NLGenWeb Newspaper Transcriptions

Daily News

Misc. News Items  - January - June 1941

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The records were transcribed by JOHN BAIRD & SUE O'NEILL.  Formatted by GEORGE WHITE
While we have endeavored to be as correct as humanly possible, there could be some typographical errors.
 

  

 

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January 2, 1941 OBITUARY HEAD CONSTABLE JOHN FRANCIS NUGENT: A great thinker, and possibly greater Philosopher, has said that, “In the midst of life we are in Death.” And how often in the lives of all of us have we seen its verification. But when the Dark Angel appears in the midst of rejoicing, his coming is appalling, death, then in all its horrors, it accentuated. And so, amidst the festivities of the Christmas season, when on Saturday past it became known that ex-Head Constable John Francis Nugent had succumbed to a relatively short illness, there was universal regret and poignant sorrow amongst his immediate friends, and the members of his heart-broken family. All over the Country, the late Head Constable was known and respected. Tough, quiet, and unassuming, the deceased was a man gifted with intelligence of a high order, and when his abilities were made know to his superiors, promotion frequently was conferred upon him.

The deceased was some 45 years, a member of the Constabulary, and served under Inspector General Fawcett, McGowan, Sullivan, Hutchings, and the present Director of the Force, P.J. O’Neill. A man often assigned to duties of a very exacting character, he executed them in a manner which won for him the aplomb of those above him, and to his associates and subordinates, the respect which is generally accorded to men of exceptional executive ability. His passing was quiet and peaceful, and his illness was borne with the exemplary fortitude and resignation of the good Christian, and the devout Catholic gentleman that he was.

The last Sacraments were imparted by Rev. Father Savin of St. Patrick’s, and during his illness he was also attended by Revs. Fathers Kent, Eagen, and Maher, all particular personal friends of the deceased and his family. The Head Constable was a consistent member of the Holy Name Society, and no adverse weather kept him from daily attendance at Holy Mass. While the remains were in the home of the deceased, it was thronged with mourning friends and relatives, and the casket was covered with spiritual and some handsome floral banquets.

The funeral took place on Monday, attended by a concourse of citizens, and the Police Force, present in great strength, in full uniform, and with arms reversed, was commanded by Assistant Chief of Police, Strange and Sergt. Crocker. As the cortege passed through Water, New Gower, and other streets leading to the R.C. Cathedral, hundreds of citizens with bared heads, uttered a solemn requiescat for one most favorably known to many of them. The funeral arrangements were capably attended to by the well known firm of N.J. Murphy & Sons.

The deceased is survived by a widow, (nee Charlotte Swain of Calvert), 3 sons, Aiden and John at home, Charles at Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S.A., and six daughters, viz. Mesdames George L Yeats (Nance) of Prisley, Scotland; John Walsh, John Angel, Ronald Shortall, John Byrne, and Miss Mary at home. Also two sisters; Mrs. John Kent of Bell Island, and Mrs. Maloney of Harbor Main. At the Cathedral, the last prayers and final absolution were imparted by Rev. Father Bowne, and internment was at Mount Carmel Cemetery. - T.D. Carew.

January 2, 1941 TWO CHINESE LOST LIVES IN LAUNDRY FIRE Early Morning Blaze in Cochrane St. Building Has Tragic Sequel

Hing Sing, and Hong Wah Chong, two members of the staff of the Chinese Laundry at the corner of Gower Street and Cochrane Street, lost their lives early Tuesday morning, when the Laundry building in which they were sleeping, caught fire, and before aid came, one was smothered and the other was burned to death. Two other inmates managed to jump from a window and so saved their lives.

About 5 a.m., Constable J Churchill on night watch, discovered that the building was on fire and rang in the alarm from box 16, the Central and East End fire fighting apparatus responding. The fire had gained some headway, and the Firemen had to work strenuously to get it under control, which finally was accomplished without any damage by fire being done to adjoining houses. Adjoining houses were damaged by smoke.

The bodies of the two victims were taken to the Morgue and on Tuesday night, were taken in charge by Undertaker Caul.

January 2, 1941 ODDITIES Two fighting deer locked antlers near Bend, Ore. Coyotes ate the body of one, but the other escaped, carrying the head of his antagonist with him

Ordinary commercial gasoline weighs from 5.6 to 6.2 pounds a gallon.

The peculiar strong-backed Africian Shrew is known there by a name, which means “hero-shrew.”

Soiled playing cards can be cleaned by rubbing them with a cloth dipped in Spirits of Camphor.


January 3, 1941 OBITUARY P J. BERRIGAN: The Calm and tranquil opening of the New Year, records in its passing of the death of a well known and highly regarded citizen in the person of Mr. Patrick J Berrigan. Nature’s gentleman in every respect — kind, courteous, obliging, charitable, ever ready and willing to contribute to any call of distress; a wise counselor, one who saw at all times only one course, and that, the strength and manly one from which there was no deviation. He was unafraid to express his opinions appertaining to the welfare of any organization he was associated with.

He was born in St. John’s in March 1866, son of the late William and Anne Berrigan. On December 22nd, 1881, he entered the employ of James Baird, founder of the firm of James Baird Limited, and by his untiring effort, his energy and ability, doing everything thoroughly and well, he advanced to the position of Confidential Clerk. Held in the highest esteem by his employers, his passing removed a familiar figure from the office over which he presided. His friendly greeting will be missed by the scores of dealers who always looked up to Mr. Berringan as a man whom they could converse with at all times, and a man who took an interest in them all.

An ardent Cricketer in his day, being a member of the “Shamrock” Cricket Club, he would talk for hours about their victories and defeats. He loved the game. Besides wielding the “willow” he was an enthusiastic oarsman, and took part in many Regatta of the past. He recreations were simple — he loved trouting, loved gardening, loved the trees, the shrubs, and reveled in fruit growing, and was never happier than when close of the day found him coming from his garden, after a day’s work well done. A devout Catholic, always setting an example to those all about him in all matters pertaining to his Church duties, his passing reflected that same sweet calmness, characteristic of a life of spiritual tranquility.

In 1901 he married Margaret Curtis of Trepassey, daughter of the late Joseph and Suzanne Curtis, who today with their two daughters, Rose and Mary, two sons, Edward and Patrick, and the deceased’s only sister “Bess” and two grandchildren, survive him and to whom is tendered sincere sympathy. COM.

January 3, 1941 BIRTHS BROWNE — Born on January 2nd. to Mr. And Mrs. James T. Browne, (nee Lorraine Walsh) 184 Merrymeeting Road, a son.
January 3, 1941 DEATHS TUCKER — Passed peacefully away on New Year’s Eve, at Winterton, T.B., Anna M. Tucker, in her 83rd year, leaving to mourn two sons, Robert A. of this city, and Franklin of Summerville, Mass., four married daughters also residing in U.S.A. Two brothers and one sister at Winterton. Two sons paid the Supreme Sacrifice on the Great War of 1914-18.

January 7, 1941 WEDDING BELLS WYLE — MALONE: The marriage of Shelia Maria, younger daughter of Thomas J. Malone and Mrs. Malone, was solemnized at the Convent of Mercy, Military Road, on Sunday, the 29th December, at 4.30 p.m. to Sergeant Victor Wyle, son of Mrs. Isabelle Wyle, Rev. Fr. McGrath officiating. Miss Mary Keough presided at the Organ.

The bride entered the Oratory leaning on the arm of her father, while Miss Margaret Walsh was matron of honor. William Malone, brother of the bride performed the duties of best man.

The bride wore a street length frock of light soldier blue, with soldier blue tailored coat trimmed with Martin fur, with Martin muff and Marten toque. Her corsage was of pink and white carnations and maidenhair ferns. The maid of honor wore a street length dress of cocatan, with black seal coat and accessories. Her corsage was the same as the bride’s. Mrs. Malone, mother of the bride, was gowned in Marina blue crepe. Her corsage was bronze mums and ferns. Mrs. Wyle, mother of the groom, was gowned in bronze crepe; her corsage was of bronze mums.

Immediately after the wedding ceremony, the newly weds called on the groom’s grandmother, after which they motored to the bride’s home where supper was served to the very immediate relatives of both parties. After supper, the bride and groom held a short at home to other relatives and friends, after which they went to Woodstock for their honeymoon. The bride’s going away attire was a two-piece ensemble crepe, of aqua green, with lizard trimmings, with black seal coat and aqua green accessories..

The bride is a graduate of the Academy of Mercy and Memorial College, and was on the Teaching Staff of St. Teresa’s Parish. During the Holiday Season she was the recipient of several showers. The groom is the son of the late Ernest Wyle, and previous to his enlisting in the Army, was an Accountant with the Imperial Oil of this city, and is now serving with the Royal Canadian Engineers. Quite recently he was transferred from Halifax to Newfoundland. For the present, Sergeant and Mrs. Wyle will take residence at the Wyle Flats, Hayward Avenue.

January 7, 1941 WEDDING BELLS FORD – BARTLETT: HARBOR GRACE — January 3rd — Yuletide, always a season of happiness, jollity and good-will, more than sustained its reputation on this occasion, to their wide circle of relatives, because of the quiet but happy event which occurred on the afternoon of New Year’s Eve, when Flora Graham, second daughter of Mr. Thomas G. (and the late Clara) Ford, until recently sub-Collector of H.M. Customs, became the bride of Ernest Godwin, son of District Inspector Bartlett, T.N.C., (retired).

The rugged old Parish Church of St. Paul’s, resplendent in its dainty Christmas decorations, presented a pleasing scene, as the bride, escorted by her father, moved to the Chancel, to the thrilling cadences of the Bridal Chorus, ably rendered by the Organist and Choirmaster, Frank Sheppard. The ceremony of unity was performed by the Rector, Rev. H.G. Kirby. The bride was given in marriage by her father. Her sister Sue, was bridesmaid; while the groom was ably supported by William T. Tapp.

The bride looked very pleasing in a gown of Sapphire Chiffon Velvet, with hat to match, and carried a bouquet of pink carnations, white chrysanthemums, and maiden hair fern. The Bridesmaid’s gown was of Russet Chiffon Velvet, with hat and accessories of gold, augmented by a bouquet of old gold chrysanthemums.

Motoring from Church to the parental home, a bounteous luncheon was partaken of, and the toasts relevant to the occasion, duly honoured by some twenty-eight members and relatives of the families. The groom’s gift to the bride was a gold and sapphire bracelet; to the bridesmaid an initialed gold bracelet; with gold and silver cigarette cases to the groomsman and Organist respectively. The tasteful display of numerous practical wedding gifts, together with telegrams from far and near, testified to the esteem in which the bride is deservedly held.

A somewhat shower, not of snow, but of symbolic rice, announced the departure by train, of the happy couple, for their home at Buchans, taking with them the very hearty wishes of the assemblage, for a serene journey through life.

January 7, 1941 DEATHS ABBOTT — Passed peacefully away on January 5th after a short illness, Mark Abbott aged 71, leaving to mourn their sad loss two daughters, two sons, fourteen grandchildren and a large circle of friends. Funeral today, Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 25 Brine Street. Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul.

McALLISTER — Passed peacefully away after a short illness, David McAllister, aged 80 years, leaving to mourn 1 son, William, and 1 daughter, Mrs. Ernest Butcher, also 11 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren, and a large circle of friends. Funeral today, Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 55 Brazil Square. R. I. P.

January 7, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE At the Church of the Sacred Heart, Petries, recently, there took place the wedding of Miss Cecilia Benoit of Georgetown, and Mr. James Dobbin of Salmonier. Rev. Father Brosnan officiated.

A thirty-five year old laborer who has no home, was before Court yesterday, charged with breaking a pane of glass valued at $200.00, in the store of Steers Ltd. He was remanded.

Corporal Mercer of the Nfld. Ranger Force, has wired from Bay L’Argent that nine year old Robert Hearley of English Harbor East, fell through the ice at that place, and was drowned.

The annual meeting of the Boy’s Welfare League will be held at the Club Rooms, formerly McGuire Bakery, on Friday night at eight o’clock. Friends of the movement are cordially invited.

A message to Inspector Fraser from Ranger Corporal Curnew at Rose Blanch, advises that on New Year’s Eve, John Taylor, aged fifty-five years of Grand Bruit, was accidentally drowned at that place.

The entire list for the special Bonspiel which will be played at the Curling Rink tomorrow, will close tonight at seven o’clock, and members wishing to participate are asked to have their names added to the list before that time.

The annual public meeting of the Grand Falls Charitable Fund was held last night. The meeting was for the presentation of the financial statement, the election of the committee, and any other business which might arise.

Edward Hurley of the Blackhead Road, was before the Court yesterday charged with stealing eleven pairs of socks, valued at $7.00, from the Royal Stores Ltd., and four pairs of garters from Bowring Bros., valued at $1.04. He was fined $50.00 or six months in prison.

A Laborer was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with assaulting his wife. He was placed under bonds in the sum of $50.00.

The annual meeting of the Club Darts League will be held at the Cottage Garden Tea Rooms tomorrow afternoon at three o’clock. Delegates from all teams are requested to be present.

M.S. Maneco is now on winter schedule, and is making only one trip from Portugal Cove to Bell Island in the afternoon. This is at 2.30 o’clock.

There were several collisions on Bell Island on New Year’s Day, and three on the following night at different points, as a result of the slippery conditions of the streets. No one was hurt in any instance, so the Bell Islander stated.

The annual meeting of the Commercial Travelers Association will be held at the Sterling Restaurant on Thursday night, and will begin sharp at 7.30. Following the business of the meeting, a social hour will be held.

Head Constable Russell, reports that several burglaries occurred recently. The Heigh-ho Café was entered while the owners were absent, and a small sum of money stolen. During the Christmas Vacation, the home of Mr. Janes Bennett at the Front, whose wife is in Hospital, was entered, but nothing appears to have been stolen. The Head Constable states that Christmas was very quite in Police circles. — The Bell Islander.


January 10, 1941 WEDDING BELLS DUNN — ARMENTANO: William Dunn, son of Mrs. and the late Thomas J Dunn, of 5 Hayward Avenue, St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Miss Rose Armentano, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Minini, of 824 Manhattan Avenue, Greenspoint, were married at St. Alphonsus R.C. Church, Kent Street, Saturday, October 26th, 1940, at 3.30 p.m. The Rev. Father Seegar performed the ceremony. The bride was given away by her step-father, Mr. Minini.

She wore a gown of white velveray taffeta, a veil trimmed with orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of roses and lilies of the valley. The bride was attended by a matron of honor, Mrs. Emma Brennan of Rosedale, Long Island, and two bridesmaids, the Misses Ann Capano and Ella McKeegan, both of Greenpoint. The matron of honor wore a gown of American Beauty, the bridesmaids each wore a gown of peacock blue and also carried bouquets.

The groom was attended by Mr. Thomas Glasco of Greenspoint, and the Messrs. Robert and David Redmond, both of Brooklyn, acted as ushers. After the ceremony the wedding party drove to Roberts Studio, Manhattan Avenue, where photographs were taken.

A wedding supper for the relatives and immediate friends was held at the home of the newlyweds, 99 Noble Street, Brooklyn. A reception was held at Shields Acme Hall, Seventh Street and Ninth Street, Brooklyn, where over two hundred guests attended and really enjoyed themselves. The many friends wish them continued happiness for many years to come.

The bride is a native of Greenpoint, having attended St. Anthony Parochial School, from which she graduated. She is also a graduate of the Metropolitan Commercial School. Until recently she has been employed by the Leviton Manufacturing Company of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, having resigned her position to become Mrs. William Dunn.

The groom is Vice-President of the Greenpoint Newfoundland softball team. He attended school at St. Patrick’s Hall, after which he learned the plumbing trade, and spent many years with W. J. Ryan, St. John’s. He immigrated to the United States in 1927. Since then he has been employed by the National Sugar Refinery of Long Island City. — Nfld Weekly. 

January 10, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A Magisterial Enquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of two Chinese Laundrymen, when the building in which their laundry was situated was on fire on New Year’s Eve, began yesterday before Magistrate O’Neill. Two witnesses were examined. The Assistant Chief of Police is conducting the enquiry.

During the past week, potholes were filled with gravel by Council employees in Queen’s Road, Long’s Hill, LeMarchant Road. Attention was given to the South-side and higher levels. Sidewalks, steps and crossings were cleared, and drains were opened in various parts of the city. Ice was removed from Water Street, Duckworth Street, and New Gower St.


January 13, 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. GEORGE F BOWDEN: Relatives have been advised of the sudden death of Mrs. George F. Bowden, at Washington, D.C., on Friday last, due to a heart attack. Christmas greetings had been received as ever. in the cherry strain that had been usual for years past, and so the shock of death has been more poignant. Born at Bay Roberts in 1868, she married about 1888. Subsequently her husband graduated M.D., at Long Island College, N.Y., and practiced medicine successfully, at Pelley’s Island and Wesleyville, at which latter place he was stricken with a long and painful malady that ended with his death.

Following his passing, she removed to the United States, whither two of her family had gone. Her two elder daughters, Mrs. John Evans, and Mrs. Robert Morison, are residents of California, Jean the younger at Washington, with whom the mother lived, and a married son in the Canadian North West, constitute the present family. Her only remaining sister, Mrs. Isaac Parsons, is at Bay Roberts, and will be the recipient of sincere sympathy in this period of sorrow. “Aunt Lizzie” as she was known in the family, was a very active woman, with a keen desire to have her children around her, and yet fate seemed to keep them more or less widely separated. She was a very devoted Britisher, and stood four square for England always. A loss in her family that bore heavily with her through many years, was the death of her son, Hugh, who was killed in France during the Great War of 1914-18. In the expressions of sympathy to the family, this paper desires inclusion.

Mrs. SARAH NEWMAN: There passed peacefully away at Freshwater, Carbonear, during the early hours of January 1st., 1941, in her 85th year, Sarah, widow of the late Rev. John T. Newman, who predeceased her by 10 years. Mrs. Newman was a native of Preston, England, and came to this Country as a bride in the summer of 1895, after postponing her marriage for several years to nurse an invalid father.

As bride and bridegroom, they went to Channel when they spent one year. During that year a call was accepted to the Pastorate of George Street, St. John’s. From there they served several of the larger outport charges, and retired from Freshwater in the Spring of 1923, owing ill health of Mr. Newman.

They then took up residence at Carbonear, where Mrs. Newman lived for nearly two years after the death of her husband. She then removed to Freshwater to live with Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Moores; Mrs. Moores being an old friend of hers. Both Mr. and Mrs. Moores predeceased her, but she continued to live in the home with Miss Delaney, a sister of Mrs. Moores. Mrs. Newman was a woman of fine strong Christian character. She was very English in spirit, accent, and manner of life, but fell in with life in the Country and was an invaluable helpmate to her husband in all his Church activities.

She maintained fairly good health, and was at Carbonear visiting friends and doing a little business less than two months before her death. But an attack of flu proved too much for her age worn earthly tabernacle, and her spirit departed to the building of God, the house not made with hands, eternal in the Heavens. Her remains were laid to rest in the cemetery at Carbonear, beside those of her late husband, and sister-in-law Miss Newman.

Owing to the illness of her Pastor Rev. A. W. Osborne, her funeral service was conducted by Rev. H.M. Davis, assisted by Revs. Cotton and Howse. C. H.


January 17, 1941 OBITUARY WILLIAM J.S.L. RYALL: A telegram to Dr. Charles Ryall from Brooklyn, N.Y., announces the passing of his uncle, the late Mr. Will Ryall, at his home, 20 Stephens Court, Brooklyn, on Wednesday. The deceased was a brother of the late Samuel Ryall, Esq., of Anderson’s Dry Goods, and of the late Mrs. Joseph Gear. The deceased lived in Brooklyn many years, and was employed by the firm of Bowring King Co., Fulton St., and was only home ill a few weeks.

In his youth, he was prominent in Church and society circles, and always a most enthusiastic interested citizen in the annual regatta. He often made a trip to St. John’s during his vacation, to attend the Regatta. In his day and generation he was most popular with all classes. He leaves a daughter, Miss Anna Ryall, who resided with him. To her and his relatives here, we extend sincere sympathy. ___ Q

January 17, 1941 OBITUARY ROY W MYERS: The residents of Bay Roberts were shocked to hear of the sudden passing of Roy W. Myers, at his residence, on Sunday Jan. 5th. at 11.30 p.m.

Born at Halifax, N.S., in 1888, of Dutch-Canadian ancestry, Roy’s love of flowers, plants and trees, inherited from the former, will long be reflected in the town of his adoption. He delighted in beautifying the landscape, and through this avenue, we get a glimpse of his artistic temperament.

