip Coker, the grandfather, was born in South Carolina, and died in Georgia. Dr. Coker is one of a family of twelve children, and being reared upon a farm his early education was received at a country school. He read medicine from 1856 until 1860, and the following winter attended the Memphis Medical College. He began to practice in Tishomingo County, Miss., and until 1870 practiced in that State. He then came to Sebastian County, and having taught school prior to the war continued that vocation one year, since which time he has devoted his attention to farming and medicine. In August, 1861, he enlisted as a Chickasaw Ranger, in Martin's battalion, of Steward's brigade, and served in the Virginia army until discharged on account of ill health the following December. He afterward served in different capacities, and he fought at the battle of Shiloh. In June, 1863, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Rogers, natives of North Carolina and Georgia. Mr. Rogers died in 1886, but his widow is now living. Mrs. Coker was born in Georgia, and has borne the Doctor eleven children, of whom nine are living, and have enjoyed the advantages of a good education. Dr. Coker has been a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for thirty-one years, having held many offices in the meantime, and his wife belongs to the same denomination. Dr. Coker owns a nice farm of 320 acres as a result of his labor. He has always been a Democrat, and for a short time served as justice of the peace. He is a demitted member of the Masonic fraternity. Source: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889.....submitted by Michael Brown, 18 Oct 1998

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Dr. Edgar M. Davenport
of Witcherville, settled here in 1876. Born in South Carolina in 1850, practiced medicine in South Sebastian County. .....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Thomas Davenport
practiced in Witcherville (Salem), Arkansas. *Young Davenport was a witness in a trial involving A. B. Martin of Witcherville, Arkansas-involved the shooting of Dick Hawthorne.Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Albert Dunlap
physician of Fort Smith, and son of Joseph and Mildred (Jones) Dunlap, was born in Alabama December 8, 1828. Joseph Dunlap is a native of North Carolina, was a mechanic by occupation, is still alive, and a resident of Washington County, Ark. His mother, Frances Dunlap, is also living in Washington County, Ark., and is the oldest person in that county. She is ninety-seven years of age. Dr. Albert Dunlap came to Arkansas during his minority, and grew to manhood in Washington County. He received his education in Ozark Institute, and in 1850 he commenced the study of medicine under Dr. Pollard. He graduated from the medical department of the Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky., in 1851, and with the exception of a short time he has since practiced medicine in Fort Smith, locating here in 1852. He is a member of the Sebastian Medical Society, Arkansas State Medical Society, American Medical Association and International Medical Congress. He has been president of the Sebastian County Medical Society, and vice-president of the Arkansas State Medical Society; was a member of the Fort Smith Board of Health for about twenty years. He was in the hospital department during the late war, serving the whole time in the trans-Mississippi Department. He is the oldest practicing physician in Fort Smith, and his family are members of the Episcopal Church. The Doctor was [p.1308] married to Miss Virginia Spring, daughter of Dr. M. Spring, formerly a physician of this place, and medical partner of Dr. Dunlap. Mrs. Dunlap is a member of the Ladies' Relief Union. Dr. Dunlap is a member of the pension examination board, and examining physician for several different life insurance companies. After years of experience in the country, Dr. Dunlap is about to retire from active practice in the city of Fort Smith, and is building up a health resort on the top of the Boston Mountains. This he considers the greatest enterprise of his life. The location is certainly a happy one, and has the sanction of the highest medical authorities in the South, besides being expressly chosen by Dr. Dunlap, who would certainly know its virtue if anyone would. The close proximity of the location to the Southern lowlands, the great altitude and the purity and variety of waters to be found on the location, make it expressly desirable. This is unquestionably destined to become one of the leading health resorts of the South. It is 2,000 feet above the level of the sea, and the highest temperature reached during the summer of 1888 was ninety degrees. The place chosen for the health resort is situated on both sides of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad, forty-two miles from Fort Smith, and two trains pass daily each way, making regular stops at the station–Winslow....... Source: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889, page 1308 .....submitted by Michael Brown, 18 Oct 1998

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William Patrick Evans, M.D.
of Excelsior, Ark., was born in Sebastian County in 1863, and is a son of William P. and Amanda Tedford) Evans, and a grandson of Patrick and Sallie (Blevens) Evans. The grandfather was born in a fort in North Carolina in 1794, and at the age of six years was taken by his parents to Overton County, Tenn., and was married in Winchester of that State in 1817, moving to Jackson County, Ala., in 1822. Here he resided until 1850, when he took up his abode in Polk County, Ark., and the following year came to Sebastian County. He was killed in the Indian Nation. Three of his uncles immigrated to the Indian Territory at an early day, and his uncle James cut the first tree where the city of Evansville now stands, the town being named in his honor. Sallie (Blevens) Evans was born in Kentucky in 1800, and died in 1874, being a daughter of Elisha and Polly (Roberts) Blevens, who were born in England, the father dying in Illinois in 1833. William P. Evans, Sr., was born in Marion County, Tenn., in 1836, and in 1851 came to Sebastian County, Ark., and died in 1862. His wife was also born in Marion County in 1836, and died in 1877. They were the parents of three children: Goodson M., who is a medical student at Little Rock; Matilda, wife of George Tedford, and William P.,M.D. The latter received his literary education in the schools of Excelsior and Hackett City, and in March, 1884, commenced the study of medicine under the instructions of Dr. J. W. McConnell, of Hackett City. In 1887 he graduated from the medical department of the Industrial University at Little Rock, and in April, 1885, began his first practicing at Brazil Station, Choctaw Nation, and eight months later located in Excelsior, one and a half miles form his birthplace, where he has since been practicing, meeting with good and well deserved success. He possesses a fine medical education, and is a young man of ability and enterprise. SOURCE: GOODSPEED HISTORIES OF SEBASTIAN CO. ARKANSAS The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889

