Home

Books Index   

Contacts

 

California Genealogy and History Archives

 

Where To Emigrate And Why
by
Frederick B. Goddard

 

CONTENTS.
MAP of United States Eastern portion
MAP of United States Western portion

 

CHAPTER I.
The Public Domain of the United States.—Topography.— Civil and Religious Rights.— Illustrious Immigrants.—National Prosperity.—Spirit of the Homestead and Pre­emption Laws.—What we Want and what we Offer.—Opportunities for Capitalists, Business Men and Farmers.—Progress of the New States and Territories, &c.     9

 

CHAPTER II.
Hints to Emigrants.—The Instinct of Emigration.—Who should Emigrate and Why.—Beginning Life Anew.—It calls a Man out and gives him new Ideas.—How much Money required?―What one can do with Seven Hundred Dollars.—How to Choose a Location.—To the Foreign Emigrant.—Castle Garden.—Its System.—The " Labor Exchange," &c       16

 

CALIFORNIA.
MapCrystal LakeYosemite Valley―Discovery of Gold.—Marvelous Progress.—Influence of the Pacific Railroad.—Arable Land.—Products.—The Vine.—The Big Trees.—Mineral Resources.—Southern, Coast, Northern, Mountain, and Valley Counties.—Climate.— Travel.—Farm Labor.—Railroads.—Steamship Lines.―Immigration.—Price of Lands.—Soil.—Crops.—Fruits.―Wages.— Manufactures.—Newspapers.— People.— Correspondence        22

 

OREGON.
A Fertile Soil, and a Healthful Climate.—Progress.—Western Oregon.—Eastern.—Columbia River.—Premium Essay on Oregon.—Soil.—Best points for the Emigrant.—The Willamette Valley. —Harbors. — Fisheries. — Schools.— Churches.—Commerce.—Crops.—Minerals—Counties Described.—Price of Land.—Correspondence       51

 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY.
Map―Situation.—Area.—The Cascade Mountains.—Climate like that of England.—Puget Sound, " The Mediterranean of the North Pacific."—Immense Forests.—Fisheries.—Price and Character of Land.—Productions.—Schools.—Indians. —A Thirty-Pound Salmon for a Dime.—Game.—Lumbering.—Wages.—Board         75

 

ALASKA.
Trappers―Purchase from Russia.—Area.—Physical Features.—Climate.—Productions.—Minerals.—Furs.—Fisheries, &c        87

 

NEVADA.
The " Silver State."—Surface Characteristics.—Lakes.—Salt Beds.—Timber.—Mineral Wealth.—The Comstock Lode. —Climate.—Social, Industrial, and Educational Progress. —Wages.—Board.—Description by Counties.—Soil.―Crops, &c.     96

 

IDAHO.
The " Gem of the Mountains."—Rivers.—Valley of the Snake.—Boise Basin.—Towns.—Mines.—The "Poorman Mine." — Climate. — Soil.— Timber.— Population.— Improvements.—Sage Brush          108

 

MONTANA.
Lewis and Clark's Explorations in this Region in 1803.―Climate.—Arable Lands.—Mountain Streams.—Grazing Lands.—Timber.—Coal.—Iron, &c.—Gold and  Silver Mining.—Education.—Miscellaneous.—Correspondence     116

 

ARIZONA.
Early Settlement. —Surface Features.—Timber.—Climate.―Rivers.—Mineral Resources.—Indians.—Interesting Correspondence     134

 

NEW MEXICO.
Boundaries.—Soil Productive when Irrigated.—The Fiendish Apache.—Climate.—Minerals.—Land Values.—Crops, &c        141

 

UTAH.
First Settlement.—The Mormons.—Salt Lake City.—Polygamy.— Mormon Emigrants.— General Features.— Mountains.—Rivers.—Salt Lake.—Irrigation.—Mines.—Coal.―Iron, &c., &c.—Correspondence, including a letter from G. A. Smith, the Mormon Apostle         148

