Ships of Bermuda - 1850-1899


James
The brigantine "James", abt 287 tons burden, Captain Richardson, left England 5 Jun 1850 for Bermuda with children from St Pancras parish workhouse in London (see passenger list). (Raymond, 1994)

James
The brigantine "James", abt 287 tons burden, Captain T W Burrowes, left England 10 Oct 1850 for Bermuda with children from St Pancras parish workhouse in London (see passenger list). (Raymond, 1994)

Swan
The brig Swan, master Joseph Pierce, arrived at the Port of New York from Bermuda 17 November1851 (see passenger lists).

New York
American paddle steamer New York at anchor, Bermuda Islands, with single smokestack; one-story structure with covered area at bow and stern; two ship name flags, US at stern.


Clipper ship "Comet" of New York: in a hurricane off Bermuda on her voyage from New York to San Francisco [California], Oct[obe]r 1852. A Three-masted sailing ship, it keeled over port side in high seas.

Petrel
The steam ship "Petrel", master William Sampson registered at the port of New York from St Thomas and Bermuda on 1 December 1852 (see passenger lists).
Burthen 730 tons.

Golden Rule
The "Golden Rule" was owned by the Watlington family, purchased from Captain John Thomas Watlington's uncle Joseph Dill of the Bermuda firm Dill, Wood & Co. She was sold to purchase the "Koh-I-Noor" (below). Under the command of Captain B W Watlington, she brought the first Portuguese immigrants to Bermuda from Madeira November 1849.

Eliza Ann
A New England ship, the Eliza Ann, was found adrift off Daniel's Head in 1853.  The derelict reportedly contained only the skeletal remains of its crew along with the tattered shreds of clothing hanging from the corpses' bleached bones. Never a clue nor a trace of evidence surfaced to explain what misfortune had overtaken the ship.  (source: Bermuda Atlas & Gazeteer, 2002)

Sir George Seymour
The "Sir George Seymour was a clipper sailing ship (barque) launched May 23, 1853 at Shelley Bay, Bermuda. She was of 267 tons burthen. Owners were Nathaniel T Butterfield, Nathaniel A Butterfield, James Henry Trimingham, Henry Mills Stowe (master mariner), and John Joseph Outerbridge (ship builder). She sailed first to San Domingo under master Henry Stowe, not yet coppered. Later, under the command of Captain Thomas Melville Dill, she made a record run of 13 days from Bermuda to Cork, Ireland. Another of her commanders was Captain Henry Joseph Watlington, under whom Nathaniel Vesey sailed. Her builder, John Joseph Outerbridge owned yards at Shelley Bay, extending from the North Shore to Harrington Sound, and to Flatt's Inlet.
Daniel Robt Tucker in his notebook, entry dated 13 Mar 1857, "per Barque Sir George Seymour, Capt Thos. M Dill. Sam'l Triscott Esq. Letter to him saying I had sent my Cedar Figure Head with a natural wig (formed by a wart that grew on a Cedar tree). I had a man's face to represent Dr Johnson carved on the side opposite the wart. I mention that his friends, Mr Disraeli & Lord Derby may see it by applying to Mr J Barge..." (BHQ vol 10 #2 p122).

Koh-I-Noor
The barque "Koh-I-Noor" was launched from Shelley Bay on January 30, 1855, of 258 tons burthen. Her owners included Benjamin W Watlington, William Richard Outerbridge, John Thomas Watlington (master mariner), and William John Cox. Built by Davis & Outerbridge, Mr Outerbridge's shares were acquired on his death in 1857, by Eugenius Harvey of St John's, Newfoundland. She was commanded by Captain John Thomas Watlington from her first voyage (to Barbados) until his death in 1870. She made voyages to England, Cape of Good Hope, Cape of Ceylon, Oporto, the West Indies, Newfoundland and Havan, Cuba. Classed A1 at Lloyd's. On 13 Oct 1906, the Fowey registered barquentine Koh-I-Noor sank on a coral reef in Aruba, Dutch Antilles (the same vessel?).

On 13 Oct 1906, the Fowey registered barquentine KOH-I-NOOR sank on a coral reef in Aruba, Dutch Antilles. 
Lloyd's List reports give: 12 Sep 1906: (W C Smith) sailed Hamilton Bermuda for Aruba [22 Oct] New York 20 Oct:  Following received form Willemstad.  Heavy rains have fallen for 11 days, the hardest being from 11 to 14 Oct, accompanied by gales........   Reports from the Island of Bonaire state that ...... several small vessels ashore, schooners LA BELLE and MERON and the British barque KOHINOOR are total losses; their crews are safe
[13 Nov] Curacao 28 Oct:  The British barquentine KOH-I-NOOR of Fowey, Smith, when leaving Aruba 13 Oct for London with cargo of phosphate, struck on reef to the East side of Boca St Nicolaas, Aruba owing to contrary wind and heavy seas and became a wreck; crew, except for boatswain, saved. Master and 2 seamen still by her trying to save whatever possible. The crew survivors, including Captain William Charles Smith, "...had to
wait for the mail boat which called at the island once a month to take them off the island and home.." Would the mailboat have been something like the ss BARBADOS, and would the route have been island-hopping back to New York, and then to ?Liverpool.

O S Livermore
Daniel Robert Tucker's notebook, entry dated Nov 5-6 1855, : "I wrote under Jan 3 & 4, 1855 to R A T and sent it by Brig O S Livermore, Capt Josiah Darrell- who sailed on Sunday the 5th Jany. 1855 for Cienfuegos, Cuba. Capt. D expects R A T to meet him there by the 15 inst." (BHQ vol 10, No 2, pp116)

Boscawen
"On Tuesday last, the 29 ult, I went out with Adm'l Fanshaw and the Master of the Flag Ship Boscawen, to look at Blue Cut, Chub Cut, Hogfish Cut, Wreck Hill, Ely's Harbour, Daniel's Island, Mangrove Bay. John Swan was pilot. The Admiral was very much pleased." (reference: notebook of Daniel Robert Tucker, Hamilton, Bermuda, 1st June 1855 in BHQ vol 10, no 2, p114).

Penguin
September 28-29, 1855: Letters received from the Penguin, Capt Wm Watlington, Thos Dan'l Hall passenger, per notebook of Daniel Robert Tucker.  "I have engaged freight of 200lbs potatoes by the G M Robertson or by the Penguin, as may be most convenient" (1 Jun 1855). Mail Nov 5-6 1855 by the Penguin.. (Bermuda Historical Quarterly, vol.10, no2, p113-115). 13 Jun 1857: "I hope those (sales of potatoes) by the Daphne, Ocean Isle, and Barque Evelyn will do as well (as those by the Penguin and Albert Field)." (Danl Robt Tucker's notebook, BHQ vol 10 #2 p123).

Albert Field
Daphne
Evelyn
13 Jun 1857: "I hope those (sales of potatoes) by the Daphne, Ocean Isle, and Barque Evelyn will do as well (as those by the Penguin and Albert Field)." (Danl Robt Tucker's notebook, BHQ vol 10 #2 p123).

Kathleen
The barque "Kathleen" embarked from Gravesend, Kent, England August 1856 for Bermuda with George Spurling and others.

Eliza Bars's
The barque "Eliza Bars's" was one of Bermuda's famous sailing ships, of shallow draught, broad beam, and very fast before the wind. The barque proved to be ideal for trading between New York and Bermuda in her years of service between 1859 and 1889. She beat the "Canima, a steam-propelled passenger ship, in a NY-Bermuda run with a time of 3 1/2 days, under Captain Henry Hollis. Many young Bermudians began their sailing experience on this clipper, including Captain Henry Hollis, Captain Nathaniel A Vesey, Captain Edmund G Young, and Captain Elliott ("Dixie") Cooper. (see passenger lists).

Pearl
The "Pearl" was a clipper barque, launched May 10 1855 from the shipyards of Mr Nathaniel Yates of White's Island in Hamilton Harbour. The barque was 252 tons burthen. Her various owners included Samuel Pruden Watson, Thomas Burch James, Solomon Hutchins (master mariner), and William Smith Hutchings. Within a few weeks after being completed in 1855, she left Bermuda with one of the largest cargoes of native produce ever shipped up to this time. This cargo included 134 barrels and 1640 baskets of onions, 3160 barrels and 80 bags of potatoes, 1261 boxes of tomatoes, 40 halfbarrels and 12 kegs of arrowroot, as well as passengers. On December 7 1855, she left Bermuda with 245 convicts, who had completed their terms and were returning to Cork, Ireland. She made the run in 15 days.
        Per Daniel Robert Tucker's notebook, entry dated Nov 5-6 1855: "The Pearl is to carry 250 convicts to England very soon at 4.10 pounds each". (BHQ vol 10, No 2, pp 115).
On October 18 1858, the "Pearl" made her last voyage under William Smith Hutchings, and disappeared en route to the Azores.