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Dr. James B. Ewart
was born in Illinois around 1843. He came to Arkansas and practiced medicine in Midland, Arkansas. He died on December 26, 1914 in Ione, Arkansas. Source: Physicians and Medicine: Crawford and Sebastian Counties, Arkansas: 1817-1976. p.326.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Henry W. Fannin
born Feburary 18, 1829 in New York (Source: Sebastian County Census-1900) Practiced medicine in the town of Hackett around 1883 (circa). The 1900 census shows he was married to a Adaline Watson, who was born around 1836(circa) in the Choctaw Nation ....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Joseph H. (J.H.) Forbes
was born in Barren County, Kentucky in 1837, and was of Scotch/Dutch descent. He died in 1894 in Hackett, Arkansas. His great-grandfather was a soldier in the Revoluntionary War and his grandfather: James Forbes was a soldier in the War of 1812. Dr. Forbes was educated at a pribate school in Barren County, Kentucky and in 1863, he began his practice of medicine in Oregon County, Missouri. In 1871, Dr. Forbes began practicing medicine in Hackett City (now known as just Hackett) and in 1877, he opened up a drug stone in that city. After 1885, he devoted his attention to solely the practice of medicine. He did open a dry goods store in Hackett. On the 22nd day of July, 1857, he married Elizabeth Woodside(daughter of John and Emily H. Woodside) in Thomasville(Oregon County), Missouri. His first wife died in 1861; leaving the doctor to care for two young children: Leigh and Alice. He later mattered again in Oregon County, Missouri, to a woman named Eliza A. Andrews (daughter of John and Matilda Andrews). The couple had fourteen children. In 1889, these were the children who were still living: Lee W Forbes; Sarah Alice Marrow (w/o Dr. U. Marrow); William J. Forbes; Clemming Casey (w/o Thomas E. Caseyof Hunt County, Texas); Molly Welch (wife of J.C. Wlech, of Hackett, Arkansas); Emma, Ida, George, Daisy, and Joseph Forbes. Dr. Forbes was a Masonic Mason. His second wife died in 1897 and is buried with Dr. Forbes at Vinita Cemetery. Source: "Goodspeed History of Northwest Arkansas." p. 1314; and "Sebastian County Cemetery Records." 1975. p.67

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James H. Foster M.D.
James H. Foster was born in Yell County, Arkansas in 1858 to Russell C. & Parmeela C. (Parker) Foster. Russell was born in South Carolina in 1828 and Parmeela was a native of Arkansas (born in 1832). Young James' grandfather, who was also named James, lived in South Carolina and was of Irish descent. The third of nine children, James attended what were then called "common" schools in Yell County, Arkansas. Upon graduation, he attend one year of his studies at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Beginning in 1882, James began in earnest his study of medicine at Memphis Hospital Medical College in the winter of 1884 and graduate from there in 1889. Medicine did not occupy his time fully, as young James met and married Willie Parker in 1882, but she died in 1884. He later married Christine Irene Van Hesberg in Memphis. They had three children: Miles, Wilna, and Faye. Dr. Foster joined the Sebastian County Medical Society in 1880. He was a member of the Episcopal Church and a member of the Masonic Lodge #398 F &AM. Dr. James H. Foster was known as a medical doctor and good surgeon in the Fort Smith and Witcherville areas. He died on May 23, 1923 in Fort Smith, Arkansas and is buried in Forest Park Cemetery in Fort Smith.
Source: Goodspeed History of N.W. Arkansas
...submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Davis Woolf Goldstein
is best remembered as one of the founding members of Cooper Clinic. Born on 14 September 1888, in Greenville, Mississippi, to Marx and Rosa (Woolf) Goldstein. He was the grandson of Davis and Jennie Wolf of Mississippi. The young Goldstein graduated from Greenville High School, he sat his goal not on becoming a doctor, but becoming a pharmacist. He began his study of pharmacy at Tulane University and somewhere during this time, changed his mind and transfered to medicine and schools. He studied medicine at the University of Tennessee. Some time after his completion of medical school, Dr. Goldstein decided to study in Europe. He left the United States in 1910. While in Europe on tours of dermatology clinics and in London, he became acquainted with Sir Alexander Fleming. Upon his eight month stay over in Europe, Goldstein returned to the United States and began his studies once again, this time in Philadelphia. In 1913, Dr. Goldstein moved to Fort Smith, Arkansas to set up his practice. This was short lived, as World War I soon broke took the world by storm and Dr. Goldstein volunteered. He was assigned to the 325th Infantry Batallion Surgeon and was stationed at Camp Gordon in Atlanta, Georgia. Later, in 1918, he was transferred to France and was assigned to the 82nd Division at Batallion Surgeon and the 328th Combat Infantry Division as their Regimental Surgeon. His work did not go un-noticed, as he was awarded for distinguised service under fire in the Meuse Argone offensive. In 1917, he married Florence Pahotski (she died in 1973) and he married his second wife Leona (Farber) Heilbron. After World War I, Dr. Goldstein returned once again to Fort Smith and joined Dr. St. Cloud Cooper and a few other physicians in forming Cooer Clinic. There Dr. Goldstein remained until he was 81 years of age...Source: Southwest Times Record. 23 Feb 1969 ...submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. L. C. Greer
practiced medicine in Huntington. Born in Geogia in 1848. Died in 1900 from apparent injuries he received-as to why and how-not known by the researchers.Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. B.B. Harrison
Dr. Benjamin B. Harrison was born in 1815, in Englad. He died in 1897. He was married to a woman named Nancy (born in 1833 in Indiana and died 1896). The 1870 Sebastian County Census shows that Dr. Harrison was a resident of the Marion Township. It also showed those living in the household as: William Horton, Hugh Horton(both of Missouri); Mary Horton(born in Tennessee); Elizabeth and Mary Horton(born in Kansas); Charley and Thomas Harrison (born in Kansas): and Alina Horton (born in Arkansas.) Nothing else is known about this doctor. Source: Historical facts compiled by the Auxillary of the Sebastian County Medical Society 1976.