 

COLORADO.
Gold Discoveries.—Settlement.—Patriotism of Coloradans.— General Description of Colorado.—Climate.—Fertile Soil.— Crops.—Fruit.—Coal.—Iron.—Mountain Regions.—Mines.—Description by Counties.—Southern Colorado.—Cost of Living.—Wages.—Routes of Travel, &c.—Correspondence        160

 

WYOMING.
Signifies "Large Plains."—Boundaries.—Topography.— Soil.—Gold.—Coal.—Iron.—Lead.—Copper.—Oil and Salt Springs.—Timber.—Climate.—Rapid Growth.—The Indians' Hunting-Grounds will be turned into Cornfields, &c.         176

 

DAKOTA.
Named after the "Dakotas," or "Friendly People."—First Settlement.—Surface of the Country.—Millions and Millions of Acres of good Public Land.—Minerals.—Rivers. —Soil.— Crops.— Stock-Raising.— Climate.— Red River Valley.—Winters.—Correspondence.—Yancton.       180

 

NEBRASKA.
MapOmaha Station―Admitted as a State.—Growth and Prosperity.—The Great Plains.—Scarcity of Timber.—Fertility of Soil.—Platte Valley.—Abundant Pasturage.—Climate.―Price of Wild Lands in the different Counties.—Vast quantity of good Prairie Lands open to the Homestead Settler.—Coal.— Iron.—Crops.—Grasses.—Fruits.—Correspondence        192

 

KANSAS.
Map―Early Political Struggles.—Kansas Scenery.—Climate.―Timber.— Surface Features.— Streams.— Salt.— Manufactures.—Railroads.—Inexhaustible Fertility of Soil.—Cities.—River Valleys described.—Products.—Price of Land in the different Counties.—Where Coal is found.—Horses and Cattle.—Correspondence.       207

 

MINNESOTA.
Map―"Sky-Tinted Water."—Boundaries.—Historical  Outline.—Indian Massacre of 1862.—Population.―A Contented and Prosperous People.—Rivers.—Great Number of Beautiful Lakes.—Soil.—Products.—The Growing Season.—Scenery. —Speckled Trout.— Game.—" Rock-Ribbed Hills and Slumbering Valleys."—Woodland and Prairie—Climate and Salubrity.—Minnesota for Pulmonary Diseases.—Water Power.—Minerals.—Railroads.―Price of Land.—Correspondence           227

 

IOWA.
MapPrairie Home―Its Beautiful Prairies.—Advantages to the Emigrant.―Minerals.—Railroads.—Great Prosperity.―Timber.—Fertility of Soil.—Climate.—Health.—Description of Counties.—Model Farms.―1,200 acres in one Cornfield.—Education.—Government Land in Iowa.—Leading Cities.—Price of Land in each County.—Crops.—Grasses.—Stock.—Orchards.—Correspondence            243

 

MISSOURI.
Map―Great Natural Advantages.—Surface Features.—Rich Soil.—  Coal.— Iron.— Lead.— Copper.— Zinc.— Cobalt, Nickel, &c.—Manufactures.—St. Louis.—Railroads.—Education. —Climate.—Price of Unimproved Lands in the several Counties. — Government Land. — Timber. — Products.―Pasture.—Fruits.—Correspondence                271

 

WISCONSIN.
General Description.—Ten Million Acres Unsold Public Land.—Lakes .— Fish and Wild Fowl.— Climate.— Lumber.—Minerals.—Soil.—Productions.—Manufactures. —Price of Wild Land by Counties.—Timber, Seasons, &c.         299

 

MICHIGAN.
The two Peninsulas.—The Lakes.—Forests.—Soil.—Copper and. Iron.— Lake Superior.— Mines.— Scenery.— Climate and Productions.— Other Minerals.— Manufactures.—Value of Farm Lands   310

 