F M Mayhew
See passenger list for passenger list for the Brig F M Mayhew in 1857. Daniel Robt Tucker in his notebook noted on 16 June 1856 "Robt. Alex. Tucker, N York per Mayhew, Capt Hall-  I enclose letter from Jacobina to Wm Hy. San Francisco, California." Another entry to Robt Alex Tucker, N York, July 22 1856 by Brig Mayhew. (BHQ vol 10, N0 2, pp116-7). "1857- Jany. Robert Alex. I wrote him by the Barque Virginia and the Brig mainhew, that sailed before Christmas... Both these vessels returned to Bermuda after being out about 3 weeks. They were beaten off... The Mainhew, Capt Hall, about 4 days after her [Virginia]. The Mayhew left Hamilton Sunday, 25th Jany. for N York."(p121-122)

Ocean-Isle
Fairy (cutter)
These vessels sailed 11 July 1856 for St Thomas and Grenada (from Bermuda) per Daniel Robt Tucker in his notebook (BHQ vol 10, N0 2, p117). 13 Jun 1857: "I hope those (sales of potatoes) by the Dapne, Ocean Isle, and Barque Evelyn will do as well (as those by the Penguin and Albert Field)." (Danl Robt Tucker's notebook, BHQ vol 10 #2 p123).

General Grant
Daniel Robt Tucker in his notebook entry 11 July  1856 "Write to Hy. Robert, Baltimore, and ask him to send me sales of the potatoes I sent him by the Genl Grant, via New York. " (BHQ vol 10, N0 2, pp116-7).

Transit
Newspaper item 30 July 1856: Mr & Mrs Adolphus D Smith & son; Miss Rosalie E Smith sailed on schooner "Transit" for Charlottetown.

Driver
Daniel Robert Tucker "went on board HM Sloop of War Driver, and put on board  on the 30th inst 60lb of arrowrt for Mr Triscott, and a box of Ferns for him. Capt Chambers of the Driver bo't 50lb of me, I bo't of Capt Chambers a small draft. The Driver sailed for Portsmouth on the 30 Aug. (notebook of Daniel Robert Tucker, BHQ, vol 10 #2, p118)

Ann
Virginia
Per letter to Robt Alex Tucker, NY by Barque Virginia Nov 1 1856; notebook of Danl Robt Tucker, BHQ vol 10 #2 p 120: "Stowe Wood and Thirza have been with us now several days. They expect to sail for Barbados in the course of a few days in an English brig called the "Ann". She is in St George's taking in stores. I am glad to say we are well. "   Letter Nov 5 1856: "Stowe Wood and Thirza went to St George's Nov 4- returned to Mr Englesbe Seon's, and remained all night, and sailed this day from St George's at 11 am in the Brig Ann for Barbados...""1857- Jany- Robert Alex. I wrote him by the Barque Virginia...both of these vesels returned to Bermuda after being out about 3 weeks. They were beaten off. The Virginia went to St George's about Jany. 10..The Virginia sailed again for N York about the 20th Jany 1857."

Lady Chapman
4 Sep 1857, the brig Lady Chapman, Joseph W. Hill, Master, sailed from Bermuda to the port of New York  (see passenger list c/o ISTG). Daniel Robert Tucker writes in his notebook, 13 Nov 1856, "Robt Alex Tucker, N York. Letter to him by Brig lady Chapman. I sent Robt a nice honeycomb."(BHQ vol 10 #2, p120)

Bigelow 
Daniel Robert Tucker writes in his notebook, 13 Nov 1856, "letter to [Robt Alex Tucker] by Schr. Bigelow, Capt Whitter. 1 Dec 1856. I sent Robert 1.1/2 doz sweet oranges from my trees at George's Bay."(BHQ vol 10 #2, p121)

Basilish
Daniel Robert Tucker writes in his notebook, 9 Dec 1856, "I wrote Mr Stowe Wood Seon by steamer Basilish that carried a mail to St Thomas- mail closed at 1pm."(BHQ vol 10 #2, p121)

Aeolus
The Schooner Aeolus, Capt Hezekiah Frith Conyers, sailed from Bermuda to New York about 20 Jul 1857 (notebook of Dan'l Robt Tucker, BHQ Vol 10 #2 p124).

Teaser
The pilot boat Teaser came down about 6pm, 20 Jul 1857, from the Brig Mayhew, Capt Harvey, with George son of Daniel Robt Tucker (his notebook, BHQ vol 10 #2 p123).

May Queen
Schooner May Queen, Capt Wm Talbot, arrived in Bermuda about July 1857 (from New York?). (Daniel Robt Tucker's notebook, BHQ vol 10 #2 p124).

W P Chandler
The barque "W P Chandler" c 1860, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Atlantic
The barque "Atlantic", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Ocean Bird
The brigantine "Ocean Bird", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Ceylon of Boston
The medium clipper ship "Ceylon of Boston", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Scotland
The brigantine "Scotland", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Naiad
The brigantine "Naiad", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Avosette
The brigantine "Avosette", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Hound
The schooner "Hound", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909). 21 Jul 1863, Consul Allen places 6 destitute seamen from "Wm B Nash" o/board "Hound". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Lady of the Lake
The brigantine "Lady of the Lake", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

W Conyers
The vessel "W Conyers", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Jessie
The schooner "Jessie", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Devonshire
The brigantine "Devonshire", mid 1800's, Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Alfred
Secret
Augustus Pearman, a West End pilot from 1860's until 1899, was skipper of the pilot sloop "Secret" and found the deserted brig "Alfred" 15 miles southwest of Bermuda and brought her to safe harbour (ref: Bermuda's Architectural Heritage Series: Sandy's, p 140))

Peerless
The Brig Peerless, Bermuda, W.I. to New York 8 January 1861, W S Doe master (see passenger lists). (Source: ISTG) 2004).

Cedric
The "Cedric" was a Bermuda-built clipper sailing ship, launched in 1862.

Cedrine
The "Cedrine" was a Bermuda-built ship designed by John Martin and built by Davis and Outerbridge, launched Jan 16 1862. She wrecked off the Isle of Wight in April of 1862 (Bermuda's Heritage 1984, pg 37)

Don
A blockade runner "Don", British Naval commander "Captain Roberts" (fictitious name), son of Earl of Buckingham, and afterwards an Admiral in the Turkish Navy. Took leave at Bermuda in the 1860's. (Bermuda Historical Quarterly, Vol XXV no1, 1968, p 14).

Ino
The "Ino" was a clipper ship, purchased at Boston 30 August 1861 and commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard 23 Sep, Lt J P Cressy in command. T. 895, l. 160' 6", b. 34' 11", dph. 17' 5", s 14k, pl. 144, a. 8 32-pdr. Unusual speed and large storage space made her ideally suited to long range cruising against Confederate commerce raiders. Her first duty 27 Sep when departing Boston was searching out "rebel pirates". "Ino" sailed from Boston 5 Feb 1862 and reached Cadiz in 13 days and 16 hours. She asisted "Kearsarge" nad "Tuscarora" to blockade Semmes at Gilbralter where he had sought repairs, forcing him to abandon the "Sumter". Returning to Boston, "Ino" was ordered to Port Royal, SC for duty in the South Atlantic blockading squadron 4 Aug 1862. On the voyage south, she captured the French bark "La Manche" attempting to run the Charleston blockade 23 Aug. Six days later she arrived at St Georges, Bermuda to obtain from the American consul the latest information on blockade running activity in that quarter. She got underway the next day at the behest of the neutrality-conscious governor of Bermuda and made Port Royal 7 Sep. (letters of Tom Parker; Dictionary of American Fighting Ships, Vol III, 1968, Navy Dept, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Naval History Div.).

Princess Royal
The brig Princess Royal, master Theophilus D Newbold left Bermuda bound for the Port of New York on 17 June 1862 with 19 passengers (see passenger lists).