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Dr. Charles S. Holt

Dr. Charles Holt on the steps of the old Sparks Hospital in the late 1930's........Photos from Lynn Sources for this writting are from: Centennial History of Arkansas. pg. 1078 and Physicians & Medicine: Crawford & Sebastian Counties, Arkansas: 1817-1976. Sebastian County Medical Society. 1977. p.389........This article written by D.Musgrove R. N.

One of the leading founders of Holt-Krock Clinic, was born in Salem, Illiniois in 1880 to Thomas Jefferson and Minerva Louise (Wham) Holt. Thomas Holt listed his occupation as a farmer. Dr. Holt also listed in his biography his paternal grandparents. They were Joseph and Elizabeth Holt. Little is known about his early childhood, but what is known is that Dr. Charles S. Holt graduated from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1906. He began his practice in St. Louis and remained there for a period of one year. For reasons unknown, Dr. Holt moved his practice to a little know area and still rural area called Fort Smith, Arkansas. There he sat up practice from 1913 to 1934 in St. John's Hospital (now called Sparks Health System). It was during this time, 1934 that he took the "reigns" of the newly named Sparks Memorial Hospital. He remained an active board member of the thriving hospital until his death in 1952.
Dr. Charles Holt was a giving man and a great example of his giving was the $160,000 he gave to the trustees of the board with a condition that it be used to build a new hospital building. His wishes were carried through and Dr. Holt almost saw his dream beome a reality, as the hospital was nearing completion when death came "knocking" at the old doctor's door. The new hospital was not the only mark that Dr. Charles S. Holt left on western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma, he left us Holt-Krock Clinic.
The new clinic (Holt Clinic), was founded in 1921 in Fort Smith, Arkansas. Then in 1928, the name changed to Holt-Krock, when Dr. Fred H. Krock joined Dr. Charles Holt in a joint practice of medicine. The clinic soon became known as Holt-Krock Clinic to those living in the western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma. The clinic brought a diverse group of physician into Sebastian County and made seeing doctors easier for families. The clinic held a wide variety of doctors under one roof, which made travel easier. No more going from Rogers Avenue to Townson to other satellite streets. Even laboratories and x-rays could be taken without traveling to another place or hospital. Life for the medical ill became a bit easier, all because of one man's dream of primary health care to the masses! This, however; is not all of Dr. Holt's accomplishments, as he served in numerous capacities in the community.
Dr. Charles Holt loved children and what better way to help them than to make sure they received a good education. He served on the Fort Smith School Board as well as the Arkansas State School Board. Dr. Holt was a member of the Scottish Rite, the Shrine, Blue Lodge(Masonic), Lions Club, Selective Service System, American College of Surgeons, St. John's Episcopal Church, Hardscrabble Country Club, and was president of the Fort Smith Board of Health for a number of years.
Medicine and memberships did not occupy all Dr. Charles Holt's time; however, as one special lady was the center of his world--his wife, Zoe (McCann) Bissell. When they met is not documented, but the two were married on September 30, 1909. The couple never had biological children on their own, but adopted two lovely dauthers, Betsy and Zoe Frances. The couple adored their children.
"Time waits for no man," as one old wise saying goes, and so it was for Dr. Charles Holt. The elderly doctor died on June 7, 1952, in the city that loved him--Fort Smith, Arkansas. His beloved wife Zoe and his two daughters Betsy Altman, and Zoe Frances Wade, were at his side when he closed his eyes forever to this life. A life spent helping others. Healing those who could be healed and giving comfort to those who could not. Fort Smith and the surrounding areas, for that matter, were forever changed because of Dr. Charles Holt's vision. His vision is still alive today, a little worn for wear, a somewhat different "take" on his idea, but still, his vision.
Thank you, Dr. Charles S. Holt!
Sources for this writting are from: Centennial History of Arkansas. pg. 1078 and Physicians & Medicine: Crawford & Sebastian Counties, Arkansas: 1817-1976. Sebastian County Medical Society. 1977. p.389........This article written by D.Musgrove R. N.


