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From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 119 dtd June 30, 2003
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2003 07:25:35 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 119 
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
June 30, 2003
(c) 2003 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)


RECIPIENTS PLEASE READ: You are receiving this email because you are a BB 
member or have asked to be added to our distribution list.  If you wish to 
discontinue these newsletters, email Gberghold@AOL.com with message "remove". 
("Cancel" will cancel membership, homepage listings and mail.) Send address and 
listing changes to the same place. Sign your email with your full name
and include 
BB in the subject line. Send no attachments or graphics unless well known to 
me.  Please keep changes to a minimum. To join the BB, see our homepage. We 
can't help with non-Burgenland family history. Appropriate
comments and articles 
are appreciated. Our staff and web site addresses are listed at the end of 
newsletter section "C". Introductions, notes and articles without a by-line are 
written by the editor and reflect his views. Please exchange data in a 
courteous and cooperative manner-not to do so defeats the purpose of our 
organization. 


IMPORTANT POLICY NOTICE!!! WE'VE HAD MEMBERS COMPLAIN THAT BECAUSE THEIR  
EMAIL ADDRESSES WERE PUBLISHED IN THE NEWSLETTERS,
THEY ARE  RECEIVING MORE MAIL 
THAN THEY WISH TO RECEIVE. OUR POLICY IS THAT ANY EMAIL RECEIVED BY YOUR 
EDITOR IS CONSIDERED MATERIAL FOR POSSIBLE
PUBLICATION AND IT MAY ALSO CONTAIN YOUR 
NAME AND/OR EMAIL ADDRESS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO DECIDE WHAT WILL BE 
PUBLISHED BUT WE WILL TAKE YOUR PRIVACY INTO CONSIDERATION,  IF SO INSTRUCTED. 
ADDING THE WORDS "DO NOT PUBLISH" TO YOUR MAIL WILL RESULT IN ITS NOT BEING 
PUBLISHED. REMEMBER; HOWEVER,
 THAT SHARING INFORMATION IS WHAT THE BB IS ALL ABOUT.  


This first section of our 4-section newsletter includes the following:

1. Taste Of The Burgenland-Gulyas Soup-Goulash Soup
2. More Members Tour Burgenland-Pum
3. Zuberbach and Narda
4. St. Bernard's Church, St. Paul, MN
5. Canadian Burgenland Immigration Records
6. Zwetolitz School Project Awarded An "A" (see BB News No. 118)


1. TASTE OF THE BURGENLAND-GULYAS SUPPE-GOULASH SOUP

I've had requests for this recipe, having mentioned it in newsletter no. 39A. 
It appears a few search engines have been asked to search on the word 
"goulash or goulash
soup and we've then been contacted. Somewhere I read that Gulyas 
(goulash) is one of the leading recipes used in the United States. It rivals 
spaghetti as an ethnic favorite. Unless of Austrian or Hungarian descent; 
however, few people know of the goulash counterpart-goulash soup, a favorite 
European dish. 


Gulyässuppe has an ancient origin. It comes from the steppes of Russia, where 
 Magyar  (and other tribal groups) carried dried meat with them tied to the 
harness of their horses. Legend tells us that meat was also fastened under 
saddles
so it would be tenderized. When they wished to eat, they built a fire over

which they hung a kettle. Meat and water were added to the kettle along with 
salt and what ever wild herbs or onions were available. This was simmered for 
hours. In its thickened form, using larger pieces of meat, it was gulyäs 
(goulash), in its thinner form with more liquid, it was gulyäs suppe.
(Note-my wife 
makes a tasty lunch time soup out of left over Goulash, by adding beef 
bouillon and a few other ingredients to taste.) After peppers
were introduced into 
Hungary during the Turkish invasions, they were sun dried into paprika and 
added to the traditional gulyäs and suppe, replacing expensive black pepper. 
Onions, lard, garlic and paprika became Hungarian staples and were later 
incorporated in this as well as other Hungarian cuisine.


The following  recipe is from a cook book mentioned below, via my wife's kitc
hen, and takes advantage of modern ingredients and Berghold family tastes. It 
will appeal to most American tastes and is not difficult to prepare. Potatoes 
can be eliminated and the soup served only with bread or crackers,  or no 
carbohydratws if desirous of cutting same. Likewise
any non-cholesterol oil such 
as canola or olive can replace butter or lard.  Pinched dumplings (nockerln or 
noodles can also replace potatoes; to make use-3/4 cup flour, 1 egg , salt, 
little water if necessary; make a stiff dough and drop small pieces into the 
soup-when they rise to the surface, they are done. To really enjoy this soup, 
serve with a cold European bean salad, home baked bread and a strong Hungarian 
red wine like Egri Bikaver (Bull's blood of Eger). You can also forget your 
diet, have a second course of cabbage, bean, turnip or potato strudel and then 
follow with a fruit strudel dessert.
Gastronomic heaven!

Gulyässuppe Burgenland Style:

1 lb beef cubed (trim all fat)
1 lb onions chopped fine
1 lb potatoes, peeled and cubed
1/3 cup carrots grated
3T shortening, butter, cooking oil or fat (Hungarians used 3T lard)
4 T flour
2 1/2 T sweet Hungarian (Szeged) paprika
2 cloves garlic crushed
1 tsp. crushed caraway seed
3/4 tsp dried marjoram (some use more to taste -maybe 1 1/2 tsp)
1 tsp salt (more if using regular beef broth rather than from beef bouillon) 
or to taste
1 tsp vinegar
1 quart beef broth (from bouillon unless you've just boiled some beef and 
have stock)
1/2 quart water
2 T tomato paste (adds nice touch and color) and a couple dashes hot paprika 
(half-sharp) or cayenne

Saute the beef, onions and garlic in shortening until golden brown. Remove 
garlic. Mix together flour and paprika, sprinkle over browned meat and onions, 
stir well. Add beef broth, deglazing pan, then water, vinegar and tomato paste; 
stir well. Add caraway seeds, marjoram, salt and hot pepper. Simmer covered 
for two hours until meat is tender. About 45 minutes before serving, add the 
cubed potatoes and grated carrots and continue simmering. Add more water if 
necessary. Serve piping hot. For a spicier variation add chopped chili peppers 
before serving or use half-sharp hot paprika. Makes 4 to 6 servings. Freezes 
well, but remove any left over potatoes.

Adapted from the traditional Burgenland recipe found in  "The Cooking Of 
Burgenland" by Alois Schmidl, Burgenland
Chef, published by Edition Roetzer 1992, 
English translation by BB Lehigh Valley Editor, Robert Strauch. 

Bob Strauch had previously forwarded the following minor variation:

Gulaschsuppe - Goulash Soup

1 oz. cooking oil
1 lb. beef cubes 
1 lb. chopped onions
3 large potatoes
1 tbsp. tomato puree
1 teaspoon hot Hungarian paprika
1 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika
1/2 teaspoon marjoram
salt, pepper and caraway seeds

Fry onions until golden brown, add spices and vinegar. Add meat, stir, then 
add tomato puree. Continue stirring until nicely browned. Cover with water and 
simmer slowly for 20 minutes. Add potatoes cut into small cubes. Simmer until 
potatoes are soft. Adjust seasoning, add a little more water if necessary.
You can 'stretch' the meat if needed, replacing part of the quantity by 
adding some sliced sausage.

ED. Note: Other traditional Burgenland (German-Hungarian-Croatian) recipes 
can be found in our newsletter
archives as nos. 39B, 74B, 81B, 83, 83A, 84A, 90, 
101, 104, 104C, 105B, 106B,109B, 114B.