Wheatlands
The barque "Wheatlands", 25 Feb 1862, driven out to sea in distress and Admiral Milne ordered 2 steamers to go in search, brought her back to St George's (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

James W Fanning
Jan 6 1862, "relief afforded sailors of ship James W Fanning, wrecked on the reefs Nov 13. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

S S Nashville
Feb 30? 1862, the rebel steamer "Nashville" arrived from Plymouth, 15 days out, short of coal. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)
S S Bermuda
arrived 20 mar 1862... principal cargo is arms and ammunition... little doubt that their intention is to run blockade of Southern ports...has on board some very heavy guns. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)
18 Mar 1862, "steamer "Nashville", Pegram master, arr here from Charlestown in October 1861. She sailed from this port for Southampton, England". Returned 20 Feb and coaled and two days later left for the Southern states. Formerly an American vessel, side wheel, high rigged. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)   CSS Nashville, a 1221-ton side-wheel steamer, was originally a passenger steamer built at Greenpoint, New York, in 1853. She was seized by the Confederacy at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1861 and converted to a lightly-armed cruiser. Nashville made one combat cruise under the Confederate Navy flag, starting in October 1861. She captured and burned the sailing merchantman Harvey Birch in the English Channel on 19 November, and spent some time at Southampton, England. Returning to American waters early in 1862, she captured and burned the schooner Robert Gilfillan on 26 February. Two days later, she ran the blockade into Beaufort, North Carolina, remaining there until mid-March, when she went to Georgetown, South Carolina.  Sold to private interests and renamed Thomas L. Wragg, she operated as a blockade runner, but was hindered in this employment by her deep draft. After arrival near Savannah, Georgia, she was sold again in November 1862, to become a privateer under the name Rattlesnake. On 28 February 1863, while still in the Savannah area, she was destroyed by the monitor USS Montauk.

Sedgwick
arrived 22 Mar 1862 from Daedon, 19 days ex. Nassau. Hull painted a dark red.. 2 masts, 1 small stack with large white diamond each side. Wants coal. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Empire
23 June 1862, the Schooner Empire, Wm S. Doe, Master, burthen 123 tons, sailed from Bermuda to the port of New York  (see passenger lists c/o ISTG).

Gladiator
Steamer arrived August 27 1862. "She is same vessel tht once ran blockade. Arr. here on 23rd, has powder on board. Not allowed to anchor at the usual anchorage. Has been partly painted a light brick color." "Sep 17 1862 "Gladiator is discharging and will return to England. Her cargo almost wholly arms and ammunition." Jul 22 1863, "Gladiator" paddle wheel stmr arr. from Wilmington., "will sail in a day or two for Liverpool with her inbound cargo of 1000 bales of cotton. The bar silver has been transferred by bill of sale through J T Bourne, agent of the rebel states." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Merrimac
5 Sep 1862, steamer arrived "deeply laden, supposedly with arms -- ammunition". 24 Jan 1863, "Merimac" arr. in want of coal. She has a quantity of powder on board... has a new master and has recently been painted. She will leave here in a few weeks. They have been trying to find a place to land their powder as they say the South is better supplied with that than with many other things which they can take." "18 Apr 1863, left here "yesterday for Wilmington". Aug 1863 "is thoroughly overhauled." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Minho
"British steamer "Minho" arr on 1st with 600 bales cotton. Reported to have left Charlestown on 27th at 8pm. Brought 10 passengers. Was out of coal when arr. and had burned her spars to make steam. She was 12 hours off the islands in sight. Had the "Ino" remained here 36 hours longer, "Minho" would have been an easy prize." "Sep 10...conversation overheard last night ... cargo of the "Minho" is to be discharged and she is to take what she can of the cargo of the "Phoebe" and return to Charlestown.... between the 20th and 25th inst. and go by night... (the Minho) is a screw steamer of about 300 tons painted lead colour, with her mainmast entirely gone but part of her fore and mizen masts standing and draws when loaded about 9 feet of water". Left Bermuda, "got out past the "Tioga" and "Sonoma" in the night of 12th inst (Oct)..."(American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Phoebe
Steamer in port Sep 1862. Seized in Bermuda "and probably cannot leave for some time. The Captain of the Phoebe has been in jail irons for some weeks (Oct 21 1862)." 19 Aug 1863, "the "Phoebe" is discharging cargo here. Her powder is gone to teh whalehouse on a distant part of the islands." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Harriett Pinkney
Steamer in port Sep 1862. Jul 1863 "is momentarily expected from Halifax with coal for rebel stmrs." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Jane
Schooner "Jane" in port Sep 1862. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

M A Horton
Brig "M A Horton" in port Sep 1862. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Drogherty
Ship "Drogherty" of Liverpool in port Sep 1862. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Almoner
Barque "Almoner" in port Sep 1862. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Omacheta
17 Sep 1862 "Omacheta" arr from England, "73 tons, 2 masts. Topsails are schooner rig, draws 6 1/2 ft water." Steamer in port Sep 1862. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Sonoma
US gunboat steamer "Sonoma" left Bermuda the 13th Oct 1862. Commander Thos H Stevens. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

"Ocheta" (Omacheta?)
British steamer "Ocheta" left Bermuda the10th inst. (Oct). She went over the reefs at the West end". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Tioga
The "Tioga" left Bermuda 13 Oct 1862. Left Bermuda the 13th inst (Oct)" (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Herald Coxette
The steamer "Herald Coxette" "arr the 17th inst. (Oct) ex Charleston with cotton. She brings 12 passengers amongst whom is Lieut Maury whom they call Commmander.... The cotton from "Herald" has been secured by Custom House authorities for violation of Revenue Laws." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Institia
British iron screw steamer "Instita" of London, about 800 tons, "with full cargo arr. here 4th inst (Nov?)". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Cornubia
Side-wheel steamer arrived Dec 1862, "very fast boat with light draft of water. While here her colour was changed from black to a light lead colour." Dec 13 8162, "Stmr "Cornubia", Capt Burroughs, left today for Charlestown with cargo from "Institia" reported as general merchandise. The supercargo is a person called Stiles who represents himself as formerly US Consul at Vienna and at one time serving as an officer in US Navy. He claims to be a native of S Carolina and familiar with the channels to the Port of Charlestown. He is the only person on board who can act as Pilot there. They have also taken a Bermuda Pilot from here, promising to return him within 4 weeks." "Arrived here 19th inst (Jan 1863) ex. Wilmington with 300 bales cotton and 80 bbls rosin and turpentine. Reports having left here at daylight on 14th inst. Was chased ntil about 11 o'clock am by a US steamer. Could get no more cotton. She has a pilot brought from Wilmington. She reports having attempted to get into Charlestwn but found it too dangerous and went to Wilmington without anyone acquainted with the waters there. She brings a passenger, a person with British credit for $200,000 to buy and fit out a steamer". 19 Feb 1863, "Stmr Cornubia arr. here at daylight this am with 300 bales cotton... made passage ex Wilmington in 71 hours." 25 Feb 1863, " having discharged and taken in cargo will leave today for Wilmington. Has large qnty arms and ammunition. Master says he will return here in three weeks." Left on the 28th inst. "She took a Bermuda pilot." " arr from Wilmington in 66 hours" 21 Apr 1863. Aug 1863 " arr with full load of cotton." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Phantom      
In 1863, Mrs Rose Greenhow, a representative of the Confederacy and a spy, arrived in Bermuda on the "Phantom" with her small daughter on her way to Europe to promote plans to buy ships, guns and other supplies with cotton certificates. She left Bermuda on a British man-of-war, later drowning on her return from Europe, off Wilmington, while on board the "Condor".

St George, formerly Crystal Palace
The SS "St George", formerly the "Crystal Palace" of Rockland, ME "has been purchased by Southern agent here on Southern acc. She left last week (Dec 1862) for Turks Is to load salt." "On reefs 23 Mar 1863". Aug 1863 "is now on the rocks at the North of Bermuda with a cargo of cotton said to be from Charlestown. She will probably be a total loss." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Elba
The ship "Elba" of Liverpool "Left here 5th inst (Dec 1862) w/625 bales of cotton brought here from Charlestown in "Herald". 8 Jun 1863, " a sidewheel beam engine stmr , hailing from St John, NB arr. here yesterday. She is about 200 tons burthen, has no cargo. It is hinted she is to be fitted as a privateer... new vessel recently built in New York. What her former name was I have not learnt but she is now called "Elba". She has a Southerner for Master." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Princess Royal
24 Jan 1863, "British steamer "Princess Royal" from Halifax arr. here 17th inst. She left here yesterday for the Southern coast.... one of the largest stmrs that as yet has attempted to run blockade." 30 Oct 1863, blockade runner "Elba" in port at this time. 10 Nov 1863 "cleared for Nassau." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Belta
Jan 24 1863, "Capt Hunter of the mail stmr "Belta" wh. arr. today ex St Thomas reports "Alabama" 300 mil south of Bermuda on 15th inst." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

General Beauregard, formerly Havelock
3 April 1863: Steamer "General Beauregard" with cargo of "Enfield rifles, 1 field battery of guns complete, 500 bags saltpetre, blankets etc and is consigned to the house of Fraser & Co, Charlestown... draws 12 ft, 6 in water." "Left here the 14th inst."(American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961).   