Surgery Room at the Old Sparks Hospital in the early years
submitted by Lynn

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Dr. Mark Maitland Hukill
Mark Hukill was born in Washington County around 1848 to James Scott and Mary Shannon. He was 22 years when the 1860s census was taken. He was at that time residing in the Sugarloaf Township area. Mark first joined the confederate forces in 1862, but soon was captured and as oral family history tells it, "was presuaded to help the Union" side. It appears Mark received his training during the Civil War. While living in Greenwood, Arkansas Mark became a charter member of the Greenwood Masonic Lodge. He also served as a post master of the town of Greenwood for a time, all the while, serving as a medical doctor. Reconstruction Period in Sebastian county was a harsh period, and with people having little money even to buy food, medical services were almost at a standstill. Mark moved his family from Sebastian County to Garland County and remained there until his death in the 1890s. He is buried at the Greenwood Cemetery in Hot Springs, Arkansas.  Contributed by Deborah Musgrove decendent

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Dr. Elbert C. Hunt
Dr. Elbert C. Hunt began his life on this earth in the year of 1862 in Huntsville (Madison County), Arkansas to M.H. and Pricillia (Ogden) Hunt. The elder Hunt was born near Rome, Georgia, and was the son of Richard and Pricillia (Ogden of Mobile, Alabama) Hunt. It is told that M.H. Hunt served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War, yet both the Ogdens and Hunts left their homes in the South and moved to Arkansas. It appears both couples moved to Madison County and in later years, moved to Johnson County, Arkansas. Elbert was one of six children born to his parents.
The young Hunt grew up in rural northwest Arkansas and received his early education at the local public school there in Madison County. He later went on to study medicine at the Arkansas Industrial University in Little Rock (now known at University of Arkansas at Little Rock). Upon completion of his medical education, he was examined by the Johnson County Medical Board and there, licensed by that very board. He began his medical practice in Hartman, Arkansas, but later moved to Hartford, Arkansas. Not satisfied with status quo, Dr. Elbert Hunt began to study optometry at the National Optical College. When he completed his optometry studies, the doctor was able to practice both medicine and optometry in the surrounding area.
Dr. Elbert C. Hunt appears to have married twice in his life. His first marriage, date unknown, was to a Elizabeth Oliver. Elizabeth died (date unknown) and Elbert remarried a Greenwood, Arkansas girl named Cynthia Russell. Cynthia was born in 1877. It is recorded that the second Mrs. Hunt died in 1923, and is buried in Liberty Cemetery just outside Greenwood (on Hwy. 96).
Dr. Elbert C. Hunt was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and served as a Steward. He also was a Masonic Mason and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Time passed and soon it was time for the doctor to "hang up his sign." Death came calling on the doctor in 1955, at the age of 93 years of age. He served the people of Hartman, Mulberry, and Hartford, Arkansas well. Rest well, Dr. Hunt, rest well....
Source: Centennial History of Arkansas. p. 1129.  Submitted by D. Musgrove

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George F. Hynes, M.D.
physician and surgeon at Fort Smith, was born in Brockville, Canada, in 1848, and is the son of William M. Hynes, a native of Dublin, Ireland, born in 1792; he was educated in England, but returned to Ireland, and emigrated from there to America, and located in New York State, before he had attained his majority. He commenced life as a teacher, and followed this occupation in that State for several years. He moved to Canada about 1827, locating at Brockville, where he followed educational pursuits for over forty years. In 1855 he went to Montreal, and was there connected with Lower Canada College as professor of mathematics for one year, after which he returned to Western Canada, and became interested in the publication of a newspaper, Prescott Messenger, filling the office, in the meantime, of superintendent of county schools. Before his death he abandoned teaching. He was a stanch Protestant member of the Presbyterian Church, and was a strictly temperate man in all his habits. He died in 1866, at the age of seventy-four years. He was married twice, first to Miss Margaret Burrell, who died in Canada, leaving six children. Mr. Hynes was afterward married to Miss Mary Burrell, a sister of his first wife, and to them were born ten children. Margaret and Mary Burrell's father, William Russell, was a prosperous farmer of New York State, and was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. Late in life Mr. Hynes and wife went to Ohio, to live with their youngest daughter, and here passed the remainder of their days. His great-grandfather, whose name was Morgan, was in the Revolutionary War, and fought on the British side. Dr. George F. Hynes graduated from Cleveland College in 1879. After practicing in Cleveland for a year he came South, and located in Van Buren, Crawford Co., Ark., where he remained until March, 1888. While in that county he was associated with Dr. Dibrell, Dr. Hynes came to Fort Smith in March of 1888. He is a member of the Sebastian Medical Association, and althoh only a short time in the State he was made chairman of Arkansas State Medical Society for 1888. While in Van Buren County he was surgeon for the railroad and for the K. of P. He was married to Miss Sue Dibrell, daughter of J. A. Dibrell, Sr., and two children were the result of this union: Dibrell Pryor and Mary Russell. Dr. Hynes is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and is a prominent practitioner.  SOURCE: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889. Contributed by Michael Brown