2. MORE MEMBERS TOUR BURGENLAND-PUM
(ED. Note: BB member Theresia Andruchowitz-Halper was among those Austrian BB 
members attending the BG picnic where I was awarded the Burgenland 
Ehrenzeichen medal. The Pums mention her in answering  an inquiry.)

Thanks Janet, . . .for your inquiry, and  . . .YES, my wife Jan and I visited 
Burgenland last October 5th, 2002.  After spending a week touring 
Switzerland, and another
week traveling thru Austria, I rented a car from Hertz, picked 
up another member of the BB Bunch (Theresia Andruchowitz, a Social Worker 
living in Vienna, interested in Genealogy and Family Heritage, and fluent in 
German,
Hungarian, and English) and spent the entire day driving South from Vienna,

to visit my "Blood Relatives" at Welgersdorf and Grosspeterdorf , in SE 
Burgenland !  We were treated like ROYALTY, fed delicious foods and drink, 
communicated as best we could, EAT some more, drank some more, tasted
more home made 
desserts, met more of the villagers (the young teenagers helped with the 
language interpretations) . . .and thoroughly had a marvelous
GOOD time of it !  They 
certainly are excellent cooks, bakers, and "Festive Party-Social People" in 
Southeast Burgenland !  We loved every minute of it, and the hugs and tears at 
the end of the day, and return drive to Vienna (about an hour & a half away) 
were an emotional release !  Hertz International was very helpful in arranging 
the Ford car rental, and our companion and travel guide/Interpreter Theresia 
Andruchowitz,  was exceptional in her HELP & Assistance !  Without the Internet 
and the Burgenland Bunch information, and their members e-mail addresses, I 
probably would not have made the trek to SE Burgenland. I did see and visit 
where my Father lived, his school,  his church,
family store,  the "Exceptional" 
and incredible cemeteries and black marble headstones of my Grandparents and 
Great Grand-parents,  ( PUM, HORWATH, SOMOGY, WAGNER, WERDERITS, LUTTENBERGER, 
)  etc, . . .all-in-all, . . .due make the trip Janet, should you care to 
visit your family heritage at Burgenland-Austria-Hungary,
 . . .whenever you can 
arrange the time.  Should you get to the Green Bay area of Wisconsin, . . .I'd 
be happy to show you my photos and maps, etc.  Thanks again for your interest 
and inquiry, . . .cheers and Best Wishes,  . . .

Bob and Janis Pum (HAPPY and fortunate to be BB members in NE Wisconsin)


3. ZUBERBACH AND NARDA (from Fritz Königshofer)

Fritz writes: This is in reference to the e-mail conversation reported by 
Gerry Berghold in the BB Newsletter, issue 118C of May 31, 2003.
 
Zuberbach (Hungarian name Szabar) and Nagynarda were villages in old Vas 
county of Hungary with predominantly ethnic Croat populations.  When the old 
kingdom of Hungary broke up at the end of WW 2,
Zuberbach became part of the new 
state of Burgenland in Austria, while Nagynarda remained in Vas county of 
Hungary.  In 1950, Nagynarda and Kisnarda
were united and now have the name Narda.
 
Zuberbach and Narda are not far from each other, about 10 miles only, but 
today they are separated by the
Hungarian-Austrian border.  With the forthcoming 
accession of Hungary to the EU, one can look forward to the day where this 
border will soon only exist on paper and the old connectedness of land and 
culture will be back.
 
If you intend to search your roots, Zuberbach had its Roman Catholic parish 
in Dürnbach (Incéd), while civil recording (from October 1895 onwards) was in 
Weiden bei Rechnitz.  I don't know whether Nagynarda was its own parish, but 
the proper parish would be easy to find out.
 
(ED. Note: Nagynarda was its own parish. Records from 1722-1895 are available 
from the LDS as microfilm nos. 0601442-443.

4. ST. BERNARD'S CHURCH-ST. PAUL, MN (from Joelle Knopf; 
joelle55113@yahoo.com
I was wondering if you might like to pass along this information.  My family 
church and neighborhood were populated by Austrian immigrants.  I called the 
church this morning and they said that the church was established in 1890 and 
the records go back to that date.  Others in the "Bunch" may find them helpful. 
St. Agnes is only a few miles south of St. Bernard's so if you wouldn't be 
able to find something
in one church you may find it in the other. St. Bernard's 
Church Business Office, 1160 Woodbridge St., St. Paul, MN 55117 Phone:  (651) 
488-6733


5. CANADIAN BURGENLAND IMMIGRATION RECORDS-(from Jean Novosel)

I thought you might like to add this website to your newsletter.
National Archives of Canada
ArchiviaNet  (On-line Research Tool - Databases)
Immigration Records (1925 to 1935) which includes Burgenlanders to Canada
http://www.archives.ca/02/02011802_e.html 
Thank you for your great work.  Jean Novosel  (Toronto, Canada)


 6. ZWETOLITZ SCHOOL PROJECT AWARDED AN "A" (from Frank Zwetolitz; 
zwetolit@us.ibm.com)

A big Thank You to everybody!  My daughter received a grade of 100% for her 
project. Given more time she would have done more research.  She provided the 
majority of original thought.  I helped her with some of the symbolism.  I also 
shared the e-mails with the entire family.  They were very delighted to read 
the information you provided.

The design chosen was:

A) Shield template:

1) At the top was grapevines to signify my daughter's great-grandfather's 
(Zwetolitz)
interest in wine making.  He would always make wine and share it with 
the neighborhood, who then would play and sing music when the wine was ready 
for consumption.

2) A motto was used:  Love, Wisdom and Honor. Where the flower represents 
love of beauty, the eagle in the crest representing wisdom and then the cross 
showing honor to God.

Lower Left:
The symbol of Burgenland is a crest (a single headed eagle whose wing tips 
hold two crosses-he is perched on a mountain and has a crown on his head). On 
his chest is a shield with red-white-red-white horizontal lines. My Burgenland 
family heritage extends to at least 1524.

Lower Right:
Coat of Arms for Croatia.  This is where my ancestors migrated from in 1524.  
The coat of arms (13 red squares and 12 silver squares arranged 
intermittently
in a 5 times 5 pattern). This coat of arms was affirmed by 15th century

documents. It is a very old symbol of Croatia resembling a red-white chess
table. 
Now it also has a crown composed of five regional symbols representing 1) The 
oldest known Croatian coat of arms, 2) Dubrovnik, 3) Dalmatia, 4) Istria and 
5) Slavonia.

Upper Left:
The flower is an Edelweiss.  The flower grows in the mountains of Austria. 
The flower is used to represent all things pure and white, simple
and beautiful. 
 The flower is used here to represent the family meaning of flower, blossom 
or bloom.  The Edelweiss flower has always become to be
know as a "Medal of Honor" because of the strength and bravery needed to 
reach the flower high in the mountains.  Also known for
its fame of the emperors.  
Just as Austrian Emperor Franz Josef had a painted picture of his wife 
Elizabeth with silver stars of Edelweiss to adorn it.
                                                                
Upper Right:
The cross is used to represent the other meaning of our last name. 
Phonetically spelt "svet" has the slavic meaning
of saintly or holy. However, our 
families continued reverence to God and church has given this symbol a special 
meaning to me.

In the Middle:

A "Z" with a circle around it to show the new world spelling and ties to the 
old world.

* We respond: Well done-the BB also awards your daughter an "A" for a great 
job. I hope this moves some other schools to develop an interest in family 
history. Sharing your daughter's project
with the family was a plus that may well 
live on in  future generations. Your immigrant family members and their origin 
have achieved immortality. 