  Robert E Lee
"Robert E Lee" of Wilmington "arr here on 16th (Apr), 3 days ex Wilmington, with 600 bales cotton, turpentine, rosin, and tobacco." Aug 1863, " came into port here last night under Confederate flag. She was lately "Havelock", Capt Coxetta, from Charlestown. She brings 1030 bales cotton. They have several passengers among whom is the wife and family of Major Walker, the agent here of the Confederate States." 6 Jun 1863 "arrived with 600 bales cotton, turps, rosin, tobacco, returning to Wilmington with salt, provisions, potatoes, onions, and 300 c/s rifles, shot, liquors..." " 15 July 1863, Vice Consul Hyland to Sec State. The stmr "Robert E Lee" under the flag of the so-called Confederate states arrived in this port on 9th from Wilmington with cotton and turpentine and is now taking cargo from store for a return voyage." 19 Aug 1863, "arr yesterday". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961). Captain John Wilkinson of the "Robert E Lee" ran the blockade 26 times. With him was Johnny Tabb, later to become to become Father Tabb, "well liked in St Georges". (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol XXV, no1, 1968). Capt T L Outerbridge related the following  in "Imprisoned for Blockade Running 1863-1864" printed in BHQ vol 6 #2 pg 105-7. He was in the steamer "Robert E Lee", Capt Wilkinson,  leaving Wilmington when the ship was attacked by two man-of-war.  

"During the month of March 1863, the "Lee's" port of destination was St George's, Bermuda. This island is easily accessible on the southern side, and was much resorted to by blockade-runners. Surrounded on all sides by dangerous coral reefs, which extend for many miles into deep water, a vessel of heavy draft can approach from the south within a cable's length of the shore. A light of the first class at the west end of the group composing the "Bermudas" is visible for many miles in clear weather. It may as well be mentioned here, that the blockade-runners rarely approached any head land during daylight; "preferring darkness rather than light". The agent of the Confederate Government Major Walker, with his staff of assistants, lived at St George's; and he and his accomplished wife always welcomed their compatriots with genuine hospitality. The house of Mr Black (an assistant of the Major) was also open to us, and no sick exile from home will ever forget the tender nursing of Mrs Black and the kindness of that whole family. The little graveyard attached to the Episcopal Church at St George's contains all that is mortal of several gallant youths from the south, who died of yellow fever; but they were soothed in the hours of their last illness by Christian counsel, and by tender hands. The white natives of the island, too, extended many attentions and civilities to Confederates, so that St George's became not only a harbor of refuge, but a pleasant resting place after the excitement and fatigue of an outward voyage. The same antagonism which prevails between the white and the black races, wherever they live together upon equal terms, exists in Bermuda. People are classed there as "Colored and plain" and a fine of one pound sterling is imposed for calling the former "negroes". There must be a natural antipathy between the two races; ... the only indigenous tree upon the islands, I believe is the cedar; the oleander which now grows everywhere, having been introduced by Mr Tucker... There is a naval station at :Ireland Island" and a floating dock (which was built in England and towed out) capable of taking in the largest-sized man of war. The naval officers... were always friendly and more than civil to Confederates... (The Narrative of a Blockade-Runner by John Wilkinson, 1877, pp 142-148.)
USS Fort Donelson, a 642-ton iron-hulled side-wheel gunboat, was built in 1860 at Glasgow, Scotland, as the commercial steamer Giraffe. In 1862 she became the Confederate blockade runner Robert E. Lee and, during the next year, successfully penetrated the Federal blockade of the South more than twenty times. While attempting to reach Wilmington, North Carolina, on 9 November 1863, the ship was captured by the U.S. Navy ships .Purchased in January 1864, converted to a warship and placed in commission in June 1864, Fort Donelson was sent back to the waters off North Carolina as a unit of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Her most notable action was participation in the mid-January 1865 operation that captured Fort Fisher, thus eliminating Wilmington as a blockade-running port. Some months later, when ordered to the Gulf of Mexico, she was found to be in poor condition and was sent back north. USS Fort Donelson was decommissioned at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in August and sold in October 1865. She subsequently returned to civilian employment under the name Isabella and, in 1869, became the Chilean Navy ship Concepcion.

Cyrene or Sirene
1863-4, Johnny Tabb, purser of the "Cyrene" (or Sirene), a blockade runner for the Confederacy was captured with 3 Bermudians, Eldon & Tommy L Outerbridge and Captain Jeremiah Peniston. They were imprisoned in Point Lookout, Maryland. Through Tabb, the British Ambassador Lord Lyons at Washington and interceded to secure their freedom. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly, Vol XXV, no1, 1968). Capt T L Outerbridge related his capture in "Imprisoned for Blockade Running 1863-1864" printed in BHQ vol 6 #2 pg 105-7. Capt Jeremiah Peniston went as Master of the "Sirene"; my brother, Eldon Outerbridge was First Officer, I was Second Officer and Mr Tabb, a gentleman from Virginia was Purser. After a passage of 7 days we reached Bowford, NC so you can see what a slow boat she was. Well, we proceeded down the coast under sail towards Cape Fear, thinking this would deceive the blockaders. After going along about an hour, the man-of-war "Key Stone State" came up and spoke to us, ordering us to heave-to, which we did. They sent a boat, took us in tow, carried us into Bowford harbour and anchored us close to a receiving-ship. The officers of the "Key Stone State" laughed at us for trying to run the blockade in such a vessel.. Next day we were put on board the receiving ship. The Captain of this craft had been in Bermuda several times in a whaler and was very kind to us. We remained on board 10 days and lived like fighting cocks. On the 4th day we saw a steamer "Pavince", a blockade runner, chased on shore by one of the Yankee men-of-war. ..the men were sent to the receiving ship- the shortest route to a prison...and we all had a good time. ... Capt Peniston, the captain of the "Pavince" and a lot of others went to take the "Sirene" to Fort Lafayette. The rest of us went to Point Lookout Prison where about 15000 Confederate soldiers were imprisoned." After release 2 months later, "we went to Mr Middleton, the Bermuda agent (in New York). Mr Middleton told us Capt William Peniston was at New York in his barque "Lapflerene". He was going to Bermuda and wanted a crew.... his wife was on board..... After the war, "Key Stone State" was purchased by Mr Webb of New York and was sent to Bermuda as a New York boat to run the mails. Her name was changed to "San Francisco".  (memoir of TL Outerbridge, BHQ vol 6 #2)

Lapflerene
"Mr Middleton told us Capt William Peniston was at New York in his barque "Lapflerene". He was going to Bermuda and wanted a crew.... his wife was on board..... After the war, "Key Stone State" was purchased by Mr Webb of New York and was sent to Bermuda as a New York boat to run the mails. Her name was changed to "San Francisco".  (memoir of TL Outerbridge, BHQ vol 6 #2; see Cyrene).

Key Stone State, later San Francisco
Union man-of-war and blockader; 1860's. See Cyrene/Sirene

Pavince
On the 4th day we saw a steamer "Pavince", a blockade runner, chased on shore by one of the Yankee men-of-war. ..the men were sent to the receiving ship- the shortest route to a prison...and we all had a good time. ... Capt Peniston, the captain of the "Pavince" and a lot of others went to take the "Sirene" to Fort Lafayette. The rest of us went to Point Lookout Prison where about 15000 Confederate soldiers were imprisoned."  (memoir of TL Outerbridge, BHQ vol 6 #2; see Cyrene).

Dashing Wave
"23 mar 1863, "Dashing Wave" arr with cargo for Southern States consigned to J T Bourne, agent for Southern steamers." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Georgiana
The Georgiana was built in England in 1862 for the Confederate states. She escaped from British juridiction for Nassau on 22 January 1863. The CSA blockade runner was detected trying to run the blockade for Charleston from Bermuda on March 22 1863. Her captain ran her around off the Long Island Beach off the South Carolina coast. The cargo of arms and supplies was mostly lost due to the shelling.