He joined the Halifax and Bermuda Cable Co., at Halifax, N.S. in 1905, transferred to New York in1907; and later to Colin (Isthmus Panama); and Nicaragua. Owing to climatic conditions at the latter place, he was compelled to returned to Canada, where he joined the Commercial Cable Co’s Staff at Hazel Hill, N.S. He was transferred to the pioneer staff of the Western Cable Co., at Bay Roberts, in 1911, and remained on staff until 1932, when he went in business for himself at Bay Roberts.

Public spirited, he threw himself whole-heartedly into any project for the betterment of his township. His rare ability as an organizer expressed itself in his various activities. His chief sports were tennis and skating. As Secretary-Treasurer of the Bay Roberts Tennis Club, which he organized, his individual and team work in raising funds and supervising the building of the very fine tennis courts of that club, remain a monument to his memory. He organized the Bay Roberts Rink Co., and plans were prepared for the construction of a rink in which the Conception Bay Hockey Series could be played. He was keenly disappointed when his project, through no fault of his, failed to materialize. No social tournament of the Cable Staff at Bay Roberts was completed without Roy as organizer, and many were the pleasant evenings enjoyed at the old Staff House, due in great measure to his untiring efforts.

He was a Free Mason of long standing, being a member of Lodge Mackay No. 1129 A.F. and A.M., S.C., at Bay Roberts, of which Lodge he was a valued and efficient Secretary for many years. He was also a member of the Independent Order of Foresters, and at the time of his passing, held the post of Financial-Secretary of Court Haig, Bay Roberts.

Roy was temperate, kindly and just. He never failed to speak his mind on the point at issue and had the courage of his convictions. A devoted husband and father, he worked assiduously to insure the comfort of his loves ones. His loyalty endeared him to his friends. Kind-hearted and considerate for those in need, he was ever ready to help their cause. A keen lover of music and of the best in nature and art, and an admirable host, we reflect on the many enjoyable evenings spent around his fireside.

He leaves a widow (nee Helena Calpin) and two daughters, Margaret at home and Olive (Mrs .Wilford Wilcox) of Bay Roberts. Also two sons, Gordon A (Lex) B.E.E.E., Resident Engineer of Colas Nfld., Ltd., Clarenville; and Roy W., R.A.F., Canada.

Funeral took place at Bay Roberts on Tuesday Jan. 7th. Rev. H. Torraville, L.Th., Rector of St. Matthew’s Church, officiated. At the close of the service, the Dead March in Saul was rendered on the organ by Miss M. B. Mosdell. Interment at Church of England cemetery.

To his family we extend deepest sympathy, may Divine Love enfold them. Roy has passed beyond the boundaries of earth’s preparatory school, to (quoting Samuel Longfellow lines):

“The freer step, the fuller breath, The wide horizon’s grander view; The sense of life that knows no death, — The life that maketh all things new.”


January 21, 1941 OBITUARY JOHN F. HOLDEN: Many of his friends in St. John’s and elsewhere, will learn with regret of the passing of John F. Holden, which occurred at Walwyn Hospital, Come By Chance, on Saturday. Deceased was stricken with a cold recently, and developed pneumonia, which was the cause of his death.

He was well known and generally respected. A Veteran of the last war, on his return he settled at Come by Chance, where he acted as Game Warden and guide etc. Thousands of people who visited that place fishing etc., had reason to know of the hospitality and geniality of the deceased, and will regret his early passing. He was but forty seven years of age. Left to mourn his passing are; his wife and 7 children, as well as other relatives. The body will come in by train, and the funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, from the residence of his sister, Mrs. Thomas Redmond, Avalon Terrace, Topsail Road.

January 21, 1941 COURT A twenty two year old girl was fined $5.00 on Saturday for assaulting another, last Saturday night. The plaintiff stated she was attacked by the defendant and two other girls, and was knocked down and kicked. The defendant stated the plaintiff had started the trouble, and in the struggle bit her finger. Both were placed under bonds to keep the peace in future.
January 21, 1941 DEATHS BOWDEN — Passed away at the Grace Hospital on Sunday morning, Percival, son of the late S.P. and Mrs. Bowden, aged 57 years. Leaving; a wife and one daughter, also two brothers and one sister. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m., from his brother’s residence, 18 Blatch Avenue.

HOLDEN — At Walwyn Hospital, Come by Chance, Saturday January 18th., John F. Holden, aged 47 years. Leaving wife and seven children to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Tuesday. at 2.15 p.m., from the residence of his sister, Mrs. Thos. Redmond, Avalon Terrace, Topsail Road.

MURPHY — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Hospital on January 19th, Stephen Murphy. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 62 LeMarchant Road. R. I. P.


January 22, 1941 OBITUARY STEPHEN J MURPHY: The passing of Stephen J Murphy, which occurred at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on Saturday, was heard with regret by a large number of people in St. John’s, and will cause sorrow in various parts of the country, as the deceased was widely known for his many acts of charity, especially his attention to sick people at the Hospitals.

Deceased had not been ill for very long, though for some little time past it was known that his condition was serious, and his demise did not come as a surprise to those who were intimate with him.

The late Mr. Murphy was born in King’s Cove and spent several years in the United States. After his return to Newfoundland, he entered the employ of the Newfoundland Railway, and for the pasts twenty years was a member of the staff of the Statistical Department. He was best known perhaps, for his activities in the Knights of Columbus. For several terms, he occupied the position of Chancellor of Terra Nova, and also served as Deputy Grand Knight. As a member of the Sick Visiting Committee, he was most attentive, and for the past ten years he was a regular visitor to the various institutions, as well as to the homes of ill brethren. In the Hospitals, the late Mr. Murphy was known to show interest in all people who were there, and his kindness was not confined to members of the Knights of Columbus, but was extended to all who needed a kind act. People from all sections of the Island who happened to be in any of the institutions, will remember him as being there every Sunday and every holiday, at all seasons of the year, and many a good deed was his. His charity knew no bounds, and many a prayer will be offered for him by those who have cause to remember his solicitude, in the years that have passed on. In all respects he was a truly Christian gentleman; his life was an example to all.

To his sorrowing widow and other relatives, deepest sympathy will be extended. The funeral takes place this afternoon at 2.30 o’clock, from his late residence, 62 LeMarchant Road.

January 22, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual meeting of the Playgrounds and Recreation Association will be held in the Board of Trade rooms on Thursday, at four o’clock. Reports will be presented and officers for the coming year elected.

At the Court House in Twillingate last week, Magistrate Abbott heard a Civil Action between a Sail Maker and a schooner owner, in connection with claim for sail repairing. Judgment was given for the plaintiff with cost.

Tomorrow is the first general holiday for the season, and the only one for the winter season. No general holiday has been scheduled for February, this being eliminated because there are two in June. The next after tomorrow, will be St. Patrick’s Day.

In the month of December, there were seventy-seven admissions to the Twillingate Hospital, and one hundred and one discharged. The total days of care numbered 2754, and the average number of patients per day being 88.5. There were four births and two deaths during the month.

Fishermen at Port aux Basques did well with codfish last week. It was the first luck they had for some time.

The monthly meeting of Shop and Office Employees Association was held last night at their rooms, Victoria Hall.

Fears are entertained that a tragedy has occurred at Lark Harbor. The Postmistress at Curling was advised from Lark Harbor, that Mrs. Effie Sheppard, wife of Linton Sheppard of that place, was missing. Search parties scoured the neighborhood without results. The Police were notified, and Sergeant Pitcher and Constable Martin were sent to assist in the search.


January 24, 1941 IN MEMORIAM STEPHEN J MURPHY: On Sunday evening at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, the soul of Stephen J Murphy went peacefully to eternal rest. For some months past, the deceased had suffered from a serious internal ailment, and latterly it was realized that death was but a matter of time.

Living quietly within the sanctuary of his own home circles, few men cared less than Stephen J Murphy for the glare of Public acclaim, yet, few were more widely known nor more universally beloved than he. As Chancellor of Terra Nova Council, Knights of Columbus, it was part of his duty to visit members of the order at the various Hospitals, and for the past fifteen years, every Sunday and holiday without exception, found him at one of the different institutions, bringing cheer and happiness to the patients there. Nor was his charity confined to those only of his own organization, and all, irrespective of class or creed, were the beneficiaries of his kindly interest. In recognition of his outstanding service and in token of the esteem of his brethren, a special meeting of the Council was convened in 1939, at which a Silver Service suitably engraved, was presented to the late Mr. Murphy, from all Councils of the Order in Newfoundland. Later he was elevated to the office of Deputy Grand Knight, but at his own request, he resumed the Office of Chancellor, which he held up to the time of his death.

The deceased was born in King’s Cove in 1871. At the death of his father the family moved to Hr. Grace, where he received his early education at the Old Grammar School of that City. At the age of fifteen he left for Montreal to complete his education, and at graduation, entered the employ of the Grand Trunk Western Railway. After a few years he joined the St. John’s Quebec School of Infantry, with the intention of following a military career, but later became interest in Engineering work, and for many years was associated with the Boston East National Dock.

On January 19th 1915, at Wellesley Mills, Mass., he married Miss Elle Murphy formerly of Keels, and it was a sad coincidence that his death took place on the 26th anniversary of their wedding. Returning to Newfoundland in 1918, the late Mr. Murphy entered the local Railway service, and up to the time of his death had been a most value employee of the Auditing Department of St. John’s.

Left to mourn are his bereaved widow, relatives and hosts of friends, all of whom will regret the passing of one, who in all things and to all men, was a truly Christian gentleman.

The funeral took place Tuesday afternoon from his late residence, 62 LeMarchant Road, and was largely attended. A Guard of Honor from Archbishop Howley Fourth Degree, and Terra Nova Council, was present. May his soul rest in peace.

January 24, 1941 WEDDING BELLS STIRLING — GUNN: At Montreal on Wednesday Jan. 15th a pretty wedding took place in the Knox Crescent Church, when Margaret, the only daughter of Mrs. Fannie and the late John Gunn, was united in marriage to Leading Aircraftman Frank H., son of Mrs. Gertrude and the late Fred M Stirling.

Rev. David Scott officiated, and the bride was given in marriage by her brother, Mr. Ian Gunn, and was attended by Miss Joan Stirling, sister of the groom. Mr. Gordon Stirling acted as best man. The bride looked most attractive in a dress of cornflower blue cut on Princess lines, and wore a corsage of white carnations. The bridesmaid also looked charming in a dress of old gold shade, and her corsage was pink carnations. Both mothers attended the ceremony, and among the guests were several friends of the young couple from St. John’s. The reception was held at the residence of Mr. Ernest Marshall, Westmount, where the usual toasts were honored.

The bride and groom are both well known and popular in St. John’s, where L.A.C. Stirling was employed as Manager of Job’s Insurance Office, for some years before proceeding to Canada with the first group of R.A.F. volunteers, under the Empire Air Training Scheme.

The numerous friend of the young couple wish them many years of happiness together.

January 24, 1941 OBITUARY MISS ANGELA McLOUGHLAN: Miss Angela McLoughlan passed peacefully away after a short illness, at her sister’s residence, 54 Livingstone Street, at 10 o’clock last evening.

“Nance”, as she was known to many, was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Michael McLoughlan, Catalina. She lived with Mrs. Bert Hayward, Rennie’s Mill Road, for 22 years, as mother’s helper, and was well known for her faithfulness and kindness.

Fortified by the Holy Rites of her Church, she passed to her Eternal rest. Her funeral will take place from the residence of her sister, Mrs. Arthur Walsh, 54 Livingstone Street, today Thursday, Jan. 23rd at 2.30 p.m. Well done thou good and faithful servant. Enter thou into the joy of thy Lord. R. I. P.

January 24, 1941 NFLD. SCHOONER STRIKES ROCKS OFF CANSO Vessel Abandoned By Her Crew And Set On fire: Canso, N.S., Jan.23 — (C.P.) — The six men crew of the motor vessel “Bastian,”95 tons, of Burgeo, Newfoundland, reached here in a boat tonight. The “Bastian” was abandoned and set on fire, after striking the rocks seven miles South of here. Captain Archibald Matthews said he tried to make Canso, but the vessel filled rapidly, and had to be abandoned and set on fire.

The “Bastian” was bound from Burgeo to Shelbourne, Nova Scotia, to load a cargo of lumber for the West Indies, when she ran upon the rocks.

The crew, all of whom hail from Burgeo, are as follows: Captain Archibald Matthews, Mate Sidney Harris, Boatswain, George Skinner, Seamen, Edward Anderson, and Ronald Hiscock, and Cook, Clarence Billard.

January 24, 1941 TOUR INSPECTION OF HOSPITALS Hon. Sir John C Puddister, Commissioner for Public Health and Welfare, and Dr. H. M. Mosdell, Secretary, have completed an inspection of Lady Walwyn Hospital at Come by Chance, and the Hospital at Bonavista, and will be at Stephenville this afternoon and Corner Brook tomorrow, returning to St. John’s on Monday next.
January 24, 1941 MUCH ACTIVITY AT ST. LAWRENCE Dr. W.S. Smith, in charge of operations for the Newfoundland Fluorspar Ltd., arrived in the city from St. Lawrence this week, and left by express yesterday for Montreal. All mining machinery is now on the ground for the development of their Hookey-Director fluorspar vein. There is pronounced activity at St. Lawrence and the prospects for a major development are excellent.
January 24, 1941 PERSONAL Mr. C.H. Hutching, K.C., C.M.G., who entered St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital last week for a minor surgical operation, is now making satisfactory progress towards recovery.
January 24, 1941 40th WEDDING ANNIVERSARY Friends Gather to Offer Congratulations and Best Wishes.

Yesterday marked the fortieth wedding anniversary of Councilor Kenneth and Mrs. Ruby, and congratulations were received from far and wide on the happy occasion. At yesterday’s meeting of the City Council, congratulations and best wishes were extended by His Worship the Mayor, on behalf of all Councillors.

Last night, more than one hundred friends assembled at the Ruby household, Waterford Bridge Road, to say how glad they were on the very auspicious event, and wished that both the Councilor and his good wife would be spared for many years. On behalf of the gathering, Mr. Charles Miller, a life-long friend, presented an address and a gift in token of esteem. The address appears below.

Councilor Ruby, on behalf of his wife and himself, extended thanks for the address and presentation, and in particular, for the kind expressions received from all sides. Reviewing the forty years that have passed, he recounted some outstanding happenings in that time, but for he and Mrs. Ruby, they had been forty happy years, and looking over them all, they had nothing but the most pleasant recollections.

Following the formal proceedings, the night was spent in a most jolly manner. Games were played and supper was served, and the entire gathering thoroughly enjoyed themselves. The address was as follows:

Address: “We have assembled on this happy occasion to celebrate the Ruby Wedding of two “Rubies” whose worth is above price, and of whom we may well and truly say, that the jewel of their friendship is rich in value. Some of the older members of this gathering have enjoyed that friendship for years.”

“Dear friends, for forty years you have weathered the storms together, sharing the joys and sorrows, the hopes and fears of wedded life, in a spirit of true companionship. What happy memories you must have; years in which even the sad days were brightened by unselfish devotion to each other, and the sacred love of home and family. Your life together is indeed a pattern of happiness and achievement, by which the young married members of this gathering may well take example. You have been good and loving parents, good friends, good neighbors, and it is to pay tribute to these qualities and to express our best wishes for many more years of happiness, that we come here tonight.”

“On behalf of the gathering, dear Mr. and Mrs. Ruby, I ask you to accept the accompanying gift as tangible admiration of your many friends. May you and we, be here to celebrate in a fitting manner, your Golden Wedding Anniversary, ten years hence.”

January 24, 1941 TRIAL BEGINS AT SUPREME COURT Evidence for Crown Concluded in Charge Against Norwegian Seaman.

The trial of Nils Wormdahl, a Norwegian Sailor charged with assault on a young woman on December 15th, began at the Supreme Court yesterday, before Hon. Mr. Justice Higgins, and the following special jury: Charles Perez, Hazen A Russell, Louis A Devine, John Janes, Leslie Marshall, Richard O’Reilly, Michael Earles, George Knowling, Harvey Roberts, S. Croke, Earnest W. Vavasour, Henry Carnell.

Mr. H.P. Carter, K.C., Crown Prosecutor, appeared for the Crown, and Mr. R.A. Parsons, K.C. for the accused. Capt. Jorgensen was sworn in as interpreter. The taking of evidence of the Crown occupied all day and concluded shortly after five o’clock. At that stage, adjournment was taken until ten o’clock this morning, when the case for the defense will be taken up. The case, it is expected, will conclude today.

January 24, 1941 EXPRESS PASSENGERS The following passengers arrived at Port aux Basques last night; R. Pearcey, S. Heulan, J.J. Jossleyn and daughter, J Wilson, R. Snow, W. Bishop, W. Bruce, E. Rogers, Miss B. Prosper, E.A. Helms, A. Manderville, J. Murray, J. Gunn, W.P. and Mrs. Keeler, Sgt. Mgr. Renshaw, W. Wilton, E. Pynn, D. Daly, A. Stewart, R.A. Lanahan, W. and Mrs, Dawe, J Keelig, J. McIsaac, J. Colquohoun, Mrs. J.S. Gunn, R. Mullowney, S. Mosdell, Sgt. F. Brown, T. Lynch, R. Goodyear, E.J. Breen, H. and Mrs. Wilton, F. Wilcox, D.K. Richardson, Mrs. J.S. Richardson, J. Butt, A. Bragg, R. White, S.J. Holt, A. Brown. W. Cake, E. Marcoux.
January 24, 1941 IN MEMORIAM Mrs. JANE BESO: HOLYROOD, Jan 18 — On January 17th there passed away one of Hoolyrood’s most respected and esteemed residents, Mrs. Jane Beso, in her 72nd. year, widow of the late John Beso. Left to mourn are two sons, Frank and Peter who were at her bedside when she peacefully passed away. Also, two sisters residing in the United States. One Brother is living in Bristol’s Hope, one daughter Mary, wife of Fred Kennedy is living in St. John’s. To all, the writer extends deepest sympathy.

During her illness, deceased had the ministration of Rev. W.J. Murphy, who attended to her most attentively until she closed her eyes in death. Those who she has left behind have the consoling thought that she died as she lived, a loving and tender mother, who never neglected her duty towards Church or State, a devout Catholic, and a good neighbor. To know her was to love her.

Her son Frank, who holds a responsible position with the Buchans Mining Company, when informed of his mother’s illness, lost no time to be at her bedside when she died. Boarding a freight train, he arrived just in time to take his last farewell of his loving mother, now gone to her reward in Heaven.

A loving mother is dead and gone, To her reward in heaven above. She passed away with a loving smile. To all of those she loved. Murmuring a prayer that she may meet again. May her soul forever rest in peace. Amen. Correspondent.


January 26, 1941 DEATH COMES TO AN EX-SOLDIER L.C.M. Some must watch while some must sleep, So runs the world away!

The news of the sudden death of Frank Dooley of “Ours”, came as a great shock on Saturday to the thousands of ex-servicemen, in whose ranks he was a prominent figure. Barely forty-eight hours ago, we had a verbal message from him through a medical friend; on Thursday he was apparently in the best of health and fortune smiled kindly. Dr. Pollicoff and Messeur Stewart Dewling, M.M., had given some temporary treatment at the Clinic; and then on the 25th January, as the gray dawn came in over his native city of St. John’s, his brothers, sisters and many friends, sat in the shadow of that mystery which has saddened mankind since the beginning of history.

Deceased was one of three brothers who served with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment in the Great War of 1914-18. He was proud of his service with the Colors, and the happiest hours of his open, vigorous life, were those spent with his comrades in arms reminiscing and re-living the scenes in the drama of France and Flanders. The memories of January 27th 1917, “The Kaiser’s Birthday”, were ever vivid; he had seen the forms on “No Man’s Land”, faces turned to the sky, and not waiting of any silver dawn any more, and he himself bore the scars and exposure of the war, which remained with him always.

The funeral took place yesterday afternoon from the residence of his brother, Sgt. Jack Dooley, one of the First Five Hundred, and a Veteran of Gallipoli and France, who with two brothers, Thomas, also severely wounded in action, and Richard, and one sister, Mrs. Wm. Aspell, survived.

This was the third time within a week that the Flag has flown half mast at the G.W.V.A. Headquarters, and thrice has the Union Jack and poppies red, adorned the mortal remains of another patriotic Newfoundlander. Surely this is significant of the rapidly thinning ranks.

Let the gentle snow and kindly earth lay smoothing hands upon our Comrade, who by war and life’s turmoil, was berefit of quietude but who is now at peace!

“The January twilight gloom lies fast on many a folded eye.”

January 26, 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. EMILY HUSSEY: In the firm belief of the Resurrection, and fortified by the rites of her Church, there passed into the Great Beyond, in her 76th year at Salmon Cove, Clarke’s Beach, on the 4th of January, Mrs. Emily Hussey, one who will be sorely missed from that place, because of her generous hospitality and general good nature.