*Bob Strauch replies: Gerne gescheh'n!. Kudos to both of you. I can't 
remember if we advised you to
have a look at the site www.best-of-ungarn.com , which 
has lots of fotos of the border villages,
including Raabfidisch/Rabafüzes. Also the site www.best-of-burgenland.com. 
Congrats again and hope to see you at Stiftungsfest.

Newsletter continues as no. 119A.

From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 119A dtd June 30, 2003
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2003 07:27:06 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 119A
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
June  30, 2003
(c) 2003 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)

BURGENLAND BAND CONCERT-CHICAGO JULY 20-CONTACT TOM GLATZ!

BB MIDWEST PICNIC AUGUST 2-SEE HOMEPAGE FOR DATA

This second section of our 4-section newsletter includes:

1. Was Mom Really A Citizen?-Bob Eder
2. Why Wasn't A Border Village Ceded To Austria (or Hungary)?
3. Purpose Of Ethnic Organizations Like The BB and BG?
4. Burgenland Composer Michael Brand (Mihály Mosonyi )-Fritz Königshofer 
5. Finding Villages-Spelling-Spelling-Spelling!
6. How To Find New Member Data
7. Austrian Band At Musikfest 2003/Bethlehem, PA-Bob Strauch    

1. WAS MOM REALLY A CITIZEN? (from Bob Eder)

(ED. Note: I often tell members to check naturalization papers filed by their 
immigrant ancestors. However many immigrants planned to return to the 
Burgenland-it's estimated as many as 25% did, and therefore they did not
apply for 
citizenship. War then intervened as did a better life style and return was 
delayed or forgotten. Naturalization was put off and sometimes ignored. Some 
families were trapped by a change in the laws. Bob tells us of one case in his 
family.)

Bob writes: I have a story that might be of interest to BB readers. It has to 
do with the discovery that my mother, living in the United states for fifty 
years,  believing herself to be a citizen, was not! This revelation occurred 
after I applied for a position with National Security Agency in 1957. The NSA 
asked me to prove that my parents were citizens. This was easy in my father's 
case. His father had been naturalized on Dec. 22, 1915. The Naturalization Law 
at that time automatically provided citizenship for his foreign born wife and 
children.

My mother's case was  more complex. She arrived at Ellis Island June 3, 1907 
(age 1 year, 4 mos.) with her mother and two sisters. They joined her father, 
Jacob Pogledic, who had arrived Jan. 9, 1907. They took up residence with 
friends in New York.

Sometime before 1910, Jacob died and my grandmother re-married, to  one Jacob 
Stutz, an immigrant from Germany. Jacob, now my mother's step-father did not 
apply for citizenship until May 21, 1924-two years two late for the automatic 
family citizenship provision to apply. The law was altered Sept. 22, 1922 and 
excluded the foreign born family provision.

Until the truth was unearthed, my mother simply believed she was a citizen, 
and of course in her heart she was. I wonder how many others passed on without 
knowing the truth. There was a happy ending for my mother. On Aug. 29, 1957, 
amid much hoopla, she spoke the Oath of Allegiance in front of Judge Kenneth H. 
Koch at the Lehigh County Court House in Allentown, PA. My hope is that this 
story sparks additional genealogical research by those who are still not 
certain that their parents were citizens. 


2. WHY WASN'T A BORDER VILLAGE CEDED TO AUSTRIA (OR HUNGARY)? (courtesy 
Albert Schuch, Bob Strauch, Fritz Königshofer, et al)

(ED. Note: The question of why some villages are in one country or another 
constantly surfaces. When you view the convoluted border of present day 
Burgenland, you may well wonder why it was done in such a seemingly
haphazard manner. 
Most borders follow straight lines (viz. US western states) or natural 
barriers like rivers or mountains. Why is Burgenland
so different? The first reason 
is that the allies in WWI, as victors of that conflict, wanted to dismantle 
Austria/Hungary. Secondly they wished to do so on racial and ethnic  lines (per 
US President Wilson's 10 Points-specifically the Doctrine of Self 
Determination) in order to preclude future
conflict. Almost an impossible task considering 
the vast ethnic make-up of the empire. As we all know, Germans, Magyars and 
various Slavic groups had migrated all over the empire for centuries, even 
though some were more pre-dominant in some areas than others. Various treaties 
followed the end of  the war, but it was mainly the Treaty of St. Germain which 
established the first
eastern border configuration of the new Austria. Since the 
western Hungarian counties of Vas, Sopron and Moson were mostly populated by 
people of Germanic extraction, this area, the proposed new province of 
Burgenland (although not then yet named as such), was ceded to Austria. Various 
problems immediately arose, particularly in the Sopron area, where Magyar 
(Hungarian)
influence created civil unrest. The Hungarians claimed (and there is 
evidence
to support their claim) that given a choice via plebiscite, many of the

non-Hungarian ethnic groups would have voted to remain in Hungary rather
than be 
ceded to Austria. Plebiscites were mainly denied by the allied powers except 
for the Sopron region, which did in fact vote to remain in Hungary, thus 
denying the new province what would have been its capital and
severing natural north 
-south rail and road networks. Wasp-waisted Burgenland was the result. The 
Treaty of Trianon then modified the previous treaty,
establishing the Burgenland 
as we know it today. (This treaty also addressed other Balkan borders as 
well.) Ethnic and political reasons aside, there were certainly other factors 
which entered the picture, as the following
exchange of correspondence indicates.)

Albert writes (some time ago): Fritz, Thanks for forwarding this interesting 
exchange.

<< ... why Rábafüzes ... did not end up in Burgenland ... Jákabháza, Felsõ 
and Alsó Rönök ... something to do with the fact that the Bavarian royal family 
owned a lot of land in that area ... >>

Certainly the Bavarian Prince was a factor. But so was the economy: Those 
villages were used to selling their agricultural goods & other products in 
Szombathely (or had their jobs there), hence many inhabitants wanted their
communities to remain in Hungary.

An interesting sidenote: The weekly "Der Freie Burgenländer" of 28 Dec 1921 
published a letter received from one Josef Taus in "Schiloh, Ohio, 
Nordamerika". He writes (dated 1
Dec 1921) that he had learned of the existence of this 
paper by reading a Viennese paper. He asks for political pressure to claim the 
German villages Raab-Fidisch, Jakobshof, Ober- and Unter-Radling for Austria.

Mr. Taus apparently also sent a letter to the Austrian State Department. This 
(anonymous)letter has been published in Otto Guglia's "Das Werden des 
Burgenlandes" (Eisenstadt 1961) and is dated 19 Sep 1921. Therein the author
(who signs as "Ein deutscher Burgenländer"; the letter has been stamped in 
Ohio) explains why the Raab river would make a suiteable border, from 
Unter-Radling to Jennersdorf.

Bob Strauch writes: << From what I've read, the villagers were swayed by the 
influence of the priest, Father Pataki, who was kidnapped one night (by 
Freischärler from
the Steiermark, they say) and found shot to death in the woods 
outside of town the next morning. >>

Guglia's book also includes an official Austrian police report about Father 
Pataki's death. The report (prepared by Revierinspektor Alois Luggos) states 
that Father Pataki was in favour auf Pernau's annexation to Austria and that
he has been abducted and killed by Hungarians. If this is of interest to one 
of you I can provide the whole report (just one page).

