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From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: BB News No. 128 dtd April 30, 2004
Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 06:58:53 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 128 
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Our 9th Year-20 Pages/4 Email Sections Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
April 30, 2004
(c) 2004 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)


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defeats the purpose of our organization. 

This first section of our 4-section newsletter concerns Ethnic Easter 
Traditions.

ETHNIC EASTER TRADITIONS (forwarded by Bob Strauch)

When Lehigh Valley editor Bob Strauch and editor Margaret Kaiser correspond 
they copy me. Bob finds something interesting on the net and copies us with 
comment.  Margaret asks a question and Bob replies. I end up with material for 
the newsletter. The following exchanges dealing with ethnic Easter traditions 
are an example: (Extracts are from: Emese Kerkay, "Hímestojás, The Art and 
History of Hungarian Decorated
Eggs", Passaic, NJ, 1995 as found by Bob-see source 
for full text) The traditions I remember from my Allentown Burgenland 
neighborhood involved
blessing food at the church, dying eggs, giving Easter baskets, 
cracking eggs on heads and baking Easter bread. Friday was always cleaning day 
(and remains so to this day.) Good Friday was no exception. One can see how 
these traditions had their origin in the following.
  .
FOLK CUSTOMS AROUND THE EGG
The combination of Christian and ancient religious rituals were incorporated 
into the practices and folk customs of Easter. In many cases they cannot be 
distinguished. One of our religious Easter customs is the blessing of food and 
decorated eggs. In an encyclopedia, published in 1773, it is written that on 
the eve
of resurrection decorated eggs were blessed in the church by the basket.

These were put in the form of a pyramid on a table decorated with flowers in 
the most beautiful room of the house. Whoever came to visit during Easter week 
had to eat from the pile. (Bartha 1983) It is evident that the Christian 
religion incorporated the cult of the egg into its ceremonies. The red
egg took on 
a deep Christian meaning by becoming the symbol of resurrection.

Old pagan elements are buried in the cleaning ceremonies before the holidays, 
as the tidying of the graves, washing oneself in running water on good 
Friday, cleaning springs and wells. Decorating eggs on Good Friday and Holy 
Saturday, giving decorated eggs as gifts, reciting in verse
form the good wishes, 
eating special food, raising of an Easter tree,
dousing with water and receiving 
eggs for it, sending of bride's plates... are also elements of Hungarian pagan 
rituals. (ED-carried over into Burgenland traditions.)

RITUAL OF EGG DECORATING (from the same source as above.)
As mentioned before, egg decorating was and is important to the Hungarians 
since ancient times, especially in springtime. In some Hungarian regions eggs, 
suitable for decoration, were collected weeks before Easter. Young girls went 
to other villages, singing songs and asking for eggs. "My hen, my hen, my 
speckled hen-How many eggs do you have?
Cackle it to me now-Is it twelve or is it 
nine? Oh so little, how cautiously you give them."

WATER PLUNGE MONDAY (Locsolás)

Decorated eggs were primarily made for Dousing Day visitors. LOCSOLÁS or 
DOUSING is a folk custom still very much alive and practiced widely not only in 
Hungary but also in Hungarian
communities here in the United States. This custom 
is mentioned already in medieval times as Water Plunge Monday. The folk 
customs and beliefs
of the Easter holidays are all connected with the renewal of 
nature. In this circle of festivities water played the most important role, 
because of the belief in its purifying, healing and magical fertility power.

Starting early in the morning, on Dousing Day, groups of boys and young men 
visit the homes of girls and women sprinkling them with water, rose water or 
cologne. In old times only clear water was used. Young men and boys doused the 
girls with buckets of water at the well. However in many regions the girls were 
dragged "against their will" to the pond, creek or stream at dawn and 
submerged or thrown into the water, while reciting little rhymes.

It was expected that the girls would accept all of this good-naturedly and 
reward their tormentors with decorated eggs, bread or a glass of wine or brandy 
- or all three. In some places they would even dance before going to the next 
home.

The two most important symbols of this ritual have to be emphasized: water 
and egg,
representing life, purification and fertility. This is a love ritual in

its purest form. The splashing of girls with water was supposed to make them 
good future wives, bearing many children. Giving the young man an egg also 
signified fertility and rebirth.

WHAT HAPPENS TO THE COLLECTED EGGS?

The children sometimes collected more than 100 eggs. The more beautiful ones 
they treasured for a long time. The rest were eaten or they played Easter 
games with them: they knocked the end of the eggs together and whose egg
broke was 
obligated to give his to the winner. But there were always cheaters. Some 
boys smuggled wooden eggs into their hands or used the eggs of guinea fowls, 
because their shell was harder. 

According to Dr. Xantus (1958) the custom of egg knocking is mentioned 
already in a medieval document from 1390 as dies concussiones
ovorum. The custom was 
called ticcselés in Bereg, türkölés in Erdély (Transylvania) and kokányozás 
in Somogy.


RITUAL OF EGG CHANGING

The Hungarians have a saying: there are as many customs as there are houses 
(ahány ház, annyi szokás). The same is true about folk customs practiced in the 
different regions/villages.

Mostly every village had its own egg decorating artist: íróasszony, meaning 
writing woman, an older woman who had lots of experience in egg painting. From 
her the hímestojás could be obtained by those, who were not very skilled. It 
would have been a great shame for the girls not to be able to present eggs to 
the young men.

Beside this important and widespread folk custom there are many more 
connected to the egg. It was customary, that the
family ate one blessed egg together, 
to ensure that if they get lost, they could find their way home to those with 
whom they ate the Easter egg. This symbolizes that the large family is 
undividable and belongs together.
Egg gifts from godparent to godchild were made in 
front of the church on Easter Sunday, suggesting its derivation from the love 
feast of the early Christians. Almost throughout the country grandparents, 
parents and godparents gave decorated eggs to the children.

Water Plunge Monday was unknown in Sárköz (West Hungary - Danube region). 
They practiced the old custom of exchanging decorated eggs. Those who took part 
at a baptism were considered members of the families; and they called each 
other Koma, which could be translated as brother, buddy, kin. There is no exact 
translation. The children of these so-called kinsmen exchanged eggs with one 
another on the afternoon of Easter Sunday, as a token for a loving kinship.

A similar custom, still practiced all over the country, is the sending of 
bride's plates. The
Sunday after Easter (also called White Sunday)  was  the day 
that little girls and boys sent one another bride's plates, which contain 
cake, wine and decorated eggs. A group, - usually eight children, - accompanies 
the plate. If the recipient excepts the gift, he or she would take out some of 
the decorated eggs, put his/her own on the plate and send it back. With this 
ceremony they became sisters or brothers and their friendship would last until 
their death. From this day on they call each other Koma. Older girls and 
occasionally men might also send each other bride's plates.

MORE CUSTOMS CONNECTED TO THE EGG

At Easter young men put dawn trees or green branches (hajnalfa, zöld ág) in 
front of the girls' houses, in their yard or fastened to their doors to ward 
off evil. Sometimes they were decorated with eggs and ribbons. 

The decorated egg, with its mysterious signs, had magical powers according to 
folk belief. The hand, a star or a cross were drawn on it, and were symbols 
of repelling ills, warding off evil and protection. It was believed that the 
egg was effective against lightning and fire and that it had healing powers. It 
would cure jaundice and hexes. Those who put a decorated egg in their water 
for washing would stay healthy and beautiful all year long. Sick animals were 
cured with the shell of decorated eggs. They even walled in eggs in a new 
building to ward off the influences of bad magic.