Aunt Emily, as she was generally known to all around, was born at the Broads, Clarke’s Beach, in 1864, and lived there, until at the age of 24, she married William Batten of Salmon Cove, who died in 1924.

In 1929 she married Isaac Antle Hussey of Port de Grace. After his decease she moved to her old home in Salmon Cove, where she resided until the Angel of Death took her. She leaves to mourn: two sons, Frederic Batten of Springfield, and Arthur Batten of Salmon Cove, and one adopted daughter, Mrs. R.W. Shepherd, now residing at Bishop’s Cove, together with three brothers and two sisters.

The extraordinary number of friends who followed the wreath laden casket to its last resting place, was a fitting tribute to “A womanly woman who was, to all around, dear. The luster of those kindnesses will shine for many a year”.

Interment took place at Salmon Cove with the Rev. G. Gruchy officiating.


January 27, 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. CATHERINE FURLONG: The passing of Mrs. Catherine Furlong on Saturday at 4 p.m. removed one of St. John’s best know ladies, widow of the late Lawrence Furlong of Smithville. Mrs. Furlong was a daughter of the late James and Anastasia Tobin, and one of the grand old stock, that is all too quickly passing away. Many of the older generation will always treasure memories of the kindly hospitality shown them by the late Mr. and Mrs. Furlong, in the old days at their popular hostelry “Smithville”. Mrs. Furlong leaves to mourn, four sons and five daughters. Rev. Fr Cotter, Bell Island, is a grandson.
January 27, 1941 DEATHS FURLONG — On Saturday, January 25th at 4 p.m., Catherine, aged 93 years, widow of the late Lawrence Furlong. Funeral takes place today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence “Smithville”, Long Pond Road.

HAMILTON — Passed away at Boston Jan. 25th Harold Francis Hamilton, son of Thomas and Caroline Hamilton, leaving to mourn; wife and two children at Boston Mass., mother, father, and one sister at St. John’s.

KELLY — Entered into rest on Sunday morning, William Morrissey Kelly, beloved son of Mrs. Hannah Kelly. Private funeral by motor hearse, Tuesday, Jan.28th at 2.45 p.m., from his late residence, 50 Colonial Street.

GRANTER — At Grand Falls, after an illness of only a few days, Mrs. Jane Granter, formerly of Greenspond, in her 84th year, leaving to mourn her passing; one brother at Greenspond, two daughters, Mrs. Maud Burry, and Mrs. A Bugden of Grand Falls, three grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

DOOLEY — Passed peacefully away at 11 a.m. Saturday, John Dooley, well known Farmer of Topsail Road; leaving to mourn their sad loss; a loving wife, one sister, Mrs. Robert Nash, two daughters, Mrs. Andrew Smith, of Old Shop, and Mrs. Richard Dunn, Topsail Road, seven sons, Douglas, Ronald, Frank, Raymond, Cyril, Clarence and Allan, all at home, 19 grandchildren, and a number of other relatives and friends. Funeral, today Monday, at 1.15 p.m. from his late residence Topsail Road. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul.

January 27, 1941 A NATIVE OF ST. JOHN’S DIES AT BOSTON Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hamilton, Carter’s Hill, were advised yesterday by wire, of the passing of their son Harold Francis, which occurred at Boston on Saturday. No particulars were received and it is presumed that his illness was of short duration, as letters were received from him recently, and he was then in good health. The deceased has been living in the United States for some time past, but is well known in the city. In the recent Presidential Campaign, he was a strong supporter of President Roosevelt, and was engaged in campaigning for him, making at least one radio speech, which was heard by several of his friends.

He leaves to mourn; his wife and two children in Boston, as well as his father, and mother, and one sister, Mrs. Richard Power, in St. John’s. To all, deepest sympathy will be extended.


January 30, 1941 WEDDING BELLS BUTLER — KENNEDY: AVONDALE, JANUARY 27. — On Thursday, Jan. 23rd, a wedding of much local interest was celebrated at Avondale, when Miss Mary Kennedy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Kennedy, became the bride of Edward, son of Mrs. and late Edward Butler of Holyrood.

The bride, who for the past ten years has been the popular and efficient Post Mistress at Avondale, was very prettily attired in an ensemble of air-forced blue with brown accessories. Her attendant was her sister Ella, who wore an ensemble of Scotch tweed.

The groom has been a valued employee of the Highroads Department for the past thirteen years, during which period he has risen to the position of Foreman. He was assisted by his brother, William.

After the wedding, which was performed by the Rev. Fr. Kavanagh, a reception was held at the home of the bride, during which Fr. Kavanagh spoke very appreciatively of the courtesy, efficiency, and kindness, shown by Miss Kennedy, during her tenure as Post Mistress, and while voicing the regret of all on her departure from her position and home town, also expressed on his own and her friends’ behalf, best wishes for her future happiness.

At night, Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy gave a party at their home to a group of young friends of the bride and groom, at which a very enjoyable time was spent. Singing and dancing kept the group in a merry mood, and refreshments were served by Miss Ella, the bride’s attendant.

The happy couple then left for a honeymoon in the city.

The writer joins with their many friends in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Butler health and every happiness. FRIEND

January 30, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Capt. John Blackmore of Port Union, is now engaged building a new vessel, which he hopes to launch in the Spring.

The annual meeting of the Society for the Protection of Animals, will be held at Government House tonight at 8.30. It is hoped to have a large attendance.

The annual meeting of the Newfoundland Board of Trade will be held tomorrow afternoon at four o’clock.

The annual general meeting of the shareholders of the Great Eastern Oil and Import Co., Ltd., will be held at eight o’clock p.m., at the Company’s office, Water Street.


January 31, 1941 OBITUARY MISS KATHLEEN BRODERICK: BAY DE VERDE, Jan. 25.

“Leaves have their time to fall, And flowers to wither at the North wind’s breath; Thou hast all Seasons for thine own, O Death.”

Peacefully, and with perfect submission to the Divine will, the gentle soul of Miss Kathleen Broderick passed within the veil, at the early age of 36 years, on the 23rd January. The late Miss Broderick was an outstanding figure in educational and Church activities for some years. She was a graduate of Littledale Academy and the Normal School, and at a very early age showed marked ability in her studies, and it was not long before she attained the goal she worked so hard and unremitting for, and the day of her graduating was a memorable one, for it brought her honors in practically every subject, and the A.A. degree of proficiency. After her graduation, Miss Broderick returned, teaching at Kingston, where she remained two years, after which she was given charge of the R.C. Superior School at Bay de Verde, where for twelve years she discharged her duties satisfactorily and efficiently, and today some of her ex-pupils are teaching in different parts of the country, another proof of her accomplishment. She was of quiet retiring disposition, and shunned ostentation, and was devoted to her work and beloved by her pupils, to whom she was ever kind and considerate.

Her health failing, she was obliged to give up her work, but she struggled heroically against the insidious malady which snapped away her life, and all the medical skill and the loving care of family and friends could not keep the death angel at bay any longer. She bore her illness with Christian resignation to the Divine Will, was never known to complain, and by pious meditation and frequent prayers, she resigned herself to God’s Will, and calmly awaited her end. And now she is dead, her kindly heart is still in death, we shall miss her familiar form and cheery greeting. Her place in the R.C. Church, which she loved so well and daily visited, will be vacant; there are aching hearts in the home, her many friends miss her, for she was one whom to know was to love and esteem.

She is gone to receive her reward of an exemplary Christian life, but her memory will always remain, for her life was an inspiration to us all and we shall pray for her soul. Left to mourn are; her parents, two brothers, and one sister, Mrs. James Moore, Bell Island, Mrs. Edward LeClair, and Mrs J. Donald Reid, of St. John, N.B, and Miss M Pauline Broderick, Cambridge, Mass., (Sister) and a large circle of friends, to whom we extend sincere sympathy.

“Break, break, break on the ever gray shore, O sea, And would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. And the funeral entered there, The cemetery over the hill. But, oh, for the touch of a vanished hand, And the sound of a voice that is still. R.I.P. D. O’N

January 31, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The first in a series of three card tournaments will be held at the Presentation Convent Auditorium, Barnes Road, tonight. There will be three special prizes for each of the three nights, as well as an extra special for the series.

In the Sanitary Department last week, there was fifty-six men working, with twenty-two horses, a total of 517 loads of ashes and garbage were deposited on Municipal Dumps. In addition, sixty-two loads of snow were hauled.

The annual prize distribution of the Academy of Our Lady of Mercy will take place tonight. This was to have been held before Christmas but was postponed, owing to the then prevailing epidemic of flu.

Notes from Little Catalina in the Fishermen’s Advocate, state that Mr. Silas Johnson is building a boat about forty feet long this winter, and that he is now cutting the timber for the boat. It is also rumored that Capt. Carpenter will be building a small boat.

The following passengers arrived here from Halifax and the Southeast Coast; E. Dyett, K. Reynolds, H. Duffett, H. Lake, G. and Mrs, Patten J. Butt.

The fourth in the series of card tournaments will be held at the Star Hall tonight. Three cash prizes will be awarded for the best scores tonight, as well as three special prizes for the best scores in the series.

Word has been received that Charles H. Peters, son of Mrs. Mary A. Penny of Long Street, who is serving with the 59th Heavy Regiment of the Royal Artillery, has been promoted to Lance-Bombardier.


February 3, 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. FRANK M HORWOOD: “Death takes us by surprise and stays our hurried feet.”

Early Friday morning, January 31st. there passed into the fuller life after a very brief illness, Agnes Ebsary, beloved wife of Frank M. Horwood, Manager of Baine Johnston’s Southside premises. Few of her friends knew that she was ill, and it was only a week ago the writer enjoyed the hospitality of her home. The late Mrs. Horwood was a woman much beloved by all who knew her, and up to a few years ago carried on the duties of a Nurse. Many today, will thank God for her kindness and skill. Her services were always in great demand – rich and poor alike found in her a true affectionate friend. The deceased was the eldest daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Ebsary, Southside Road. She is survived by her husband, two daughters — Mrs. Wesley Osmond (Violet), Mrs. Robert W. Fogwell (Evelyn); two sisters — Mrs. Douglas Horwood and Mrs John Bailey.

The funeral took place yesterday afternoon from 127 Southside Road, and was attended by a large concourse of mourners. At the home a very impressive funeral service was conducted by Rev. A.F. Blannington, Minister of George Street United Church. During the service, a favorite hymn “Sun of my soul” was sung. Interment was at the General Protestant Cemetery. Rev. A.F. Binnington taking the committal at the graveside. The floral offerings were many and very beautiful — a silent tribute to one who loved flowers and God’s great outdoors. “With the blessed thought of reuniting on the resurrection morning.” W.

February 3, 1941 WEDDING BELLS LAMSWOOD — HOLLETT: BELL ISLAND, Jan. 31s t— The Lamswood-Hollett nuptials which took place Thursday, January 16, at St. Cyprian’s Church, Bell Island, was one of the gayest weddings to be celebrated here for some time.

The contracting parties were Mr. Richard Lamswood, popular Business Man of the Front, and Miss Marion Hollett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Hollett of Arnold’s Cove, Placentia Bay. The ceremony was performed at 7.30 p.m. by Rector, Rev. N.S. Noel, in the presence of a large gathering of friends. The bride was charmingly attired in white chiffon velvet bridal veil, with wreath of orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations and fern. She was attended by the groom’s sister, Miss Winifred Lamswood, who wore an ankle length, pink taffeta gown with halo to match, and carried a bouquet of pink and blue iris. The groom’s mother wore wine corded silk crepe and matching accessories, with a corsage of white carnations.

The bride was given in marriage by Mr. A.W. Reed, in the absence of the bride’s father, Mr. A.E. Stress performed the duties of best man. The wedding march was beautifully rendered by Mrs. C.M.F. Foote.

On leaving the Church after the ceremony, a motor tour of the Island was made, with a procession of twenty cars, to the Masonic Hall, where the reception was held, at which approximately 200 guests partook of refreshments and danced to the music supplied by Mr. Richard Penny with his piano accordion, and Misses Bernadine and Bride Power at the piano. Songs and recitations were given by several of the guests, and an enjoyable time was spent by all, until the wee small hours of the morning.

The toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Rev. N.S. Noel, who was guest of honor, and responded to by the groom. The toast to the bride was proposed by Mr. A.W. Rees and responded to by Mr. A.E. Stares. The toast to the bride’s parents was proposed by Mr. F.T. Lamswood. The toast to the groom’s parents was proposed by Mr. Mike Kelly and responded by Mr. John S. Power. The toast to the boys overseas was proposed by Mr. Gus Connors and responded to by Mr. Arthur Grant.

Many and costly were the presents received, showing the esteem in which the young couple are held. We wish Mr. and Mrs. Lamswood loads of happiness, and bon voyage over the matrimonial sea. A GUEST.

February 3, 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. MINNIE A DWYER: After an illness of some months, death came quietly last night to Mrs. Minnie A Dwyer, at her residence Garrison Hill. The late Mrs. Dwyer, nee Parker, never fully recovered from the shock she received last fall, when the house she occupied caught fire, and she had to be removed from her sick-bed. She leaves to mourn one sister, Mrs. Dr. Whitmore, at New York. The funeral takes place at 2.45 p.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, from her late residence 21 Garrison Hill.
February 3, 1941 DEATH DWYER — Passed peacefully away at 11 p.m. yesterday, February 3rd., Minnie A. Dwyer, aged 77 years. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 21 Garrison Hill, on Wednesday at 2,45 p.m.
February 3, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Owing to the snow fall of last week, Farmers and Milkmen coming to the city, have has to make detours from the roads, and go through some of the fields, the fences of which were covered over.

Yesterday was Candlemas Day, and old timers were again quoting the old saying: “If Candlemas Day is fair and fine, the worst of the winter is left behind.” If that is true, there is cause for satisfaction, as yesterday was certainly fair and fine.

The case of the Waitress of the Newfoundland Hotel, charged with selling liquor to a minor, was heard before His Honor Judge Browne, on Saturday. The evidence was that she sold beer to an eighteen year-old Norwegian Sailor. The minimum fine of $10.00 was imposed.

In the Juvenile Court on Saturday, a fifteen year old youth appeared on a charge of larcenie from several stores. The boy has a bad record, and he was sentenced to three months imprisonment, with the option of a $50.00 fine. It was ordered that he receive three strokes of the birch when the sentence is completed.

The ninth weekly drawing in the Holy Cross Sweepstakes took place on Saturday night, and the names of the prize winners appear in the advertising columns today.

The regular monthly meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1452 Knight of Columbus, will be held tomorrow night. Following the meeting, an illustrated lecture will be given by the Chaplain, Rev. E.J. Rawlins, and his subject will be “The Eternal City.” A social hour with supper will end the night.

A thirty-three year old man was before Court on Saturday charged with indecent assault, he was remanded.

The express train leaving this afternoon, will make connection at Port aux Basques for the South Coast and Fortune Bay.

Codfish and herring have been plentiful at Port aux Basques and Channel in the last week and good catches are being made.

The train leaving at nine o’clock this morning will make connections at Argentia for the Bay route Placentia Bay.


February 5, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A man who was taken from his house on Sunday by the Police, was examined yesterday by a Doctor, and was ordered to the Mental Hospital.

A large list of articles are now in possession of the Police and await claim by their owners. Details of the articles appear in the advertising columns of the News yesterday.

The annual meeting of the City Club will be held on Thursday evening, when the election of officers for the year will be held. The annual sale of papers will be held at this meeting.

Several cases of drunkenness were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and fines of $1 and $2 were imposed. Two who were also charged with disorderly conduct were ordered to sign bonds for their future good behavior.

The road to Portugal Cove is now open to traffic, the Highroads plow having done the work. People who use the road state that in some sections, the snow had drifted to a height of about twenty feet.

Head Constable Russell informs us that at a dance held last week, a girl was caught red-handed by Constable S. Andrews, while stealing articles from ladies handbags. She was found to have $17 worth of goods in her possession, and the articles had been stolen from handbags and coats. — The Bell Islander.

The first in the series of five card tournaments was held last night at St. Joseph’s Hall. Three cash prizes were awarded and three special ones will be given at the close of the series.

The Twillingate Sun states that the Bay is now full of slob ice. The Southwest wind carried off the field of ice, but ice formed quickly two weeks ago, with the temperature below zero.

Two men were before Court yesterday, charged with stealing a motor car from Freshwater Road on January 16th. They were find $50 or one month imprisonment.

Seals were not numerous this season and there has been trouble setting nets since the slob ice in the Bight. Several herring were netted however, and one bedlamer was captured alive. — Twillingate Sun.

Mr. William Smith of Lobster Harbor had the misfortune to loose his store recently when fire destroyed it and all its contents, which included winter provisions, nets and other fishing property. — Twillingate Sun

In the window of Messrs Bowring Bros. Ltd., Water Street, there is now on exhibition, a model of H.M.S. Renown, which was built by Mr. S. Sheppard of Catalina, and which is to be disposed of to the benefit of the Newfoundland Patriotic Association. The model is of wood but very well executed.

The regular monthly meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1454 Knights of Columbus, will be held tonight at 8.30 at Columbus Club. After the business session, Rev. E. J. Rawlins, P.P., Chaplain of the Council, will give an illustrated address on “The Eternal City” and a social hour with supper will follow.

February 5, 1941 OBITUARY JAMES M ATKINSON: After an illness of but a few weeks, James M Atkinson entered into rest yesterday afternoon, at his residence, Military Road. Born at Carlisle, England, in 1884, son of James and the late Sarah Atkinson, the deceased having finished his education, accepted a position in a London Draper’s store. He came to St. John’s in 1905, to the firm of E.M. Jackman, and later in partnership with Mr. G.F. Kearney, opened K and A Store, at the corner of Beck’s Cove and Water Street. After the conclusion of the Great War, he went with the Imperial Oil Company, and has been with the company for the past 23 years and up to the time of his death.

During the majority of the years he was with Imperial Oil Company, he was attached to the Southside premises, and for many years past, as Manager. Latterly he was Auditor of Fuel Stations of the Company outside the Peninsula of Avalon.

He leaves to mourn; his wife nee Connolly, two sons, Michael and Wilfred, and one daughter, Dorothy, father and one brother, Thomas, at Newcastle-on-Tyne, a brother Sydney, in South Africa, and one sister, Dorothy (Mrs. Keane) at Shelburne, Nova Scotia. The funeral takes place at 2.45 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday from his residence, 134 Military Road.

February 5, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A visit to the dock where Capt. John Blackmore is building his new vessel, disclosed that the ship is practically ready for launching. The finishing touches are being done by Capt. Blackmore himself, and his sons. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

Last night, with the sleet and rain which followed the snow of the afternoon, the streets were in very bad condition again. Miniature ponds were everywhere, and pedestrians were put to much discomfort whilst vehicle traffic was made very difficult.

A Chinaman from Bishop’s Falls was before Magistrate Hollett at Grand Falls last week, for selling over-proof beer. When analyzed it showed 3.3 per cent alcohol by volume. A fine of $10 was imposed. In another case of a similar nature, the analysis showed 7.30 per cent, and a fine of $10 was also imposed.

Albert Woodfine of Torbay, was before Court yesterday, charged with breaking and entering the house of Peter Cantwell, and stealing there from an overcoat, a short coat, a vest and a shirt, all to the value of $26.00. The hearing was adjourned until this morning.

In the window of Messrs. George Langmead & Co., at present, are some trophies which have been imported for presentation to the City Bowling League. These are special trophies donated to the League. They are of the latest type, and have been the subject of admiration by all who saw them.

A man before Court yesterday charged with being drunk and disorderly, was fined $5.00.

The annual congregational meeting of Gower Street United Church will be held tonight at eight o’clock.

Arthur Priestman Cameron, “The man from Yorkshire” with Alan Pittman, will be on the air over radio station VOCM tonight at eight o’clock.

The death occurred at Grand Falls, last week, of Mrs. Katherine YOUDEN, aged 86 years. The remains were taken to Torbay for interment and were accompanied by Mr. John P. Molloy. — Grand Falls Advertiser.

The annual meeting of the City Club will be held tomorrow night. The sale of papers will take place on this occasion.

Ninety-one members of the crew of the ship Edmund Donald have left for their homes. It is not necessary to have a full crew while the ship is in port.

A Soldier serving in the Grand Falls area was before Magistrate Hollett last week, charged with stealing a radio from a home in Windsor. He was fined $50 or two months with hard labor.

Members of the Newfoundland Hiking Club are doing quite a lot of skiing now, and their headquarters at Bay Roc Lodge are frequented by large numbers on Sundays and holidays. Invitations have been extended to the visiting troops to join them on these occasions.