Stanley
14 June 1863, steamer "arr ex England. Govt has refused to supply "Stanley" with coal and she cannot get it from any other source at present." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Leopold
14 Jun 1863, steamer "arr ex England, is of light draft.. consigned to J T Bourne... has taken all coal in the hands of individuals which is only about 50 tons." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Adela
26 Jun 1863, "the iron side wheel steamer arr. 19th. She is a long, narrow vessel with 2 large white smoke stacks, one forward of the other. She hails from Belfast." Jul 1863, "landed 16 c/s rifles and 5c/s cartridges which are stored in my office." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Ladona
8 Jul 1863, "steamer "Ladona" now in port here has on board 25 tons salt petre... master... explains it being on baord by saying it was taken by mistake supposing it to be salt." "after finding there was no coal here except that belonging to the US raised the Stars and Stripes and was extremely Northern in his professions and with his Consular license tried every scheme human ingenuity could invent to obtain coal of me. He went so far as to offer $1000 to go to the other end of the islds and leave my business for 2 days in the hands of a merchant." "left here 16th (Jul 1863) cleared for Nassau." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Keronese
"Arr here 19th (Jul 1863) with sickness on board. She was sent to quarantine where she now remains, 5 having died on baord of yellow fever." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Peterhoff
Aug 1863, "Peterhoff still in port. They have been waiting for the "Memphis" wh was burned here when captured." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Memphis
The "Memphis was burned c1863 in Bermuda when captured. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Alma
The schooner "Alma" "leaves with salt and liquors (Aug 1863)." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Eugenia
The stmr "Eugenia" arr. "She is side-wheel boat about 350 tons." 6 Jun 1863, "arrived with full load of cotton". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)


Wachusett
"June 5 (1863). A J M Gilbert Controller of Customs to Consul Allen: I am directed by H E the Gov. to acquaint you that USS "Wachusett" is not to leave this port within 24 hours after Confederate steamer "Robert E Lee" sails." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Venus
" 12 Jun 1863. "Venus" is a side wheeler w/ 2 masts and square sail about 700 tons burthen. She draws about 9 ft with her coal on board." 17 June 1863 "stmr "Venus" left on 14th." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)
Was at one time commanded by Captain Murray, later Admiral Murray-Aynsley. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly, Vol XXV, No1, 1968).

Emma
"arr. ex Wilmington with 350 bales cotton. 400 bx tobacco and turps (1863). (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Harkaway
"Bermuda schooner left here last night (Jun 1863) with assorted cargo. Her master applied at Custom House for clearance for Port Royal, SC but could not get it and cleared for Nassau. She flew the Southern flag a portion of the time while in port here." 25 Jul 1863, Consul to Sec State, "Schooner "Harkaway", Capt Firth (possibly Frith) of this port, sails in a day or two for Nassau, in ballast. Has taken something from the "Florida" but cannot ascertain what it is in time for this communication." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Jeff Davis, formerly Cornubia
22 June 1863, "on 20th inst arr here stmr "Jeff Davis" of and from Wilmington on 17th inst. She was formerly British stmr "Cornubia" but now comes under Confederate flag. She brings a passenger C L Vallandigham. I hear he will go to Halifax by first oppty.. Her only cargo is 17 bales cotton. She brings dispatches for Confederate stmr "Virginia", expected here soon." 27 Jul 1863 "arrived also Confederate stmr "Jeff Davis". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961).   Jefferson Davis, a 187-ton brig, was built in Baltimore, Maryland, in about 1845 as the merchant vessel Putnam. As the slaver Echo, she was captured off Cuba on 21 August 1858 by USS Dolphin. Sold by the U.S. Government in January 1859 to a Charleston, South Carolina, owner, she regained the name Putnam.  In May 1861, after the outbreak of the Civil War, Putnam was renamed Jefferson Davis (or Jeff Davis) and was commissioned as a Confederate privateer in mid-June. She left Charleston later in that month to begin an effective commerce-raiding cruise off the U.S. east coast, capturing nine merchant sailing vessels. Three of these were recaptured, three were released, one was burned and two, able to reach port in the Confederacy, were auctioned for the benefit of the privateer's owners and crew. While attempting to enter harbor at Saint Augustine, Florida, in mid-August 1861, Jefferson Davis went aground and was lost. http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-us-cs/csa-sh/csash-hl/jefn-dvs.htm.

Virginia
22 June 1863, Confederate stmr "Virginia" "expected here soon." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

V H Hill
"Whaling schooner "V H Hill" of Provincetown, Freeman, master, arr on the 4th inst (Jul 1863) with 54 seamen put o'board on 27th ult rebel stmr "Florida"." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Florida
21 Jul 1863, "arrival in this port on 16th inst of the armed stmr "Florida" under flag of rebel states of Am." 27 Jul 1863, "sails on 25th with full supply best Cardiff coal." 7 Aug 1863, "on the 4th, British screw stmr "Florida" with 1000 tons of coal from Nassau and is supplying other (conferderate) steamers. 30 Jun 1864, "Florida" went to sea last Monday evening, "but has not been far from land. She is in sight today from the hills about six miles off. She boards all vessels approaching islands."(American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961; vol 19, no 1, 1962).
USS Hendrick Hudson, a 460-ton (burden) screw steam gunboat, was built at Greenpoint, New York, in 1859 as the commercial steamship Florida. In January 1862 she was seized at New Orleans by the Confederate government and ran through the Federal blockade on 19 February on a successful attempt to carry cotton to Havana, Cuba. The following month Florida arrived at the Florida panhandle with a cargo of rifles and gunpowder. On 9 April 1862, while nearly ready to depart with another shipment of cotton, she was captured by a boat expedition from the U.S. Bark Pursuit and, with some difficulty, was gotten to sea. Later sent north for adjudication by the prize court at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Florida was purchased by the U.S. Navy in September 1862 and converted to a gunboat. Renamed Hendrick Hudson, she was commissioned in late December 1862 and went back to the Gulf of Mexico to enforce the blockade. Serving off western Florida during the remainder of the Civil War, she captured three sailing blockade runners in February-April 1863 and rammed and sank another in March 1864. Her crew also participated in expeditions ashore to destroy or capture enemy facilities. USS Hendrick Hudson was decommissioned in August 1865 and sold a month later. Returned to commercial service as the steamship Hendrick Hudson, she was wrecked near Havana on 13 November 1867.

Henrietta
7 Jul 1863, British brig "Henrietta", Capt Doe agreed to take to NY the seamen brought in on the "V H Hill", belonging to the destroyed ships "Southern Cross", "Red Gauntlet", "Benjamin Hoxie". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Wm B Nash
21 Jul 1863, "8 men, crew of brig "Wm B Nash" of Cherryfield, Maine, wh vessel was boarded and burned by "Florida" on 8th inst in lat 40, long 70, while on a voyage ex NYk to Marseilles, have landed and sought of this consulate." 21 Jul 1863, Cosul Allen places 6 destitute seamen from "Wm B Nash" o/board "Hound". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Hansa
Jul 1863, paddle wheel stmr arr. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Ella
Jul 1863, "Ella" paddle wheel stmr arr. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Spaulding
Jul 1863, "Spaulding" paddle wheel stmr arr. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Miriam
27 Jul 1863, "Miriam arrived with arms to be stored in warehouses. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Banshee
27 Jul 1863, paddle stmr "Banshee" arrived in Bermuda. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Eugenia
27 Jul 1863, "arrived also ... stmr "Eugenia" with cotton". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Gibralter
19 Aug 1863, "Since the last dispatch on the 7th inst "Gilbralter" and several other steamers employed in running US blockade have sailed for Wilmington. These vessels all cleared for Nassau and St John's with cargos of arms, ammunition, and provisions. The former vessel carried 2 very large guns destined for the works at Charlestown. Abundance of coals have been brought up from Nassau for these vessels..." "Gibralter" has arr. ex Wilmington with 350 bales cotton". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Fort Jackson
12 Sep 1863, USS "Fort Jackson", Capt Alden, reported to this consulate the 10th inst ad after receiving necessary information immediately proceeded on a cruise. The presence of this vessel has created alarm among the blockade-runners which will do good service... the route of several runners has been altered for Nassau." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Lady Davis
"Confederate stmr "Lady Davis" "arr. this am 10th inst (Sep 1863) w/ passengers Com. Barron and Prof. Benslow, Sec War en route to Europe." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Dee
30 Oct 1863, blockade runner "Dee" in port at this time. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)


Ella and Anna
30 Oct 1863, blockade runner "Ella and Anna" in port at this time. 10 Nov 1863 "cleared for Nassau." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961) Built as the steamship William G. Hewes in 1860, Ella and Annie was captured off New Inlet, North Carolina, in November 1863. She later became USS Malvern. William G. Hewes, a 747-ton iron side-wheel steamship, was built at Wilmington, Delaware, in 1860 for commerical service between the U.S. East Coast and the Gulf of Mexico. She made her maiden voyage early in 1861, as north-south tensions were expanding toward civil war. The steamer was seized by the State of Louisiana in late April 1861, initially with the idea of converting her into a gunboat, but instead became a blockade runner operating out of New Orleans. She was moved to Carolina ports after Federal Forces captured the lower Mississippi River in April 1862.  Sometime thereafter, William G. Hewes was transferred to private ownership and renamed Ella and Annie. She continued to run the Federal blockade on behalf of the Confederacy until 9 November 1863, when USS Niphon captured her off New Inlet, North Carolina, during an attempt to enter the port of Wilmington. Ella and Annie was subsequently purchased by the U.S. Navy and commissioned as USS Malvern. Sold at auction in October 1865, she reentered civil employment under her original name. Following a long and varied career, the steamship William G. Hewes was wrecked off Cuba on 20 February 1895. http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-civil/civsh-e/ella-ann.htm>.