Traditions Among Burgenland Immigrants

Margaret Kaiser writes to Bob: 
 
Thanks for this enlightening article.  Amazing!  I wouldn't have thought that 
one could keep a boiled egg for a week or more and still eat it (on the 
Saturday
after Easter).  Some of these eggs were kept for years.  I'm not clear
on 
whether these were boiled eggs or eggs that were cleaned out and decorated. 
Did you fabricate the last paragraph? (concerning ritual of running
naked around 
a house and throwing an egg to have fire change direction!)

Bob responds: No! It was an actual tradition. I read about it in a book about 
the Eastern Slovak method of dyeing eggs.  Mom knew how to color eggs using 
natural materials, like onion peels.)

I also once tried cooking them in red cabbage to get a blue coloring. Besides 
the wax method -as in pysanky-, I've also done the scratch method where a 
design is scratched on after the egg has been dyed a single
color. In Burgenland, 
they use both these methods. There's also a neat method where leaves and 
sprigs of herbs are affixed to egg before it is dyed, leaving an imprint. I did 
this method for several years. I used sprigs of dill and boiled the eggs with 
onion skins. I know this method is definitely done in Switzerland and in 
Salzburg. I'm sure in other regions as well. I first
read about it in a Family Circle 
magazine, where they were called Swiss Easter eggs. Eggs cooked in onion 
skins are still pretty popular in this
area. Before Easter, produce stands at our 
farmers' markets sell bagged onion skins especially for this purpose. 
 
I remember my grandmother ( from Punitz) telling me of another method they 
had for decorating Easter eggs.
They would dye an egg a single color, then place 
it out in the yard or field in an anthill. The ants would then "scratch" a 
design onto the egg. I've never heard of or read about this method anywhere 
else.
 
When I made the Ukrainian wax method eggs, I always blew them out afterwards. 
I remember hearing stories of people leaving them intact only to have them 
later explode in their
china closets. Others left them intact without a problem. 
When I used the scratch and batik methods, I boiled them. I remember giving 
one to a friend maybe 10 years ago, and she still has it. The white evaporated 
and the yolk got hard like a rubber ball, but it never rotted.  

Have you ever seen the boiled and peeled eggs that some folk make which are 
boiled, cracked and packed in a jar with beet juice (and vinegar, I guess)? My 
mother used to make them. We called them "Dracula eggs". (ED: Hard boiled 
eggs-shells
removed are pickled in vinegar and beet juice and eaten for lunch or 
picnic snacks-my wife still makes them.)

Used to be customary in US for bars to have boiled eggs on counter - to have 
with beer, I suppose.  (ED-Oh yes-a regular feature at Fiedler's Cafe in 
Allentown-both
plain hard boiled and pickled-served with a salt and pepper shaker 
on a paper plate. One day a customer dipped his hand in the pickled egg jar and 
took one-Ed Fiedler saw him and said-you just bought the whole jar-the 
customer laughed and offered eggs to everyone!) When I was in Switzerland just 
before
Easter 1992, in the Emmental near Bern, I went into a village Gasthaus
for 
lunch and there were complimentary eggs cooked in onion skins on each table 
with a shaker of Knorr seasoning. 
  

Cracking Eggs Over Heads
From: Marylou Tousignant Of The Washington Post

In Mexico and some states including Texas and California, Latino families 
have a cracking-good way of celebrating: They fill eggshells with confetti and 
crack them on each other's heads.

Cascarones, as these dyed-and-stuffed eggs are called, have been a tradition 
at our house for years. They are fun to make - everyone in the family can help 
- but even more fun to break over the head of an unsuspecting sibling or 
friend. Best of all, cascarones (pronounced cass-kuh-ROW-nays) are
something that 
everyone, from toddlers to grandparents, can enjoy, though you do have to be 
careful not to smack tiny (or, for that matter, aging) noggins too hard.

The origin of cascarones (which means eggshells in Spanish) is a little 
muddled. Some credit explorer Marco Polo with bringing them back to Italy from 
China in the early 14th century. The Chinese filled their eggs with perfume and 
scented powder.

From Italy the egg idea traveled to Austria, France and Spain. Carlota, the 
wife of Emperor Maximilian, introduced cascarones to Mexico in the 1860s. From 
there they headed north into what we know as California, Arizona, New Mexico 
and Texas. (ED-while my brother and I cracked hardboiled eggs on each other's 
head-I don't know where the idea came from-my grandparents didn't do this.)
    
Newsletter continues as no. 128A.

From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: BB News No. 128A dtd. April 30, 2004
Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 06:59:42 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 128A 
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
April 30, 2004
(c) 2004 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)

*** NEW  BURGENLAND BUNCH INTERNET LINKS - ADDITIONS, REVISIONS 04/24/2004 
HAVE BEEN ADDED TO OUR WEBSITE (from Internet/URL Editor Anna Tanczos Kresh)***

This second section of our 4-section newsletter includes:

1. Königsdorf-A Village Genealogy
2. More Ethnic Events In Chicago-Tom Glatz
3. Burgenländische Gemeinschaft Chicago Election Results

KÖNIGSDORF-A VILLAGE GENEALOGY

The ancient village of Königsdorf (K-dorf) is found In the southernmost 
Burgenland district of Jennersdorf. The Hungarian name pre 1921 was Kiralyfalva,
at 
which time it was part of the district of Szt. Gotthard, Vas Megye, Hungary.  
It was the site of a Roman border station and Roman artifacts and graves have 
been found. Like most Burgenland villages, its history before the 17th 
century is obscure. If not actually possessed by them, it was part
of the 11th-13th 
century holdings of the Counts of Güssing. Records from 1327 state it then 
reverted to the Hungarian crown and derives its name from when King Stephen was 
its patron. In 1428, King Sigismund granted the Güssing holdings to Peter Cseh 
de Leva and K-dorf was included; from this point on its destiny was controlled 
by the Herrschaft of Güssing, the domain of the Batthyany family from 1524 to 
1918.  In 1605, during the Bocskay Rebellion, the village was destroyed.  In 
1704, a raid by Styrian forces again burned the village. This was followed in 
1711-12 by plague which depopulated the area. The village was rebuilt, most 
likely by colonists from eastern Styria, Upper Austria and/or southern Bavaria. 
It is within the Lutheran synod of southern Austria  and still retains a 
Lutheran minority. In 1873 there were 803 Roman Catholics
(Parish of Kiralyfalva), 
568 Lutherans (Parish of Eltendorf-Kortvelyes)) and 3 Jews. Today as a result 
of the Auswanderung, the population is about 800. The Catholic church (Heilige 
Stephan) was renovated in 1994-95. Its cemetery was a gift from Count 
Batthyany in 1759. Another cemetery directly across the road may have civil or 
Protestant overtones. A Lutheran school and prayer
house attests to the continuation 
of the Protestant minority who attend the Martin Luther Kirche in Eltendorf.

Situated in the valley of the Lafnitz River and at the mouth of the Limbach 
brook, which flows from the north and empties into the Lafnitz, it was 
obviously a good place to settle, being
at the junction of two waterways and their 
fertile valleys and near two major towns (Fürstenfeld and Szt. Gotthard).

A secondary road heads north from K-dorf and crosses the main east-west 
highway, paralleling the Limbach.
Southward the same road connects to Jennersdorf. 
Just a short distance beyond the highway to the north, the road branches, the 
western arm going on to the village of Limbach, the eastern to the village of 
Kukmirn. At this junction, on the edge of the Königsdorfer Wald (forest) is 
found an appendage of
K-dorf called Königsdorfer Bergen-really a part of K-dorf, 
but some distance  from the village. 