In the Magistrate Court yesterday, a Canadian Soldier was charged with being drunk and assaulting Constable Downs in the discharge of his duty. He pleaded not guilty. The evidence was that the Constable was called to a Beer Parlor to remove the accused, who refused to get out. The Constable said he had to handcuff the man, and he was assaulted whilst they were on the floor. He said the assault might have been accidental. The defendant claimed he was not given time to put on his coat, but that was denied by witnesses.

Capt. Puddicombe of the Quebec Bar was given permission to speak on behalf of the accused, and pointed out that there was no evidence of drunkenness, and that about assault was confusing. The first charge was dismissed, and the charge of assault was reduced to one of resisting arrest. On this, a conviction was recorded and the accused was fined $5.00.


February 7, 1941 ACKNOWLEDGMENT The Christian Brothers of Mount St. Francis wish to acknowledge the receipt of fifty-one dollars from Mr. R.J. Cuddihy of Montreal, and to express their gratitude for this and previous generous contributions to the annual collection.
February 7, 1941 BIRTHS SMITH — At the Grace Hospital Monday, Feb. 3rd, to Mr. And Mrs. Chester E. Smith of Bay Roberts, a son.
February 7, 1941 DEATHS DILLON — Died early this Friday morning at the General Hospital, Bride, beloved wife of P.J. Dillon (Tailor). Left to mourn are husband, 1 son, 1 daughter, father, mother, 1 sister, 4 brothers. Funeral Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 370 Water Street. R. I. P.

THISTLE — Passed peacefully away on Thursday, February 6th, Margaret Neal, relict of the late John Thistle, and daughter of the late George Neal Sr. and Mary Neal. Leaving to mourn; three sisters and several nephews and nieces. The funeral takes place on Saturday at 2.30 p.m. by motor hearse, from No.8 Bond Street.

FULLERTON — Passed peacefully away at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, on Thursday, February 6th, Mrs. R.D. Fullerton (Effie Henderson.)

February 7, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual meeting of the City Club was held last night, when officers were elected and the sale of papers took place.

On Monday next, the 10th February, a Jumble Prize Concert will be held at St. Mary’s Hall. By special permission of the Base Command, the U.S. Base Command Orchestra will attend, under the direction of Warrant Officer Ferguson. His Worship, Mayor Carnell will act as Chairman of the evening.

The final in the series of card tournaments will be held tonight at the Star Hall. Cash prizes will be given tonight as well as special ones for the series.

At George Street United Church, rehearsals are now being held for a performance of Handel’s Messiah, which is to be sung at the above Church on Good Friday evening, April 11th.

In the charge against four men, charged with assaulting a Norwegian Seaman, about a month ago. His Honor Judge Browne handed down judgment yesterday. All four were convicted and fined $50.00 each.

A charge of selling liquor, which was heard at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, was dismissed. Mr. Gordon Higgins appeared for the defendant. It is probable that a housekeeper who lived in the house, will now be summoned for the offence.

Fifty-six men and twenty two horses were working in the Sanitary Department last week, and a total of 514 loads of ashes and garbage were collected and dumped. On Wednesday afternoon, employees of the Department were engaged removing snow from various streets.


February 11, 1941 OBITUARY JOSEPH KING: Sydney, Feb 3rd. — The death occurred in Saint Rita’s Hospital Saturday evening, of Joseph King, 50, well known and esteemed resident of Whitney Pier. He was a native of Newfoundland, having lived here for the last 29 years, and was employed the Steel Plant.

Besides his widow, he is survived by the following children; John, Fred, Gerald, Edward, Evelyn, Loretta and Maria. Also, a brother Joe in Winnipeg; Jack, Jerry and James in Sydney; a sister, Florence King, in Sydney.

JAMES PIDGEON: The country lost one of its most outstanding Tradesmen yesterday, in the passing of Mr. James Pidgeon, which occurred at the General Hospital. Though he had been in failing health for a considerable time, he was able to be about his regular business when he was stricken, and was ordered to Hospital where his death occurred yesterday.

The late Mr. Pidgeon was born in Canada and was a Carpenter by trade. He came to this Country shortly after the Great Fire of 1892, and was actively identified in the rebuilding of the city, at that time. For years he engaged at his trade, and he assisted in erecting some of the finest buildings in the city, as well as in various parts of the Country. Subsequently, he entered into business on his own account as a Contractor and Builder, and in many sections today there are edifices, which will stand as memorial to his skill and efficiency.

He was one of the earliest members of the Knights of Columbus and took an active interest in Terra Nova Council, being for some time Deputy Grand Knight. Left to mourn his passing are his wife and five children, in St. John’s, and one sister in Prince Edward Island. To all, sympathy will be extended. His remains were removed from the General Hospital, to Columbus Club, last evening, and the funeral will take place from there tomorrow afternoon at 2.30 o’clock.

DANIEL CARROLL: The West End of the city was saddened Sunday last, when the news spread that Mr. Daniel Carroll had died early that morning, at his residence, Patrick Street.

It is needless to remind our citizens of the severe loss suffered by the community in the decease of this gifted fellow countryman. During the whole of his long life, he was a constant benefactor to public service, and came of an old and respected family, well known and widely related to many in St. John’s.

His name (the well known “D.C. “) is spread over the annals of our native literature, and his vivid brush helped to typify many a Newfoundland scene on stage, and in the halls of our instructional institutions. To all and sundry were his talents offered in the public good, and a wonderful disposition, sunny and sincere, endeared him to everyone. In fact, so diverse was his genius in poetry, painting, dramatics and architecture, that it will be hard to find anyone amongst us, who can really fill the niche left vacant by his sad departure.

To his only remaining relative; his sister, Mrs. J Williams, sincere sympathy is tendered from all, and not least from the Daily News, whose columns for half a century, bear eloquent tribute to the merits and literary gifts of an unselfish and patriotic Newfoundlander.

February 11, 1941 DEATHS CLOONEY — At St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on February 10th Catherine, beloved wife of James Clooney. Leaving husband, two sisters and a large circle of friends to mourn their sad loss. Funeral at 2.30 p.m., Wednesday, from her late residence, 36 William Street. R. I. P.

PIDGEON — Passed peacefully away at the General Hospital on February 10th, James Pidgeon, (Contractor); leaving to mourn wife, five children, one sister in Prince Edward Island. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2.30 p.m. from the Knights of Columbus Rooms. R. I. P.

February 11, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A resident of Waterford Bridge Road was before Court yesterday, charged with operating a motor vehicle without having a license. He was fined $10.00.

Six residents of Petty Harbor were before Court on Saturday, charged with cutting wood on private property. They were convicted and fined $2.00 each, and costs amounting to $6.00, will have to be paid between them.

A dance was held last night at the T.A. Hall, and it was attended by a large number. Music provided by Mickey Duggan’s orchestra.

The lady assistants of James Baird Ltd., will be hostesses at a dance to be given tonight at the Caribou Hut. Music will be supplied by LaFosse’s orchestra.

A youth was before Court yesterday, charged with stealing two legs of mutton from the store of Alex Foster. He pleaded not guilty, and the hearing was postponed until this morning.

A meeting of the Newfoundland Graduate Nurses Association will be held tonight at eight o’clock at the Child Welfare Centre. The speaker will be Dr. V.P. Burke, O.B.E., K.S.G.

A card party will be held at the T.A. Hall tonight. Three cash prizes will be given.

Fishermen at Port aux Basques and Channel did well with codfish last week, according to an item in the Western Star.

Though there is a lot of drift ice around the shores at Codroy, no seals have been captured to date.

A meeting of the Executive of the Newfoundland Patriotic Association will be held tonight at the Board of Trade rooms.

The first in the series of card tournaments was held last night at St. Joseph’s Hall, and was attended by a large number of players. Three cash prizes were given last night, and four cash prizes will be given for the best score in the series.

On Wednesday February 19th a super special card party will be held at the Holy Name Auditorium, Harvey Road. Four prizes will be awarded for the cards and there will be twenty-five prizes for lucky numbers. In addition, special door prizes will be given, including two half tons coal and cash prizes.

Two youths were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with stealing wood from Patrick Gladney’s property on the Broad Cove Road. They pleaded not guilty. The evidence for the prosecution was that they were seen trying to take away a large stick, from a pile that had been cut by the owner. They said they were looking for a fox that had escaped from a ranch. The hearing was postponed until Thursday.

The mother of two small children was before the Magistrate yesterday, charged with neglecting them, and she was ordered to sign bonds for her future good behavior, or serve three months in prison. The action was taken by the Probation Officer, who said the woman had been given assistance, including clothing for the children, by the Department of Public Health and Welfare, but she had given the clothes away. Miss Edgar stated she had visited the house on several occasions and found the mother away. The children were always filthy.


February 12, 1941 WEDDING BELLS HOBBS – WARREN: NEW PERLICIAN — The marriage of Miss Leah Warren, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Warren, to Seaman Hobbs, R.N., eldest son of Mr. And Mrs. Heber Hobbs, took place at St. Augustine’s Church, New Perlician, on January 31st, at 3 p.m.

The ceremony was performed by the Rector, the Rev. Hugh W. Facey, B.A., R.D. The bride was given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. Robert Warren, and Mr. Raymond Legge, R.N., cousin of the groom, was best man, whilst Misses Frances Northover, and Alma Warren, sister of the bride, were the bridesmaids.

Following the marriage, the bridal party drove to the lovely home of the bride, where high tea was served to the families and friends of both parties. A very enjoyable time was spent by all the guests, who included the Rector, the only regret being the absence of the brides father, who was at Buchans, where he works. It was not until a late hour the last of the guests departed, having spent a most enjoyable evening.

Seaman Hobbs has been in the Royal Navy many months and saw much active service, and even now he had only five days leave. New Perlican was delighted to welcome home one of her Royal sons, and as further proof of our regards for the boys of our Navy, and Seaman Hobbs particularly, at this time the W.P.A. members contributed a sum of money to give the young couple their best wishes for future happiness, and a safe return at the conclusion of the war. The numerous presents received by the young couple also testified to their popularity. Seamen Hobbs also has a younger brother serving in the royal Navy.

February 12, 1941 OBITUARY MRS. WILLIAM COLLINS: After an illness of some months, Mrs. William Collins (nee Saunders) entered into rest on Monday of this week, at her home at Corner Brook. The deceased was born in St. John’s, and with her husband some fifteen years ago, went to the Humber District, living at Corner Brook since the completion of the Paper Mill there. Some two years ago, her son Dermott was accidentally killed in a motor accident, and she never recovered entirely from that shock.

She leaves to mourn beside her husband, two sons, Alex and Herbert, and three daughters, Mrs. Penney, Mrs Silver and Agnes. The late Harry Saunders, Manager of the Anglo-American Telegraph Co., was a brother. The funeral takes place at Corner Brook.

February 12, 1941 BIRTHS SUMMERS — At Cartwright, on January 25th, to Corporal and Mrs. Charles L. Summers, a daughter.
February 12, 1941 MARRIED WARREN — HOBBS – At New Perlician on January 31st., Leah Warren, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Warren, to Seaman Hobbs R.N., eldest son of Mr. And Mrs. Herber Hobbs.
February 12, 1941 DEATHS LEWIS — On Tuesday, February 11th, at 7 p.m., Helen Elizabeth, aged 3 months, darling child of Thomas and Frances Lewis, Patrick Street.

NORMAN — Mrs. Emma J. Norman of Clarke’s Beach passed away at 12.30 Tuesday, February 11th at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Vardy, 86 Freshwater Road, St. John’s; leaving three sons and two daughters. Funeral on Friday, at Clarke’s Beach.

COLLINS — At Corner Brook on February 10th, Gertrude, beloved wife of William Collins; leaving a husband, three daughters, Mrs. Penney, Mrs Silver and Agnes; also two sons Alec and Herbert. Funeral at Corner Brook.

February 12, 1941 IN MEMORIAM CALEB SPARKES: (Lower Island Cove) In loving memory of our dear husband, Caleb Sparkes, who passed to the Great Beyond on February 12th, 1940.

As we loved so we miss you’ In our memories you are dear Loved remembered, longed for always. Bringing many a lonely tear.

You are gone but not forgotten, never shall your memory fade, Sweetest thoughts will always linger, Around the grave where you are laid.

Inserted by his wife, sons and grandchildren.


February 17, 1941 WEDDING BELLS JOSEY — STAPLES: The Old Garrison Church of St. Thomas’s was the scene of a pretty wedding at 4.30 o’clock Saturday afternoon, when Louise Staples, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. McM. Staples of Halifax, N.S., was united in marriage to Lt. Aubrey Josey, R.C.N,. V.R., son of Mr. and Mrs. V.S. Josey of Halifax. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Canon A H. Howitt, Rector of St. Thomas’s.

The bride, who wore a frock of sequa marine with black crepe hat, tulle trimmed, which set off by a corsage of multicolored sweet peas, was given in marriage by Mr. Percey Crosbie, who acted as father giver. She was attended by Miss Martha Wadden of Westville, N.S., who was gowned in grey with hat of rosewood and corsage of chrysanthemums. Lt. R.E. Millie, R.C.A. was best man. A reception was held at the Newfoundland Hotel.

February 17, 1941 NOTE OF THANKS The relatives of the late Mr. Thomas Ross of Harbor Grace, wish to thank all who sent expressions of sympathy in their recent loss.
February 17, 1941 DEATH O’CONNELL — Passed peacefully away February 16th, Kathleen (Kay), daughter of Nellie and John O’Connell. Leaving mother, father, four sisters and two brothers and a large circle of friends to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 66 Brazil Square. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.

February 19, 1941 OBITUARY Rev. John James COOKE - Yarborough, M.A., Canon of Winchester Cathedral, and father of Mrs. C.E.A. Jeffery of this city, died at his home on Sunday, after a brief illness. He was in his 86th year.

Beginning his career as a Missionary in Zanzibar, he subsequently served his Church in Stepney, London, and at Hemsworth, Yorkshire. Three years were spent as Organizing Secretary for the Universities Mission to Central Africa, and then for five years he was Curate of Chislehurt, following which he was appointed Vicar of Ramsey, where he carried out the work of renovating portions of the ancient Abbey. From there he went to Christchurch, Harts, in 1909, being made Canon of Winchester, and then became Rector of Putnam.

Until a year ago, he was actively engaged as Secretary to the Ecclesiastical Commission of the Winchester Diocese; his knowledge of architecture being of invaluable service to the Commission.

Canon Cooke-Yarborough made several visits to Newfoundland, first coming here in the interest of the S.P.G. in 1908. A keen sportsman, an artist and interested in Botany, he fully appreciated the Country’s many attractions, particularly enjoying the salmon and trout fishing. With the knowledge that he gained of Newfoundland, he was able to collaborate with the late Dr. Bruton in the preparation of a work on the natural history of the Country. In addition, from time to time he wrote articles on Newfoundland fishing for the Field and other journals.

Canon Cooke-Yarborough married in 1880, Emily Foster, daughter of the late Richard Foster of Chislehurst, by whom, and four other daughters besides Mrs. Jeffery, viz: Mrs H.P. Ingram, Mrs. Keith Van-Sickle, the Viscountess Traprain, and Mrs. P.S. Jackson-Taylor, he is survived.


February 20, 1941 OBITUARY J. J. WOODFORD: We regret to record the death recently at New York of J.J. Woodford, one of the best known Western Union Telegraph Operators.

The deceased was born at North Arm, Holyrood, Nfld., about 69 years ago, and after attending the local school there, he came to St. John’s and spent two years under the care of the late Bro. Kennedy at St. Patrick’s Hall. He then chose as a vocation Telegraphy, and worked with the “Anglo” for some years. Eventually he left for the United States, and joined the staff of the Western Union, where for nearly forty years he served that Company faithfully. He became an expert Telegrapher, and for years past was night Manager in the General Office of the W.U.

He was first married to Miss Lizzie Strapp of Hr. Main, (sister of our highly respected Brother Strapp, of St. Bon’s College), by whom he had a family of four sons, Fred and Alexander, born in New York, and Tom and Jack Jr., born in Nfld., the two latter being boarding ex-students of St. Bon’s College, all of whom are comfortably settled in Brooklyn N.Y.

Falling ill with a clot of blood on the brain, he was rushed to Hospital where an operation was performed, but too late to save his life. After two days suffering he passed away peacefully, having received all the rites of Holy Church of which he was a devoted member, on January 14th last..

His second wife was Miss Baldwin, of St. John’s, who together with the four sons, are left to mourn a devoted husband and a good father.

We join with his many friends in Newfoundland, particularly the Telegraph profession, in expressing sincere sympathy to his wife and family, and mourn the loss of an outstanding “Knight of the Key” whose number is dwindling in an art, which is fast becoming extinct. W.J.A.

February 20, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual meeting of the St. John’s branch of the G.W.V.A will be held tonight at the Holy Name Hall, Harvey Road. Reports will be presented and officers for the coming year nominated.

The weekly dance will be held at the Caribou Hut tonight for Soldiers and Sailors. An attractive program has been prepared.

The preliminary enquiry into the charge of murder against Samuel Taylor, charged with the death of Henry Mengle, started at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon at three o’clock. Some important matters are to be discussed at this meeting.

Some of the ponds were in excellent condition for skating yesterday afternoon and last night, and many enjoyed skating in the open.

The trail of Adrian Bran [Last letter of this name is doubtful – difficult to read. GW.] charged with attempting to break and enter the store of Roper and Thompson with intent to steal, will be heard at the Supreme Court today with a special Jury.

The streets of the city at present are in a very slippery conditions and walking is very dangerous. In some places citizens have spread ashes, and the Council employees did the same on some of the steep inclines.

The Reliving Officer at Bonavista is now allotting some coal to the widows and invalids, and to any who cannot, through infirmity or ill-health, secure wood. This is a splendid act of charity on the part of the Department of Public Health and Welfare, and many of our aged citizens will now be able to enjoy a cozy fire. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

People on LeMarchant and Harvey Road yesterday afternoon, saw a rather unusual sight. A one story house complete in every detail, was being towed along by one of the Canadian Tractors. The building was put on wood slides and moved along quite easily over the frozen surface.

An ice carnival was held at Corner Brook last week, in aid of the funds of the Womens Patriotic Association. It was sponsored by Bowaters Ltd. The ice was in good condition and though the temperature was in the neighborhood of zero, the attendance was large. The program was enjoyable and included a football match played on the ice. 


February 22, 1941 OBITUARY MARTIN BULGER: On Wednesday last, Martin Bulger entered peacefully into rest in his 85th year, at his home at King’s Bridge, after an illness of some months. Born, son of the late James and Hannah (Grace) Bulger of Flatrock, he came to St. John’s 71 years ago as a lad of 14, and with his parents, lived on the West side of the road opposite his present home. He served his apprenticeship with the Newfoundland Shoe Company, and afterwards was with Kehoe the Shoemaker. Starting business for himself as a Shoemaker, on the North side of Duckworth Street, opposite the Custom House, then the Atlantic Hotel, he continued there for some years and then opened a similar business at King’s Bridge, which he continued for many years.

About 20 years ago the deceased was appointed to the Customs House as Tidewaiter, and about six years ago was retired on pension. At the time of his death he was the oldest living member and Vice-Chairman of Mount Carmel Cemetery Committee, and was one of the most indefatigable members. In his younger and more active years he was a keen sportsman with both gun and rod.

He leaves to mourn three sons, Jack in Boston, Phillip and Michael at home, and three daughters Hannah (Mrs. J O’Brien) at New York, Annie (Mrs J. Squires) and Bride (Mrs. Wm. Clooney) of this city. The funeral takes place at 2.30 p.m. today, Friday, from his late residence, King’s Bridge.

February 22, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The bi-monthly meeting of the Carpenters’ Protective Union was held last night at the S.U.F. Rooms. Important business was transacted.

The preliminary enquiry into the charge of murder against Samuel Taylor will be continued at the Magistrate’s Court this afternoon.

The second in the series of card tournaments at the Star of the Sea Club rooms will be held tonight. Cash prizes will be given tonight as well as special one for the series.

The following arrived here from New York and Halifax; Mr. And Mrs. Cecil Martin, Anita Martin, Nina Martin, Claude Noonan, L. McCarthy, Mrs. M. Moore, Miss W. Reid, V. Boone, L. Puddester, J Saunders, J. Walsh, L.W. Parsons.

A special train will leave ay 9 o’clock tomorrow morning for Argentia, and will make connection for Placentia.

A dance will be held at the T.A. Club rooms tonight. Mickey Duggan and his orchestra will provide the music.

During last week, the Water Works Department of the City Council attended to nineteen calls, and fountains and hydrants all over the city were cleared of ice and snow and examined.

A woman resident of Rossiter’s Lane who was before Court yesterday, charged with being intoxicated on the public street, was fined $2.00.

