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California Genealogy and History Archives

Biographies
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Sacramento County

 

JACOB J. FISCHER

As one of the members of the Sacramento broom factory Mr. Fischer retains an intimate identification with one of the well-known industries in Sacramento. Long experience in the work admirably qualifies him for the accurate discharge of all duties connected with his responsible position. Although not an elderly man, but still in the prime of mature activities, he has given more than one-quarter of a century to work at the one trade and meanwhile he has acquired a thorough knowledge of the industry. Up-to-date machinery has been introduced, and the output has been increased. While a portion of the raw material comes from Illinois, much is bought in California and largely grown in Sacramento county on the river of the same name, in the district lying north of Knight's Landing. The special product is the house broom of ordinary size but superior quality and in addition there is manufactured every other kind of broom for which any demand exists.

Himself a native of Marietta, Ohio, born December 5, 1865, Jacob J. Fischer comes of Teutonic parentage. When they were young his parents, William and Catherine Fischer, came across the ocean from Germany and settled at Marietta, Ohio, where the former followed the trade of boot and shoemaking. While yet in the old country he had served an apprenticeship to the trade and his unusual expertness was recognized by a large circle of customers. Throughout practically all of his active life he followed the same occupation, quietly and successfully continuing his work until his death at the old Ohio home about 1894. His widow still continues to reside in Ohio. Of their five sons William is a lawyer in Rainier, Ore.; Frederick is engaged in the ministry and has a charge at Zanesville, Ohio; Edward is a business man of Rockford, Ill. ; while Herman carries on a grocery business in Indianapolis, Ind. The fifth, Jacob J., likewise has been successful in his life efforts and by his high standing and enviable reputation adds prestige to an honored family name.

The financial condition of the parents did not permit idleness on the part of the sons and we find that Jacob J. Fischer was a mere lad when he began to earn a livelihood through employment on farms and through work at the broom-maker's trade. The latter he acquired familiarity with when very young and always liked the work, so that he naturally drifted into it as a permanent occupation. Seeking employment in various parts of the country he continued as a journey- man for some time. During early manhood he became interested in the west and decided to come hither, but lie made the journey a means of self-support and of education. Work at the trade enabled him to earn his own way through the country, and he was thus able to gain an excellent knowledge of various sections of the United States. During June of 1899 he arrived in Sacramento and here he promptly found a position with the Columbia Company, in whose employ he remained, meanwhile by various promotions reaching the position of manager. Continuing until October, 1912, he resigned and with three partners started the Sacramento Broom Factory at No. 1715 Fifteenth street. Of his two children the older daughter, Delia, married Roy Walthers and resides in San Francisco; the younger daughter. May, is at home. Fraternally Mr. Fischer is associated with the Druids, Knights of Pythias, Improved Order of Red Men and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In national elections he votes with the Republican party, but in local campaigns he gives his influence to those whom he regards as best qualified to represent the people, irrespective of their political ties. 


Source:
History of Sacramento County, California
Biographical Sketches of The Leading Men and Women of the County Who Have Been Identified With Its Growth and Development from the Early Days to the Present
History By: William L. Willis
Historic Record Company, Los Angeles, California (1913)

Transcribed by Peggy Hooper 2011