K-dorf is easy to locate. Following Hungarian Route 8 west from Kormend, 
Hungary (Rt 8 is just a little north of Szt. Gotthard), we come to the Austrian 
Burgenland  border village of Heiligenkreuz (border crossing station.) Route 8 
then becomes Austrian Route 65 (the E66)-now a major artery connecting Austria 
with Hungary. Continuing west from Heiligenkreuz, for 2 kilometers we come to  
Poppendorf and in another 4 kilometers we reach Eltendorf.  If we start from 
the Styrian border at Fürstenfeld and head east on the same highway for 4 
kilometers,
we reach the Burgenland border at Rudersdorf, then after another 4 kms

Dobersdorf, and again Eltendorf 3 kms later. Königsdorf lays one km south of 
Eltendorf  on Route 57. The entire crossing of southern Burgenland in this 
region, from Styria to Hungary,  is less then 20 kms and takes about 15 to 20 
minutes depending on traffic. The E66 has been modernized and is being
considered 
for a major autobahn in order to cope with the heavy traffic coming from Graz 
and heading east into Hungary (connection at Kormend for Budapest and points 
east, north  and south.)

This part of Burgenland, roughly a rectangle, Güssing to Jennersdorf (north 
to south) and Rudersdorf to the Hungarian border villages (west to east) more 
than any other, contributed the greatest percentage of its population to the 
1890-1924 Auswanderung to America. It is a very important immigrant region in 
our study of Burgenland family history.

I traveled and studied this region extensively beginning in the 1980's, since 
this is where my family history had its origin. I exhausted many of the 
sources of data which included the parish church records (both
RC and Lutheran), 
the 1825 Hungarian census, civil records, the pre 1828 records both at the 
church offices and the Eisenstadt Diocesan archives
and the US 1910-1920 census. I 
also studied the available German and Latin translations of extant Urbars and 
Canonical Visitations. Visits to distant family members rounded out my search 
and I thought I had exhausted the available material. Whenever I come to this 
conclusion, it seems that another door opens. I believe the ghosts of our 
immigrants must be guiding our search! 

Last month Klaus Gerger, who serves as BB Burgenland co-editor and happens to 
be my cousin, visited us. Among the many things shared by him was a paper 
back local (private?) publication called "Unser Wurzeln"-"Stammbäume Häuser 
Heiraten der Königsdorfer." (Our Roots-A
Genealogy of the Houses and Marriages of 
the People of K-dorf, Published 2002.) Written by Sepp Kametler, a local 
history teacher with deep roots
in K-Dorf, this booklet lists the owners of K-Dorf 
houses from 1720 to 1900 and the marriages from 1900-1960. Awork of some 
erudition and research,
it is indicative of what can be produced by studying and 
organizing extant
records.  Sepp Kametler provides the old and new house numbers, 
house names (Vulgo), the names of the brides and grooms occupying the houses, 
their ages, religions, occupations, social standing, birthdates and places, 
marriage dates, parents and a short description of the history of the houses.  
There is also mention of family migration to America.


In his forward, Kametler explains how he arrived at the data. He also 
mentions
that some of the family names date from 1635-1641 (as found in Urbars.)

These are: DEUTSCH, DOPPLER, EBNER, EDELMANN, EDLER, FANDL, FISCHL, FRISCH, 
GOLDSCHMIDT, GRAF, GRÖLLER, GSELLMANN, GUTMANN, HAFFNER (HAFNER), HANZL
(HAINZL), 
HOLLER, JAKES, KAMETLER (KAMEDLER), KESSLER (KETTLER?), KOANDL (KAINDL), KOHL, 
KOHLBAUER, KORNTHEUER, KRANKL, KREUZER, KÖNIG, KURZ, LACKNER, LANDMANN, LANG, 
LEITGEB, LUKAS, MOZERT, NEUBAUER, PERL (PERDL), PFEIFFER, RODLER, SCHAFLER 
(SCHABLER), SCHERMANN, SEIDNNITZ, STEINER, TAPLER, TSCHANDL,
UNGER, WAGNER, WEBER, 
WILFING, WIRT. 

While many of these names, stemming from the 30 Years War (and possibly being 
names of refugees from that period) are still to be found in K-dorf, others 
are no longer found and new ones appear 1693-1719. These new family names are: 
ASTL, AUGUSTIN, BAUER, BEUTL (PAIDL), BOANDL (POANDL), BRUNNER, DAMERL(ER), 
DAMHESL (THAMHESL), DECKER, DEX, DRUISNER, ERNST, FRENZ, FUCHS, GIBISER, 
GRABNER, GRASMUCK, GROSSMANN, HEILIGMANN (HALLEMANN),
HARTL, HARTNER, HAUPTMANN, 
HEBENSTREIT, HIRTZER, HOFMANN, HOHENTANNER,
HOHL, HÜTTER, KALLICH (KOLLE), KENDL, 
KERN (KREN?), KLOCK (GLOCK), KÖFER, KORNHÄUSL, KROBATH, LORENZ, MATTES, 
MAYFURTH, MILLNER (MÜLLNER), MIRTH, MOIK, MONSCHEIN, MOOSBICHLER, MUHR, NIKLES, 
PELZMANN, PUCHL, ROHRER, RÖSSLER, SALBER, SCHLEDERER, SCHMIDT, SCHREINER, 
SCHUSTER, SCHWARZ, SEIDL, SOMMER, SOMMERAUER, SPIRK (SPÖRK), SPRINGER, STELZER, 
TRINKL, WALDECKER, ZACH, ZODL, ZOTTER. 

Allentown (PA) is often mentioned as a place of birth (for returning 
immigrants or for marriages reported
to the Hungarian or Austrian authorities?) and 
the fact that many of these
names can still be found in the Allentown area is no 
coincidence. At least 19 are well known to me as relatives or neighbors from 
Allentown. Many are also found in nearby villages (Poppendorf, Eltendorf, 
Kukmirn, Heiligenkreuz,
Grieselstein, Neuseidl, Limbach, Rudersdorf, Dobersdorf, 
Zahling etc.) attesting to the movement of family names via marriage. 

House owners can suddenly change. The author explains this as occurring due 
to families dying out as a result of heavy infant mortality in the 18th 
century. He also
attributes it to marriage outside of the family, some sales after 
1848 (prior to that time-aristocracy retained title) and inheritance by 
relatives
and even neighbors. Some house were abandoned entirely and later taken
over 
by colonists. During the Kommassierung (the breaking up of the aristocratic 
holdings following 1848) many houses changed hands. Even prior to
that time, the 
aristocratic owners of the property did not really care who inhabited the 
property, as long as rent was received and robot labor performed. Orphans were 
often raised by neighbors, relatives or friends until they
came of age and could 
assume status as a householder. 

While not complete, following are families who are mentioned as emigrating to 
America, having descendants who emigrated or who had returned from such 
emigration. It is not necessarily the people named
who emigrated-it could be them, 
part of their family or descendants.

Marriage Date-groom-bride-house number-Vulgo name-notes are shown.

1893-Josef Pfeiffer-wife Cacilia Perl-house no. 7 (old 6)-Vulgo 
Schreiner-Thauss-descendants to America

1891-Josef Unger-Maria Fischl-house 22 (21)-Vulgo Kroboth-Unger-to England & A
merica

1883-Josef Kern-Theresia Schmidt-house  24(23)-Vulgo Piker-Kern-eldest son 
emigrated

1866-Thomas Fabian-Theresia Kern-house 27-Vulgo Wagner-descendants to 
Allentown

1898-Franz Fischl-Cacilia Dex-house  29 (25)-Vulgo Schreiner-Fischl-to 
Allentown-descendant was mayor

1899-Karl Fischl-Caroline Mayer-house 30 (26)-Vulgo Jakes-Decker-(returned 
immigrant?)

