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Frequently Asked Questions

Do you provide genealogy research services?

No, I do not provide genealogy research services for others. I do not have access to documents other than what is on the Internet. 

I recommend The Manitoba Genealogical Society. MGS provides research services for an extremely reasonable fee, including the following: cemetery transcriptions, early Manitoba newspapers, current Manitoba newspapers, Manitoba Crown Land Registry Index, Anglican Marriage and Baptismal Registers, Catholic Marriage Registers, United Church Archives, Local History Book Collection, Henderson's Directories (all of Manitoba from 1876-1908; Winnipeg only 1908-present), 1870 Red River Census, 1881 / 1891 / 1901 Manitoba Censuses, Pedigree Chart Index, and other indexes. You do not need to be a member to use the MGS resources.

Where is the town my ancestors lived in?

Go to the Manitoba Regions Page. Each Region page has a listing of Municipalities, Cities, and Towns.

If the town isn't listed, try Canada's Official Geographic Names Site. It is searchable by current and historical names. You can get a map of the area, find out the distance from one location to another and look up all other settled areas within a given radius.

If you heard there was a local town history book, check our Volunteer Look-Ups Page to see if a volunteer has the book. You can get a lot of information from a town history book, and if someone can do look-ups from it, get the publisher's name and address so you can order your own copy if some are still available. You can also write to MGS.

If no one has this history book, but you know one exists, try the Manitoba Legislative Library. One of the services they offer is inter-library loan. They can be contacted via e-mail.

I need the information from the grave of my great-great-grandfather, who died somewhere in Manitoba...I think.

The Manitoba Genealogical Society has transcribed and indexed over 1200 cemeteries in Manitoba -- that's nearly 90% of them! Even if you don't know for sure where your family lies buried, they have a master index, filed by surname as well as by cemetery. If you have a general idea of where they lived, check out the cemetery indexes they have for sale. The MGS can be contacted by e-mail.

If you don't know where in Manitoba your ancestor died and the MGS doesn't have any record, then try the Manitoba Queries Board. Someone who reads your post, may be able to help you.

Where can I get a copy of my ancestor's Birth/Christening, Marriage or Death/Burial Record?

The Manitoba Department of Vital Statistics. Under Manitoba law, all birth / marriage / divorce / death information has been kept on file there since the 1880s, with some records pre-dating that period. There is a fee of $25 Canadian per look-up, with each look-up covering a 10-year period. You will receive an official document to go with your research. You don't necessarily need a specific date, just the names of the people involved and the approximate period when it happened. Vital Statistics can be reached by e-mail if you would like to learn more about the fees and what information is required from you.

Please note that under Canadian privacy laws, many vital events records from the mid- to late-1900s may not be accessible unless you are either one of the people involved or directly descended from the people involved.

Another option is to try contacting a church or other religious organization to see what they have in their archives. A list of different groups is available at the Manitoba GenWeb: Ethnic & Religious Groups page. Most religious archives include the whole of the province of Manitoba.

We used to have cousins in this one town. Do they still live there?

Visit Canada411, choose 'Find a Person', enter the surname, the town and the province and check the white pages. You will get a phone number and complete address, including postal code. No family left? Try returning to the main Canada411 page, choose the 'Find a Business' and try entering "Town of..." or "RM of..." and find the address for the town offices. A letter there may point you in the right direction, and maybe someone who knew your family will hear of your query.

Also check the Manitoba Genealogy Families page. It includes links to personal home pages of other researchers interested in Manitoba. Your cousin may be there!

I want to find my family on the 1901 census, but I don't know where to look. Can you help me?

You'll find a list of National Archives of Canada microfilm numbers and corresponding locations on Manitoba GenWeb´s Census pages. Almost all universities in Canada keep copies of all Canadian censuses in their reference section. If you live outside of Canada, the University of Manitoba participates in inter-library loan. Visit your local library and find out their policies. If you have any questions about doing inter-library loan, contact the Elizabeth Dafoe Library at the U of M.

My great-uncle was a Manitoba soldier who died in the Second World War. Where can I find information on this?

Check out the Manitoba GenWeb History & Military Links page which may offer some information on certain battles and even specific Manitoban and Canadian regiments.

If you lost a family member during the First or Second World War, visit the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, which has a Debt of Honour Register in memory of those who died. Information found on this site includes, but is not limited to, name and rank of soldier, date and location of death, age at death, location of burial and any commerative monument nearby (also where to find the name on the monument), names and hometowns of parents and/or spouses, historical information about the battle in which this person died, and a printable Record of Commemoration.



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