3. PURPOSE OF ETHNIC ORGANIZATIONS LIKE THE BURGENLAND BUNCH (BB) & THE 
BURGENLANDISCHE GEMEINSCHAFT (BG)? (with thanks to Bob Strauch  and Tom Glatz)

Some time ago Bob Strauch sent me an excerpt from the Allentown Morning Call 
which included a letter to the editor complaining about local ethnic 
organizations
formed by the descendants of  Pennsylvania Palatinates (commonly known
as 
Pennsylvania Dutch). The complaints mainly concerned the fact that ethnic 
organizations often become merely  social groups, interested only in eating, 
drinking and having a good time (albeit with ethnic overtures). Some
also engage 
in worthwhile local social works, sponsor money raising events and even 
commercial ventures like fairs and concerts. Although these
activities have value, 
they do little to promote ethnic heritage or preservation of ethnic language, 
the prime reasons for founding the organizations in the first place.

When we consider the decline of ethnic clubs, we tend to blame television, 
current family activities and modern life styles. One rarely hears that an even 
more important  reason may be the lack of other than social  reasons for 
becoming an active club member.  The Internet has
changed all that and we now have 
purely non-social ethnic organizations like the BB (although there are some 
gatherings of Internet groups like our own mid-west picnic sponsored by Hap 
Anderson), who are strictly devoted to
preserving heritage and language. That they 
attract large memberships (like our own 1000+ members) is indicative that 
they are fulfilling other than a social need. Family history certainly adds a 
very strong element, which is often  completely lacking among purely social 
groups. Language preservation,
while viewed as impossible and hard work by some, is 
readily taken up by others, viz. the Hianzen efforts of the BG and the 
language queries received by the BB.

We can't ignore the fact; however, that we are social animals. We require 
physical as well as mental interaction. A physical meeting often cements 
relationships which
have been acquired strictly through mail, telephone  or Internet 
communication. When I visualize the BB and BG, I see the faces and hear the 
voices
of those whom I have personally met. The others are still a vague outline,

even though we may have become kindred spirits. 

I have come to the conclusion late in life that the preservation of ethnic 
heritage and language has a significance far beyond what we may imagine. As 
families fragment geographically and disperse, as the older generations
pass on, 
we may well wonder why we feel rootless and alone in a seemingly uncaring and 
shrinking world, increasingly populated by strangers of an ethnic heritage 
other than our own. Family history and the study of ethnic heritage
can go a long 
way in supplying roots and a circle of family. This is the magic we find as 
members of an Internet based BB, but it should also be assisted by social 
activity as provided by an organization like the BG. I strongly
urge BB members to 
consider joining a local Heritage group like the BG. If a BG group has not been 
formed in your vicinity, consider any Austrian, Hungarian or Croatian group 
or join the BG, by sending annual dues of $15 to their Güssing office in order 
to receive their newsletter and be advised of world wide Burgenland affairs. 
You will be promoting your ethnic heritage as well as advancing your family 
history. Any BB member in the Chicago area can contact Tom Glatz, in the Lehigh 
Valley area, Bob Strauch.  More information concerning the BG and their snail 
mail address can be found by viewing their website at www.burgenlaender.com . 
They can also be reached via the BB homepage.


4. BURGENLAND COMPOSER MICHAEL BRAND-(from Fritz Königshofer) Mihály Mosonyi,

In the slowly progressing BB newsletter series on "Composers of the 
Burgenland" (of which so far articles on Joseph Haydn and Franz Liszt have been 
published), my next installment would be on Mihály Mosonyi, the first Hungarian 
writer of symphonies, who was born in 1815 in Frauenkirchen
as Michael Brand, son 
of the master furrier Michael Brand and Elisabeth nee Thell.

It seems that the first Brands who moved to Frauenkirchen (in about 1776) 
were a Michael and wife Franziska, perhaps the grandparents
of the composer. Mr. 
Gmasz, who works for the Austrian TV/Radio and heads the city archive in 
Neusiedl, wrote to me that the records of Neusiedl
show in 1770 the marriage of a 
Michael Brand, furrier, with Franziska nee Gartner.

Does anyone have any information on this couple? They did not have children 
in Neusiedl, and may have lived in Mönchhof for a few years before settling in 
Frauenkirchen. That means, if they indeed were identical with the Michael and 
Franziska of Frauenkirchen.


5. FINDING VILLAGES-SPELLING-SPELLING-SPELLING!

The BB has solved the problem of finding villages in the Burgenland. If you 
can't find a village that is in Burgenland today, you are not searching our 
website. A search of Albert's List, our
Village List, the Burgenland Map Site and 
our archives will find your village plus much more. There are three places 
however which can cause trouble. Burgenland records often refer to border 
villages which are now in Hungary,
Slovenia or Slovakia. They now carry names in 
those languages as opposed
to German. Our map site will identify some, the others 
may take some searching in other websites like those available from 
World-Gen-Web (through Roots-L). None the less you must be able to spell them 
correctly. Below
is an example as written by Albert Schuch who is replying to a query 
we recently received. 

The query stated: "Her father was Georg Czuppon, born in Szentpeterfa, 
Hungary
in 1862, served as village Wachtmeister in Stegersbach, Austria until about

1922, died in 1936; married to Johanna Korpits in 1896 in Goruja-Lendava 
(spelling is from record, but no idea where it is).

Albert replies: Exchange the "u" for an "n" and you have "Gornja Lendava", 
today's "Grad", a place (an old castle) in the North-Eastern corner of
Slovenia, 
close to the Austrian and Hungarian border.

6. HOW TO FIND NEW MEMBER DATA

To find BB members, you just have to search our website member list. You may 
not have done so recently and thus you may have missed some. You may not know 
that new members are identified at the end (following "Z") of our member list 
for a short time before being alphabetized.

A member writes:I read the BB newsletter last night.  I am amazed at how it 
has grown in such a short amount of time.  I do miss seeing who the new members 
are every month and what names they are researching.  

Reply: Data concerning new members would reduce the space available for other 
articles in the newsletters. Since the same data is available from the 
membership list at our website, I opted to stop publishing them some time ago. 
Hannes Graf, our membership editor, also lists new members with
a "new" tag at the 
end of the membership list. He holds them there for a short time, before 
adding them to the alphabetic section. To see new members
daily or weekly, just go 
to the BB website, click on membership and go to the end of the list.  

7. BB-AUSTRIAN BAND AT MUSIKFEST 2003/BETHELEHEM. PA (from Bob Strauch) 
    
Here's something of possible interest to BB members in the Lehigh Valley or 
those planning to visit the area in August. This year's Guest European Band at 
Musikfest in Bethlehem (August 1-10) comes from Austria: "Ludwig Gruber und 
seine Steirischen Musikanten" (Ludwig Gruber and his Styrian Musicians), who 
hail from Krieglach in the northeastern Steiermark. Krieglach lies in the Mürz 
Valley between Bruck an der Mur and Mürzzuschlag, on the main train line 
Graz-Vienna. For more information on the group, as well as photos and listening 
examples, check out their website at www.musikmarkt.at/steirmus/. For complete 
information on Musikfest, including performance
schedules, go to www.musikfest.org

Newsletter continues as no. 119B.

From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 119B dtd June 30, 2003
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2003 07:27:45 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 119B
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
June 30, 2003
(c) 2003 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)

This third section of our 4-section newsletter includes:

1. Online Genealogy Classes
2. Croatian And Other Records  In The Burgenland Parishes Of Szt. Peterfa and 
St. Kathrein
3. Was Meint "Heimat"? (How Is "Heimat" Defined?)
4. Some Help For A Lehigh Valley, PA Query (Vollman)


1. ONLINE GENEALOGY CLASSES (courtesy Margaret Kaiser)

I'm sure  we have some members who have little or no experience with 
genealogy. While the BB can help those interested in Burgenland family
history, such 
help often requires at least a basic familiarity with genealogical tools and 
methods. The BB was never intended to be a purely genealogical website, it is 
more of a micro-genealogical family history center. 