1872-Franz Kametler-Anna Kulovits-house 38-Vulgo Kammerler-Sattler.
(house purchased by Karl Frenz (Frenzn-Charlie) a returning immigrant

1888-Johann Damhösl-Theresia Dieber-house 186-Vulgo Dieber-Damhösl-Franz 
Damhösl emigrated but returned with family 

1897-Julius Pernitz-Cacilia Weinhofer-house 40 (29)-Vulso "Angers"-family 
Pernitz-Fischl to Milwaukee

After 1881-house number 49 (37) was purchased by Josef Trinkl (Vulgo 
Trinkl-Polster)-children emigrated to America

1869- Franz Trinkl-Cacilia Kallich-house 52 (40) -descendants emigrated to 
America

1869-Franz Perl-Juliana Weber-house 57 (45)-Vulgo Steindl-Perl-family died 
out and house was bought by Franz & Anna Bauer who came from America

1900(?)- Josef Miszpichler-Anna Mayer-house 65 (53)-Vulgo Sommer-to 
America-house bought by Danyo

1897-Josef Dex-Juliana Plessl-house 70 (58)-Vulgo Sperk-Dex-descendants to 
America between WWI-II. House bought by Franz Jaindl returning from 
America-(there are Dex families in Allentown)

1892-Josef Trinkl-Juliana Matthes-house 85 (65)-Vulgo Fischl(?)-to 
America-Trinkl families in Allentown.

1897-Franz Perl-Amalia prem-house 89 (70)-Vulgo Perdl?-to America but 
died-House bought by Andreas & Rosa Ehritz who emigrated and returned 

1895-Josef Wirth-Theresia Decker-house 111 (93)-Vulgo Reichen-Holler-oldest 
daughter to America.

1870-Mathias Korntheuer-Juliana Venus-then widow married Trinkl, Johan -house 
115 (97)-Vulgo Alten Richter-family descendants to America. Bought by Family 
Spahits who in turn emigrated. 

1884-Ludwig Tapler-Amalia Spirk-house 128 (110)-Vulgo Tapler-to America 
(Allentown)

1872-Josef Weber-Amalia Deutsch-house 132-Fvulgo Weber-to America-house 
abandoned?

1877-Mathia Holler-Theresia Buchfeller-house 144 (161)- Vulgo 
Wagner-Holler-to America

1894-Mathias Frenz-Cacilia Decker-house 150 (155)-Vulgo Frenzn-Motzl-to 
America


If you have links to this village, I'll be happy to provide you with any 
additional data that I can find.  Please furnish immigrant names, birth dates, 
marriage dates, house numbers etc. if known. The more data you can supply, the 
easier my search. Many of these family
surnames are repeated and this additional 
data will be required to identify your links. Send to Gberghold@ 
AOL.com-subject BB K-dorf Link. I'll reply as I'm able in the order received.


2. MORE ETHNIC EVENTS IN CHICAGO-(from Tom Glatz)

Tom writes: I haven't rec'd my latest Eintracht (local ethnic paper listing 
events). The Siebenbürger Sachsens have a dance at the Donau Schwaben Hall in 
Des Plaines, Illinois, on April 17th. I don't know any of the details 
unfortunately. The warm weather
will bring a lot of events. Hopefully the clubs will 
put them in the Eintracht
earlier. I need to get on the mailing lists of more of 
the clubs. 
 
The Siebenbürger Sachsens are going to have a large event in July with music 
groups coming from Austria and Germany. Unfortunately the 2 day event will be 
held at the Donau Schwaben Hall in Des Plaines which does not hold many 
people. I also
heard that in order to get tickets one must send to the headquarters 
in Cincinnati for them. They will be around $30.00 which will include the 
meal. I will have more on this later. 

The Steirer Damenchor will hold their 77th Frühjahrs-konzert und Tanz, on 
Sunday, May 2nd, at 12:00 PM, at Victoria Banquets, 7600 W. Irving Park Rd., 
Norridge, IL There will also be a zither ensemble and tenor George V. Humphrey 
will sing. Music will be played by the Paloma group. In previous years the 
Chicago
BG supported the Steirer Damenchor. Emma Wenzel's mother as well as many

other Burgenland immigrants were members of the Steirer Damenchor.

The last member of the famous baker Urbauer family, Fred Urbauer passed away 
this week. My mother said to me that now all of those good recipes are gone 
forever! To this day I still have never tasted Mohn or Nuss Strudel as good as 
the Strudel from the Urbauer Bakery. They did not skimp & the filling was 
mostly ground nuts or poppy seed. They found a way to make it using very
few bread 
crumbs. Then they put a soft icing on the top of the strudel. I can just taste 
it now as we speak. Last week I had some strudel at the Siebenbürger Sachsen 
Stiftungsfest & it did not taste anything like the Urbauer Strudel. It had a 
strange aftertaste like they added some artificial flavoring (like Vanilla) to 
it. 
 

3. BURGENLÄNDISCHE GEMEINSCHAFT (BG) CHICAGO ELECTION RESULTS

Our BB Chicago Editor Tom Glatz has long been active in BG activities as well 
. At a recent election, he was named Vice President, Secretary and Membership 
Chairman of the Chicago chapter. We congratulate Tom and hope that Burgenland 
Bunch members in the Chicago area will support him by  becoming active 
members of the BG as well.
 
Tom told me that he is the first non- immigrant to hold the position of vice 
president and first 2nd generation American to be elected secretary.  The 
other newly elected officers are: 

President: Karl Billisits, Treasurer: Steve Karlovits
 
We congratulate them as well and offer our support to whatever extent 
possible. We are two organizations with common goals.

Newsletter continues as 128B.

From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: BB News No. 128B dtd. April 30, 2004
Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 07:00:33 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 128B 
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
April 30, 2004
(c) 2004 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)


This third section of our 4-section newsletter includes:

1. An Easter Story Translated From The Hianzisch
2. Taste Of The Burgenland-Fried Cabbage And Noodles (Kraut-Nockerl)
3. A Sterz Response
4. Klaus Gerger (BB Burgenland Associate Editor) Visits Allentown-Ed Tantsits
5. New History Of Esterhazy Family

1. AN EASTER STORY TRANSLATED FROM THE HIANZISCH-(courtesy Bob Strauch) 

Osterg'schichterl/Easter Story-Hianzisch/English from Ban Fostnsingan (by  
Herta Schreiner from Zemendorf/Burgenland)

During Lent, around 2 in the morning, the night watchman would sing "The 
Passion of Christ" while patrolling the village streets.
 
People knew that one could get quite a dry throat from all that singing, so 
many would hand him a shot of Schnaps or something out the window as he passed.
 
One night, Aunt Tessie got a glass of wine ready on her nightstand, and as 
the night watchman finished with "Praised be Jesus Christ", she handed
it to him 
out the window. In the dark, because she didn't want to bother lighting the 
petroleum lamp.
 
Well, the night watchman had really worked up quite a thirst, and the first 
sip tasted awfully good. But then he noticed something in the glass. "What's in 
here?", he thought to himself. He reached in with his fingers and fished out, 
my God, Aunt Tessie's false teeth! She must have mistaken her denture glass 
for her wine glass when going to bed. 
 