The Kinsmen’s Club formal dance will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel tonight. The Rhythm Kings will provide the music.

The fifth annual meeting of the Jubilee Guilds of Newfoundland and Labrador will be held on Thursday, March 6th, at 5 p.m. at Government House.

In the window of the Royal Stores Ltd., Grocery Department, there are now on exhibition, two lemons which were grown by Mrs. A.C. Sapp on Bell Island. One of them weighs 1 1/4 lbs.

The Ungava Steamships Co., Ltd. have announced that sealers signing on the S.S. Neptune be required to produce certificates as to good health and free from all infectious disease. This is the same course as followed last year.

During the past week the Wassau plough was operating at the widening of city streets, and the F.W.D. plough, at the cutting of ruts, and snow plough No. 25 at street intersections and snow banks on Water and Duckworth Street.

During the past week, Council trucks were engaged in the removal of snow from Water Street, Duckworth Street, New Gower Street, Military Road, Barnes Place, LeMarchant Road, Harvey Road. Drains were opened in Gower Street, LeMarchant Road, Circular Road, Alexander St., Deanery Avenue, St. Clare’s Avenue, Topsail Road, South Side Road.


February 25, 1941 PLANE CRASHES NEAR MUSGRAVE HARBOR Sir Frederick Banting, Two Members Of Crew Killed; Trappers Rush To Aid Pilot.

Sir Frederick Banting became World Famous By Discovery Of Insulin

Was Winner Of Nobel Prize For Medical Research And Received Knighthood on June 4th, 1934

(By Canadian Press)

OTTAWA, Feb. 24. — Sir Frederick Grant Banting, M.C., K.B.E., F.R.C.S. Medical Research Worker, Surgeon and Painter, was known throughout the world for his discovery of the insulin treatment for diabetes, in collaboration with Dr. J.B. MacLeod and Dr. Charles H. Best, of the University of Toronto. Lives of thousands of persons were saved by the treatment they developed.

Dr. Banting, credited with being the leader in experiments that resulted in development of the insulin treatment, received honors from many lands, including the Nobel Prize for Medicine, awarded jointly with Dr. MacLeod in 1923, the year after the discovery. Knighthood was bestowed on Dr. Banting in the King’s Birthday Honors published June 4, 1934.

Few Scientists receive such speedy and enthusiastic recognition for their discoveries as Dr. Banting. His finding that use of pancreatic hormones helped diabetes suffers, was greeted at first with considerable doubt by Medical Authorities, but its speedy and undoubted benefits won it general acceptance.

Medical men in many Countries hailed the young Canadian discovery as the greatest since those of Pasteur. The Canadian Government granted him an annuity of $7,500 to enable him to pursue an uninterrupted program of research. Honors heaped on Dr. Banting following announcement of his discovery, failed to affect his sense of loyalty to his co-workers. He thought it an injustice that the Nobel Prize Committee failed to give equal recognition to Dr. Best, and declared at once, he would share with that Scientist his own half of the prize, which when it reached him through the exchanges, amounted to $5,600.

One of Dr. Banting’s first concerns was to insure means of establishing a Medical Research Foundation, through which he could carry on his work. The endowment for the Institution which later bore Dr. Banting’s name, was begun by donations of patients, who had benefited from insulin treatment. The need for research facilities was recognized by Sir William Mulock, Ontario Chief Justice, who headed a campaign for collection of money, and who insisted on naming the institution the Banting Research Foundation. The first $22,000 for establishment of the foundation was donated by diabetic patients.

Frederick Grant Banting was born at Alliston Ont., Nov. 4, 1891, a son of William Thompson Banting. He received his early education in his home town, attended Victoria College, Toronto, and was graduated in Medicine from the University of Toronto in 1917. He enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces and served in Canada, England and France, finally, in 1918, as Medical Officer of the 44th Battalion. He was severely wounded in one arm at Cambrai, where he was awarded the Military Cross, and was invalided to England with blood poisoning.

Discovery that removal of the pancreas resulted in diabetes in animals, was made as far back as 1889, two years before Dr. Banting’s birth. It remained for Banting and Best, working under the direction of MacLeod, to extract insulin from the pancreas, and to discover that lack of insulin caused diabetes. In their experiments, they found that dogs deprived of their pancreas, developed distressing symptoms of advanced diabetes, which could be corrected by subcutaneous injections of insulin. Then they found the same method of treatment beneficial to human diabeties patients. They discovered that insulin injections corrected the tendency of diabetic persons to excrete sugar in the urine, by correcting the deficiency of insulin in the internal organs.

Dr. Banting’s achievement won early recognition in his own Country. In 1922, soon after the discovery of insulin, he was awarded the Dr. R.A. Reeve Prize, for the work in the University of Toronto showing greatest aptitude in medical research. In May 1924, the American Philosophical Society gave him the John Scott Medal.

Dr. Banting did not go to Stockholm to receive the Nobel Prize until 1925, when he was asked to deliver the Nobel lecture. He was the first Canadian honored by such an invitation.

In 1927, Dr. Banting investigated the feasibility of establishing in the Canadian Arctic, Hospitals and other facilities for giving medical care to the Eskimos. He went North for three months aboard the Dominion Government steamship, Beothic. He found it would not be feasible to establish Hospitals for the Eskimos, because of their roving life. During his trip to the North, the Doctor had time to indulge his favorite hobby, painting. With A.Y. Jackson, member of the former Group of Seven, he came home with numerous pictures of Arctic scenes which attracted wide notice.

From 1919 to 1920, Dr. Banting was Resident Surgeon at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. For the next year he practiced medicine in London, Ont., and was part time Assistant in Physiology at the University of Western Ontario. A considerable time after he had left London, it was revealed by a British Surgeon, that Dr. Banting had made a casing for the deformed foot of a seven year old boy, which was described as a masterpiece. His skill in that department of surgery was not generally know until then.

In recognition of his service to medicine and humanity, he was made life member of the Canadian Clubs of Toronto, New York and London.

Banting was married in 1924 to Marion Robertson, daughter of Dr. William Robertson, of Elora Ont. They had one son and were divorced in 1932.

He was a member of the United Church of Canada.

February 25, 1941 CHIEF PILOT ONLY SURVIVOR OF ACCIDENT Two large Planes Equipped With Skis Enroute From Ottawa

Ottawa, Feb 24 – (C.P.) – National Defense Minister J.L. Ralston, told the House of Commons today, that Sir Frederick Banting, with two crew members of a plane, had been killed when their machine crashed in Newfoundland. The dead crew members are Navigator William Bird of Kidderminster, England, and Co-Pilot William Snailham, of Bedford, Nova Scotia. Captain Joseph Mackey of Kansas City Missouri, Chief Pilot of the plane, was the only survivor of the crash.

Hon. Mr. Ralston read to the House a message from Wing Commander Gordon of the Royal Canadian Airforce in Newfoundland, as follows:

“Pilot Mackay is still alive — the others are dead. Two trappers ran to aircraft. Aircraft dropped more emergency rations to party. Moth ski plane will proceed to scene of crash as soon as possible. Two ski planes from Ottawa air station are also proceeding to Newfoundland to bring out Pilot and deceased.”

Two large ski-equipped planes left Ottawa, heavily laden with medical and rescue equipment, when the first word of the crash was received. The plane was en route to England when it crashed.

An atmosphere of sadness spread over the House, as Defense Minister Ralston told of the tragedy. Prime Minister King rose to pay tribute to Sir Frederick. He recited the honors which had been given to Dr. Banting, including the Nobel Prize for his discovery of insulin, which is used in the treatment of diabetes, and which has brought new hope to many who suffer from the dreaded malady. The Premier said Sir Frederick has brought honor to his native land by his discoveries, “And great will be the grief that his own life, so full of promise for human welfare, should have come to such a untimely end.”

The Prime Minister said that Sir Frederick Banting was a “great benefactor of mankind”. He said that at the outbreak of war, he had offered his service to the Nation and had organized a “particularly important branch of medical research. With a devoted band of workers, he had dedicated himself to the solution of new medical problems associated with Aviation, and the speed, height, and low temperatures involved, in operations of modern aircraft.”

February 25, 1941 FOUR MARYSTOWN BOYS MISSING Information has been received by the Department of Public Health and Welfare, from the Registrar of Seamen, London, to the effect the following men, all of Marystown, P.B are reported missing at sea, subsequent to attack by enemy aircraft on the 23rd January namely; William J Brinton, next of kin, father, Charles Brinton. Patrick B Power, next of kin, mother, Mrs. Adela Power. Robert Nolan, next of kin, father Vincent Nolan. James W. Molloy, next of kin father, Edward Molloy. Steps were at once taken through Rev. Father Fleming, P.P. of Marystown, to have the next of kin notified accordingly.
February 25, 1941 COMMITTED FOR TRIAL FOR MURDER The preliminary enquiry into the charge of murder against Samuel Taylor, charged with the murder of Henry Mengle, a shipmate, concluded yesterday afternoon before His Honor James Brown at the Magistrate’s Court. The accused was committed for trial at the Supreme Court. It is probable he will come before the Grand Jury this week.

Mr. Carter, K.C. Crown Prosecutor, conducted the case for the Crown, and the accused was represented by Mr. James D. Higgins.

February 25, 1941 PRESENTATION TO MISS WHITESIDE A pleasing presentation took place at the Clinic on Friday, to Miss Whiteside, by her pupils, the Midwifes. She was presented with an address, which was read by Mrs. Mullins, after which a beautiful reading lamp was presented by Mrs. Blyde, and a bouquet of Lillies by Mrs. Hutchings. Miss Whiteside leaves shortly to take up new duties as Matron of the Mental hospital.
February 25, 1941 NEWS IN BRIEF Work on the American Bases is being well distributed, and it is understood that a fair proportion of the men employed, have come from various parts of Conception Bay, and even from as far North as Bonavista Bay. It is said that operations have been slowed down by a shortage of lumber, much of which has to be imported. Local production of lumber is expected this winter, to reach a record figure.

One year ago today, the Foreign Ministers of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, announced that their Countries would act as a unit, in putting pressure on all belligerents, to respect their neutral rights in conformity with International Law, unfortunately, as Denmark and Norway now know to their sorrow, Hitler has little respect for International Law.

It is understood that there is a substantial quantity of pitprops in the country, for which no sale is yet available. The outlook for the export logging industry is unfavorable during the present year.

Salmon is now classed as a luxury in England. The effect this will have on the local industry is yet to be known, but there is fear that a substantial curtailment of production may result.

A reminder that the seal fishery is just around the corner, is provided in the announcement the S.S. Neptune’s crew will be signing articles on March 3rd and that she may sail two days later. The fleet this year, is but a shadow of the past — but four ships, and even if all four return home with bumper trips — as all hope they will — the voyage will not be a big one at all.

The main road on Bell Island was opened last week by the snow plow. It was closed since the last fall of snow, and was made possible through the efforts of a committee of five citizens of the Island, who canvassed and secured the necessary funds to defray the cost of opening the road. That is one way in which the Municipal Council may get the necessary funds to keep our street clear.

February 25, 1941 PLACENTIA “JACK-BOATS” FIND NEW USE Skippers And Crews Living On Board In Over Crowded Port of Argentia

Some schooner skippers in Placentia Bay are finding a new use for their vessels these days; perhaps the strangest use to which these particular ships, or any other of the Bay’s Jack-Boats, have ever been put. They are being used as floating living quarters, in the now crowded port of Argentia. Under ordinary circumstances these vessels would be lying up at this season of the year, moored securely in their home ports, while their skippers and crews worked ashore in preparation for the next fishing voyage. In fact, these particular vessels were moored in their home ports, that is until a few weeks ago.

News of possible employment at Argentia was in circulation around the Bay, and with the news of work available came reports that living quarters were crowded at the settlement. The schooner men decided they would go to the port and try for a job, rather than take chances on having no place to stay, they made up their minds to take their living quarters with them. Accordingly, the Jack-Boats were made ready for the voyage, and one by one they put to sea, and bore up for Argentia. Arriving in the harbor with great hopes of success, they dropped anchor in the smooth water, and rowed ashore in dories. They were handy men, some of them having built their own boats, and they got jobs. The big difficulty was overcome when they said they could provide their own accommodation.

“Floating Barracks”

And so it is that the “Richard Peck” is not the only floating barracks at the port of Argentia. Looking very small and frail beside larger ships that house the Navy Personnel, the flotilla of Jack-Boats nevertheless are serving a similar purpose. And the men who eat and sleep in the little v-shaped forecastles, have abandoned for the time being, the time-honored calling for which their boats were intended.

Tossing like corks when the water is rough, the little vessels swing at their moorings in the harbor, South of the pier. Morning and evening, the men who live on board, make their way to and from the job in the dories. Some of the Jack-Boats are moored in the more sheltered but distant waters off Marquise. Additional ships are expected to join the “floating barracks” fleet, as the news continues to spread among the settlements of the Bay.

One schooner belonging to the place and moored nearby, is being used as a makeshift boarding house. Stripped of her sails and gear, for the winter lying up, this vessel can accommodate a number of men in her Forecastle and cabin, with a measure of comfort and satisfaction. Mostly, this ship serves as temporary quarters for men who have arrived in the settlement, seeking work and having to wait their chances.

Such is a sidelight on living conditions at the busy port of Argentia today. With the great influx of working men and others, homes are filled to the last bed — and couch. The schooners are serving a very useful purpose as floating barracks, and the skippers are displaying the same hospitality as is shown by the hard pressed townspeople on shore.


February 26, 1941 ENGINE FAILURE MAY HAVE CAUSED CRASH Dr. Banting May have Died From Exposure. The Two Occupants of Plane Believed Been Killed Instantly

Additional information as to the circumstances surrounding the air tragedy on Friday morning last, when three men, including Sir Frederick Banting, lost their lives South-Southwest of Musgrave Harbor, have been received by the Daily News, through the courtesy of Rev. W.B. Perry, Pastor of Wesley Church, and official messages received by Sir Wilfred Woods, Commissioner for Public Utilities.

Messages were received yesterday morning and last night, by Rev. Mr. Perry, from his brother in law Mr. Cecil Abbott, of Musgrave Hr. The first message gave the same information as was published in the Daily News yesterday morning, and last evening’s message’s stated that they were still awaiting a plane to take the bodies of the three victims, and also pick up Captain Mackey, the Pilot of the ill fated plane. The visibility was poor. Pilot Mackey was much better. It is now thought that sir Frederick Banting probably died from exhaustion, and that the two others were killed instantly.

The cause of the crash has not been determined, but from information received, it appears that when the plane was some miles off the Coast, one of the engines failed, and Captain Mackey turned his plane about and headed back to land. After flying some distance inland, the second engine cut out and wireless apparatus failed. Captain Mackey shouted to Sir Frederick Banting, and the other occupants of the plane, to bale out, and he thought at first that they did. It was not until the plane came down that he discovered the other occupants were still on board. The plane crashed on a frozen pond, and while landing, the left wheel was broken and the under-carriage ripped off. The plane was of American make, and was being ferried across the Atlantic to England.

Sir Wilfred Woods told a News Reporter last night, that he had not received any information as to the arrival of a rescue plane from Canada. As soon as conditions warrant, the three bodies will be flown to Newfoundland Airport. Chief Magistrate Hollett of Grand Falls, has been instructed to proceed to the Airport, and it is presumed a Magisterial Enquiry will be held into the circumstances.

February 26, 1941 NEWS IN BRIEF The Grand Falls Advertiser published a letter to Mrs. H.C. Hanson, from Lady Walwyn’s meeting with Harry Powell, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Powell of that town. The letter states that Harry was serving on H.M.S. Malaya, on which Lieut. Walwyn was serving for a short time, replacing an Officer who was ill. Mr. and Mrs. Powell had a letter from their son, who joined the Navy in 1938, and in this, mention was made of having met Lieut. Walwyn. H.M.S. Malaya was one of the ships which recently took part in the blasting of Genoa.

It is probable that Samuel Taylor, who was committed for trial at the Supreme Court for murder, will appear before the Grand Jury this weekend. If a true bill is found the trial will be set for sometime next week.

The Fishermen’s Advocate states that Mr. S.W. Mifflin had paid a bonus of 25 cents per quintal, on what Labrador fish his firm handled this year.

Hard paths and good hauling are great help to woodsmen at Catalina and vicinity these days, and many people are busy hauling their supply of fuel for the year.

A steamer is due tomorrow at this port, which will bring a full mail from Canada. In connection with this steamer, the three boys Walter Abbott, Walter Hussey and Malcolm Greeley, of Portugal Cove, who were reported missing last week, are stowaways on her.


February 27, 1941 EDDIE QUIGLEY – A TRIBUTE Five, possibly six years ago, there worked in the Newfoundland Hotel, a perfect little gentleman. He did not hold a fancy position; he did not even draw down a big salary; he was a Bell Boy and his name was Eddie Quigley, but he did his job well. Unassuming, always pleasant, always obliging — tip or no tip — it was a pleasure to any guest, when services were required, to be waited on by Eddie Quigley. If a few friends were being entertained, it was not unusual practice to ask Eddie, “How about a song?” and, even now, in memory, the writer can hear Eddie voicing a popular ditty of the day, with a chorus running:

“You may not be an angel, ‘Cause angels are so few, But until that day that one comes along. I’ll trail along with you!”

The song completed, Eddie would give a polite little bow and a pleasant smile, and depart, leaving a very pleasant impression on his impromptu audience.

The years move on, and next we hear Eddie is a Steward on one of the Furness Red Cross Boats, and again singing — this time at ship’s concerts in aid of the Permanent Marine Disaster Fund — almost, one might think in all reverence, a premonition of the plans the Almighty had mapped out for Eddie Quigley. The last time Eddie ever sang in public was here in St. John’s, only a few weeks ago, over a Recruiting Broadcast sponsored by the Enlistment Committee.

When war broke out, Eddie Quigley’s part was with the Mercantile Marine. He was at the evacuation of Dunkirk, and those that knew he would, firmly believe Eddie went through that trying time with a smile on his lips and a song of cheer for those who needed it.

There was sorrow in the hearts of many in St. John’s yesterday, when the news came that Eddie Quigley had been lost at sea. Sorrow among his friends, who had the privilege of knowing him, and sorrow amongst those whose only contact with Eddie, had been “over the air.” Eddie Quigley died at the age of 20. In his brief life he had given pleasure to many more than a great lot of us will do, who may live out the allotted “threescore years and ten.”

A fifteenth century poet has written as follows: —

“Death, be not proud, through some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; One short sleep past, we wake eternally, And death shall be no more.”

To Eddie Quigley’s sorrowing mother and other relatives, sincere sympathy is extended. — A FORMER NLFD. HOTEL GUEST.

February 27, 1941 IN MEMORIAM OATES — In loving memory of my dear father, George Oates, of Carbonear, who passed away on February 27th, 1934. — Inserted by his daughter.
February 27, 1941 DEATHS HOWLETT — This morning, Estelle (Stella) Gertrude, younger daughter of W.M. and Rose Howlett. Funeral; tomorrow, Friday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 6 Howley Avenue.

GRAND — Passed peacefully away at 10 o’clock on Tuesday night February 25th, Mrs. William Grand, aged 68 years. Leaving two daughters, and three sons, Funeral at 2.30 p.m. on Thursday, from Barrett’s Mortuary Rooms. Grand Falls paper please copy.

DRISCOLL — Passed peacefully away early this Thursday morning, February 27th, Margaret Ann, in her 67th year, wife of the late William Driscoll, leaving to mourn their sad loss, four sons, four daughters and three grandchildren. Funeral notice later.

HENNEBURY — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on February 26th, at 7 p.m. William T. Hennebury, in his 80th year. Left to mourn his sad loss are two sons, Thomas and Richard, and two daughters, Mrs. Keith Osborne of this city and Mrs. E.J. Greene of Brooklyn, New York, and a large circle of friends. Funeral at 2.30 from his son’s residence, 83 pleasant Street. May his soul rest in peace. (Brooklyn papers please copy.)

February 27, 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Notice has been given by the Carpenter’s Union that on and after Saturday, March 1st., the rates of pay for Construction Carpenters with be 45c. and 50c. per hour.

A meeting of the Newfoundland National Association will be held tonight at the Board of Trade Rooms when a report and recommendations for future action will be read.

The annual meeting of the St. John’s Branch of the G.W.V.A. will be held tonight at 8.15 at the Holy Name Hall. Through the courtesy the Canadian Legion War Service, moving pictures will be shown.

The weather was fine for the half holiday yesterday, and many people were outdoors. Quite a few were seeking trout on the various ponds, but having to cut holes in the ice a couple of feet thick in some places, was not much pleasure.

The first of the Lenten Devotional Periods, sponsored by the St. John’s Presbytery of the United Church, was given yesterday from 10 to 10.15 over Radio Station VONF. The speaker was Rev. Dr. L. Curtis. This morning Rev. J.E. Bell will give the address.