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Dr. Lee H. Ingraham
farmer and stock raiser, and retired physician, of Lavaca, was born in McNairy County, West Tenn., in 1844. His parents, James M. and Elizabeth (Spencer) Ingraham, were born in Bedford County in 1815, and in Wilson County in 1817, respectively. They were married in Madison County in 1835, and afterward settled in McNairy County, where the father of our subject was reared. In 1869 they left that county to come to Sebastian County, Ark., where Mr. Ingraham farmed until 1879. He then established the first family grocery store where Lavaca now stands, where he has since continued to do business, being at present the oldest merchant in the town. His father, John S. Ingraham, was a native of Virginia, who accompanied his parents to Wayne County, Ky., when a child. After his marriage he settled in McNairy County, Tenn., where he was the third white settler subsequent to the sending away of the Indians. He died in that county in 1855, at the advanced age of seventy-one. Our subject is the fifth of a family of nine children. He received his early education in his native county, and at the age of seventeen enlisted in Company C, Fifty-second Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, which, after the battle of Shiloh, was consolidated with the Fifty-first Tennessee. He served until the fourteen months of his enlistment had expired, and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville and Stone River. He then returned home, and in 1867 began to study his chosen profession. In 1869 and 1870 he attended the medical university at Louisville, Ky., after which he practiced in McNairy County one year. He then came to Sebastian County, and for four years practiced in Big Creek Township. He then retired upon a farm four years, after which he passed three years in the practice of his profession again, being the only physician between Fort Smith and Charleston. September 10, 1874, he was united in marriage to Mrs. [p.1331] Mary E. Carroll, daughter of John D. and Louisa Arbuckle. Mr. and Mrs. Arbuckle were born in Christian County, Ky., in 1808, and Cooper County, Mo., in 1817, respectively. After their marriage they lived in Cooper County a short time, and then removed to Henry County. In 1835 they came to what is now Sebastian County, and settling in Big Creek Township they passed their lives in the house they built at that time. They were among the early pioneers of the county, and died in 1872 and 1886. Mr. Arbuckle was a nephew of Gen. Arbuckle, who formerly owned Arbuckle Island, which is now the property of our subject. In 1872 Mr. Arbuckle was elected to represent this county in the Senate, but his death occurred before the Legislature convened. For a number of years he had served as justice of the peace. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and his wife of the Christian Church. He was of Scotch-Irish extraction, and a descendant of one of three brothers who came to America in an early day. Dr. Ingraham is one of the prominent citizens of the county. He is the owner of nearly 1,000 acres of land—the result of his own thrift and industry, and has cleared about 300 acres of land on Arbuckle Island. His wife owns 600 acres of choice land. To them one child has been born. In religion the Doctor and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics the former is a Democrat, his first presidential vote having been cast for Tilden in 1876. He is a member and fills the position of secretary of Oak Bower Masonic Lodge, No. 277. He belongs to a long-lived family, his great-grandfather, James Ingraham, having lived in Wayne County, Ky., to the age of one hundred, and two of his sons also lived to be very old men. James Ingraham originally came from Virginia. SOURCE: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889, p. 1331 Contributed by Michael Brown

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Dr. D.T. Johnson
listed his place of birth as Griffin Georgia around 1847. According to the 1880 census records for Sebastian County, his father's fame was Thomas Johnson and his mother's name was Amanda (Fitzgerald) Johnson. No information remains as to where he received his early education, but D.T. attended the University of Louisiana Medical School and graduated from Bellevue Hospital Medical College, in New York, New York in 1870. Sometime between 1870 and 1880, Dr. Johnson found his way to a little place called Fort Smith, Arkansas. It was here, in 1880 that Dr. D.T. Johnson was admitted to the Sebastian County Medical Society.
In the Fort Smith weekly newspaper, Elevator, Dr. Johnson had a business listing. Very little is known abouthis specialty, if any. Yet, the doctor appeared to be a man of high medical standards, as is evidence in the Sebastian County Medical Society elected him president in 1886 and once again in 1903. Dr. D.T. Johnson served Sebastian County for twenty-four years, yet the doctor was not all medicine, ashe did have a family life.
On the 1880 Sebastian County Census, Dr. D.T. Johnson listed Erna Johnson as his wife. Erna (according to the census), was born in Georgia. No children were listed at this time. No other information can be found on the good doctor.
At the ripe old age of eighty-one years, Dr. D. T. Johnson died in Fort Smith,Arkansas and was buried at Forest Park Cemetery.  Source: Sebastian County 1880 Census, and Physicians and Medicine: Crawford and Sebastian Counties, Arkansas: 1817-1976
Submitted by D. Musgrove