After that, the night watchman wouldn't accept any more glasses in the dark, 
and none at all from Aunt Tessie. She felt offended. "What can you do", she 
said, "if people are gonna be so picky?"


2. TASTE OF THE BURGENLAND- FRIED CABBAGE & NOODLES=KRAUT NOCKERL (Suggested 
by letters from The Allentown (PA) Morning Call Recipe Exchange forwarded by 
Bob Strauch.)

This dish is well known due to its ease of preparation as well as it being a 
favorite of Burgenland descendants. It has many variations-for my taste the 
simpler the better-all it really needs are good fresh cabbage-toothsome noodles 
and lots of black pepper. I also like the noodles to be fried until the bottom 
layer gets a little crisp. I do not like to use wide egg noodles for this 
dish-too "eggy." I prefer something with more "bite" like Mueller's medium 
seashells or twists. Of course homemade are best.  

I mailed Bob and Margaret Kaiser the following: In response to your email 
concerning cabbage noodles-how can something so homely as Kraut-nockerl (I love 
them) create so much interest. Truly the stomach retains more ethnic memories 
than the brain. You've given me another "Taste Of The Burgenland" article-thank 
you. The many cabbage noodle variations mentioned are most interesting. One 
thing that hasn't been mentioned is that the type of cabbage adds much-seems 
young fresh cabbage (perhaps mountain grown) is sweeter-some old cabbage can be 
bitter. Yes bacon fat can add something (taste-as well as cholesterol) in fact 
my friend Forrest Fiedler (son of Ed Fiedler-deceased- who had Fiedler's Cafe 
at 2nd & Gordon in Allentown-now a parking lot) has his wife add bacon 
grammels (bits). Forrest's grandfather John Fiedler was from
Neustift bei Güssing. 

Bob had written: Catharine Ache of Bethlehem sent in a recipe for cabbage and 
noodles to the Morning Call. ''In response to your reader's request for a 
cabbage and noodle recipe, I hope this one from
Walp's Family Restaurant Cookbook 
is one she will want to try. Although I have never made this recipe 
personally, I enjoyed this dish whenever Walp's had it on the menu. I have also 
included Walp's recipe for Spaetzle,
just in case your readers would like to make 
their own noodles,'' Catherine says. A recipe for Kraut Noodles also comes from 
Edith Dergosits of Whitehall.

GERMAN FRIED CABBAGE AND NOODLES

Drain cooked wide egg noodles (or German-Spaetzle, see recipe). Saute lightly 
in bacon fat. Add chopped raw cabbage leaves (twice the amount of raw cabbage 
leaves as cooked noodles) chopped in approximately 1-inch squares. Season 
with substantial amount of
salt and ground black pepper. Continue sauteing until 
mixture begins to brown. Turn heat  low, add a little more bacon fat and 
simmer until cabbage
is tender (about 20 minutes), stirring occasionally to prevent 
scorching. Turn off heat and after 10 minutes remove cabbage and noodles from 
burner. Serve hot.

SPAETZLE (German noodles)
2 1/2 cups flour, sifted
1/2 tsp. salt
Pinch of baking powder
2 eggs, well beaten
1/4 cup milk (more or less)

Combine flour, salt and baking powder in mixing bowl. Mix well. Make a well 
in the center, add eggs and 1/4 cup milk. Beat until stiff dough forms, adding 
a little more milk if needed until the right consistency (thick, firm, coming 
away easily from the side of the bowl). Knead on a floured board until smooth. 
Let rest for 30 minutes.

Dampen a pastry board with water and then flour the board. Place dough on it. 
Flour a rolling pin lightly, and roll the dough out to a 1/8-inch thickness 
or thinner.

Bring salted water (2 quarts) to boiling. With a sharp knife, cut off tiny 
slivers
of dough, transfer to a plate as it is cut, and push dough directly into

the boiling water. Do not crowd the kettle. Cook for about 20 minutes, until 
the dough is tender. Stir often. Remove from heat, rinse with warm water in a 
colander, and drain well. Add melted butter, salt to taste, and a small amount 
of dry bread crumbs. Serve hot. Yields 4 cups. Catharine Ache, Bethlehem

KRAUT NOODLES
1 large onion, diced in medium pieces
1 Tbsp. vegetable or canola oil
2 slices of bacon, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1/2 package of broad noodles, cooked
1/2 cup broth or water
1/2 head cabbage, coarsely chopped
Salt and pepper to taste

In a large saute pan, saute the diced onion and bacon in the oil until the 
onion is limp and bacon soft, about 5 minutes. In another pot, cook the noodles 
in salted water until al dente. Drain the noodles and set aside.

When ready, add these noodles to the onion-bacon mixture and add 1/2 cup 
broth, salt and pepper. Cover the pan, lower the heat and let steam until the 
cabbage is as tender as you like. Serve as is with applesauce or with
kielbasa or 
both. A little butter can be added to the noodles.
Edith Dergosits, Whitehall
Copyright (c) 2004, The Morning Call 
    

* Margaret Kaiser writes: Thanks Bob for these most interesting recipes.  
There are several interesting thoughts here. 

1.  The 2nd cabbage and noodles recipe suggests serving them with kielbasa or 
applesauce.  We always ate them alone (as I remember).  I would never have 
thought to combine them with kielbasa (Polish influence?) or applesauce. I wish 
I remembered more about these things, but sadly I don't. Many think they're 
better reheated.

2.  I don't remember seeing my Mom make kraut noodles.  I wouldn't be 
surprised if browned bread crumbs were also involved, but
I could be thinking of 
something else with noodles.  Are any of these
two recipes close to what you do? 

Bob responds: Browned bread crumbs are used with Wutzinudln (finger-shaped 
dumplings made from potato dough) and plum dumplings. Maybe even over cooked 
regular noodles ( can also be topped with poppyseeds, cottage cheese.) (ED. And 
even ground walnuts and sugar as a dessert.)
 
As for the cabbage & noodle recipes, I don't know anybody that uses bacon 
fat, although I have heard of that before.
The old-timers traditionally used lard 
(some people still do). Some people add chopped onions. Some add sugar. Some 
add vinegar. Some make it with Sauerkraut instead of fresh cabbage.
 
The kind of pasta used determines the name of the dish:
 
Krautnudln - w/regular egg noodles.
Krautfleckerln - w/square noodles ("patches").
Krautnockerln - w/small dumplings. The dumplings can also be made from a 
potato dough. The Eastern Slovaks and  Carpatho-Rusyns make a variation using 
grated raw potatoes. 
 
3.  Margaret: When I was taking German class, Grüner Donnerstag was 
mentioned.  I hadn't heard this
expression before.  I think we ate meatless, but I 
don't remember eating green, or hearing anything about eating green on Holy 
Thursday.  We may have
eaten something called Peltchen (don't know the spelling).  
These were made with cabbage or maybe potatoes. 

Bob: Years ago I read that the "Grün" in "Gründonnerstag" actually comes from 
the Old German word "greinen", which means "to mourn". Think of "Maundy 
Thursday".
Somehow "grein" became "grün" and it became a tradition to eat a green

vegetable on that day.

4.  Margaret: I never knew about spaetzle until my grandmother, who lived in 
Tamm, visited us for a year (ca. 1964?).  She went with my mother to Old 
Yorkville.  Among the things they came home with was a spaetzle maker.
 You squeeze 
the dough through the maker into a boiling liquid.  Even with the spaetzle 
maker we didn't have spaetzle very often as my Dad didn't care for them.  Many 
menus in the Stuttgart area seemed to serve spaetzle, as I understand them to 
be a Black Forest specialty, so I wonder if they are often found in the 
Burgenland.
 