Boston
30 Oct 1863, blockade runner "Boston" in port at this time. "Boston" came in leaky some weeks since ex Halifax w/ cargo badly damaged and cannot get away for want of funds". 20 Jun 1864, in Port of St George. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961; vol 19, no 1 1962)

Heroine
10 Nov 1863, "Heroine" topsail schr rigged, draws 4 ft (?), capacity 400 bales cotton." 12 Dec 1863, steamer "Heroine" left Bermuda on 12th for Wilmington, having cleared for Nassau." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Powerful
10 Nov 1863, "Powerful" small side wheel riverboat with wheels aft, 150 tons" here. 10 Nov 1863 "cleared for Nassau." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Ceres
10 Nov 1863, "Ceres" screw boat of about 350 tons" here. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Vestus
28 Dec 1863. Consul to Sec State. Twin ship to the "Ceres, the British stmr "Vestus" "arr since my last." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

City of Petersburg
10 Nov 1863, "City of Petersburg", a fine powerful paddle boat, capacity 1300 bales cotton" here. 20 Feb 1864, arr with 750 bales cotton. 1 Mar 1864, "left here yesterday", with Capt Fulton." Arr on the 15th inst (Mar 1864) from Wilmington. "She was chased by the USS Shenandoah west of these islands." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Coquette
20 Nov 1863, "Coquette" arr w/ general cargo and machinery. She is about 500 tons burthen and draws about 10 ft." 11 Dec 1863, "in port w/ cargoes o.board. They were ready to leave some days ago but are afraid to go." 12 Dec 1863, steamer "Coquette left Bermuda on 12th for Wilmington, having cleared for Nassau. Returned here on 19th and reports having been among the blockading fleet at Wilmington but could not get in." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Hermione
11 Dec 1863, "in port with cargoes o.board. They were ready to leave some days ago but are afraid to go." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

See
11 Dec 1863, "the "See" was expected some days ago". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Ranger
21 Dec 1863, "steamer "Ranger" left here 14th with a full cargo and returned today not having been into port." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Will O' Wisp
28 Dec 1863, "British stmr "Will O' Wisp" "arr. since my last... is a paddle boat of about 350 tons capacity. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

G O Bigelow
28 Dec 1863, "the owner of sch "G O Bigelow" of Bermuda applied to this consulate for a license to go to Beaufort which was refused as the mate is a North Caroliner and a bl. runner." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961)

Alfred
John Hiram Paynter Patterson's  father was a seafaring man and the young JHP went to sea when 17 yrs old (c1883). He shipped in the brig Alfred with the late Captain Herbert Young, and as a young boy on board followed the sea, making 15 voyages between Bermuda and the United States, with occasional trips to Nova Scotia and one voyage south to Martinique. In fair weather the trip to the United State and return would take from 4 to 6 weeks, but often the sailing ships would encounter rough seas or at times would lay becalmed on oily smooth waters. When he was 19 (c1885)... he stayed ashore... (reference:  The Bermudian Magazine, Nov 1945, "Personalities Roundabout"-  John Hiram Paynter Patterson,  by Mary Louise Herkes
Augustus Pearman, a West End pilot from 1860's until 1899, was skipper of the pilot sloop "Secret" and found the deserted brig "Alfred" 15 miles southwest of Bermuda and brought her to safe harbour (ref: Bermuda's Architectural Heritage Series: Sandy's, p 140))

Lady Milne
The Lady Milne was a Bermuda-built clipper sailing ship, launched in 1864.

Flora
The "Flora", a Confederate blockade runner of 359 tons, was a slow steamer making sixteen runs into Southern ports carrying lead, cloth, saddles, saltpetre, cotton cards, bbots, shoes, coffee, and shovels. She brought out 2380 bales of cotton and 240 tierces of tobacco. After striking a reef in Bermuda, she was sent to Halifax for repairs, but sank en route. 30 Oct 1863, blockade runner "Flora" in port at this time. 10 Nov 1863 "cleared for Nassau." 20 Nov 1863, "Flora" arr w/ cargo cotton and large number of passengers." 21 Dec 1863, steamer "Flora" of Wilmington "arr here on 16th with cotton. They saw a British mail stmr off Bermuda and supposing her to be an American war vessel ran for the island with all speed, struck on the rocks and knocked a hole in her bottom. It is doubtful if she can be repaired here. She cannot run blockade for some time." 18 Jan 1864, "stmr "Flora" previously reported on the rocks underwent temporary repairs & left on the 7th inst for Halifax; sprang a leak & went down next day about 60 miles from land." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2, 1961; Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Lord Clyde or A D Vance or Advance later Frolic
The "Lord Clyde", a British steamer was purchased by North Carolina in 1863 and re-named the "A D Vance". She made thirteen successful runs between Bermuda and Wilmington before she was captured in September 1864. "June 17. Consul to Sec State. Side wheel stmr "Lord Clyde" arrived." 30 Oct 1863, blockade runner "A P Vance" in port at this time (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Society, Vol 18, no 2 1961). Was a steamer of 880 (or 614)tons, purchased by the US Govt c1864/5 and name changed to the "Frolic", sold by the Govt 27 Sep 1883 (unverified source; List of Officers of the US Navy and of the Marine Corps 1775-1900).  Advance, a 902-ton side-wheel steamer, was built at Greenock, Scotland, in 1862 for use as a River Clyde packet. Purchased by the State of North Carolina under the name Lord Clyde in 1863, she was renamed Advance (a name frequently given as A.D. Vance), and put to work running the Federal blockade. She was one of the most successful Confederate blockade runners, making more than twenty voyages before her capture by USS Santiago de Cuba off Wilmington, North Carolina, on 10 September 1864. Taken into the United States Navy soon thereafter, she served as USS Advance until June 1865, when she was renamed Frolic.

Mary Celestia
The "Mary Celestia" was a Confederate blockade runner. She struck a reef off the South Shore and sank September 1864.  aka Mary Celeste: 26 Sep 1864, " the only arrival in July was the stmr "Mary Celeste" belonging to Crenshaw Brothers. She lost several men by the epidemic while here (yellow fever). Took a cargo principally of canned meats and left for Wilmington. Ran into a rock off Bermuda & sank in 20 fathoms in 6 minutes. Vessel a total loss, cargo nearly so. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Nola
18 Jan 1864, "stmr "Nola" ex Glasgow with a full cargo of merchandise, mostly dry goods, went on the reefs here and sank. Vessel & cargo almost total loss. "Nola" was a good vessel and cost L31,000 sterling." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Agupiris/Agupina
22 Jan 1864, "a Frenchman calling himself Peyrusset arr. here in British bark "Agupiris" on the 10th inst ex London. He brings Hon. C F Ada's card with following written over the private name: "Mr Allen, receive the bearer Mr Peyrusset, he will make known his business; you can act as you see fit. London. Nov 13 1863". "Agupiris" has 50 tons coal, about 100 tons powder, 70 cartridges & a large quantity rifles. She is now in St Georges harbour. Peyrusset informs me he went on board the vessel at London with the sanction of Mr Adams and Consul Morse who paid him L10.. He was informed the vessel was to supply "Alabama" or some other privateer." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Hauser
20 Feb 1864, the "Hauser" attived "with 540 bales cotton." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Tudex
20 Feb 1864, the "Tudex arr with 500 bales cotton. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Floris
20 Feb 1864, "Capt Moffitt of the Confederate stmr "Florida" comes as passenger on "Floris" from England." Intends to leave 2 Mar 1864 as master of the "Floris". 10 Mar 1864, "Stmr "Floris" under British flag left here the 2nd inst for Wilmington under command Capt Moffitt. "Returned on the 4th (Mar) leaking badly. She cannot be repaired here. Admiral Milne will not any of the blockade runners to be repaired at the Dockyard". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Cambia
10 Mar 1864, "the "Cambia" went on the reefs at the entrance of port of St George. Vessel and cargo nearly a total loss." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Greyhound
19 Mar 1864, "Greyhound" arrives, "is a screw boat w/ 3 masts , 1 smoke stack, draws 8 ft when laden, about 300 tons register. She is under command of Capt Burroughs, a successful blockade runner & formerly master of "Cornubia"." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