ILLINOIS.
Surveyor's Camp―Its Wonderful Growth and Development.—River and Lake Navigation. — Fertility.— Timber.— Minerals.— Price of Unimproved Land in Different Counties.—Agricultural Products.—Coal-fields.—Nearly Four Thousand Miles of Railroad, &c.      322

 

THE SOUTHERN STATES.
Who Want to go South.—Nature's Bounties.—Slavery.—Its Historical Outline.—Secession.—Four Long and Bloody Years.—Labor Disorganized.—Lack of Laborers.—Cheap Lands.—Why Emigrants have not gone South.—A new Era            331

 

VIRGINIA.
Mother of Patriots and Statesmen.—George Washington.—Great Resources.—Scenery.—Government Lands all Sold. —Tide-Water Region.—Piedmont District.—The Shenandoah Valley.—Farms.— Inhabitants.—Crops.—Churches. —Timber.—Price of Lands.—Products.—Correspondence.         337

 

WEST VIRGINIA.
Admission as a State.—General Description.—Coal Lands.—Their increasing Value.—Minerals.—Petroleum.—Its Uses. —Flowing Wells.—Oil Territory.—Cheap Lands.—Climate.—Salubrity.—Schools.—Price of Lands.—Crops.―Fruits.—Correspondence           362

 

NORTH CAROLINA.  
Area.—Surface.—Fertility.—Letter from Governor Worth.— Resources.— Climate.— Productions.— Minerals.— Manufactures.—Fisheries.—Public Schools.—Foreign Settlers. —Swamp Lands.—Game.—Fish.—Value of Land.—Correspondence     376

 

SOUTH CAROLINA.
Map―Area.— Surface Description.— Favorable Location.— Six Varieties of Soil.—Health.—Grape-Growing.—Rivers.―Forests.—Game and Fish.—Climate.—Productions.—Live Stock.—Railroads.—Schools.—Price of Land.—Minerals. —Crops.—Correspondence        389

 

GEORGIA.
Map―Natural Advantages.— Gold Mines.— Water Resources.―Chances for the Emigrant.—Northeastern, Northwestern, Southwestern, and Southeastern Georgia.—Agriculture.―The Freedmen.—Cotton.—Cost of Improved Farms.―" We must have White Labor."—Grain.—Grasses.—Live Stock.—Minerals.—Treatment of Northern Men.—Land Values.—Georgia Letters          403

 

FLORIDA.
Map―Discovery by Ponce De Leon.— General Description.―Lands.—Productions.—Climate.—All Sorts of Questions Answered.— Price of Land.— Resources. — Crops.— Best Localities for Invalids.—Hotels.—Price of Board.—Rent. —Price of Provisions.—Roses bloom all Winter, &c         427

 

ALABAMA.
Map―Surface.— Soil.— Climate.— Vegetation.— Rivers.— Seven Million Acres Unsold Public Land.—Statistics.—Minerals. —Crops.—Price of Unimproved Lands.—Timber.—Fruits. —Letters  440

 

MISSISSIPPI.
MapCotton Field―Area.—General Description.—Fertility of Soil.—Favorable Climate.— Jackson.— Natchez.— Vicksburg.— Price of Lands.—Cotton.—Wheat.—Mississippi Correspondence.—Immigrants' Cotton Plantation.—Its Profits.—Health.―Schools, &c .        452

 

TENNESSEE.
Diversified Surface.— General Description.— Cumberland Table-Lands.— Advantages to the Emigrant.— Cities.— Present Land Values as compared with 1860.—Price of Lands.—Minerals.—Crops.—Yield per Acre.—What One Hand can Do.—Peanuts.—Fruits.—Correspondence         468

 

KENTUCKY
Map―Daniel Boone the First Immigrant.—His Straggles with the Indians.—General Description of Kentucky.—Most Productive Soil.—Coal.—Minerals.—Railways and Cities.—Price of Land.—Timber.—Crops.—Tobacco.—Yield per Acre.—Wheat.—Fruits.—Letters        480