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Hon. James E. Johnson
practicing physician and surgeon at Lavaca, was born in Monroe County, Miss., in 1847. His parents, Rev. Samuel C. and Margaret (Jennings) Johnson, were natives of Georgia and Tennessee, born in 1804 and1808, respectively. They were married in Greene County, Ala., and made that place their home until 1846, when they removed to Monroe County, Miss. The mother died in the last named county in 1871, and Mr. Johnson is now living in Lowndes County, with his second wife. He is a man of natural fluency of speech, and for over fifty years has been an active and energetic preacher inthe Baptist Church. His father, Jesse Johnson, was a well-to-do farmer ofGeorgia. The maternal grandfather of our subject came to the United States from Ireland [p.1332] when young, and settled in Pennsylvania, where he was married. He was named Jesse Jennings, and died in Tennessee. James E. Johnson is the youngest of a family of five sons and four daughters. He was reared upon a farm, but received a common-school education during his early youth. During the latter part of the war he served in Company H, Twenty-eighthMississippi Cavalry, Confederate Army, and after the war returned home. In 1869 he began life for himself as a farmer, and in 1872 began the study of medicine. In 1874 he studied with Dr. E. E. Winn, of Sherman, Tex., with whomhe remained a year. He then studied in Polk County, Ark., with Dr. J. W. Gwinn as a preceptor, since which time he has practiced with success. He lived in Polk County until 1884, when he came to Sebastian County, and after spending two years at Central he became a citizen of Lavaca, where he has already a wide and extended practice. In politics he is a Democrat, and as such represented Polk County in the Legislature one term. He has been a member of the Baptist Church since 1871. At this time he is master of Oak Bower Lodge No. 277. In 1872 he was united in marriage to Mary, daughter of Samuel D. Ryan and Mary McKanse, natives of Georgia and Tennessee, respectively. Mrs. Johnson is a native of Georgia, and the mother of five sons. She also belongs to the Baptist Church.  SOURCE: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889, p. 1332 Contributed by Michael Brown

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J. M. Kelleam, M. D.
J. M. Kelleam, M. D., and coroner of Sebastian County, was born in Franklin County, Ark., November 6, 1858, and is a son of Dr. W. L. Kelleam, a native of Johnson County, Ark., where he practiced over thirty-five years. Our subject lived in Franklin County until sixteen years of age, and then entered the literary and scientific course of the Cumberland University, in Tennessee. Returning to Arkansas, he attended the University at Fayetteville one term, and then entered the University of Louisville, Ky. He graduated from the medical department of that institution in 1882, and then located at Fort Smith, where he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession since, and is meeting with well-deserved success. He is a member of the County and State Medical Society, and also of the Medical Association. In 1888 he was elected coroner of the county, and he is now filling that position with credit to himself and the community. While in Louisville, Ky., he married Miss Emma Wier, a lady of education and ability.  SOURCE: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889
Contributed by Michael Brown

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Dr. Robert T. McAlister
Born in Mississippi. His parents were born in Tennessee. Was married to Alis F. (born in Tennessee-her parents born in Mississippi). She died March 1913. "Southwest American" newspaper wrote, she "was the widow of Dr. Robert McAlister, pioneer physician of Greenwood and Hackett. She is survived by a son, Lawrence McAlister of Vinita, Oklahoma; two daughters, Mrs. Annie G. Walker of Fort Smith, Arkansas, and Mrs. L.C. Davenport of Antlers, Oklahoma.   Submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. John W. McConnell
physician and surgeon for the Kansas & Texas Coal Company, at Huntington, and senior member of the drug firm of McConnell & Brewster, was born in Lawrence County, Mo., in 1855, and is a son of Samuel C. and Catherine (Miller) McConnell, natives of Blount County, East Tenn., and Huntsville, Ala., respectively. The father was born in 1826, and when twenty-eight years of age went to Missouri. The mother was born in 1828, and [p.1339] when young accompanied her parents to Missouri. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. McConnell lived in Lawrence County until 1858, when they located near Fort Smith, in Sebastian County, Ark., where they are now successfully engaged in farming. During the war Mr. McConnell served in the Confederate army some time as a forage master. His father, John McConnell, came to the United States from Ireland or Scotland after the Revolution, and served in the War of 1812. He was a farmer and hunter, and died in East Tennessee. Our subject is the eldest of three living children, and after receiving a common-school education attended Cane Hill College. At the age of twenty he began the study of medicine, and at the expiration of eighteen months he practiced for two or three years. He then attended the medical department of the Arkansas Industrial Institute, at Little Rock, one year. After practicing two years more he returned to that institution, from which he graduated, in 1884, in a class of fifteen, receiving the first prize for general proficiency. Since that time he has had two students who have graduated from the same college with highest honors. After graduating he lived in Hackett City until 1887, when he came to Huntington, where he enjoys a good town practice. Since November, 1887, he has been engaged in the drug business in connection with his practice. He is a memberof the Sebastian County Medical Association at Fort Smith, and is secretary of the Greenwood Medical Association, besides being a member of the State Medical Association. In 1872 he married Sarah, daughter of the Rev. N. B. and Belle McNabb, formerly of Tennessee, where Mrs. McConnell was born. About 1872 the family came to this county. Since the age of eighteen Mr. McNabb has been a minister in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The Doctor has a family of two living children, and himself and wife belong to the Methodist EpiscopalChurch, South. He is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Hancock in 1880. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, American Legion of Honor, and Independent Order of Odd Fellows.  SOURCE: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889, p. 1339
Contributed by Michael Brown