Bob: Yes, they're made in Burgenland, but they're called "Nockerln" (from 
Italian "gnocchi"), although I have seen them referred to
as "Spotzn" (sparrows). 
 Have you gotten yourself a new Easter hat for the Easter Parade?
 
Margaret: I prefer something to munch on.


3 A STERZ RESPONSE (from Bonnie Schantzenbach )

Subj: Sterz - I was so excited . I grew up on Sterz which was a favorite 
breakfast food for my family.  My grandmother
made it especially when the family 
members would "come home to visit". 
 
I have always tried to find info on it.  I actually thought our family was 
the only one who ate it.  My father liked the whole wheat type which was like 
bread but my favorite was the potato which was baked in the oven.  I loved when 
the ends would get hard and crunchy.  We used bacon fat instead of lard.
 
Haven't made it in a long time. You got my taste buds jumpin'.  Must make 
soon! Thanks for all of your helpful information.  I really look forward to it 
every month.
 
Bob Strauch copied remarks: I never heard of a potato Sterz that is baked in 
the oven, only the varieties made on top of the stove. Is it made with mashed 
potatoes, or grated potatoes like Potato Kugel?
 
BTW, I notice on the BB membership list that your grandfather was a Lackner 
from Kukmirn. We had a friend here in Allentown named Bob Wolf, whose mother 
was a Lackner from Kukmirn. His father was a Wolf from Deutsch Kaltenbrunn. Bob 
died in 1994 and was married to Julie Eichner, who came here from Rudersdorf 
after WWII. They lived on N. 23rd St. Any relation to you? Glad you enjoyed the 
food talk. There'll be more, I'm sure.
 
4. KLAUS GERGER (BB BURGENLAND ASSOCIATE EDITOR) VISITS ALLENTOWN (from Ed 
Tantsits)

Ed writes: Klaus Gerger, after finishing work in Washington, DC came for a 
visit to the Lehigh Valley. I had given him an open invitation since we first 
met in Güssing when we visited my relatives there.

He arrived and stayed at my home near Fogelsville, PA on Friday 3/26 and left 
on Monday 3/29 at noon. He had difficulty getting an earlier return flight 
and had to stay a bit longer than he anticipated. My wife Priscilla, brother 
Frank and myself really enjoyed having him visit.

We did a lot of exchanging of family data and searching census info on the 
computer. Also talk a lot the Lehigh Valley and Burgenland. But also we moved 
around the valley quite a bit. Friday - went to Wert's Cafe for Supper. After 
that, drove down Hamilton St turned north on 4th St, past Sacred Heart Hospital 
and Church, Central Catholic High School, Young Men's Club, (Gordon and Jordan 
St area) then drove thru Coplay where my brother and I were born and lived, 
then went to the Edelweiss in Northampton to enjoy the button box jam session 
for a bit, then went home.

Saturday after breakfast we toured a bit of western Lehigh county, where the 
old Fogelsville Cement plant and company homes used to be. A lot of Austrians 
lived and worked there also. Went to the St Peter's cemetery in Coplay as well 
as St John's in Stiles. Went to the museum of the first cement plant in 
Coplay, PA. and walked around the old
kilns. When my brother and I were young we 
climbed and ran all around the area. This brought about many memories. Visited 
the old homestead in Coplay in the daylight. Showed him where the Saengerbund 
in Coplay was and the Liederkrans in Northampton. While so close to Tessie 
Teklits, we stopped for a  short visit. After that we drove by all the cement 
mills, showed Klaus the Sister
City monument. (Stegersbach/Northampton). We were 
unable to show Klaus the cement museum there because the curator had other 
plans and no arrangements could be made. From there we went to Bethlehem , PA 
showing Klaus the remains
of a once thriving steel plant, Lehigh University, and 
the view from top of the mountain campus. Drove thru Bethlehem Broad street, 
Hanover Ave to Gorden/Jordan st area, western Hamilton St, Cedar Beach area. 
Went to Mass at St Joseph the Worker in Orefield(my church) and then supper at 
Tony's family restaurant in Coplay. 

Sunday we took a small tour of the covered bridges in the two counties, 
visited more cement mills. Saw an old jet plane being set up at the VFW in 
Cementon, PA and
visited the old farmstead on our mother's side of the family in 
Kreidersville,
then enjoyed the music at the Coplay Saengerbund. This was a more 
relaxing day.

Monday 3/29 Visited the Appalachian Trail at rte 309 on the top of the hill. 
Then Klaus had to pack, have lunch and leave for the BWI airport around noon 
to take his flight back home.

Allentown has become stagnant. I mentioned to Klaus how at Christmas time 
Hess's, Leh's, Zollinger's and all other stores all decorated at Christmas with 
all the people shopping. I have a lot of photo slides of the city and of 
Christmas City in Egypt.

I had mentioned to Klaus also that he was now in the Holy Land. Here also, we 
have Bethlehem, Nazareth, Egypt Emmaus and Jordan River (creek). He indicated 
that he was honored to be here in this biblical area.

We really enjoyed his visit. Klaus and his family are welcome to visit any 
time.

Ed Tantsits
edtantsits@juno.com
  
5. NEW HISTORY OF ESTERHAZY FAMILY (compliments of John Rajkovacz)

John sent me a review concerning the book "Celestial Harmonies" by Peter 
Esterhazy,
translated by Judith Sollosy. Ecco Publishers, 864 pages at $29.95. The

reviewer comments that the book encompasses all of Hungary's history viewed 
against the background of Esterhazy family history. The translator states "to 
fully understand (this book) is the work of a lifetime."

As reported in a previous newsletter there are other histories of this noble 
family; however, they are in Hungarian or German. This would be the first 
English language history to my knowledge. To fully understand our own
Burgenland 
family histories, we must be familiar with those of the two main aristocratic 
families who shaped their destiny, Esterhazy in the north and the Batthyany in 
the south. Neither have had an English language family history to date.  I'll 
be buying a copy for my library.

Newsletter continues as no. 128C.

From: GBerghold@aol.com
Subject: BB News No. 128C dtd. April 30, 2004
Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2004 07:01:30 EDT

THE BURGENLAND BUNCH NEWS -No. 128C 
DEDICATED TO AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BURGENLAND FAMILY HISTORY
(Issued monthly by Gberghold@AOL.com)
April 30, 2004
(c) 2004 G. J. Berghold-all rights reserved)


** THE BURGENLÄNDISCHE GEMEINSCHAFT INFORMS US ITS TIME TO PAY DUES AGAIN-IN 
AUSTRIA 13 EUROS-ELSEWHERE $15.  A SMALL PRICE TO KEEP OUR GREAT SISTER 
ORGANIZATION ALIVE & WELL. PAY YOUR LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE OR SEND YOUR CHECK
DIRECTLY 
TO THE BG IN GÜSSING (address at end of newsletter.)**

*TOM GLATZ-NEW CHICAGO BG V/P &  MEMBERSHIP CHAIR ASKS AREA BB MEMBERS TO 
RENEW BG DUES OR JOIN THE CHICAGO BG IF THEY AREN'T ALREADY MEMBERS. **

This fourth section of our 4-section newsletter includes:

1. BB Mentioned In "Rot Weiss Rot" Journal
2. Jurmeister Name Derivation
3. Comment Concerning Non-receipt Of Newsletter #126
4. More On Schmarn
5. NY Brotherhood Of The Burgenländer To Hold Annual Dance
6. Items From Chicago Enclave-Tom Glatz 
7. Email From An Eisenstadt Schanta-Bob Strauch

1. BB MENTIONED IN "ROT WEISS ROT" JOURNAL (from Fritz Königshofer)

(ED. Note: "Rot Weiss Rot" (Red White Red-the Austrian National Colors) is 
the monthly journal of Austrians living and/or working in foreign lands.)

