Black Rock - Canada Creek
Kings County, Nova Scotia
(pictures taken in November)

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Black Rock Rd
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Canada Creek area
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Canada Creek area
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Canada Creek area
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Canada Creek area
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Black Rock area
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Black Rock light
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Black Rock light
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Black Rock light
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Black Rock area
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Black Rock area
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Black Rock area
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Black Rock area
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Black Rock light
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Black Rock light
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Canada Creek area
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Black Rock Culture and Recreation Hall
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Black Rock Culture and Recreation Hall
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Black Rock United Baptist church - 1840
Russia Rd
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Black Rock United Baptist church - 1840
Russia Rd
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Black Rock United Baptist church - 1840
Russia Rd
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Black Rock United Baptist church - 1840
Russia Rd
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Black Rock Community Centre
 

These images are courtesy of Don Whittier, Berwick. They were used in a recent compilation by Don on the Black Rock Light. - (dates unknown)
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Old Black Rock Light
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Aerial view of Black Rock
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Old Black Rock Light

The Register - December 7th 1898

Written for THE REGISTER.

Black Rock Lighthouse.

On surging Fundy's rocky shores
Stands many a lighthouse tall
Whose gleaming lights the mists quench not
Tho they hang like a funeral pall.

One stands to the west of a cruel rock
That juts into the Bay,
And there secure, sends her light afar
Guiding white-winged ships on their way.

Onward they bear their precious freight,
Calmly they take their way,
Or idly rock on the foaming waves
When they anchor in the Bay.

But when the winds arise in their might
And the waves dash o'er Black Rock
And the screaming gulls ride light on the
gale
And the fears of the sailors mock,

Then the lighthouse sendeth abroad her
cheer

Like a messenger of peace
From Him who biddeth the winds be still
And the waves from their raging cease.

The loving hearts and faithful hands
Within that lighthouse strong,
Cease not their ever watchful care
Till morning's glorious dawn.

Ah treacherous seas that lure mankind
By promises of gain,
Count nevermore among your friends
The lighthouse on the main.

Oh lighthouse, in thy massive strength
Emblem of hope and life,
Shine on amid the storms of time,
Shine on amid men's strife.

Guide troubled souls to havens safe,
Where winds and storms shall cease;
Guide those whose lives are tempest tossed
To everlasting peace.

H.A.F.,

Waterville


January 19th 1898

Black Rock

Mr. James Moody relating the loss of the schooner Orient several years ago, spoke highly in praise of the courage shown by Alonzo White, one of the seamen, in the rescue of the crew. The Orient went ashore at low water at Spicer brook, one mile west of Black Rock light. It was a bitter cold day in midwinter with a strong northwest wind which rendered the rescue all the more difficult. Mr. White, an expert swimmer, attached a rope to his person and swam for the shore; when but part way he signaled to be hauled on board which was done. White told them he could not make show without some stimulants. After draining a brimming glass of "grog" he made the second attempt and succeeded, although thoroughly benumbed by the ice cold water. The rope was made fast and all on board went ashore by the aid of the line with the exception of the lady passenger, Miss Marion Vales, who refused to leave and was washed over board and drowned. Mr. Moody thinks had it not been for the courage and determination of this man the lives of all would have been sacrificed. Mr. White now resides in the eastern part of Cornwallis and no doubt will remember the circumstances.

Conversing lately with our esteemed postmaster, J. H. Rawding Esq. he related several stories bordering closely on the supernatural. One, the truth of which is touched for by himself, touches at least on the marvelous. About eighteen years ago - the narrator said - between 8 and 9 o'clock on a November evening, he with several others saw a bright light a few miles southeast of Isle Au Haute. As the light increased he could plainly distinguish - as he supposed - a large square rigged vessel under full canvase on fire. The flames could be seen running up the shrouds and spreading until the whole ship was in flames. The blaze continued about a half hour when the fire and vessel suddenly disappeared without showing that any part had been consumed or that there were any persons on board. About a year afterward at the same time on a November evening he witnessed again a repetition of the same. Mr. Rawding advances no theory and can offer no solution as to the phenomenon which it certainly was, as no such thing as a vessel burning actually took place near the Island within the memory of the oldest inhabitant.

"Ned" Chute and "Jim" Nichols with their fox hounds, one day last week pursued a wild cat ten miles, but the wily feline proved too wary and escaped capture. Judging from the track and stride the animal was very large of its kind.


February 20, 1929

The Pioneers (No. 2)

(Written for The Register)

Among the first grantees of Cornwallis, in 1761, was a man with military title of whose surname the spelling is uncertain. In the early records he appears as "Major William Canada." His descendants have always spelled the name, "Canady." A memorial, signed by his grandson, John William, as Ruling Elder in a Presbyterian Church, was published in a Belfast (Ireland) magazine, the signature appearing as "John W. Kennedy." It seems quite probable that Kennedy was the original name.

The Major chose as the location of the grant awarded him, (666 2/3 acres), the shore of the Bay of Fundy, at and around the mouth of a stream ever since known as "Canady Creek." Here a settlement of farmers, fishermen and traders soon grew up. The Major is understood to have had connection, business or otherwise, with the garrison at Annapolis Royal and at Windsor. During the troublous times that marked the later years of the eighteenth century, travelling by sea, even in the Bay of Fundy, was not always safe and in winter there were dangers to lighter craft from ice and storm.

A road was early made from Canady Creek to the Valley. This road, from the top of the mountain down, was considerably west of either the "Old Black Rock Mountain Road," or the "new" one in use for the last 70 years. It reached the Valley about where the highway now runs. Thence the route taken was west-wardly, forming what was afterwards known at its eastern end as the "Newcomb Lane" and at the western as the "Calkin Lane" (now leading to the residence of Rufus Power). This was laid out as a public road. From the western end of this road the route lay along the right bank of the Cornwallis River. At the great bend in that river, north of where Berwick now stands, the travellers rounded that bend and proceeded – still on the right bank of the river, but now on its southern side – till they reached a surveyor’s line (blazed) which they followed south to the Old French Road at the base of the South Mountain. That blazed line became Commercial Street, Berwick.

In 1814, Mr. John Woodworth, one of the lot layers of the Township, made an important visit to Western Cornwallis. He was a relative by marriage of both Mrs. Jonathan Newcomb and Mrs. Hugh Graham Bowles, referred to in No. 1 of these notes. His business on this occasion was to lay out a road that would connect the residences of these next-door neighbors residing four miles apart. The road from the foot of the Black Rock mountain to the Cornwallis River, at Waterville, is a result of this visit.

This road, at the point where it struck the "Big Brook," the head-waters of the Cornwallis River, swerved from the compass line, making a detour of nearly two miles in length and rejoining that line at the point where Mr. Gay E. Best afterward built his house. This detour gave a road of easy grades completely avoiding the clay hills which were for years the dread of travellers between Buckley’s and Grafton corners. The road was changed to its present route over those hills in 1836.

Such detours were quite common in the early roads of the Township. Another instance occurs in this same vicinity. The road east from "Buckley’s," where the store of Mrs. Burgess now stands, is also famous for its clay hills. The road first built, being located a few rods north of this one, completely avoided these hills, giving easy grades all the way to Woodville. It branched off from the main road laid out in 1814, as stated above, at a point about opposite the barn on the Buckley property, now owned by Mrs. Burgess.

(To be continued)


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