From the Murrille Schofield Collection.  

Courtesy of Laurene Shewan

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Berty Fuller
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John Schofield

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Unknown Soldier

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W.W.I Soldiers
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W.W.I Soldiers
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W.W.I Soldier
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Clinton Gillis
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George Smith
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James Little
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W.W.1 Soldier
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Eldred Schofield
W.W.II
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3 Schofield Brothers
James, Robie & Cecil
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Mamie Maude
Schofield
Thornton's wife
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Thornton & son
Murrille
Schofield
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Murrille Schofield
returns from WWII
to Mother
 

Notes from Laurene Shewan

Eldred and Murrille Schofield  were raised as if brothers, by Mamie Maude, with Granny Edna.

Thornton was killed in WWI in 1918.  Murrille, the son of Thornton and Mamie Maude, was the family historian from Gaspereau Mountain.  He worked for the power company in Halifax and spent his weekends at home in Gaspereau.  All of these items were given to Keith Brown at Murrille's death.  Keith generously allowed us to have them, so we could share them.  Laurene

Name: SCHOFIELD, THORNTON EDWARD
Initials: T E
Nationality: Canadian
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Royal Canadian Regiment
Date of Death: 27/08/1918
Age 31
Service No: 733321
Additional information: Son of Emery and Emma Schofield, of White Rock, King's Co.; husband of Mamie Schofield, of Gaspereaux, King's Co., Nova Scotia.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: II. E. 20.
Cemetery: LIGNY-ST. FLOCHEL BRITISH CEMETERY, AVERDOINGT 

THE REGISTER

JUNE 14, 1922

STOOD LIKE STONE WALL IN THE FIGHT

LORD FRENCH PRAISES WORK OF CANADIANS AT YPRES AND THROUGH THE WAR

"The Canadians at Ypres stood like a stone wall, never flinching," said Lord French, the famous British Field Marshal, in addressing the Empire Club at Toronto last week. "This service was inestimable to the Empire," he continued, "and I am here to day to express my deep gratitude for what the Canadians did there. I could not leave these shores without telling you here."

Lord French paid tribute to the Canadian soldiers, not only for their heroism in the second battle of Ypres, but for their work all through the great war. He eulogized Lord Byng, Governor-General of Canada, for his great qualities in peace as well as in war, and the late Sir Sam Hughes and Sir Robert Borden for their part in the war. There was no doubt, he said, that it was largely through the efforts of Sir Sam Hughes that Canada filled such a glorious role.

Lord French advised Canada to keep up her militia. He emphasized the necessity for training men and officers.

"You have been tried in the fire and not found wanting," he said. "You know what you can do. You have in you that quality so invaluable to any body of soldiers – you have self confidence. Keep that self confidence up."


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