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Dr. Thomas C. Miller
of Dayton, Sebastian Co., Ark., was born in Jennings County, Ind., October 23, 1846, and is a son of Jonathan M. and Helen M. (Thomas) Miller, who were born in Indiana in 1823, and New York in 1828, respectively. They were married in Indiana, August 29, 1844, and were early settlers of that State. In 1856 they removed to Clinton County, Mo., in 1862 went to Effingham County, Ill., and in 1868 went to Caldwell County, Mo. In 1880 they became residents of Dayton. The father died here November 15, 1887, a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the mother died March 1, 1885. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Robert Miller, was of Scotch- Irish descent, and a native of North Carolina. He was an early pioneer of Jennings County, Ind., during the days when, for safety, they attended church carrying a gun on the shoulder. He reared a large family, and died near Paris, Ind., about 1855. The maternal grandfather, Dewitt C. Thomas, was born in New York, settled in Indiana in an early day, and afterward removed to Illinois. Late in life he returned to Indiana, where he died. Dr. Miller is the [p.1348] eldest of a family of seven sons and one daughter. He attended common schools in Indiana, Missouri and Illinois before the age of seventeen, when he joined Company E, Sixty-second Illinois Veteran Infantry. He entered the army February24, 1864, and served until discharged, March 23, 1866. He served as hospital steward in Arkansas after October, 1865, having joined the army at Little Rock, Ark. He fought in no regular engagements, but participated in many skirmishes. December 3, 1865, he was married at Fort Smith to Eunice, daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Bader, natives of Germany, where they were reared and married. Mr. Bader served in the United States army after coming to America, and died at Fort Smith in 1848. Mrs. Miller is a native of New York, and has borne ten children, five of whom are living. After the war Mr. Miller went to Illinois, and at once began to study medicine at Mason, with Dr. M. McCarty. A year later he moved to Caldwell County, Mo., and then began to practice at Proctorville. In 1869 he located near Dayton, in which town he built the first house, the following year. He soon started a drug store in connection with his medical work, and about 1871 succeeded in having the Hodges Prairie Post-office removed to his place of business. He then named it the Dayton Post-office, and served as postmaster two years. Some years later he also engaged in thegeneral mercantile business. He is one of the leading spirits in all enterprises for the advancement of the country in this neighborhood, and himself and wife are zealous and active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He owns a farm of sixty-one acres near Dayton, and is a well-to-do man, although he began life in humble circumstances. He is a strong Republican, and in 1868 cast his first presidential vote for Grant. He belongs to the G. A. R., Pea Ridge Post No. 45, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. Encampment at Huntington. He is a Mason, having joined Reid Lodge No. 163, in Scott County, in 1872.  SOURCE: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1889, p. 1348 Contributed by Michael Brown

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Dr. Thomas C. Miller
practiced medicine in Dayton starting 1869. Instrumental in moving the Hodges Prairie Post Office to his drug store in Dayton. Born in Indiana in 1846. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Samuel M. Mosely
practiced medicine in Huntington, Arkansas. He was born in Alabama. Practiced medicine until his death(by gun shot wounds), in 1920. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Francis M. Motter/Mottu
practiced medicine in Salem(now Witcherville), Arkansas between 1870s to 1880s.  Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove
(Additional notes Jan 2010:) "He was born 1817, in Baltimore, MD. This is were he was educated and received his Doctor's degree. He went south, perhaps the second year of the Civil War, where he served as surgeon at least a year or perhaps two years. Soon after the Civil War he married Charity Elvira Ann Griffith Tucker Hughes and settled in Little River County, AR. He and several doctors had made an agreement that when they died they would donate their bodies to further the study of medicine and science. He died September 10, 1885. They lived about 25 miles southwest of Fort Smith.....This is from information that his youngest daughter, my mother's great aunt, passed down in her writings"..... Katie Sockey)

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Sparks Memorial Hospital graduating class of 1941


Source is Sparks Memorial Bullentin, May 1941.....submitted by Lynn

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Dr. Reeves M. Osborne
had a drug store in Mansfield, Arkansas in 1887, but for some reason, moved in 1888 to Huntington, Arkansas. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Samuel J. Ozmart
practiced medicine in Huntington, Arkansas. He was born in 1867 in Mississippi. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. John Seamans
practiced medicine in Mansfield, Arkansas. He was born in 1871 (unknown where), and died in 1954. He is buried in Mt. Harmony Cemetery.