Fritz writes (copy to Burgenland Editor Albert Schuch): I just received the 
new issue of RotWeissRot, "das Magazin für Auslandsösterreicher."  In the 
section called "Das 10. Bundesland" I was surprised to find an entry under 
Winchester.  I'll send you a copy.  The entry is about the Burgenland Bunch and 
yourself, and mentions the reaching of the 1000th member of the BB.

Another article is on the fires in Southern California, written by a Franz 
Dorninger who lost his house in the fires.  I immediately thought of BB member 
Bob Unger who fortunately was spared.

Yet another interesting article is about the town of Ferdinand in Indiana.  
According to the article, this little place was named after emperor Ferdinand, 
the uncle and predecessor of emperor Franz Joseph.  The town was founded by 
Joseph Kundek (1810-75), an Austrian (Croat) priest who had received
the support 
from the Leopoldinen-Stiftung (foundation) to purchase the land.  The story 
reminds one of Alexander Berghold, a story we still must tell!

2. JURMEISTER NAME DERIVATION? 

 Steve Geosits writes: I have been trying without success to determine the 
meaning of the surname "Jurmeister".  Family legend has it that the name is 
derived from an Austro-Hungarian military title, but I cannot find any  
documentation to substantiate this. 

Reply: After searching my "namenbucher" and drawing a blank, I must revert to 
the simple approach and break the name down into its Germanic components. 
Never a reliable method as name derivations have many twists and turns both 
linguistic and substantive. My own name "Berghold" means "mountain plot"-but in 
archaic Styrian (the name is found in Styria where my oldest family origin has 
been traced ) it means vineyard worker (Bergholde)-see what I mean? 

"Meister of course means "master" -chief-leader-or one who has attained an 
upper rung of one's trade or profession. "Jura" refers to jurisprudence or the 
study of law so I would assume the name refers to a person involved with the 
law on a high level. This is not the word for lawyer (Anwalt) so it refers more 
to the teaching or study of law as opposed to the practice.  I don't see any 
military connection but then the military always has an "inspectorate" branch 
and it could come from that. "Jura" comes from the Latin, so its Germanic 
equivalent could take many forms, like an early name for assessor
(jurator). When 
the original German did not have an equivalent,  foreign words were often 
substituted. "Jur" also means oath in Latin. 

Just on a hunch I checked my two volume Hungarian dictionary and found 
"Juratus"-law student in Hungary in the early 19th century. If a Juratus was a 
student it's not much of a linguistic jump -particularly in an area where they 
frequently mixed German-Hungarian and Latin-to "Jurmeister"-a graduate with a 
masters degree in law-interesting-hmmm? Der Jurmeister- Stephan has a nice ring!

There is also a Jura mountain chain, but "a master of the mountains" doesn't 
seem viable. I have a feeling we're dealing with an archaic term at 
best-probably a very old one. Little help I'm afraid.
Perhaps some of our members will 
comment.


3. COMMENT CONCERNING NON-RECEIPT OF NEWSLETTER #126

Mary Kamper Sheridan writes: I am sorry to hear that you had so much 
difficulty with the #126 issue of the
BB Newsletter.  I have added to my address book 
Burgenland-Newsletter-L@rootsweb.com in the hope that this will preclude any 
such problem as you had.  

I have been alerted to the AOL spam folder by your comments in the #127 
newsletter.  I have double checked the settings to be sure that even if the 
newsletter should be tagged
as spam by AOL, it will be sent to that folder which I 
will check to make
sure I don't lose any of the BB Newsletters. I did obtain the 
#126 Newsletter from the BB archives.  I don't want to miss an issue.

If by some chance I don't receive the newsletter, I will simply wait until 
the newsletter
is posted to the archives and retrieve it from there.  My hope in 
telling you this is to alleviate some of the aggravation and frustration you 
must have gone through.  (Haven't we all had similar problems with one company 
or another?  I know I can only speak for myself, but I truly enjoy the BB 
Newsletter
and read each one carefully; your work and the work of all the editors

is much appreciated in my house.


4. MORE ON SCHMARN

Ginger Opitz McGurk writes: I have really enjoyed the newsletter and look 
forward to it each month. The debate over recipes tickles me. When you
mentioned 
Schmarn, it reminded me of a recipe I received from my Great Aunt Johanna (nee 
Klein) for "Schmorn". Would the difference in spelling have to do with 
pronunciation? (ED.-yes a phonetic twist-same dish) Her recipe
was from her mother, 
Magdalena Platzer Klein:

Schmorn

4-5 eggs, 3/4 c. milk, 1 T. sugar, pinch of salt, flour as needed, and a 
little lard

Beat the eggs, milk and sugar together very well. Add the pinch of salt and 
enough flour to make a heavy-like dough. (or like a pancake dough) Beat again. 
Using a fry pan, add enough lard as for scrambled eggs. When lard if hot, put 
batter into pan and keep turning and cutting up with a knife or spoon until 
dough is done. Serve with sugar ---or whatever is desired.

The idea seems to be about the same. I haven't tried them, but intend to do 
so. I also have Magdalena's recipe for "Hungarian" Strudel. (It sounds like a 
lot of work!) Notice she referred to it as Hungarian, not Austrian. Even though 
German, or actually the dialect was her language, she thought of herself as 
Hungarian evidently. Just wanted to share another version of the recipe with 
you. Keep up the good work----don't even thing of leaving, please.    
 

5. NY BROTHERHOOD OF THE BURGENLÄNDER TO HOLD ANNUAL DANCE (from Margaret 
Kaiser)

Margaret sends the following: 

The (Bruederschaft der Burgenlaender) Brotherhood of the Burgenlaender, S & D 
Benevolent Society of New York, founded 1937, invites all members, friends 
and their families to celebrate with us at our Annual
Anniversary Dance AND Miss 
Bruederschaft der Burgenlaender Contest on Sunday, May 23, 2004, at Castle 
Harbour Casino, 1118 Havenmeyer Avenue, Bronx, New York (718) 822-9459.  The 
Castle Harbour family style dinner includes soup, sauerbraten, roast pork, 
chicken schnitzel, beer, wine, soda, coffee
and cake.  There will be a raffle stand 
and a children's ice cream parade.  A special attraction will be schuhplattler 
dancing by the Schlierachtaler Stamm.  Music will be provided by the Joseph 
Weber Band.  Tickets are $40 per person.  Children under 6 are free and 
children 6 to 12 are $10.  Dinner
starts at 2 pm and doors open at 1:30 PM.  RSVP by 
May 16, 2004.  For information and reservations call (718) 445-4388 or (718) 
366-3259.  Checks should be payable to The Brotherhood of the Burgenlaender.  
Mail checks to Rose Zach, 123-18 18th Avenue, College Point, NY 11356.  Alois 
Zach, President, adds this message, "I thank you for your support in the past 
and I hope to see you all in May to celebrate this special event together and 
meet the New Miss Bruederschaft der Burgenlaender and Calendar Girl for 2005!"  