North Heath
19 Mar 1864,stmr "North Heath" arrives. 31 mar 1864, "left here today for Wilmington." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Caledonia/Caledocia
31 Mar 1864, stmr "Caledonia/Caledocia" left here for Wilmington, commanded "by Capt Libbey, a new man, a Southerner." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Heronie
The "Heronie" left on the 27th (Mar 1864) "under Capt Gilpin, an Englishman who has been twice captured." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Pavensey/Pevensey, later Kangaroo
7 May 1864, stmr "Pavensey/Pevensey, " left this am for Wilmington, "commanded by Capt Burroughs". 310 May 1864, "Stmr Pevensey, Burroughs arr here ex Wilmington with over 1,000 bales cotton." 4 Jun 1864, "name of "Pevensey" now changed to "Kangaroo". (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Resolution
20 Jun 1864, British stmr "Resolution" of Liverpool, "now in port of St George, has recently been sold to a person who goes by the name of Johnson. No doubt he is Lieut. (John C) Braine of Chesapeake notoriety." About 80 tons register. 28 Jun 1864, left these islands last Saturday. "She is in fact under command of one Locke who assisted at the capture of the "Chesapeake". Her registered master is McTue: fore and aft schooner, black hull, with deep blue deck house, apparently about 80 tons but registered only about 60 British. I think she has gone to the West Indies." (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Lady Lyons, late Syren
20 Jun 1864, "Lady Lyons", late "Syren", now in port of St George, had thought to be foundered previously. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Edith
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Lynx
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Old Dominion
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Little Hettie (or Hattie)
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Atlanta
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Mans
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Celestia
20 Jun 1864, now in port of St George. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Storm King
30 Jun 1864, "Storm King", C L Hobson of Richmond, agent, supplied coal to the "Florida". (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Falcon Fisher
13 Jul 1864, "stmr "Falcon Fisher" arr. on 4th ex Glasgow. She has 3 stacks, 2 masts, side wheel w/ 2 screws. She is comanded by a person who when formerly master of the "Don" went by the name of Roberts. He is said to be an English Naval Officer, son of some nobleman, an intimate friend of Governor Ord. If captured he will try to pass himself off as a deck hand." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Hawk
13 Jul 1864, " stmr "Hawk" is still in port & has her yards all down. Capt Locke calls her his vessel." 1 Sep 1864, the stmr "Hawk" "was originally built for a war vessel, her lines & model were submitted to the Naval Authorities before she was built; she is fitted with a double deck, each deck 3 1/2 inches thick, bolted together so as to form one deck 7 inches thick; she is fitted with ward & mess rooms for officers...she was undoubtedly intended for a blockade runner between Mobile and Havana.. commander E C Stiles, formerly of South Carolina, is expected to arrive here soon from England... at present she is also detained by a considerable number of cases of yellow fever on board." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Wild Rose
7 Nov 1864, "Wild Rose" left Bermuda since 25 Oct 1864. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Agnes Fry
7 Nov 1864, "Agnes Fry" departed Bermuda since 25 Oct 1864. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Owl
7 Nov 1864, "Owl" departed Bermuda since 25 Oct 1864. 24 Dec 8164, "Owl" , Capt Moffitt arr "ex Wilmington with 700 bales cotton." 23 Jan 1865, the "Owl" returned "on the morning of the 20inst." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Caroline
7 Nov 1864, "Caroline" departed Bermuda since 25 Oct 1864. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Stormy Petrel
7 Nov 1864, "Stormy Petrel" departed Bermuda since 25 Oct 1864. Under command of Capt Gordon who made 29 voyages through the blockade. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Talisman
7 Nov 1864, "Talisman" departed Bermuda since 25 Oct 1864. She went down at sea Jan 1865. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Virginia
7 Nov 1864, "Virginia" arr here ex Wilmington with 1000 bales cotton on 30th ult. She is a large new vessel & considered the most valuable of the fleet." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Edith, later Chickamagua
7 Nov 1864, "a rebel war vessel has just come to anchor off these islds. Reported to be stmr "Edith", 10 days to Wilmington. Report further says she has destroyed six vessels." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)
16 Nov 1864, "the rebel armed vessel reported by me on Nov 7 as having anchored off Bermuda came into St Georges next day. She is called "Chickamagua" late the blockade running steamer "Edith". She is commanded by one Wilkinson who was master of the "R E Lee" athte time of her capture. When she arr here she had 0/board 171 men, about 70 of which deserted here, the authorities refusing to render any assistance in returning them... she left on the 6th." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)
CSS Chickamauga, a 585-ton cruiser, was formerly the blockade running screw steamer Edith, which had been constructed in London, England, in 1863. She was purchased by the Confederate Navy at Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1864 and refitted as a warship. Chickamauga operated as a raider in the western North Atlantic in October and November 1864. After capturing several Union merchant ships, she returned to Wilmington. Chickamauga remained on the Cape Fear River until 25 February 1865, when she was burned to prevent capture. http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-us-cs/csa-sh/csash-ag/chickmga.htm"

Isabelle Maria
16 Dec 1864,... I S Black who acts as confederate agent here & who is... fitting out British schr "Isabelle Maria" of Halifax, lately purchased by Joseph Johnson, late Johnson & Crofts, who were agents for Briane in fitting out the "Resolution" in June last... is a fore & aft schr of 70 tons register w/cabin & caboose on deck; draws 8 ft water & is not fast. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Charlotte
30 Dec 1864, "arr at these islds on 23rd inst of British stmr "Charlotte" ex Wilmington, under a rebel flag, with 1015 bales cotton to W P Campbell. Is commanded by one Cocker, formerly a British Naval Officer." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

 Colonel Lamb
24 Dec 1864, "Colonel Lamb" arr with 1760 bales cotton, under a rebel flag. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962). Colonel Lamb, a 1788-ton side-wheel steamer, was built at Liverpool, England, in 1864 for employment running the Federal blockade of the Confederate coast. She successfully ran into the port of Wilmington, North Carolina, in late November 1864 and escaped back to sea the next month. In January 1865, with east coast blockade running at an end, she went to the Gulf of Mexico but was found unsuitable for operation into Galveston, Texas, and returned to England a few months later. Reportedly sold to Greek interests and renamed Bouboulina, she was destroyed in an explosion while loading munitions at Liverpool in 1866 or 1867. http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-civil/civsh-c/col-lamb.htm

 
Teaser

Stag
13 Jan 1865, rebel stmr "Stag" arr the 30th ult from Wilmington w. cotton. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Chamelon, later Tallahassee
13 Jan 1865, rebel stmr "Chamelon" (later the pirate "Tallahassee"), under the command of Wilkinson who commanded the "Chickamagua", arr 30th ult from Wilmington w. cotton. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

City of Richmond
1 Mar 1865, stmr "City of Richmond" arr "under the British flag ... a few days since." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Messina
14 Apr 1865, British barque "Messina" left Bermuda for England today, "after having been kept here some months by a rebel agent at an expense of not less than $3000." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Ajax
14 Apr 1865, "British stmr "Ajax" wh. undoubtedly came here for the purpose of, in some manner, getting guns & war ammunitions... is still in port." (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

Nashville
"steamer "Nashville", Pegram master, arr here from Charlestown in October 1861. She sailed from this port for Southampton, England". Returned 20 Feb and coaled and two days later left for the Southern states. Formerly an American vessel, side wheel, high rigged. (American Consular Records, Bermuda Hist Quarterly Vol 19, no 1, 1962)

J A Pitt
The brig "J A Pitt" departed 19 Jun 1866 from Bermuda (Caribbean Historical & Genealogical Journal)- see passenger lists. Nathaniel Veseywas a member of the crew on one voyage. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Excelsior
The brig "Excelsior" departed 19 Jun 1866 from Bermuda (Caribbean Historical & Genealogical Journal)- see passenger lists. Nathaniel Vesey was a member of the crew on one voyage. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

Mary Rideout
The bark "Mary Rideout" departed 19 Jun 1866 from Bermuda (Caribbean Historical & Genealogical Journal)- see passenger lists.