A special meeting of the Union of Municipal Workers will be held tonight at the S.U.F. Hall, when business of importance will be transacted. During the evening, addresses will be delivered by Messrs James Stowe, Past President of the Newfoundland Federation of Labor, D.J. McEachern of the Co-operative Societies, and J.J. Spratt, President of Bricklayers and Masons Union.


February 28, 1941 TRIBUTE TO LATE REV. BROTHER FLOOD Letter From Nfld. Man Now in United States Recalls Schooldays in St. Patrick’s Hall.

The following extract of a letter to Mr. Peter Maher of this city, from Mr. J. Fitzhenry, a St. John’s boy, now Editor of the Walpole Times, will be of much interest to many in this Country, and particularly, to those whose names are mentioned therein. The news of Brother Flood’s death has started a wealth of memories trooping up out of the past. I loved him dearly in the long ago. He was a very dear friend, and an outstanding idol of my boyhood days.

As a small boy, after a preparatory course at the Convent of the Sisters of Mercy, I entered Mr. Flood’s School, and now through misty eyes, I am looking back to the old classroom, the teachers, and the boys of more than a half century ago. At that time, the presence of the Brothers was not very imposing from a numerical standpoint, but with all due respect for the successors of that little band, many of whom have been dear and intimate friends of mine, I cling to the belief that the old teachers at Patrick’s Hall have never been surpassed; and by the old teachers, I mean Mr. Flood, Mr. Flemming, Mr. Kenney and Mr. Slattery, with Mr. Kavanagh as Assistant to Mr. Flood, and Mr. O’Hurley as Assistant to Mr. Flemming.

The boys of that time! Many an hour have I sat late into the night dreaming of them in waking dreams, and picturing their youthful forms and boyish faces in the smoke wreaths of my favorite pipe. Some of them I suppose, are still at home; others like myself, have made their homes elsewhere, and some have crossed the Great Divide. Most of them have passed out of my life, but not out of my thoughts. I carry the most tender feelings for them, because they were small boys with me in the long ago, in the hallowed class rooms of St. Patrick’s Hall, receiving their early instructions for the battle of life from that Saintly man, talented teacher Rev. M. B. Flood.

Gus and Tom Ellard, Mike Hoberg, John Rowe, Larry Hanniford, Johnny Sullivan, Mat Primm, Billy Kielly, John Gourley, Peter McDonald, Nix Vinnicombe, Jack Geary, Jim and Dike Boggan, Garry O’Leary, Phil and Andy Corish, Tom Keating, Will Furlong, Dan, Bob and Joe Kent, Ned Shea, Jack O’Neill, John Sinnott, Paddy Barnes, Tommy Cosgrove, John Cudihy, Mike Power, Dick Andreoli, Danny Maher, Pat Oakley, Ned (Tilley) Morris, Jack Moakler, Tommy Malone, Pat Joy, Tom and Pat McGrath, Ned and Jim Fogarty, Ned Flynn, John Ahearn, Ned and Frank Meehan, Charlie Gamberg, Jim and Jack Partridge, Mike Ready, Tom Allen, George and Bob Coleman, Sandy Forward, Billy Rose, Will Ryan, Walter Dwyer, John Fitzgerald, Mike Spurrell, Billy Dunphy, George Bradshaw, Charley White, Jack Fagan, Pat Deady, Jack Walsh, Jack Kavanagh, Tom and Jack O’Mara, Jack and Dick Howley, Paddy Grace, Billy Hand, Ned Molloy, Ned Norris, Mike (Dykie) Carroll, Jack Corcoran, Phil Kenny, Jimmy Fardy, Jack O’Brien, Tom and Pat Dwyer, Jack Green, Ned Sandys, Maurice Kavanagh, Ned Fitzgibbon, Tom Myler, Simon Hogan, Frank Little, Jimmy Farrell, Jack Ashley, Johnny Boland, Mike and Peter Raftus, Jose Molloy, Billy Galivan, Tom Bearnes, Mickey Cassidy Charlie Dutton — all of them and many others, were boys with me in “the dear, dead days,” which, thank God, are not “beyond recall.” In Mr. Flood’s School, in the early life of that great teacher of youth, all of us in that distant day, came under as great an influence for good as it has ever been our lot to know, no matter what our experiences may have been through life.

The life of Mr. Flood has been interesting to him and valuable to mankind, and those of us who were so fortunate as to know him in the early days of his young manhood, can form some degree of appreciation of his accomplishments in the field of instruction and teaching, during his mature years.

The news of his passing has taken me back to the days of boyhood, back to the days when he used to pass out the little printed cards with the figures and words, “4 lame” , “13 quick,” which were used as samples to be copied in our “exercise book,” the pages of which we were required to “rule” into three columns with red ink, using purple ink for the writing; back to the days when Mike Slattery was the Monitor without a peer, and when Mrs. Kelly Morrissey on Garrison Hill, gave only ten bullseyes for a ha’-penney, while Mrs. Bullseye Bryan and the other “confectioners”, gave anywhere from twelve to fifteen. Back to the heyday of Dick Collins, Jack Stapleton, Andy O’Neill, Jack Raines, and the others ancient marathoner’s, who established the fact that they were gluttons for punishment, by staging a fifty mile race on the fifteen-lap track at the Parade Rink. Back to the Star of the Sea Lyceum, in their presentation of the “The Bells or a Polish Jew,” for which my uncle Jim built a horse in the Cooper Shop, with flour barrel hoops for ribs and a cow hide for a skin, and then walked the “horse” from Moore Street to the Hall, as a sort of advertisement for the show. “Wenlock of Wenlock” with its fateful rhyme:

“When the western Turret totters and falls, And the dark mantle floats through the midnight halls. With the curse of a Priest and the screams of a lass Shall Wenlock of Wenlock to darkness pass.”

“Captain Kid”, “Hofer or the Tell of the Tyrol,” and the other dramatic efforts of the by-gone day, parade once more across the stage of memory, as I dream of the days when Mr. Flood, a young man with none too rugged a physique, was teaching the “baby” class of St. Patrick’s Hall.

Memories, memories, I often wonder if the people of other lands delight in living in the past as much as do the people of Newfoundland. I would continue indefinitely, but you might grow weary of my ramblings.

Peace be to the ashes of that grand old man, whose name is a golden link in the chain which binds me and hundred of others like me, to the friends and the scenes of my childhood, binds me with a bond, which strengthened, rather than weaken by each passing year, to dear old Newfoundland and her people, the most beautiful Country, and the most nearly perfect people in the whole wide world.


March 1 1941 WEDDING BELLS ANDERSON — DEAKIN: On Monday February 24th, at 8 p.m., at the Church of St. John the Baptist, the wedding took place of Hilda, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Deakin of St. John’s, to Pte. Clayton F. Anderson, son of Mrs. Ester Ferre of Colordo Springs, Colorado, U.S.A. Clayton is a member of H.M. Canadian Forces in Newfoundland. The bride, wearing a dress and hat of powder blue with a corsage of sweet peas and roses, presented indeed a very charming picture. She was attended by Miss Josephine Picco. The duties of best man were very capably performed by Corpl. Clyde Haffey. The ceremony was performed by the Hon. Capt. D. O’Sullivan, C.S.S.R.

Mrs. and Mrs. Anderson then motored to their future residence at No. 9 Garrison Hill, where a reception was held, and was attended by a very large number of friends of the happy young couple.

March 1 1941 OBITUARY SUSIE LOUISE ASH: Sydney Feb. 23rd — The death of Susie Ash, wife of Albert S. Ash, 104 Webster Street, occurred Sunday afternoon, she was 29 years of age.

Besides her husband, she is survived by a daughter Jacqueline, and an infant son Albert. She is also survived by her parents, Mr. And Mrs. Jack Bryant, two sisters, Mary Frances Bryant of South Bar, and Mrs. Fred Campbell (Hazel) of Sydney River. Other relatives of the deceased include, Mrs. Archibald Budden, Mr. and Mrs. William, all of Heart’s Delight, Newfoundland.

She was a member of St. Alban’s Anglican Church and prominent in A.Y.P.A. circles. The funeral will be held on Wednesday afternoon; service at the house at two o’clock; service at the Church at 2.30. Interment at Hardwood Hill Cemetery.

March 1 1941 WAR 25 YEARS AGO TODAY Feb. 29, 1916 — French held German attackers, as first stage of Battle of Verdun ended. German Raider Grief, and British Armed Cruiser Alcantara, sunk in fight in North Sea.

March 1 and 2, 1916 — British Minesweeper Primula, sunk in Eastern Mediterranean. Blockade of German Camerooms raided “International Trench” near Ypres, recaptured by British, Russians.

March 1 1941 BIRTHS POLLARD — At St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on Friday, February 28th, to Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Pollard (nee Eileen O’Mara), a daughter.
March 1 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Twenty-six horses were housed at the Sanitary Department last week, and they consumed 3460 lbs hay, 26 sacks oats, and3 sacks Bran Feed, and 350 lbs straw used as well; cost a total of $123.94.

Wassau plough and the La Plante plow, owed by the City Council, are now engaged at the widening of streets and the cleaning up of intersections. The F.W.D. plough is cutting down ruts in various streets.

The regular train at nine o’clock on Monday morning, will make connection at Argentia for the Bay route of Placentia Bay.

A meeting of the Tasker Celebrations Committee will be held at the Masonic Temple on Tuesday next, March 4th.

The train for Argentia and Placentia leaves at noon today, instead of 9 a.m. as usual.

Yesterday morning, 200 bags of foreign mail arrived in the city from North Sydney via the South West Coast.

Adjourned quarterly meeting of the Benevolent Irish Society, will be held at St. Patrick’s Hall tomorrow morning after last Mass.

An advertisement in today’s paper announces that beginning today March 1st, there is an increase in rates for Public Liability and Property Damage Insurance on motor vehicles.

The weekly special drawing for three cash prizes in the Holy Cross Golden Jubilee Sweep, will be held tonight at the Holy Cross Auditorium. Prizes are $25., $15., and $10.

Fifty-six men were employed in the Sanitary Department last week and twenty-two horses were working. A total of 539 loads of ashes and garbage were collected and taken to dumps.

The speaker, over the daily broadcast devotional period sponsored by the St. John’s Presbytery of the United Church today, will be Rev. C. R. Blount. The time is 10.15 a.m.

A twenty-three year old girl was before Court yesterday, charged with disorderly conduct on the public street, and she was fined $10.00. She was arrested on the previous night, after she had been into a row with another girl.

In the Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon, a Civil Case was heard before His Honor Judge Browne. The principals were two brothers, and the subject matter dealt with property on Bell Island, board provisions etc. All the evidence was taken, and adjournment was taken until Tuesday next. Mr. Edward Wood appeared for the defendant.

In the Central District Court yesterday, a suit for damages against Dr. F.W. Burden was dismissed. The evidence was that the Doctor, finding the exit from his garage on Henry Street blocked off by another car, broke the glass in the second car, released the brake, and moved the car away. Mr. S.H. Hawkins, Council for the defendant, held that the car was an obstruction, and that his client has a right to abate the nuisance.


March 3 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. LAURA GRILLS: The home of Michael Grills, Stewart on S.S. Bacalieu, was plunged into grief on Saturday Morning 1st March, when the Angel of Death summoned to her eternal reward, his beloved and devoted wife, Laura Griffiths.

Up to two years ago she was able to be about her regular household duties, but since that time, her health began to fail, necessitating confinement to her room for the greater part of that period until her death. Even tho’ her illness was long and tedious, she was always cheerful, and ever ready to greet her many visiting friends with a smiling disposition.

A sudden change in her condition a few days previously, gradually deteriorated, until the final summons on the morning of March 1st, despite the loving and tender care of her devoted sisters, and the constant attention of her sorrowing family and relatives, and the best medical skill procurable.

Meeting death with exemplary courage and resignation, fortified with the Rites of Holy Mother Church, and surrounded by her devoted friends and family, the end came peacefully.

In Belvedere Cemetery she will be buried this afternoon at 2.30 p.m. To her sorrowing husband and daughter Kathleen, of the R.E.W.A. Stores, as well as to sisters and brothers, deepest sympathy is extended in this sad hour of bereavement. A FRIEND.

Mrs. SARAH M. MURPHY: The death of Mrs. Sarah Mary Murphy, beloved wife of Mr. Patrick Murphy, Warbury Street, on February 21st, removed from St. Patrick’s Parish, a member of that community who was held in high esteem by all with whom she came in contact, during the long period of her residence there. The deceased could be considered the exemplification of a true Christian lady in her devotion to her family, her ready eagerness to help others, and her faithful observance of practices of piety and prayer, that brings one nearer in soul to the realization, that the highest human happiness is in service — service to God, and service to our fellow beings. Because of this, late Mrs. Murphy was blessed with a happy disposition, was always cheerful and smiling, and to use an expression oft times heard years ago, “Was always to the fore with the good word.”

Mrs Murphy’s death at the age of sixty-seven, was not old for a member of the family from which she descended. The generation preceding her ranged from seventy-nine to eighty-nine, and the one before that counted ages in the eighties and nineties, while a step further back, holds one record of eight years over a century.

Mrs. Murphy was a daughter of the late Capt. William Burke and the late Margaret Kelly Burk of Brigus. She leaves to mourn; her husband, one son, Patrick F., of Newfoundland Railway Mechanical Service; four daughters, Margaret, Teacher of St. Patrick’s Convent Kindergarten School; Annie M.R.N., B.S. Director of School of Nursing Education, Seton Hall College, South Orange, New Jersey, Mrs. Raymond Kelly, Ossining, N.Y.; Mrs. Walter Quast, New York City, and four grand children, also three brothers, William Burke, Patrick Burke and Brendan Burke, all residing at Brigus. Amongst other relatives who mourn her passing are, Rev. Leo St. John, of Uvalde, Texas; Rev. Leo Burke, of Shuler, Alberta; Rev. Patrick Burke, Carbonear, and John Burke Ecclesiastical Student, Scarboro Bluffs. Ontario, each being a nephew of the deceased.

Interment was at Brigus on February 24th, and was preceded by a Requiem High Mass at which Rev. Father Patrick Burke was the celebrant. A large congregation was present at the Church, a great number of whom joined in the funeral procession to the cemetery, where her body was laid to rest in the family plot there, to await the final call to all mankind.

March 3 1941 IN MEMORIAM Mrs. EMILY JANE BUTT: There passed peacefully at Spaniard’s Bay, in the early morning of February 19th, Mrs. Emily Jane Butt, wife of the late Charles Butt, in her 78th year. The deceased had been in ill-health for the past two years, and her death came not unexpected. Left to mourn her sad passing are one son Norman at Worcester, Mass., Winnie, Mrs. James Butt, at Toronto, Canada, and Mary at home, also one brother Ebenezer Hutchings at Spaniard’s Bay, and one sister Mary Ann, at Sommerville, Mass., and a number of grand children residing in Canada and U.S.A.

MATTHEW COSTELLO: With deep regret, we record the sudden death of Matthew Costello, a well known and highly respected citizen of Spaniard’s Bay, which occurred on January 27th., at the age of eighty-for (84). In his private life the late Matthew Costello was a devoted husband, a kind father, a good neighbor, and a staunch supporter to his Church, which he attended as long as health permitted. As a fitting tribute to his noble life, Solemn Requiem Mass was celebrated at St. Ann’s Church by the Rev. Fr. Terry, relative of the deceased. After Mass, Father Terry expressed his heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved relatives and friends of the deceased.

Mr. Costello had worked with the Newfoundland Railroad for 40 years, and was faithful and hard-working in his occupation. He is survived by his widow, four daughters; Alice, Mrs. Michael Hammond, Lance Cove, Bell Island; Annie, Mrs. Joseph Delaney, Boston, U.S.A., Elizabeth, Mrs. Stephen Hammond, Bell Island; Joan, Mrs. P Cullen, Long Island, New York; two sons; John, employed with the Newfoundland Railway at St. John’s; Matthew, somewhere in South America, to all deepest sympathy is extended. May his soul rest in peace. B.H.

March 3 1941 AUDITORIUM IS OVERCROWDED TO HEAR REV. FR. SAVIN. Lecture Given last Night is Attended by Overflow Audience—Musical Numbers Rendered.

St. Patrick’s Auditorium was crowed to capacity, and many were unable to gain admittance last night, when Rev. Father J.D. Savin delivered a lecture, the subject of which was, Outstanding Events in the Church History of the Past Year.

Mr. J Fitzgibbon, President of the Holy Cross Literary Association, in his capacity as such, presided on the platform. Beside the Reverend, lecturers were Messrs H.J. Brownrigg, M. Galgay, J.P. O’Keefe and C.O’Reilly. The address, which was a splendid one, reviewed the work of the Church in all sections of the world in the past twelve months, and most important events were described and explained. To the large audience it was a revelation to know that so many really outstanding things have occurred in the short space of time under review. Father Savin’s ability as a platform speaker is generally known, and last night he was at his best. The subject, interesting and all though is was, was made even more so by the manner in which it was presented.

At the close, a vote of thanks was proposed by Mr. J Norris and seconded by J.T. Power, and the acclaim with which their remarks were received, was evidence of the pleasure which it was given.

A program of music was also rendered and in every respect it was in keeping. Every item was of high standard and specially the tableau “Jerusalem” which was staged in a manner that did credit to all concerned.

March 3 1941 BIRTHS MURDOCH — At St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on Wednesday February 26th, to Mr. and Mrs. James M. Murdoch (nee Olive Young), a daughter.
March 3 1941 DEATH GRILLS — Passed peacefully away Saturday morning after a long and tedious illness, Laura (nee Griffiths), wife of Michael Grills, Stewart on S.S. Baccalieu, leaving to mourn one daughter, Kathleen at home; two sisters, Mrs. T.J. Rolls and Mrs. A Furlong; also two brothers, William and George. Funeral today Monday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 35 Atlantic Avenue.
March 3 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The remains of a man were recovered by a trawl on the fishing grounds off Port aux Basques, last week. They are thought to be those of Thomas Skinner, who was lost last Fall from down the Coast.

The annual general meeting of Newfoundland St. Andrew’s Society, will be held in the Presbyterian Hall this evening at eight o’clock. Reports will be presented and Officers for the coming year elected.

The fifth annual meeting of the Jubilee Guild of Newfoundland and Labrador will be held on Thursday next at Government House. An exhibition of work will be held at 4.30 and the meeting will start promptly at five o’clock.

About fifty sealers arrived by the shore train on Saturday from points in Conception Bay, and 110 arrived by a freight train from Bonavista Bay. A number also arrived by the express on Saturday night.


March 4 1941 OBITUARY CHARLES F.B. EDDY: After a brief illness of but three weeks, Charles F.B. Eddy entered into rest at 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon. He had not been in his usual good health since November last, but it was not until three weeks ago he became seriously ill. Born at Hants Harbor in 1880, son of the late Richard and Elizabeth Eddy, the deceased came to St. John’s in 1901 and was for a time with Robinson Exporters Co., Importers and Exporters, and then with Bishop & Monroe; later Bishop and Sons, in the Grocery Department, where he served for nearly 20 years. About 20 years ago, he founded the Red Taxi Co., practically the first taxi service in St. John’s, and afterwards founded the Central Taxi Service, which he managed up to the time of his death.

Beside his widow, he leaves to mourn one daughter; Mrs. Don Pushie, seven sons; Gordon, Charles Jr., Ronald, Maxwell, Richard, Bert and Clarence, all of this city, one brother William, in New York, and two sisters, Mrs. H. Leonard and Mrs Fred Willar, of St. John’s. The funeral takes place tomorrow Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 12 Prince of Wales Street.

March 4 1941 DEATHS CHANCEY — Passed peacefully away 1.30 a.m. Tuesday, March 4th, Elizabeth, widow of the late John Chancey, leaving to mourn three daughters and two sisters. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 111 Campbell Ave. at 2.30 p.m. Thursday.

KELLOWAY — Accidently killed March 2nd, 1941 L.A.C. Chesley A Kelloway, son of Mrs. and the late Aubery Kelloway, formerly of Badgers Quay, Bonavista Bay; left to mourn their sad loss; mother, two brothers, Ralph in the R.A. in England, Gerald in St. John’s and a large circle of friends in the city and elsewhere.

EDDY — Passed peacefully away at 5 p.m. yesterday after a brief illness, Charles Fox Bennett Eddy, aged 61 years, son of the late Richard and Elizabeth Eddy. Left to mourn are a loving wife, one daughter, Mrs. Don Pushie, 7 sons, Gordon of the Imperial Tobacco Co., Ltd., Charles Jr. of the Central Taxi Service, Ronald of the Terra Motors Ltd, Maxwell of the City Service Station, Richard of Dicks & Co., Ltd., Bert of the Central Taxi Service; Clarence of the Golden Arrow Coaches, also one brother William, in New York. Two sisters, Mrs. H Leonard and Mrs. Fred Willar, of this city. Funeral tomorrow Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 12 Prince of Wales Street. (American and Canadian papers please copy.)