6. ITEMS FROM CHICAGO ENCLAVE (from Tom Glatz)

The unveiling of the new Chicago Spurensuche website will be on May 8th. The 
committee involved in making this happen is giving a private reception. I will 
be there & they have invited Karl Billisits, the new Chicago BG president, to 
attend. Karl is very excited to be a part of this. I am hoping this will be 
the catalyst to make him go online as well. The Chicago BG has a lot of work 
cut out for ourselves if we want to get back into the mainstream of the 
German/Austrian club
scene. I am sure you will hear from the Spurensuche committee 
about setting up links with our BB.  The site should have links to every club 
which has a website.
 
I would like you to mention BG dues again. There are 3 BB members that have 
not paid BG dues. I will send reminders to all of the people on my list.
 
The Czechoslovak-American Musicians Club will hold a spring concert and dance 
on Sunday afternoon, May 23, 2004, at the Sokol Berwyn-Slavsky, 6445 W. 27th 
Place, Berwyn, IL 60402. Tickets are $8.00 in advance or $10.00 at the door. 
Advance ticket sales: Hans Schaden, 4730 N. Kedvale Ave., Chicago, IL 60630, 
773-736-0594.
 
Mr. Schaden is of Burgenland ancestry. The original founders of the 
organization
were mostly Czech and Slovak. But over the years others have joined. This

group is a very professional group. The Chicago Burgenländische Gemeinschaft 
often supported them and they in turn supported us by coming to our events and 
dances. 
 
Next Saturday is the Chicago DANK (Deutsch Amerikan National Kongress) Süd 
Mai Tanz. It will be held at the German American Heritage Center, 25249 S. 
Center Rd. Frankfort, Illinois. Doors open at 6 PM. Entry fee is $8.00.
Children 
under 16 free. The group D'Lustigen Holzhacker Buam Schuhplattler
Verein will be 
the entertainment. Also the group Paloma will provide the dancing 
entertainment. The food is always good with Kasseler Rippchen
or Bratwurst. Partly 
because there are so many members in the BG that are members of the DANK, the 
Chicago BG usually supports the DANK Süd or south.
 
The DANK west will hold a Maydance Saturday, May 8th, at the Ramada Inn, 303 
S. Frontage Rd., Burr Ridge, IL. Tickets are $10.00 in advance, $12.00 at the 
door. Call Annalies 708-562-7038.
 
 The DANK Nord and DANK Schule invites everyone to the Maitanz, on Saturday, 
May 15th, 2004. The doors open at 6PM. The DANK Haus is at 4740 N. Western 
Ave., Chicago, IL. Telephone: 773-727-5748. This one is a real bargain for the 
entrance fee of $5.00!!!! Parking can be a real problem in this area because 
this is the center of German activity in Chicago. The Brauhaus restaurant is on 
the next street. Music will be provided again by the Paloma! The food is 
excellent at this event.
 
Lastly, the Schubert-Lyra Choir of Chicago invites all to a dance the above 
address in the DANK Haus, on May 8th. Admission is $15.00. John Koscak may be 
reached for tickets at 847-299-8979.
 
7. EMAIL FROM EISENSTADT SCHANTAS (from Bob Strauch)

This email (translated by Bob Strauch) was recently received:

Dear Mr. Berghold! By chance I happened upon your newsletter on the Internet 
and noticed the following item:  "ETHNIC NEWS FROM ALLENTOWN (from Bob 
Strauch)

 The 22nd Annual Austrian Flag Raising will take place Sunday, October 22, 
2000 at the Austrian-Hungarian Veterans Society, 852 N. 4th Street,  Allentown, 
PA.

  12:30 PM Ceremony
  1-2 PM Reception-goulash & pastry
  2-6 PM Dance w/Schanta Band

  The public is invited. Sponsored by the A/H Vet. Soc. and the 
Burgenländische Gemeinschaft."
  
*As we are a music group from Burgenland ("Die Schanta Buam"/"The Schanta 
Boys") and also bear the rather rare name of  Schanta,
we would like to send the 
"Schanta Band" in Pennsylvania greetings from Burgenland.  More information 
about our group can be found at www.schanta-buam.at

Sincerely,  Norbert  SCHANTA Treasury Dept. Bank Burgenland, Eisenstadt 
 
 
Bob then writes:  I've conveyed the greetings from the Eisenstadt Schantas to 
the Lehigh Valley Schantas and provided the Eisenstädters with some 
background info on "our" Schantas. Norbert Schanta
has even kindly offered to send us a 
copy of their CD. "Our" Lehigh Valley Schantas originally come from the 
villages of Jakabháza/Jakobshof and
Rábafüzes/Raabfidisch, which lie just across 
the southern Burgenland border in Hungary near Szentgotthárd. After emigrating 
to the US and settling in Coplay in 1957, they continued their family music 
tradition under several names:
"The Burgenländer Band", "Die Schanta Buam", "Die 
Familie Schanta", "The Schanta Band", and presently as "The Emil Schanta Band" 
since under the direction of son Emil Schanta Jr. Maybe we can get both 
groups together sometime for a jam session. 
     

END OF NEWSLETTER

BURGENLAND BUNCH STAFF (USA residents unless designated otherwise)
Coordinator & Editor Newsletter, Gberghold@AOL.com (Gerald Berghold)
Burgenland Editor, albert.schuch@gmx.at (Albert Schuch; Austria)
Home Page Editor, hapander@spacestar.net (Hap Anderson)
Internet/URL Editor, ARKRESH@AOL.com (Anna Tanczos Kresh)

Contributing Editors:
Austro/Hungarian Research, fritzkoe@comcast.net (Fritz Königshofer)
Burgenland Co-Editor, klaus.gerger@usa.net (Klaus Gerger, Austria)
Burgenland Lake Corner Research, dkneb@tnics.com (Dale Knebel)
Chicago Burgenland Enclave, tglatz@aol.com (Tom Glatz)
Croatian Burgenland, fteklits@comcast.net, (Frank Teklits)
Home Page village lists, ardsleyut@mstar2.net, (Bill Rudy) 
Home Page surname lists, steichen@triad.rr.com (Tom Steichen)
Home Page membership list, burgenland-bunch@chello.at , (Hannes Graf, 
Austria)
Judaic Burgenland, 71431.1612@compuserve.com (Maureen Tighe-Brown)
Lehigh Valley Burgenland Enclave, strauchfam@enter.net (Robert Strauch)
Szt. Gotthard  & Jennersdorf Districts, Burgenlaenderin@aol.com (Margaret 
Kaiser)
Western US BB Members-Research, r-unger@cox.net (Bob Unger)
WorldGenWeb -Austria, RootsWeb Liason-Burgenland,  cwardell@aon.at (Charles 
Wardell, Austria)

BB ARCHIVES (can be reached via Home Page hyperlinks) or a simple search 
facility (enter date or number of newsletter desired) at:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~autbur/bbnlarchx.htm
BURGENLAND HOME PAGE (WEB SITE)
http://www.spacestar.com/users/hapander/burgen.html
http://go.to/burgenland-bunch (also provides access to Burgenländische 
Gemeinschaft web site.)
WORLDGEN WEB BURGENLAND QUERY BOARD
http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec?htx=board&r=rw&;
p=localities.ceeurope.austria.Prov.burgenland

The BB is in contact with the Burgenländische Gemeinschaft, Hauptplatz 7, 
A-7540 Güssing, Burgenland, Austria. Burgenl.gem@bnet.at

Burgenland Bunch Newsletter distributed courtesy of (c) 1999 RootsWeb.com, 
Inc. P.O. Box 6798, Frazier Park, CA 93222-6798 

Newsletter and List Rights Reserved. Permission to Copy Granted; Provide 
Credit and Mention Source.


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