 

TEXAS.
Map―Its Great Size.—The Coast Region.—The Central Flower-Embroidered Prairie, the Plains and Uplands of the West.—Respective Productions.—The Wheat Region.— Stock-Raising and Sheep-Husbandry.— Mr. Randall's Description of Climate, Soil, Resources, Seasons, Health, &c.— Description of Characteristic Coast, Northern, Eastern, Central, Western, and Northeastern Counties.—Directions for a Small Farmer.— Land Titles.—Price of Land in different Counties, &c          492

 

LOUISIANA.
Map―Area.—General Description.—Dense Forests.—Fertility.―Prairie Portions.—Climate.—New Orleans.—Description of St. Mary's Parish.—Its Gardens.—Climate.—Health.―Sugar Crop, &c.—Price of Lands.—Crops.―Correspondence            518

 

ARKANSAS.
Map―Boundaries.—Description of Indian Territory on the West. —Area of Arkansas.—Nearly Twelve Million Acres Public Land yet Unsold—General Description of Arkansas. —Crops.—Education.—Hot Springs.—Medicinal Effects. —Chemical Analysis.— Wachita Oil Stone.—Price of Lands.—Correspondence  528

 

THE PACIFIC RAILROAD.
The Vast Plains.—Indian Tribes.—Whitney's Efforts for a Railroad.—The First Flash of War showed its Necessity.—Union Pacific Charter.—Government Aid.—Ground First Broken.—Early Difficulties.—The Pick and Shovel with the Rifle and Pistol.—Camp Followers.—Julesburg, Cheyenne, Sherman, Laramie, &c.— Business of the Road.—Commerce of India, China, Japan.—Benefits to the New Territories.― Impetus to Mining.— Future Towns and Cities.—Course of the Railroad.—Healthfulness of the Plains.—Dazzling Beauties of the Great Mountains.—The Invalid and Pleasure Seeker.—Equipments.―Palace Cars.—Forty Car-loads of Cattle daily.—Thomas C. Durant.—The Central Pacific Chartered, 1861.—Government Aid.— Early Obstacles.— The Sierra Nevadas.— Nearly a Million Dollars for Powder.—The Great Trade of the World.— Connections of the Central Pacific.—Other Lines will soon be Built.—These Roads really built by the American People.—More Liberal Passenger and Freight Rates should be Adopted.—Character of Lands along the Lines.—A " Band of Strength, a Bond of Union, a Harbinger of Prolonged Peace."      539

 

WAGES OF FARM LABOR.
Farming the most Honorable, Healthful, and Enviable Calling in the World.—Great Demand for Farmers.—Tables showing rate of Farmers' Wages, in every section of the United States, by the Year, and by the Day.—Cost of Board of Farm Laborers, in every State and Territory     557

 

HOW TO OBTAIN TITLE TO PUBLIC LANDS.
By Location, Cash Purchases, Location with Warrants, College Scrip.—Pre-emptions.—How Made.—Homestead Land.— How Secured.— Fees and Commissions to be Paid.—Southern Land Sales.—Fees.—Heirs.—Sale of Homestead Claim, &c.—The Pre-emption Law.—Act of March 3, 1843.—Act of March 3, 1853.—Act of March 27, 1854.—THE HOMESTEAD LAW.―Act of March 21, 1864.—Act of June 21, 1866.—Forms of Application, &c., under the Homestead Law.—Location of all the United States Land Offices    561

 

ROUTES FOR THE EMIGRANT, FARES, &C.
Beware of City Swindlers.—Where to buy Tickets.—Luggage.—Emigrant Trains.—The Three Great Routes West from New York, and their connections.—Steamships.―How to reach Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Kansas, Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Montana, the Pacific States, Virginia, Texas, and each of the Southern States.—A Table showing cost of Emigrant Tickets and charges for extra luggage, from New York to 132 Towns and Cities in the West and South.... 582