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Dr. D. A. Sims
of Washburn, Arkansas. Born in Louisiana; Settled here in 1871......submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr.  Wyatt Slaughter
born Pitt Co., N.C., Feb. 23, 1826; died Ft. Smith, Ark., June 9, 1888; moved with parents to Tipton Co., Tenn.; married Mary A. Fleming, Chapel Hill, Tenn., July 7, 1847; joined Methodist Church in 1844; graduate, Botanico Medical College, Memphis, 1856; most of his years of medical practice spent in Tipton Co.; afterwards for his health eventually settled in Ft. Smith, Ark. 
Source: GENEALOGICAL ABSTRACTS FROM REPORTED DEATHS, THE NASHVILLE CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, 1897-1899 (Aug 4, 1888) By Jonathan Kennon Thompson Smith Copyright, Jonathan K. T. Smith, 2002  
More about Dr. Wyatt Slaugher is found in his son's bio in Goodspeeds History of Tennessee:
John Dennis Slaughter was born in Tipton County, Tenn., in 1850, and is a son of Dr. Wyatt and Mary Ann (Fleming) Slaughter. The father was a native of North Carolina and the mother of Tennessee. Dr. Slaughter was a practicing physician in Tipton and Shelby Counties for twenty-five years, then moved to Fort Smith, Ark., where he now carries an extensive practice. John D. Slaughter was educated in Tipton County. He spent some time clerking after finishing his education. He married Miss Mary M. Stewart, a daughter of J. D. Stewart, a well known farmer of Shelby County. Eight children have been born to this union, only five of them living. Mrs. Slaughter is an earnest member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In 1885 Mr. Slaughter established himself as a merchant at Stewartsville, in Shelby County, and has conducted his business in an enterprising, liberal manner, and has a large patronage. He is independent in politics and a man of generous disposition, and broad views.  Source: Goodspeed's History of Tennessee 1887  Submitted by Carol A. Zick

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Dr. Elam Stevenson


a well known physician and one of the organizers and twice president of the Arkansas State Eclectic Medical Association, was born near Pulaski, Giles county, Tennessee, and was there reared and given his primary education. He studied medicine in the Eclectic Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was graduated with the class of 1879. He began the practice of his profession in Shelby county, near Memphis, Tennessee, and in 1880 removed to Beebe, Arkan- sas, where he practiced in association with his father-in-law. Dr. Wyatt Slaughter, till 1882. In 1883 Dr. Stevenson took up his residence at Fort Smith, where he won great success. In 1880, in the office of Drs. Slaughter and Stevenson at Beebe, he and Dr. Slaughter and Dr. Pruett of Russellville, Dr. Park of Cabot. Dr. John S. Eastland of Judsonia, and Dr. M. P. Dumas of Bald Knob organized the Arkansas State Eclectic Medical Association. Dr. Steven- son has been twice chosen to its presidency and three times to its secre- taryship. There are now about two hundred and fifty eclectic physicians in the state, and about one hundred and fifty of them are enrolled in this association, which is in a flourishing condition. Dr. Stevenson is a mem- ber and an ex-president of the Arkansas State Board of Medical Ex- aminers representing the Eclectic school. He is a Past Grand Master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas. Dr. Stevenson is president of the board of trustees of the Central Methodist Episcopal church South, of Fort Smith, which position he has held by repeated re-election since the organization of that body. He was a leading spirit in founding the church and one of its constituent members. Mrs. Stevenson was Miss Martha C. Slaughter, who was born and reared in Shelby county, Tennessee. She is a daughter of Dr. Wyatt Slaughter, mentioned above. Dr. Stevenson's son. Dr. J. Eugene Steven- son, is associated with him in the practice of medicine. There are also two younger sons — Wyatt and Vincent Stevenson.  Source: HISTORICAL REVIEW OF ARKANSAS ITS COMMERCE, INDUSTRY AND MODERN AFFAIRS FAY HEMPSTEAD ILLUSTRATED VOL.Ill CHICAGO 1911  Submitted by Carol A. Zick

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Dr. James H. Stone-(Surgeon)
practiced medicine in Mansfield. Served as surgeon for the Rock Island Railroad. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. J. D. Williams
of Hartford was born in Arkansas......submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. G. G. Woods
practiced medicine in Huntington, Arkansas, beginning in 1904. It is recorded he delivered an estimated 3,000 babies during his medical service to the area. All deliveries were "home deliveries." Born in 1876. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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Dr. Merle Woods
practiced medicine in Huntington, Arkansas, starting in 1934, alongside his father, Dr. G. G. Woods. Source: A History of:Mansfield School District,1994.....submitted by Deborah Musgrove

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