T A Darrell
The Brig T A Darrell sailed from Genoa, Italy and Bermuda to Baltimore, MD, arriving 15 July 1867. See Passengers Lists for details.

Bermuda's Floating Dock
Bermuda's first floating dock was in use at the Royal Naval Dockyard from 1869 until 1904. While being towed away to a ship breaker's yard, the dock broke loose and stuck at the foreshore, Spanish Point.

The Quebec and Gulf Port Steamship Company
In 1874, the Quebec Steamship Company made a contract with the Government of Bermuda to operate a steamer service between New York and the Islands. The first steamer employed for the service was the S S Canima (see below). The firm Cox & Trott began in the early 1850's with William John Cox and his senior clerk Harley Trott.

S S Fah-Kee
The steamer "Fah-Kee" arrived on her first trip to Bermuda in September 1868. Agents were Trott and Cox starting in 1869.  ( see Cox & Trott )

Guiding Star
The "Guiding Star" was a 2,384 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 40.5ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), wooden hull, side paddle wheel, prpulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Built by Roosevelt, Joyce & Waterbury, NY, she was launched for the New York & Havre Steam Navigation Co, NY and started first voyage from NY to Falmouth and Havre 30 March 1867. Her last voyage (her 3rd) from Havre to Falmouth and NY started 21 August 1867. Chartered to Rugers American Line, she commenced a single round voyage 1 May 1869 between NY - Southampton- Bremen- Copenhagen. On 25 August 1870 she started a round voyage for North American SS Co from NY to Havre, Antwerp, Southampton, Bermuda (for coal bunkers) and NY. Was scrapped in 1874 (North Atlantic Seaway by NRP Bonsor, vol 1, p216).

S S San Francisco
The steamer "San Francisco" (previously called "Key Stone State")  arrived on her first trip to Bermuda in August 1870. Trott and Cox became agents for the steamer in 1873. ( see Cox & Trott )

S S Canima
The "S S Canima" was a steamer-propelled 60 passenger ship. It was the first steamer operated by the Quebec Steamship Company  ( see Cox & Trott ), after contracting with the Bermuda Government to operate a steamer service between New York and Bermuda in 1874. The Canima was a converted yacht of 950 tons, fitted to carry 30 passengers. (Note: Bermuda Newspaper account dated Oct 30 1877: William E Witter, in his 51st year, a native of Bermuda, First Officer of the Canima, drowned at sea on Oct 27, when swept overboard in a gale, en route from New York to Bermuda. He left a wife, 3 sons, 4 sisters. He was one of Bermuda's most experienced mariners, and had joined the Canima in January 1874 (full account given in article). See also voyage of  14 Jan 1878, Bermuda to New York (under passengers lists).

S S Bermuda
The "S S Bermuda" was a steamer, passenger ship operated by the Quebec and Gulf Ports Steamship Company c 1870"s.

S S Trinidad
The "S S Trinidad" was a steamer of 2000 tons, iron built, and a single screw steamer belonging to the Cunard Steamship Company, which together with the Demerara, started a Glasgow-West Indies service in 1872. The service was not a success and the ships were transferred a year later to the Mediterranean trade. The "Trinidad" sailed from Bermuda to New York in 1888 (see passenger lists).  ( see also Cox & Trott )

S S Hatterass
The "S S Hatterass", master Saul Lawrence, burthen 808 40/100 tons, arrived at New York from Hamilton Bermuda 12 June 1873 (see passenger list). An ad found at "Missing Friends" website notes: William Taylor, a native of Dublin, who left there about six or seven years ago, and joined the US Navy. He served on board the "Brooklyn", "Rachel Seaman", and the "Hattaras" and the latest account of him is from the "Grand Gulf" which he left Sep 17 1864 on her arrival at NY. Should this come under his notice, or any person that can afford any intelligence of him, it will be most gratefully received by his wife." Mrs Taylor, 2219 Reese St, above Susquanna Ave, Kensington, Philadelphia, PA. 5 Jan 1867.

HMS Eurydice
24 March 1878 at 4:30 pm, there was a tragedy at sea on an elderly British warship, HMS Eurydice, bound fromBermuda to the United Kingdom.  She was caught in a sudden and severe gale in blinding snow which came down the channel from the northwest. Off the Isle of Wight, the ship capsized and sank with only two survivors. More than 300 passengers aboard her died. One of them was Captain Louis John George Ferrier of Belsyde in Scotland, Commanding Officer since 1877 of the 32nd Company of the Royal Engineers in Bermuda. He was going home on leave and had boarded the ship on 6 March in Bermuda. His body was identified by his brother Captain George Henry Ferrier of the 105th Foot which was stationed at Colchester. Captain Louis John Ferrier was 38 years old.

 Brig E H Adams
The brig E H Adams, a whaling vessel, Captain Leonard Ewins West, landed at St George's May 1878. Among his papers were found a bill from the Globe Hotel in St George's, a receipt of payment from Wm Gilbert Outerbridge, harbour master, and evidence that he paid for a detective to find some of his crew that had jumped ship. (source: descendant Tom Bates 9/04)

North Carolina
On Dec 30 1879, brand-new iron sailing ship North Carolina set out from Bermuda for England. 36 hrs later she wrecked on the reefs off Bermuda for unknown reasons. (History Channel Oct 11 2004)

Alkelda
The br. schooner yachtt "Alkelda" sailed from Bermuda to New York 17 May 1880, F.W. Earle, master. (see passenger list)

SS Bermuda
May 17 1880, the steamship "Bermuda" arrived at the Port of New York from Bermuda (see passenger lists).

Darlington
In 1880, the steamer "Darlington" wrecked off the Bermuda and the metal was salvaged in a salvage operation c 1916-1917.

S S Aminiqua?
The "S S Aminiqua", Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

S S Tassaday
The "S S Tassaday", Nathaniel Vesey a member of the crew. (N Vesey's journal 1909)

S S Orinoco
9 Jul 1883, S.S. Orinoco, W.J. Frasier  Master, sailed from Bermuda to the port of  New York with 45 passengers, many Bermudians. (see passenger lists c/o ISTG).  ( see Cox & Trott )

Moondyne
Steam tug "Moondyne" is mentioned in Julia Dorr's "Bermudian Days", Atlantic Monthly Dec 1883. The tug comes out to incoming passenger boats for the mail and takes passengers to Hamilton dock.

Tenedos
The HM ship "Tenedos" lying at Grassy Bay, ...making herself fine to receive the princess. (J Dorr, Atlantic Monthly, Dec 1883).

Belle Brown
30 May 1890, the Belle Brown, master Capt. C M Sawyer , sailed from the port of Hamilton, Bermuda to the Port of Boston (see passenger list courtesy of ISTG).

S S Alpha
Dec 30 1890; William Sullivan, age 38, lineman of Cable Co, Halifax, NS, died Dec 27 at the Windsor hotel, Hamilton. He came here as a passenger on the SS Alpha on Dec 20 and took cold on the rough passage, and died of pneumonia. Burial at the RC Cemetery near Prospect. (Bermuda Index, pg 1301)

Volo
(O.N.84053), on a trip from Swansea to Newfoundland in May/June 1891, the second mate is listed as W. ONION (certificate number 021497) from Bermuda. His age is given as 28.

Fortabelle
Madiana
Pretoria
These steamships began service to Bermuda in 1899.  ( see Cox & Trott )


1893
AE Outerbridge & Co, 39 Broadway, New York - agent for the Quebec S S Company Royal Mail Steamers Pickford & Black, Halifax, NS and St John, NB - agent for the Canadian, Bermuda and West Indies S S Lines.

Orinoco
1895, Ship Orinoco from Bermuda to Ellis Island, NY: Mr AW Eve (b c 1859; described as a servant), Mrs A W Eve (born about 1859), John Eve (born about 1893) and Claudine Eve (born about 1894) listed as passengers. (Ellis Island Records)

1892, Ship Orinoco from Hamilton, Bermuda to Ellis Is, NY: Miss/Mrs A Eve (b c1865) listed as passenger.