One of the reasons behind the formation of the BB is that the Burgenland is 
pretty unique among family history locales. First, Burgenland descendants in 
the US are rarely more than three generations removed from
the homeland of their 
 immigrant forebears. They thus are often fully aware of their pedigree in 
the new land and often have knowledge of the their origins. This differs from 
other groups (the Pennsylvania Palatines for instance or the 
Scotch-Irish-English immigrants of colonial days.
Here the thrust is on American pedigree first 
and foremost as opposed to European pedigree. In other words, BB members are 
interested mostly in European family history whereas others are more interested 
in American. There is a considerable difference in the two approaches.

Secondly, the Burgenland is a mixed ethnic area with a long history of 
migration and strife. At least four languages will be encountered and political 
changes often affect where records will be found. A knowledge of history and 
religious change is a necessary tool.

American family history, on the other hand,  requires much emphasis on 
census, land records, naturalization
records, wills, military service  and the like 
whereas European (especially Burgenland) requires emphasis on church and civil 
records (particularly those great LDS microfilms of the 1828-1921 period). 
The 1825 Hungarian census is secondary. Both Burgenland and American family 
history require some knowledge
of shipping lists and immigration records as far as 
the link to Europe is concerned. Internet availability is also common to 
both.

Members interested in preparing a valid genealogy or family history will 
often encounter the
need for expertise in both American and European genealogical 
methods. This is where a structured class or educational help in genealogical 
tools and methods will be of value. We have often encouraged members to 
acquire
a genealogical "how to" book. For some this is the answer. For others,
a 
class may be a better approach. 

Member Margaret Kaiser, a proven Burgenland genealogist and frequent 
contributor to this newsletter, has forwarded the following which you
may find of 
value. I have not investigated this offer myself, but I do
know that Ancestry.com 
has been doing some good work in this area. As usual, the BB cannot guarantee 
results or value, you must make up your own mind. If anyone participates in 
any of these classes, we would appreciate your comments.

Margaret writes: These on-line classes may be helpful to researchers 
beginning their Burgenland research.  Course outlines
can be read by copying and 
pasting the URL/s into Internet browsers. 
I recommend locally taught classes when 
these are available.  Local genealogy societies and community schools often 
conduct excellent beginning to intermediate genealogy classes at reasonable 
cost, however, these classes are
generally not specific to Burgenland and Eastern 
European area research.  These listed on-line classes can be considered 
overviews.        

Upcoming Online Genealogy Classes at MyFamily.com

Each class is $29.95 and includes: 
--- Four weeks of lessons and interaction with a genealogy expert 
--- 30-day subscription to Ancestry.com including more than 1.8 billion names 
and online census images 
--- Tips and advice on how to find ancestors online 
--- Lessons through site interaction and worksheets 
--- Ability to create your family tree using Online Family Tree software and 
downloadable genealogy forms 
--- Collaboration with other site members to grow your family tree over the 
course of a year 

Immigration And Naturalization Research Class 
03 July 2003 
George G. Morgan 
http://ancestry.myfamily.com/rd/redir.asp?targetid=3598&sourceid=831

*NEW* Other German-Speaking Countries Research Class 
07 July 2003 
Adele Marcum
(Switzerland, Austria, Germans from Russia, and other small German-speaking 
settlements such as Luxembourg, Polynesian Islands, etc.)
http://ancestry.myfamily.com/rd/redir.asp?targetid=4622&sourceid=831

*NEW* Eastern European Research Class 
24 July 2003 
Lisa Alzo 
(Austria, Hungary, Czechia, Poland, the Ukraine, Rusyn, and Bohemia)
http://ancestry.myfamily.com/rd/redir.asp?targetid=4624&sourceid=831


2. CROATIAN AND OTHER RECORDS IN THE BURGENLAND PARISHES OF SZT. PETERFA AND 
ST. KATHREIN

In earlier newsletters, I have mentioned the work done by BB members John 
Lavendoski and Frank Teklits in photo copying and digitizing the church records 
of the parishes of  Szent Peterfa (Hungary) and St. Kathrein. If you have 
missed them, the following message from John Lavendoski to Martin Ivancsics (a 
member of the Burgenland governor's office), will introduce the availability of 
these records.


John Lavendoski writes (June 2002) to Martin Ivancsics:
It was with great pleasure that I spoke with you in Northampton during your 
visit. Our discussion at the Edelweiss concerning Croatian settlers in the 
region near Eberau was very enjoyable.

Here is a review of the points which we discussed:

1) The Burgenland Croatian population of Northampton (PA) primarily hails 
from the following villages:

Szentpeterfa (Prostrum / Pertovo Selo),
Edlitz,
Kathrein,
Harmisch,
Kroatisch Ehrensdorf,
Winten, Gass, Eberau Moschedorf, etc.

2) Several researchers from Szentpeterfa and also from the US including 
myself, and also Frank Teklits (who received one of the awards at the Coplay 
Sagerbund) are quite interested in tracing the origins of these people back to 
Croatia and discovering
properly the circumstances surrounding their movement into 
present day Burgenland.

3) Over the past 5 years or so, I have made digital copies of thousands of 
early Roman
Catholic church records from the Szentpeterfa and Kathrein parishes. 
These records go back to 1683.

4) Frank Teklits has constructed a detailed index of these records which is 
in Microsoft Excel format. It is sortable by name and date. It is a great aid 
in determining which Croatian names flourished over the years in these areas.

5) Sadly, 1683 in the cut off point, so it reveals nothing about the late 
1500s
and early 1600s, when many of these Croatian families may have come to
the 
area.

We are interested in sharing our info with your office and also in receiving 
your help in tracing the origins of these families in the Eberau area.


3. WAS MEINT "HEIMAT"? HOW IS "HEIMAT" DEFINED? (courtesy Bob Strauch)
Bob Strauch forwarded the following from The Week in Germany, May 30, 2003
Editors: Margaret Dornfeld, Valerie Belz
Contributing Writers: Tanya Jones
e-mail: twig2@germany-info.org

This is a partial extract:
Where the Heart Is? What Heimat Means Today
"Germans are known for their attachment to Heimat - a word with broad and 
deep connotations commonly translated as "homeland" or "home." Since the 19th 
century, Heimat has been invoked to boost everything from nationalist causes to 
sentimental movies about life in the high Alps. But what does it really mean to 
the average German? According to a survey recently conducted by the social 
research institute Emnid for Reader's Digest Deutschland, 94% of Germans, 
cutting across all age groups, have a place or an idea they call Heimat.
For 32% of 
these, it is the place "where I live now," while for 14% it is Germany as a 
whole. Another 13% equate Heimat with family, 12% with their birthplace, 11% 
with "a certain region or landscape," another 11% with "where
I feel at ease" and 
an equal number with the idea of "home in general." (end of extract)

A BB definition. As a Burgenland writer, I use the term often. To me it means 
the homeland of my forbears-my Burgenland grandparents and their ancestors. 
It also refers to a special place in my own mind-the place of the origin of my 
clan, my family, the source of my European family history. I was born and 
raised in Allentown, PA-I no longer call it home-I don't think of it as my 
"heimat." I spent time in other places, then 30 years
in Delaware and now almost as 
many in Virginia.  I consider neither my "heimat." I have relocated too often 
to have deeply attached roots anywhere. A problem with today's American 
generations-few of us remain in one place
long enough to develop a  personal sense of 
"Heimat."
To a Burgenlaender who can look back on many generations of his family living 
in one house, one village; however, "Heimat" can only mean his village or at 
most the general geographic area of his village, his parish, his "Bezirk", his 
district. To an immigrant, it had even deeper meaning, it meant the source of 
his roots-the place where family still remained-the place for which he 
forever yearned, remembering
the good, forgetting the bad. Heimat to us, means our 
ancestral immigrants' heimat.

