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J. B. Loser

It falls within the experience of very few indeed to have traveled over forty-two states of the Union, but this has been Mr. Loser’s privilege, and the fact that he still finds California the only place in which he would wish to make his home, speaks more eloquently than can words of the superiority of this state over others in points of advantage both as a place of residence and a business center.

A native of Pennsylvania, J. B. Loser was born in Lebanon county September 23, 1859, the son of Benjamin and Catherine (Sugar) Loser, the parents also natives of that eastern state. When their son was a child in arms the parents immigrated westward as far as Indiana, settling in the town of Bluffton, Wells county, where the father conducted a mercantile business and also carried on an extensive business as a stock-raiser eastern state. When their son was a child in arms the parents immigrated westward as far as Indiana, settling in the town of Bluffton, Wells county, where the father conducted a mercantile business and also carried on an extensive business as a stock-raiser. This continued to be his home throughout the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1886, while his wife passed away four years later, in 1890. At the age of thirteen J. R. Loser left the home in Indiana and returned to Pennsylvania, where he apprenticed himself to learn the cabinet-maker’s trade, and after mastering it, followed it for a couple of years in the east. Wisely divining that a larger field for his line of work could undoubtedly be found in the newer west, he began working his way in this direction, and a for a number of years found remunerative work in his line in shops in Sedalia, Mo. From there he went to the state of Washington in 1880. after which for seven years his duties took him between that state and California, following which he went up in the timber districts of the Cascade mountains in the interests of the tunnel contractors of the Northern Pacific Railroad, who were then constructing a tunnel between Easton and Weston. It was this experience in California that attracted Mr. Loser to its possibilities from various standpoints, and the decision which he then and there made to make it his permanent home was acted upon and has been adhered to ever since. After leaving the employ of the railroad he went to Sacramento and worked at his trade in the car shops for a time, from there coming to Sebastopol in 1889 and this has been his home ever since. Soon after locating here he purchased the Analy hotel and conducted it with success for the following eighteen years, during which time he gained the reputation as “mine host” which any hotel proprietor might envy. At the end of this period he leased the hotel property and opened a real-estate office in Sebastopol, and since 1907 has been successful in this line. He still owns the hotel property and receives a good annual rental from it.

While in Sacramento, in 1889, Mr. Loser was united in marriage with Mrs. Martha Strobel, a native of California and the mother of two children, both of whom are now married and in homes of their own. Lillian is the wife of Robert Surryhne, of Sebastopol, and the mother of one child, Norine. John Loser is married and has one son, John, Jr., and resides in San Francisco. Fraternally Mr. Loser is a Mason, and also belongs to the affiliated order, the Eastern Star. Mr. Loser is one of the best-known and most highly respected citizens in Sebastopol, whither he came and settled when there were only a few houses scattered about to denote that a settlement had been started. The part which he has played in its advancement in the years that have passed is not inconsiderable, and as one of the town’s upbuilders much credit is due him.


Source:
History of Sonoma County, California
Biographical Sketches of The Leading Men and Women of the County Who Have Been Identified With Its Growth and Development from the Early Days to the Present
History By: Tom Gregory
Historic Record Company, Los Angeles, California (1911)

Transcribed by Peggy Hooper 2011