March 4 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A resident of Carbonear was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with being intoxicated whilst in charge of a car on Saturday Night. He pleaded not guilty. Some evidence was taken and the matter was adjourned till tomorrow.

A housewife from Rossister’s Lane was before Court yesterday, charged with keeping a house used for lewd purposes, and also with assaulting Constable Cox. She was fined $50 or six months for the first offence, and $29 or 21 days for the second.

The first annual meeting of the Bell Island W.P.A. will be held tomorrow night at the C.L.B. Armory. The reports will be read and officers for the coming year will be elected.

The Captain of a local ship was summoned yesterday for assaulting the Third Engineer of the ship. The plaintiff said he has been on the ship for some time, but had been replaced by another. On Saturday, he went onboard to seek his job, and protest against the man taken on in his place, when he was assaulted by the Captain. Evidence for the defense was that the plaintiff was abusive on board the ship, and refused to leave when ordered to do so by the Captain. The case against the Captain was dismissed, and the plaintiff was placed under bonds in the sum of $50 to keep away from the ship in future.

The Manager of a Mine, who is a guest in the Newfoundland Hotel, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with parking his car on Water Street in such a manner as to obstruct traffic. The evidence was that the car was parked so near the Streetcar rails near Holloway Street, that the Streetcar service for forty minutes, had to transfer passengers from car to car. The defendant stated the rails were covered with slush, and he though his car was parked in a manner to give the tram sufficient room to pass. He was fined $5.00.


March 11 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. JULIA DAY: Glace Bay. March 5th — The death occurred this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. James Hayes, of Mrs. Julia Day, well known and widely respected resident of Glace Bay for nearly half a century.

A native of Newfoundland, where she was born 86 years ago, Mrs. Day came to Glace Bay while a young woman, and had resided here ever since. She was a pioneer worker in the ranks of the Salvation Army, and had been identified with the organization since it was introduced to the town 45 years ago. Her husband, the late Charles “Happy Day”, had also been prominently identified with the work of the Salvation Army in Glace Bay.

Mrs. Day is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Thomas Scott, and Mrs. James Hayes, in Glace Bay, and Miss Naomi, of the Staff of the City Hospital in Sydney, and three sons, Alfred and John in Glace Bay, and Charles in Windsor, Ont.

MICHAEL J POWER: The announcement yesterday that Mr. Michael J. Power had passed within the vale, was heard with much regret, not only in St. John’s, but throughout the Island, because no man was better known to the trade, especially the fish trade, than was he.

For some time the health of the deceased was not of the best, and during the past twelve months or so it was of a serious nature, and he was forced to remain at home for most of that time, although whenever he felt equal to it, he was about, as he had been for some many years before.

In his 72nd year, the late Mr. Power had lived a very full life, and his passing creates a loss in the business life of the Country, that is difficult to all, whilst in other connections, his demise will be sadly mourned too.

The late Mr. Power was son of the late David and Mary Power. He was born in St. John’s on January 10th, 1869, and was educated at St. Patrick’s Hall. At the age of thirteen, he went to work with the firm of P & L Tessier, handling fish, herring, salmon and pickled fish, as well as seal oil from Tessier’s Southside Premises. At the age of fifteen, he was sent in charge of fish collecting, by schooners in the outports.

Upon the late J.C. Tessier entering into partnership with Sir Robert Thorburn, Mr. Power became Assistant to the late G. Mews, who replaced Mr. Tessier, and later with M. E. Watson, who succeeded Mr. Mews. Mr. Power replaced Mr. Mews when the latter became associated with the firm of Bowring Bros. Forty-eight years ago, at the age of 23, Mr. Power entered the employ of Mr. James Baird Ltd., and he remained with the firm up to the time of his death. He was regarded as probably the best authority in Newfoundland on matters appertaining to the fishery, and especially as to marketing.

He was not interest much in social affairs, through privately, his charity and good works knew no bounds. He sought no prominence — in fact he shunned publicity of any kind, and preferred to work quietly, “Not letting his left hand know what the right hand was doing”, but there are many instances of his sterling qualities which will make his name remembered long after his mortal remains will have been laid away. He was a life long member of the Benevolent Irish Society, and he loved to visit the rooms and enjoy the Company of his many friends and associates there. He was also one of the first members of Terra Nova Council Knights of Columbus.

Left to mourn his passing are five sons and two daughters; Capt. Gerald residing at Bahia; Dr. Augustus, located at St. Louis, U.S.A., Rev. Father John attached to St. Joseph’s Parish, Hoylestown; David C., Newfoundland Agent for Mendez & Co., and Robert at home, Mrs. E. Leo Carter and Miss Margaret Power of the Newfoundland Fisheries Board are the daughters. To all, the sympathy of hosts of friends will be extended. The funeral will take place at 2.30 tomorrow afternoon from his late residence, 8 LeMarchant Road.

March 11 1941 DEATHS POWER — Passed peacefully away March 10th, Michael J. Power. Leaving to mourn five sons and two daughters and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 8 LeMarchant Road. R. I. P.

KENNEALLY — Passed peacefully away March 10th, Bridget aged 81 years, wife of the late Joseph Kenneally. Funeral today, Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from her neices residence, Mrs. A.M. McDonald, 30 Fleming Street. R.I.P.


March 14 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. PATRICK WALSH: Yesterday, a wire to Mr. W.J. Walsh of this city, contained the sad tidings of the passing of his mother, Mrs. Patrick Walsh, which occurred at Glace Bay yesterday forenoon, at the age of 86 years.

The deceased, who before her marriage was Miss Sarah Barron, was born at Dunville, Placentia, in 1855, and was married at Little Placentia in 1877. In the year 1880, she went with her husband and two sons to the Little Bay Mine, and when that closed down over forty years ago, the family moved to Cape Breton. Mrs. Walsh’s husband predeceased her in 1910.

Though a long time out of this country, Mrs. Walsh never lost touch with her friends nor lost her interest in the land of her birth, and it was her great pleasure, at all times, to greet people from Newfoundland and especially those from Placentia and vicinity, as well as others from Little Bay and thereabouts, where she had lived for a few years. Active and robust despite her advancing years, she was one of that type of Newfoundland women who are so often spoken of in tones of admiration, and who are now rapidly diminishing. Her life, where ever she went, was wrapped up in her husband and family, and she could take pride in her children at all times.

Left to mourn the passing of the late Mrs. Walsh at Glace Bay, are three sons — Edward and Michael at Glace Bay and William J., of this city, formerly Minister of Agriculture and Mines; also two daughters, Mrs. James Ford and Mrs. Russell McNeil also at Glace Bay.

The deceased lady leaves in this Country, especially at Dunville, Argentia and Placentia, a large circle of relatives and friends who will mourn her passing, and who extends to her sons and daughters, very deep sympathy.

The funeral will take place on Saturday from St. Ann’s Church Glace Bay.

March 14 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The express train which goes out this evening will be in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at five o’clock and all sleeping car passengers twenty minutes later. Dining cars will be attached at each section.

The annual general meeting of the Sergeant’s Mess of Newfoundland will be held in the G.W.V.A. rooms this Friday night at 8.30 ‘clock. Reports will be presented and officers for the coming year elected.

The City Engineer reported at yesterday meeting of the Council, that during the thaw of this week, no damage was reported, and all the gullies that had been opened worked satisfactorily.

The annual meeting of the Newfoundland Historical Society will be held in the Chambers of the Council of Higher Education tonight at 8.30. The business will include the presentation of reports and election of officers.

The express train which arrived last night brought 494 sacks foreign mail. This was not assorted last night, at the General Post Office, but the work will be done this morning.

A weekly ice dance at the Arena was held last night and was fairly well attended. Music was provided by Walter Chambers and Mickey Duggan Orchestras.

The express train leaving this afternoon at five o’clock will make connection at Port aux Basques for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route.

The Kinsmens weekly dance was held at the Newfoundland Hotel last night and enjoyed. Music was provided by the Rhythm Kings Orchestra.

When the express arrived last night, the Tender resembled a large iceberg, as it steamed into the Station covered all over with ice and snow.

The Proprietor of a Chinese Café was before Court yesterday for operating without having permit from the Department of Public Health and Welfare. The case was adjourned till Wednesday next.

Two housewives who were recently convicted and fined for keeping disorderly houses, were before Court yesterday, to show cause why their children should not be taken away from them. The hearing of the case was postponed.

A seventeen year old girl resident of Moor’s St., was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday and was convicted for keeping a disorderly house. She was cautioned and put under bonds in the sum of $100.00. Her parents are now serving prison terms for the same offence.

During the past week, trucks and men were engaged in removal of snow and ice from Military Road, Queen’s Road, Gower St., Church Hill, Rawlin’s Cross, Duckworth St., Beck’s Cove, George St., New Gower St., Job St., Water St.

Last week, the Water Works Dept. of the Council had to install a new center piece and frost case, in an anti-freezing hydrant at the corner of Water St. and Hill of Chips. The Police are making an investigation as to who caused the damage.

The long delayed express arrived last night in two sections. This was the train, which on regular schedule, should have arrived on Monday night. It came in two sections, the first with sleeping car passengers and mails, arrived at 10.10, and the second section with first and second class passengers, about 1 ½ hours later.


March 18 1941 WEDDING BELLS Ridgley — Ryan: At the Roman Catholic Cathedral yesterday afternoon at 5.30, the wedding was solemnized of Mollie, daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Patrick Ryan of North Harbor, St. Mary’s, and James Joseph, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ridgley of this city, the ceremony being performed by Rev. J. Murray.

The bride was attired in a blue ensemble, and was attended by Miss Bragg, the best man being Mr. Edward Ridgley, brother of the groom. After the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of the groom’s parents, the toast to the bride and groom being provided by Mr. J.W. McNeily, which was responded to by the groom, who proposed the toast to the bridesmaids, this being responded to by the best man. Several of the guests added their best wishes to the bride and groom, who later in the evening left on their honeymoon.

March 18 1941 EXPRESS PASSENGERS The following passengers arrived at Port aux Basques: — J Perry, D. Willistown, C. Ash, T. Gaudet, E. Cave, Miss M. Clarke, Miss M. Ryan, A.G. Ogilvie, J. Germain, T.E. Buckley, W.A. Whittle, J. Copley, H.E.Seienk, J.G. Maxwell, C.E. Earick, F.B. Preble, E.H. Everett, Mrs. G.S. Tooley, Mrs. A. Kelly, F.E. Wilson, M. McArthur, C.J. Reed, E.L. Baillie, J.H. Schoefield, R. Randell, E. Johnson, S.O.J. Penleche, R.A. Logan, W.H. Abbott, J. Granhex, C.S. Darden, D.E. Clifford, F.M. O’Leary, E.W. Hammer, W.J. Enright, W.J. Haden.
March 18 1941 MARRIAGES RIDGLEY — RYAN — At the Roman Catholic Cathedral on Monday, March 17th by Rev. J. Murray, Mollie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Ryan of North Harbor, St. Mary’s, to James Joseph, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ridgley of St. John’s.
March 18 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A meeting of the Tasker Celebration Committee will be held in the Masonic Temple tonight. All members are requested to attend.

The weekly drawing in the holy Cross Golden Jubilee Sweep, was held on Saturday night, and the prize winning numbers appear in the advertising columns today.

North Carolina harvested and sold the largest tobacco crop in its history in 1939.

The regular weekly forum will be held at the K.of C. Club tonight and an important matter is to be discussed.

At the Board of Trade Rooms tonight, the election of officers of the Newfoundland National association will be held.

The card tournament held at the Star of the Sea rooms yesterday afternoon, was well attended and enjoyed to the full. Three cash prizes were given.

In addition to the midnight skating frolic and the ice dance at night, both morning and afternoon skating sessions at the Arena on St. Patrick’s Day, were crowded.

The regular meeting of the Holy Name Society was held on Sunday, following Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament at the Cathedral.

The weather for the holiday yesterday, was disagreeable, and prevented outdoor activities that were planned. All the indoor place of amusement were thronged with patrons.

On Saturday night, Brigadier Gonera Ernshaw, inspected the recently formed Grand Falls Home Guard. This is the first time that the Guard has been inspected by a Canadian Officer.

The following have left here for New York and Halifax: — Miss B. Crane, E. Dawe, J.C. Waddell, R.B. Turner, Mrs. E. Hann, P.H. Cowan, Miss Agnes Kelly, George Clarke, John Mealey, E. Smith, C. Butler.

The position of Government Health Inspector on Bell Island, which has been vacant since the beginning of the year, was filled on March 10th by the appointment of Mr. Eric Butler. — The Bell Islander.

A Contractor from Windsor sued two residents of Grand Falls last week, for the price of work and labor on the defendants premises. The defendants were represented by Mr. Hawco. In the first case, the claim was allowed, and the second for $159.00 was dismissed. — Grand Falls Advertiser.


March 21 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. AGNES MURPHY: The passing of Mrs. Agnes Murphy, which occurred on Tuesday night, is very sincerely regretted by the many friends whom she has, and by the friends of her husband and family who realize what the death of a wife and mother means.

Wife of Mr. James Murphy of the firm of F. McNamara Ltd., the deceased lady had been ill for about three weeks, but it was not until Monday past that her ailment assumed serious proportions, and on St. Patrick’s Day, she entered St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital. Everything possible was done there by her Physician, and the loving care of Sisters and Nurses, but the call had come and it found Mrs. Murphy ready; at 11 o’clock on Tuesday night, having received all the consolations of her holy religion, calmly, and peacefully, she passed on to receive the reward which is promised to all whose lives had been as free from guile as hers was.

The late Mrs. Murphy was a lady whose whole life was wrapped up in her family, and she was a model wife and mother, caring for her household and bringing up her children in the fear and love of God. But she found time to do many acts of kindness and charity, and those who lived about her knew Mrs. Murphy as one of these neighbors who was ever ready and anxious to do a good turn for someone else. There are many who will hold her memory in reverence and will utter fervent prayers for her eternal repose, because they have cause to be grateful.

Left to mourn her passing besides her husband, are five sons, viz. Patrick, Anthony of the firm of Harris and Hiscock, Michael of the Central Bakery, and John who is still attending School, as well as James who is now serving overseas with the Royal Navy; four daughters, Mrs. F. Stevenson, Mrs. William Kearsey, Misses Agnes and Vera at home, also one adopted daughter Winifred, also at home. One brother and two sisters also survive, and to all, the deepest sympathy of many friends will be expended.

The funeral takes place 2.30 this afternoon from her late residence, 28 Flower Hill.

“We dream, and dreaming, dream Of those who’ve gladly gone; Who somehow happier seem Now they life’s rest have won.”

March 21 1941 DEATHS FOLEY — Passed peacefully away at 5.30 Thursday morning, at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, after a short illness, Annie Foley, aged 44 years, beloved wife of Fergus Foley; leaving to mourn husband, six daughters, four sons, mother, three sisters and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 21 Job Street. “May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.”

MOORE — Passed peacefully away at Bay Roberts, on March 11th, John Edward, aged 84 years. Leaving to mourn; wife, one son, four daughters, two step-daughters, six grandchildren, one great grandchild, also one sister. Funeral took place on Thursday, March 13th, to the S.S. Citadel and cemetery. Adjt. James Thorne officiated.

SNOW — Yesterday morning at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, Katherine (Kate), widow of the late James Snow; leaving to mourn their sad loss, three daughters. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 26 Prescott Street. (Montreal papers please copy.)

MURPHY — Passed peacefully away at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, after a short illness, at 11 p.m. March 18th, Agnes, aged 55 years, beloved wife of James Murphy; leaving to mourn their sad loss; husband, four sons at home, and one son, James serving overseas; four daughters and one adopted daughter; one brother and two sisters. Funeral today, Friday, March 21st, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 28 Flowers Hill. R. I. P.

March 21 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The erection of the concrete wall at the B.I.S. property has been completed and the scaffolding is now being taken down.

The express went out yesterday with two sections. The first class and second class passengers left at five o’clock, and the second with sleeping car passengers at 5.30 p.m. A large number traveled on both.

The following passengers have left here for the South Coast and Halifax: T. and Mrs. Garland, Miss G. Day, C. Barbour, Magistrate Powell, Miss N. Matthews, Miss C. Grandy, J. and Mrs. Wiseman, Mrs. Wadsworth, H. Hillier, H.B.C. Lake, P.L. Carr, R. Spencer.

The next Kinsmen dance will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel on Thursday night next.

A jumble sale will be held at George Street lecture hall this evening at 7.30 o’clock. Teas will be served.

Twenty-six horses were housed at the Sanitary Department last week, and their feed cost the city $121.74. They consumed 364 lbs. of hay, 25 sacks oats and 3 sacks bran.

The mission for the children will conclude at the R.C. Cathedral today. During the past three days, numbers of children have attended the religious exercise.

During the past week, trucks and men have been engaged at the removal of snow and ice from Water, Duckworth, New Gower, Hamilton, Linscott Street, Church Hill, Freshwater Road and Walgrave Street.

Shortly after midnight this morning, a glass door in the Beauty Parlor of J.H. Walsh, New Gower Street, was smashed. The Police notified the owner who visited the place, but there was no evidence the place having been broken into. Last Saturday night a large plate glass window on the same street was broken.

A motorist was before Court yesterday, charged with parking his car between C.P.U. signs on Water Street, near the junction of Adelaide Street. He pleaded not guilty. A Police Constable stated the car was parked there for ten to fifteen minutes, and was off from the curb. The defendant stated that he went into Doyle’s Store, got a package weighing about 40 lbs., put it in his car, and then drove away. This took about ten minutes and he claimed he was not parked within the meaning of the act. He was convicted and fined $1.00.


March 24 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. JAMES SUFFIDY: Sydney March 18 — The death occurred in the City Hospital late last night, of Mrs. James Suffidy of 15 Cabot Street, this city. She was 53 years old and had been ill only a few days. Her passing will be regretted by a wide circle of friends in Sydney.

Beside her husband, she is survived by three sons, George, James and Roy, all at home; two daughters Mary and Gertrude; also four daughters and a son by a previous marriage as follows; Mrs. Malcolm Butler, Mrs. A. Coffie, Mrs. William Waye, Mrs. Hugh MacPhee, Sydney Mines; John Jarvis, Sydney.

One brother Joseph Wiggs, in Bulls Cove, Burin, Newfoundland; one sister, Mrs. William Brushett, of the same place.

The deceased was a member of Christ Anglican Church.

March 24 1941 DEATHS PAUL — Passed peacefully away at 5 p.m. Saturday, Matthew Paul aged 75 years. Leaving to mourn one son, four daughters and one sister and a large number of grandchildren. Funeral today Monday from his daughter’s residence 17 Mullock Street.

CROSSMAN — Passed peacefully away, Saturday, March 22nd, Thomas Hunter Crossman, son of the late Thomas W. and Minnie Crossman, in his 40th year. Left to mourn are his wife, one daughter, three sisters and two brothers. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 131 Pennywell Road.

MANNING — Passed away at the General Hospitial, on March 22nd, after a short illness, Stephen Manning, aged 47 years, son of the late Patrick and Frances Manning of Tilt Cove Mines. Left to mourn their sad loss are his wife and one daughter; four brothers, Edward, Alex, James and Peter (of Boston, Mass.) and two sisters, Mrs. Patrick Spry and Mrs. Peter Lundrigan of this city. Funeral this Monday afternoon from his late residence, 10 Sheehan St. Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul. (Boston papers please copy.)

March 24 1941 BACHELORS PAID FINE A Scottish law of 1288 gave bachelors a chance of escaping Leap Year proposals by the ladies, upon payment of a fine up to one English pound sterling.
March 24 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The funeral of the late Mrs. James Snow took place from her late residence, Prescott Street, yesterday afternoon, and was largely attended.At the R.C. Cathedral, prayers were recited by Rev. J.W. O’Mara. Interment was at Belvedere Cemetery.

Two women, residents of Waldegrave Street, were before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday and were charged with obtaining Liquor from the Board of Liquor Control, using fictitious names. They pleaded not guilty. Some evidence was taken and the hearing will be resumed on Wednesday.

The Twin Towns Correspondent of the Western Star states that there have been large catches of codfish there in the past couple of weeks. The season has been a prosperous one for the fishermen, and prospects are much brighter now in the Twin Towns.