4. SOME HELP FOR A LEHIGH VALLEY, PA QUERY (from Bob Strauch & Margaret 
Kaiser)

Craig Vollman write to Bob Strauch.
I am writing you because I saw that you were the Lehigh Valley Editor and I 
would like your insight. My name is Craig Vollman. I live in North Carolina now 
but I was raised in Bethlehem.  I have been a BB member for some time and 
have found a lot
of information about my Vollman relatives.  My great grandfather 
Josef Vollmann came from Radafalva (Rudersdorf) in 1892. I found the Ellis 
Island records of his arrival.  I know my great grandmother Cecilia Kefer or 
(Kafer)? was from Burgenland (Raba Szt Kereztur-Heiligenkreuz)and came over in 
1893, but I am unable to find any arrival records for her.

I am unable  to find any marriage document for them. I checked with Lehigh 
and Northampton
county court houses with no luck. I believe they were married in 
late 1893 or 1894. Their first child was born on 01/05/1895 and baptized at 
Friedens Reformed Church in Friedensville Pa.  I found that in a book from that 
church at the Lehigh Historical society in Allentown, but they did not have 
any marriage document.  They also spelled the surname Folman.  They lived their 
entire life in  Friedensville then the Freemansburg area.  They were Lutheran 
and were baptized in the Lutheran church in Eltendorf , Burgenland 

Do you have any idea where I could look for any information to locate a 
marriage
document, either another county or church that was popular at that time
in 
history?  I would love to find that document. I am headed up that way in July 
and will be able to do more research. 

Bob replies:
 The only other possibility I can think of is St. Peter's Evang. Lutheran 
Church on Vine St. in S. Bethlehem, which was the main German-speaking Lutheran 
parish in Bethlehem (Holy Ghost being its Catholic counterpart) and where the 
Lutheran Burgenländers in Bethlehem would have gone. Just speculation, but 
maybe your great-grandparents married there and later joined the church in 
Friedensville. The church has its own website: www.stpetersbethlehem.org.
 
I have a friend here in Allentown named Julius Köfer (spelled Koefer now) who 
was born and raised in Rosendorf, not far from Heiligenkreuz. I went to the 
Ellis Island site and searched the names Kofer, Koefer, Koffer, Koeffer. I did 
find a Cecilia Koefer and a Cecilia Kofer, both from Heiligenkreuz, but coming 
in after 1900.
 
I'm copying Gerry Berghold as well as Margaret Kaiser from NJ on this for 
their input and ideas. Margaret has done a lot of research in S. Bethlehem.
 

Margaret Kaiser writes:  I looked for your family in Ancestryplus.com 
(available only in subscribing libraries), and found the following:

1910 PA Census
Enumeration District 0088
Visit 0145
County Northampton

Joseph Vollman, age 36, birth place Germany, Head of Household
Wife, Cele, age 32, born Germany
Son, Joseph J., age 15, born PA
Daughter, Cele, age 12, born PA
Daughter, Annie, age 11, born PA
Son, William, age 8, born PA
Daughter, Julia, age 6, born PA
Daughter Lucy, age 3, born PA
Daughter Ada, age NR, born PA (maybe NR = not readable)
Brother, Samuel, age 25, Germany

1930 census
Northampton County
Freemansburg borough
Enumeration district 48-59

Vollman, Joseph, Sr., Head, has radio, age 56, widowed, born Austria-Graz, 
immigrated 1892, occupation packer
Vollman, Samuel, brother, age 48, single, laborer, power & light company
Vollman, Anna, daughter, age 31, single, born PA, occupation none
Vollman, William, son, age 28, single, born PA, occupation none
Vollman, Ada, daughter, age 21, single, born PA, sewer in silk mill
Vollman, Lotti, daughter, age 17, single, born PA, examiner in silk mill
Vollman, Robert, son, age 14, single, born PA, none
Vollman, Esther, daughter, 12, single, born PA, none
  
I looked at the Eltendorf films which I have on permanent loan, but found the 
marriages for the late 1890s are on film no. 700738, which I do not have on 
loan.  You can order this film through your local Family History Center.  In 
some of the parish records I have seen, marriages in the USA were recorded
there 
as well.  These were recorded sometimes well after the fact.  Presumably the 
pastor/priest was advised by someone in the village of this event (or maybe 
the Churches in the USA notified the Church in Europe).  

I don't know about PA rules and regulations re marriages.  I was searching 
about a year ago for a couple who married in Philadelphia.  Their marriage 
record was found in court records.  I imagine the Church has a record as well.

If the 1910 census is correct and this is the family you are interested in 
the eldest child was Joseph Jr. who would appear to have been born in 1895 in 
PA.  I did not find this family in 1920 in PA; perhaps you will have more 
success.

It would appear that someone advised the census taker in 1910 that the family 
came from Germany, rather than Austria.

The following might be of interest to you
Vollman, Albar, from Rudersdorf, arrived 1902 at age 19
Vollmann, Anna, from Rudersdorf, arrived 1912, age 20
Vollman, Franz, from Lzt Keraszt, Hungary, arrived 1909 at age 27 
(Heiligenkreuz)
Vollmann, Rudolf, from Rudersdorf, Austria, arrived 1924 at age 26
Vollman, Yulie, from Harringkreunz (probably Heiligenkreuz), arrived 1906 at 
age 20

I tried to search for Cecilia, but the Internet site is having difficulties.  
Cecilia is a name which can be spelled various ways.  Try to search using the 
following site:
For First Name (enter only "C")
For Last Name (enter only "K")
leave town name blank (in this case)
for Year of Arrival (enter between 1893 and 1895)
for Age of arrival (between 15 and 18)
and hopefully you'll find her.

(Newsletter continues as no. 119C)

From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: [BURGENLAND-NEWSLETTER-L] BB News No. 119C dtd June 30, 2003
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2003 07:28:25 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 119C 
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
June 30, 2003
(c) 2003 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)

This fourth section of our 4-section newsletter includes:

1. BB Statistics
2. New Member Extraordinary!
3. Heimattreffen in Grossdorf/Vaskeresztes (from Bob Strauch) 
4. Ethnic Joke Of The Month (learn a little German)
5. Add Village History To Family History
6. Preparation For Emigration?


1. BB STATISTICS

Number of members: 1038
Number inactive (email addresses not current): 46
Number of hits to membership page: as of 21 June, 20,000 since Feb. 14
Number of Burgenland surnames listed on Surname website: 3838
Number of Staff volunteers: 16
 

2. NEW MEMBER EXTRAORDINARY!

The average new member supplies two or three family surnames and perhaps the 
same number of places of origin. On occasion we attract someone who has 
obviously done a lot of research. The following is one of those and we extend a 
hearty welcome to the Hladky family. Some of their data is from contiguous
border 
villages.

Viktor & Regina HLADKY write: We would like to join the BB...

viktor.hladky@utanet.at
Wiener Neustadt, Austria
 
We can help with Trausdorf/Daraszfalva
                           Oslip/Oszlop
                           Sankt Margarethen/Szentmargit
                           Zillingtal/Völgyfalva (especially 1820-1920)
 
Ancestors:
Trausdorf/Daraszfalva
HLADKY, FERSCHIN, STALANICH, BARILICH, ZEICHMANN, KRISANICH, KLIKOVICH, 
SKARICH, KRAJASICH, DUNARICH, WAIKOVICH, MERTINSICH, IVANCSICH,
SLANDOSICH, KROJER, 
JANKOVICH, GOLUBICH
 
Oslip/Oszlop
GERDENICH, SCHRUIFF, KOGLER, STROMMER, MIKATS, SCHUSTER, SCHNEIDER, HÖLD, 
KRUPICH, PANTNER, HUIBER, KUTROVATZ, SCHUMICH, SCHANESZ, BARILICH, PALANICH, 
PFAFFLMAYER
 
Siegendorf/Cinfalva
MIKATS, JURINA, JURKOVICH, RAIMANN, MALICH, BUKETICH
 
Zillingtal/Völgyfalva
LAKITS, ADLMANN, CSARMANN, HEISZ, STUMPF, GALLOVICH
 
Wien/Vienna
ZICKBAUER, SCHIFFER, OLIVA, CHOUTKA, SCHMELZER, SCHMIED
 
Niederoesterreich/Lower Austria
ZICKBAUER, HASLINGER, TREIBER, ERBER, ANZINGER, NAGL, SCHAEBASSER, 
ROSENBERGER
 
Czech Republic
HLADKY, SVEDA, JELINEK, SLEZACEK, MARAK, HLOUSEK, SMAK, POSPISIL, SCHMIED, 
PECHER, REMTA, VEVERA, MOUDRY, JEDLICKA, MARTINEK, KLOUFAR, KLOBUKOVA, ERHART, 
MUZIKA
 
Thanks for everything you are doing! The Hladky-Family


3. BB-HEIMATTREFFEN IN GROSSDORF/VASKERESZTES (from Bob Strauch) 

I thought that this might be of special interest to those of us with roots in 
the villages across the border in Vas County, from St. Gotthard/Szentgotthárd 
to SteinamangerSzombathely to Güns/Köszeg and a bit beyond. Every few years, 
the ethnic-Germans living in Vas County get together for a folk 
festival/reunion (called "Heimattreffen" or "Heimattag").
Folk dance and singing groups 
perform, speeches are given, a special mass
is celebrated, and awards are given to 
those persons who are working to preserve the German language and traditions 
in the villages, not an easy task when one remembers that these villages lost 
many, if not most, of their German-speaking inhabitants during the expulsions 
after World War II, and also during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.
 
This years "Heimattreffen" took place on June 1st in Grossdorf/Vaskeresztes 
in the Pinka Valley. Several BB members have roots in this village. After BB'er 
Frieda Eberhardt made me aware that the homepage of Eisenberg an der Pinka 
(www.eisenberg.at) had recently updated their photo archive, I checked it out 
and discovered a whole set of photos
taken at the event in Grossdorf. The direct 
link to the photos: www.dbase.at/album/2003/grossdorf. Unfortunately, the 
photos are not labeled. Several I can identify: Photo #1830 shows the German 
Chorus from Grossdorf, and photo #1840 shows the German Ladies' Chorus from 
Pernau/Pornóapáti.        


4. ETHNIC JOKE OF THE MONTH (and learn a little German-from Margaret Kaiser)

Customer: "Aber Herr Ober, der Kaffee ist ja kalt!" "But waiter-the coffee is 
cold!

Waiter: "Gut, dass Sie mir das sagen, mein Herr! Eiskaffee kostet nämlich 
einen Euro mehr..." It's good
(or I'm glad) you told me my man! Ice coffee costs 
one Euro more."


5. ADD VILLAGE HISTORY TO FAMILY HISTORY (Pamhagen, suggested by Marlene 
Thuringer Bennet)

In a message dated 6/26/03, Marlene writes:

I am a member of the Burgenland Bunch and am presently involved in writing  a 
family history.  My grandparents emigrated to the U.S. in 1903 and 1904 from 
Pamhagen, Hungary, Austria.  I would like to include a brief history of the 
village of Pamhagen but I'm rather confused about the village name change.  In 
Newsletter Jan 24, 1999 it states the village name changed several times over 
the centuries.  In 1268 a document said it was called "Pomog", 1431 called 
Pomaken, 1589 Pommogen,
1653 Pammaggen on Lutheran church records, 1696 Pomogy seu 
Pamhaken.   In BB Newsletter No. 116B pg 4 of 5,  it states in 1346 it was 
known as Pamhagen.  Would you be able to shed some light on this matter or 
direct me to someone who may  be able to help me.
   
I have very much enjoyed being a member of "your bunch".  I am a member of 
the  LDS Church and work at the Family History Center in Wichita Falls, Texas.  
It has been a rewarding experience to be able to assist  others with their 
research.  I appreciate  the assistance you and your members have provided.

Reply: All the names you mentioned are correct, Pamhagen being the last and 
present name. In a family history I would mention all of them. It is very 
common for
Burgenland (as well as many European) villages and towns to have many 
names over a period of a thousand years. Even in the US we have had more than 
one name for some places-vis. New Amsterdam-New York, etc. The names can often 
mean the same thing in another language-in this instance we have a Latin name, 
Hungarian (Magyar names) and German names; often the spelling varied. The 
original Latin name was Villa Pomog-probably the name of a Roman family villa. 
Doesn't take much imagination to change Pomog to Pamhag in German. Our village 
history found in our village list (click on blue village name in list) also 
shows the following:

Pamhagen
Called "Pomog" in 1268, "Pammaggen" in 1653 (in the Lutheran church records).

The Urbarium of 1589 counts 65 houses (including the vicary) in "Pommagen". 
Surnames of 1589: 8 MUTH; 3 PFANN, SCHNEIDL, LANG, KIEREIN; 2 KRIEGLER 
(KRÜNGLER),
KLEINDL, PAUER, GABRIEL, GRAF, KRAMER, OBRECHT, KAINZ, WALLOSCH (BALOS),

RABA (RABOLT); 1 TITSCH, WEIDENHOFER, JÄCKL, DÜRNFELDER, PLÖDL, FÜRST, 
AUGUSTIN, ANDOCK, PLANK, FLEISCHHACKER, AUSSENSCHMIED, PLATTEIS, GREUSS,
ANDRE, HÖDL, 
WETTL, KOWITSCH (KOVACZ), ORGOTSCHI (ORGOCSI), FÜRASS (FÜRESZ), MÄCKHUSCH 
(MAKKOS), ANNOTSCH (ANYOS), ERDESCH (ERDÖS), RUDITSCH.

>From 1596 legal documents are known concerning the inheritance of a 
Margarethe BINDER, Thomas FRIES, Thomas ANOTSCH and Simon FLEISCHHACKER. 

In the middle of the 16th century Pamhagen annexed the former village 
Micheldorf, which had been destroyed in 1529 by the Turks.
The Pamhagen inhabitants 
subsequently became Lutherans. Lutheran church records for 1653-1660 have been 
used to (try to) prove Lutheran immigration from Styria and the Bodensee area 
in 1606-1620. PATSCH, PHILIPP, MUHR, GRAISY, GUTSCHI and DENK have been said 
to be Styrian names, WUNDERLE (WUNDERLICH, WUNDERLE) has been said to be a 
Bodensee area name.

The Urbarium for 1675 gives the following surnames: 6 ANDERT; 4 RAUHORT, MUT, 
LENTSCH; 3 KOHLNDORFER, WUNDERELE (WUNDERLE, WUNDERLICH), KOTZENMACHER, 
OBRECHT; 2 WEISS, SCHNEIDER, FLACKER, KRAMMER,
SCHUSTER, SCHERER (SCHIER), IRMITZ, 
FRONAUER, LANG, BAUMGARTNER, PERICH, HOLZBAUER; 1 HALBBAUER, WENIGER, DÜNNAGL, 
NERMANZ (NEMAC ?), DACHS, GRAF, ROTH, KLENGER, GUTENDINGER, BIERBAUER, FROMM, 
GRÜNBERGER, PFANN, PREINER, GELBMANN, RAHMKÄS, KÜHRAIN, PLANK, REINHARDT, 
BUSCH, ECKER (EGGER), TURKER, MANNER, HEISS, MAURER, RIEPL, WORTA (BERTA ?), 
WIEGER, KOPPA (KAPI), KAINZ, WEINER, SCHEDL, RIECHEL, GROSS, DENK, GREISY, 
MÜNZENEDER, SPRENZL, FLEISCHHACKER, KLINGER, SCHAFFER, TATEN, MUHR; additional 
Söllner surnames: FUCHS, WAGNER, WEIDINGER, PFAIDL, SAGENMEISTER, KEGL, KAMITZ, 
HOFER.

Catholic church records started in 1681 by a priest named Gregor STANITZ, 
stopped in 1683, restarted in 1686.

Seems that the Turks burned down village and church during the 2nd siege of 
Vienna (1683).

1734 Wallern became an independent parish, having belonged to Pamhagen until 
then.

Teachers: Paul STUPPACHER (1726-1728); Josef HALLER (1800-1808; married to a 
STUPPACHER); the "praeceptores" (assisting teachers) Johann NEUKAM (1807) etc.

Source: Dr. Josef Loibersbeck's series "Um den Eisenberg", published in "Volk 
und Heimat" 17-19/1966, 1/1967; summarized and translated by Albert Schuch 10 
Nov 1999 (end of fragment)

I am very pleased that you work as an LDS volunteer. Their Burgenland records 
are the finest extant. Unfortunately they can be difficult to understand 
which is one of the reasons why the
BB was formed. There is a lot more information 
concerning history if you are interested. For instance I would include the 
fact that at one time it belonged to the Herrschaft of Forchtenstein, later the 
Nadasdy family and then various emperors. It was (and is) a market town of 
about 2000 inhabitants. It is a so-called "linear village"-that is the houses 
stretch along the main
strret (road) on both sides with the farm plots behind the 
houses. There is a Toll House from 1777 as well as a "Turk" tower dated 1683 
(a bell tower and observation post during the Turkish Wars). A popular holiday 
site called "Pannonia" is now nearby. 

We have tried to archive a short history of most villages. As you can 
imagine, there
is very little available for some and trying to find even fragments 
can be very difficult. They frequently require translations.  What we have is 
available from our Village List (maintaind by editor Bill Rudy-click on blue 
village
names) or in our newsletters, both of which have been supplied as English

translations by Burgenland editor Albert Schuch. We are very proud of these 
village history fragments. By all means include them in family histories.
                                                                              
           
6. PREPARATION FOR EMIGRATION? (suggested by Marlene Thuringer Bennet)

Marlene writes: Thank you for your response to my e mail concerning the name 
Pamhagen.  Have any of the Burgenland Bunch addressed the advanced 
preparations the early emigrants had to make before making their voyage
to the U.S.?  
I've recently read about my early ancestors who came from Norway and all the 
preparations they had to make before coming to the U.S.
They were months salting 
meats, baking flatbreads, making clothing, etc.  They even had to bring brandy, 
vinegar and wine as well as raisins and prunes to make a soup for the 
seasick. Sulfur  powder and ointments for the
itch-a good supply of soaps and fine 
combs.  Water enough to supply each person with 3 quarts a day.  After reading 
this article it made me wonder about the preparations if any, that our early 
ancestors had to make before their voyage to the U.S
                                                                            
Reply: Short of finding some diaries, it would be very difficult to answer 
your query with any degree of accuracy. However we can make some educated 
guesses as to what would be necessary.
We must recognize that conditions varied with 
time and mode of travel. The preparations you mention would seem to be 
necessary for a voyage on
a sailing ship (1880's or earlier), which would require 
considerable time (four to six weeks or longer.) Even in the very early days of 
steam, it was often necessary for the cheaper fare passengers to provide their 
own food, bedding and other requirements. Sometimes these earlier vessels did 
provide bare minimum food and water and sleeping facilities, which the 
passengers would
supplement. By the advent of steam ships in excess of 15,000 tons, 
the shipping line would supply these items as part of the passage fare, even 
for third class, steerage. I would estimate that these preparations  may well 
have been necessary on some ships prior to 1900 and even later for sailing 
vessels. After 1900 (when most of our Burgenland immigrants traveled), the 
requirements
were much simpler. Based on my grandparents' experiences, their most 
pressing
preparations involved securing the necessary travel papers, tickets and

itineraries (these too varied with time). The only food they carried was 
enough to cover their train travel to the port of embarkation, they then
ate and 
slept in shipping hostels until they boarded their ship. All four
remembered the 
fine meals provided by the shipping firms. They did carry new clothing and 
blankets in steamer trunks. One grandfather traveled steerage and said the food 
was as good as he got at home, one grandmother said she and her mother felt 
like royalty as they had second class tickets provided by their immigrant 
brother and son-they didn't know how to eat bananas and some of the other food 
served in the 2nd class dining room. Perhaps some other
BB members might respond to 
this subject.

END OF NEWSLETTER

BURGENLAND BUNCH STAFF (USA unless designated otherwise)
Coordinator & Editor Newsletter: Gberghold@AOL.com (Gerald J. Berghold) 
Burgenland Editor:  albert.schuch@gmx.at (Albert Schuch; Austria) 
Home Page Editor:  hapander@spacestar.net (Hap Anderson)
Internet/URL Editor:  ARKRESH@AOL.com (Anna Tanczos Kresh)

Contributing Editors:
Austro/Hungarian Research: fritzkoe@mindspring.com (Fritz Königshofer)
Burgenland Co-Editor & BG liaison: klaus.gerger@usa.net (Klaus Gerger, 
Austria)
Burgenland Lake Corner Research: dkneb@tnics.com (Dale Knebel)
Chicago Burgenland Enclave: tglatz@aol.com (Tom Glatz)
Croatian Burgenland: , fteklits@comcast.net (Frank Teklits)
Home Page village lists, eberau@mail.burgoyne.com, (Bill Rudy)
Home Page surname lists:  steichen@triad.rr.com (Tom Steichen)
Home Page membership list: lagraf1@chello.at, (Hannes Graf, Austria)
Judaic Burgenland: 71431.1612@compuserve.com (Maureen Tighe-Brown)
Lehigh Valley Burgenland Enclave: strauchfam@enter.net (Robert Strauch)
Western US BB Members-Research: rfunger@cox.net (Bob Unger)
WorldGenWeb -Austria, RootsWeb Liason-Burgenland:  cwardell@aon.at (Charles 
Wardell, Austria)

BB ARCHIVES (can be reached via Home Page hyperlinks) or a simple search 
facility (enter date or number of newsletter desired) at:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~autbur/bbnlarchx.htm
BURGENLAND HOME PAGE (WEB SITE)
http://www.spacestar.com/users/hapander/burgen.html
http://go.to/burgenland-bunch (also provides access to Burgenländische 
Gemeinschaft web site.)
WORLDGEN WEB BURGENLAND QUERY BOARD
http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=board&r=rw&;
p=localities.ceeurope.austria.Prov.burgenland

The BB is in contact with the Burgenländische Gemeinschaft, Hauptplatz 7, 
A-7540 Güssing, Burgenland, Austria. Burgenl.gem@bnet.at

Burgenland Bunch Newsletter distributed courtesy of (c) 1999 RootsWeb.com, 
Inc. P.O. Box 6798, Frazier Park, CA 93222-6798 

Newsletter and List Rights Reserved. Permission to Copy Granted; Provide 
Credit and Mention Source.


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