A twenty three year old Laborer whose home is at the Sandpits, was before Court on Saturday and was charged with living on the earnings of a disorderly house. The evidence was that the man had been spending most of his time at the house on Moore Street with two young girls. The parents of the girls are now serving terms for keeping a disorderly house, and one of the daughters had been convicted for a similar offence. The father of the accused gave evidence, and stated his son was not working, and spent most of his time away from home. The Assistant Chief of Police who conducted the prosecution, stated it was the first case of its kind to come before the Court, and it was the beginning of an effort to stamp out a rapidly growing evil. The man was convicted and find $10, and also put under bond in the sum of $100.00.

March 24 1941 COLOR ACCORDING TO MOOD Bright colored automobiles gain popularity in prosperous times and lose favor in hard times, according to the findings of manufacturers. Women’s favorite color is red, while men’s is blue, Psychologists declare.

March 26 1941 WEDDING BELLS ANDREWS — SNOW: The Presentation Oratory presented a scene of flowered beauty, on St. Patrick’s night, when Madeline, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Snow of this city, was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Albert Edward, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.G. Andrews, also of this city. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Monsignor Kitchen, and the many friends of the happy couple, filled the Church to capacity to witness the happy event. The ushers being Mr. James Kent and Mr. Phil Andrews, brother of the groom. The bride was attended by Miss Sarah Andrews, sister of the groom, whilst the duties of best man were ably carried out by Mr. Albert Michael’s, uncle of the groom.

At 8.30, to the beautiful strains of Lohengin’s Wedding March, the bride entered the oratory, leaning on the arm of her father, who gave her in marriage. She looked charming in a gown of white organdy lace, trimmed with chiffon velvet and white flowered hat to match, and carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations, gladiolas, and fern. The bridesmaid wore a dress of tea rose Russian taffeta, and hat to match, and carried a bouquet of carnations and fern. The groom’s mother was attired in a dress of black satin and marina blue, whilst the bride’s mother was gowned in navy blue crepe, with accessories to match. During the ceremony, Miss Julia Andrews, sister of the groom, who looked beautiful in a gown of marina blue, rendered very beautiful Gounod’s Ave Maria, accompanied by Sister M. Josephine at the organ.

Following the ceremony, the happy couple, followed by a long string of cars, then motored through the city into the country, returning to the home of the groom’s parents, where the reception was held. Upwards of two hundred guests were present, and a sumptuous repast was served by the lady helpers, and was greatly enjoyed by all.

Mr. Albert Michael proposed the toast to the newly married couple, and was ably responded to by the groom. Dancing was the order of the evening. The music was supplied by Miss Martha Carbage of Bell Island; Mr. Myer French, Chris Andrews, Leo Michaels. Between dances, songs were rendered by Misses Julia and Sevilla Andrews, talented sisters of the groom. Messes E. Tuma, and Joe Basha, of Bell Island, whilst being members of the band, and Mr. Fred Michael’s, also favored the gathering with songs, etc. Mr. and Mrs. Andrews were the recipients of many beautiful and costly gifts, including messages and telegrams of congratulations from friends in and out of the city, which were indicative of the esteem in which they were held.

That they shall be blessed with many years of marital happiness is the wish of the writer. A. GUEST.

March 26 1941 OBITUARY MARY FRANCES KENNEDY: Holyrood, March 24 — As if all nature sympathized with him, there is a quietness about the home of Mr. M.J Kennedy, who, in his desolate chamber sits sad but submissive, patiently awaiting the time when he shall again be reunited to his dear wife, Mary Frances, his companion through the battle of life for over half a century, having just a year ago, celebrated the Golden Anniversary of their wedding.

After a long illness, borne with Christian resignation, despite loving care and attention and all that medical skill could do, the Grim Reaper claimed her soul, having been prepared for the long journey by the Rev. Father Murphy, P.P., who was in constant attendance. The deceased had been suffering from diabetes for a number of years, and although the best medical aid was sought, both here and in New York, the malady assumed a new and fatal form and — all was over.

She had reached the advanced age of 77 years, and was one of those woman who grew up with and held those sweet attributes of gentleness, modesty and kindness. Indeed, her charity and hospitality were unexcelled, and to her home, the waif received the same smiling welcome as the one who was better off. In her younger days she took a leading part in both Church and social activities.

Besides a husband, she leaves to mourn; one sister, Mrs. Patrick Laracy, New Jersey; three daughters, Mrs. Bernard Dawley and Mrs.Frank Wade, Medford, Mass.; Mrs. Gus Thompson, Chicago and two sons, William, in Canada and Edward, in New York; Mr. Thomas Woodford, Railway Agent, at Holyrood, is a son in law, while Sister Madeline and Gertrude of Conception, Sister Xaxerious of St. Claire’s, and Sister Amelia of New Jersey, are nieces of the deceased.

Her funeral in charge of Undertaker Dunphy, took place on Sunday evening to Holy Cross Church, and was the largest seen here for some time. The blessing at the Catafalque was given by Rev. Father Murphy, assisted by Rev. Father Dwyer of Harbor Main, after which the solemn cortege wended its way to the little cemetery on the hill, where in the family plot, the mortal remains of a dear and affectionate wife, a loving mother, and a very devout Catholic Christian, were tenderly laid, to await the last call.

Sleep on, dear friend, sleep on. Not many years, not many years will fly Ere all, yes, all of our brave forms must lie Shrouded and sepulchered. Requiescat in Peace — Amen.

March 26 1941 DEATHS SULLIVAN — Passed peacefully away, March 25th, James Sullivan aged 50 years, son of William and the late Sarah Sullivan, leaving to mourn wife, four sons, one of whom, William, is serving overseas with the Royal Artillery, one daughter, father and a large circle of friends. Funeral tomorrow, Thursday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 4 Flavin Street. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul.
March 26 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The canned fruit market is strong and prices seen to advance. The advance is expected, as higher costs have been prevailing at the source. This applies particularly to peaches.

Coffee first came into human notice during the 18th century, because the shrub caused intoxication among sheep.

The Humber Herald states that Rev. I.F. Curtis, D.D., Pastor of the United Church at that place, left last week for Toronto, to attend a meeting of the Social Service Council of the United Church of Canada.

The Trade Review states that the hardware business continued unusually active in February. Prices still remain in a very stable condition generally, but some minor changes are going on all the time. There is still a great shortage of supplies in some directions and continued difficulty in obtaining supplies from manufactures as they are required. Fence wire is quoted without change from last year.

The Newfoundland Historical Society will hold a meeting tomorrow night in the Chambers of the Council of Higher Education. The speaker will be Dr. J. St. P. Knight, whose subject will be “The story of Newfoundland Hospitals from 1831 to the present.”

Not a single case was on the Docket at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. A few cases came before the Civil Court. There was one case in which the amount involved was $4.50 and the cost of issuing the summonses, etc., was $5.25.

A prisoner in a Concord, N.C. jail, wants to get out, because he said he was “getting too much to eat.”

The express train which goes out tomorrow afternoon, will leave in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at five o’clock, and all sleeping passengers will leave at 5.20 p.m.. A dining car will be attached to each section.


March 28 1941 ROYAL NAVAL VOLUNTEERS The following naval Volunteers have arrived at St. John’s for interview and final medical examination:

BELL ISLAND DISTRICT: McGRATH, Patrick Joseph; MERCER, Ronald; PITTS, Harvey Wilbert, MORIARTY; Martin; MYLER, Louis Nicholas; DAWE, Andrew; NEVILLE, James Francis.

BURGEO DISTRICT: STRICKLAND, Harvey Murley; STRICKLAND, Joseph Walter.

CARBONEAR DISTRICT: MARTIN, Clifford; ANDREWS, Raymond; ROCKWOOD, Stuart; BUDDEN, Edward Clarence; WHEADON, Angus Lester; COOPER, Albert George; SEAWARD, Augustus; CROCKER, George Stanley; BUTTON, Ralph Lester; MILLER, Thomas Joseph; SOOLEY, Bernard Franklin; MEADUS, Ronald Cecil; REID, Louis James; NEIL, John Charles.

CLARENVILLE DISTRICT: DAVIS, Donald: ROCHE, Cyril John; TUCKER, Allan Chesley.

CORNER BROOK DISTRICT: BOLAND, Alex Simon; GILLINGHAM, Morgan Henry, Wm; SCOTT, Ralph; PENNELL, Wilfred Wallace; SHEARS, Roland Campbell; KENNEDY, Stanley Joseph; FEWER, Edward; WHEELER, Cyril George: GAUDON, Harold; CONNORS, Aloysius; BLACKWOOD, Arthur; KENDELL, George Reuben; CONNORS, Thomas; WHITE, Benjamin Duncan; SHEPPARD, Cyril Eloil; CHILDS, Wm. Henry; CHILDS, Wallace; RIDEOUT, Raymond George; BENNETT, Leo ; REID, Sidney Theodore; ABBOTT, Wilfred; PRESTON , Wm. Frederick.

FERRYLAND DISTRICT: MORRY, Wm. Anthony; OATES Wm. Lawrence.

GRAND BANK DISTRICT: ANSTEY, John Ben; PITTMAN, Charles Henry; KING, Gerald Samuel; KING, Aubrey Crews; PRICE, John Wm; FLEMMING, John Lundrigan.

GRAND FALLS DISTRICT: PURCHASE, Ralph Arthur; TOOPE, Alfred Wm.; TUCKER, Harold Lloyd; PEDDLE, Gordon Bramwell; HUNTER, Cyril Percie; KNIGHT, Wm. John; PENNEY, Alexander James; KING, Aubrey Angus; CONNORS, Cornelius; FLIGHT, Sandy Augustus.

HARBOR BRETON DISTRICT: SPENCER, James Marshall; BLAGDON, Philip; MacDONALD, Wm. Joseph; WILCOTT, Peter; FELIX, John Stanley; PARDY, Angus Saunders; BARNES, Amos; PARDY, Wm. James; MILES, Warren: DOUGLAS, Jack.

MARYSTOWN DISTRICT: Hodder, Josiah: HODDER, Charles Henry; BROWN, Charles Hodder; COOPER, Stephen; BROWN, James Gabriel; BUTLER, Wm. Albert.

SPRINGDALE DISTRICT: CAVE, Bert; CARAVAN, Cyril; OXFORD, Lemuel; RIDEOUT, Raymond John; STARKES, Albert Joseph; LOCKE, Fredk. Harold George.

ST. GEORGE’S DISTRICT: DUPHNEY, Wm.; McLEAN, Raymond; WHITE, Adolph; HAWKINS, Andrew; YOUNG, Walter Joseph; BRAKE, Allan Joseph; RETAFF, Maurice; TOBIN, Amedie Edward: WHITE, Gerald William; O’QUINN, Samuel; DENNIS, Leo Joseph; BESAW, James; CORNACT, Wallace; FELIX, Roderick; GARNIER, Vincent; MORRIS, Arthur Stanly; SAMMS, James Walter; McEACHREN, Alexander Patrick; COLOUMB, Frank; GILLAM, William Charles; FLYNN John.

ST. JOHN’S DISTRICT: SHORT, Harold Kitchener.

TWILLINGATE DISTRICT: MILLEY, Edgar Earl; SNOW, Warwrick Norman Buller; JENNINGS, Benjamin George; CURTIS, Claude; BARNES, Ira Martin; SMALL, Ellwood Benjamin.

GREENSPOND DISTRICT: BROWN, Donald Randolph; BROWN, H Malcolm; BUTT, Maxwell Stewart; RALPH, Donald; RALPH, Lloyd; RALPH, Piercie Lorenzo; WAKELEY, Albert Wesley; BUTT, Garland; MOSS. Edgar; WHITE, Robert James, C.P.; WOODLAND, Percy Duncan; SAUNDERS, Thomas Gordon; BROWN, Louis; ROGERS, Christopher; OAKELY, Arthur; SAMSON, Lloyd Elsworth; HALLETT, David WATTS ; CHAYTOR, Roy Kitchener.

HOLYROOD DISTRICT: WHITE, Stanley; WARREN, Nelson; SNOW, Edward Allan; SMITH, William Clarence; Gushue, HAROLD; Barnes, Clarence; WALSH, Walter Francis; Parsons, Edgar Dwight; PENNEY, Leonard; COSTELLO, James (of Pat); ROBERTS, James Henry; MERCER, John (of James).

March 28 1941 OBITUARY Mr. THOMAS FRENCH: Mrs. Thomas French, of Harbor Grace, received the sad news on February 19th that her husband, who was serving in the Mercantile Marine, had met his death through drowning the previous day. No particulars were given at the time. Recently, she received letters from Messrs. Watts, Watts & Co. Ltd. from London, giving further particulars of the tragic happening.

It seems that while returning to his ship on the night of February 18th, he tripped in the darkness over an iron rail, and fell overboard into the Manchester Canal. He must have struck his head in falling, as when he was recovered from the water shortly afterwards, life was extinct. Accompanying the owner’s letter was one from Capt. Brown, of the ship on which the deceased served, in which he stated that an inquest had been held, and that the Chief Officer and an Able Seaman who had been with the victim at the time of the accident, were witnesses. He paid tribute to Mr. French, stating that, “He was an excellent seaman, sober and clean living, and that the loss would be very much felt.” The Coroner’s inquest returned a verdict of. “Death of misadventure due to the man’s shortsightedness, and the darkness of the night.” A later communication received, stated that Sailor T. French had been buried at Weaste Cemetery, on February 21st by the Mission of Seamen, at the request of the Shipping Federation.

The deceased was 45 years of age and a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James French of Harbor Grace. He served with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment for three years, and following his discharge, went to the United States, where he worked for some years as Carpenter and Builder. In 1929, he came home and married Miss Fannie Parsons, of Bryant’s Cove. They returned to the States, but when the depression came he was forced to come home, not having taken out American Citizenship. Since that time, he followed his trade as Carpenter locally and at St. John’s, and also served for a while on one of the trawlers of the Nfld. Trawling Co. In June last, he joined the Mercantile Marine and had not been home since.

The late Mr. French was a fine type of citizen, quite, hard working, and industrious, and was highly thought of by all with whom he came in contact, and his widow and two young sons will have the sincerest sympathy of their many friends in their sad bereavement. — COM.

March 28 1941 DEATHS WYATT — At Traytown, Alexander Bay, March 27th, William, second oldest son of the late William and Catherine Wyatt of Highfield, Prince Edward Island.

O’KEEFE — Passed peacefully away at noon March 26th May Ellen Dalton, beloved wife of Michael J. O’Keefe, aged 59 years; leaving to mourn their sad loss; husband, 1 brother, 3 sons, 4 daughters and 1 grandson. Funeral today Friday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 22 McFarlane St.. R. I. P. (U.S. papers please copy.)


March 30 1941 NAVAL RECRUITS Recruits Examined at Hr. Grace For Royal Navy, March 21, 1941

Edmund Quinlan, Holyrood; Edward Mitchell, Hant’s Harbor; Harold B. Penney, Hant’s Harbor, Allan Barrett, Old Perlican; Annan H. Bishop, Heart’s Delight; David Wade, Conception Hr.; Joshua Tuck, Hant’s Hr.; Reuben P. King, Perry’s Cove; Thomas P. Coombs, Upper Island Cove; Abraham A. Bishop, Cupids; Chesley Parsons, Cavendish; Thomas A. Pottle, Flatrock, Carbonear; James Wade, Conception Hr.; Archibald Piercey, Brigus; Howard Smith, Hant’s Hr.; James Slade, Victoria, Carbonear; Cecil Stone, Bryant’s Cove; Frederick Stone, Bryant’s Cove; John Dalton, Conception Hr.

March 30 1941 OBITUARY ESAU GOSSE, SPANIARD’S BAY, March 24 — In the early morning of March 18th, there passed peacefully away to the Great Beyond, the soul of Easu Gosse, at the age of 75 years. He was well and favorably known, not only in Spaniard’s Bay, but also at Harbor Grace, Bay Roberts, and many other settlements in Conception Bay, and his passing was greatly regretted by his many friends.

For the past five years he was an invalid, owing to some peculiar malady, he lost completely the use of both his legs and was unable to stand alone, and had to be assisted to and from his bedroom. Whilst all done long he had remain sitting in his chair, [This is exactly as written. GW.] and although he felt his great affliction keenly, he bore up patiently, and always had a pleasant word and a cherry smile when visited by his many friends.

In his younger years he prosecuted the Labrador fishery, and on retiring from this, he was appointed by the Government as Mail Courier between Tilton and Bay Roberts, which he performed faithfully and well, for many a hard struggle he had at the winter season, when the roads were blocked with snow, getting from Tilton to Bay Roberts, a distance of five or six miles, but he always delivered the mail, according to schedule. At that time there was no shore line train to Harbor Grace via Tilton. After the shore line was opened, this was discontinued, and he was appointed Reliving Officer for Spaniard’s Bay, Tilton, Bishop’s Cove, and Upper Island Cove, in which capacity he performed his duty faithfully and efficiently, as no complaint was ever made of his work not being honestly performed. When the Commission Government took charge of the Country, he was retired on a small pension.

His funeral took place on Thursday, March 20th and was largely attended by many friends and sympathizers. The members of the L.O.A., of which he was a member, had charge of the funeral arrangements, and preceded the cortege in full regalia, to the Church and cemetery. The Rev. F. Hunt officiated, both at the Church and cemetery, and gave a very appropriate address for the occasion at the Church, whilst Miss Mary Murrin presided at the organ. His casket was profusely covered with beautiful wreaths and flowers, which was evidence of the esteem and respect in which he was held by his many friends. He leaves to mourn the loss of a kind father, four sons, and four daughters, Nathan an ex-war veteran of the Great War, now residing at Lynn. Mass., U.S.A. Roland, Moses, and John, at Spaniard’s Bay; Annie at Sydney, C.B., Susie at Cambridge, Mass., and Lily and Minnie at Halifax, N.S., to whom sympathy is extended.

And now he rests from his labors and may light perpetual ever shine upon him. B.B.S.

March 30 1941 DEATHS SCURRY — Suddenly at 1 o’clock this morning, Lawrence, age 59 years, son of the late John and Ellen Scurry. Leaving his wife, 4 sons, 1 sister and 5 brothers to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Monday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 8 Monroe Street.

SIMMONS — Passed peacefully away March 28th, after a long illness, Susan, aged 69 years, beloved wife of Samuel Simmons, leaving to mourn; husband, three sons, four daughters, and eight grandchildren. Funeral on Sunday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence 25 Campbell Avenue. Forever with the Lord.

March 30 1941 EXPRESS PASSENGERS The following have arrived here from New York and Halifax: — R. Gill, Mrs. Irene B.Welty, Mrs. Mabel Waller, Master Waller, Miss Waller, J. Fitzgerald, R. Grant, Master C. Grant, J. Tizzard, H. Mackay.

March 31 1941 WEDDING BELLS CHRISTIAN — MILLER: The marriage of Miss Jeanette B. Miller of Chauncey Avenue, East Orange, to Dr. Donald Knight Christian of Rutledge Avenue, East Orange, took place March 20th, at Arlington Avenue Presbyterian Church, East Orange, Rev. William E. Kroll officiated. After a luncheon at the Fulton Tower, East Orange, the couple left for Miami Beach.

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Miller of Neenah, Wis., the bride was given in marriage by her brother, Albert H. Miller of East Orange, with whom she has made her home. Her sister in law and Dr. James C. Christian of East Orange, brother of the bridegroom, were the wedding attendants.

Mrs. Christian is a graduate of Oshkosh State Teachers’ College and is on the faculty of Lincoln School, Orange. Dr. Christian has graduated from Middlebury College of Osteopathy, where he also did graduate work. —Newark, N.J. Evening News.

March 31 1941 DEATHS McNEILY — Entered into rest on Saturday, March 29th, in her 94th year, Alice Maud Reid, daughter of the late Alexander S. Reid, and relict of I.R. McNeily. Funeral private.

DUFF — This Monday morning at 2 o’clock, at Carbonear, Louisa Canning, beloved wife of the late Robert Duff. Funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m.

RAINES — Passed peacefully away March 29th, John Charles Raines, aged 88 years. Leaving to mourn; wife, three sons, one daughter, ten grandsons (one grandson, John Charles in U.S.A.) six granddaughters. Funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 71 Prince’s Street.–R. I. P.

March 31 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A Motorist was before Court on Saturday, charged with obstructing traffic, and he was fined $2.00.

The Express train leaving this afternoon will make connection at Port aux Basques for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route.

An ice dance will be held at the arena tomorrow night. Music will be provided by Mickey Duggan and Walter Chambers orchestra.

The regular monthly meeting of the Star of the Sea Association was held Saturday afternoon at their rooms. The President, Hon. M.P. Gibbs, K.C., gave an address, the subject of which was “Some Stories I have Heard.”

A residence of Purcell’s Ridge was before His Honor Judge Browne on Saturday, and was charged with being drunk and disorderly and using insulting language to a lady on New Gower St. He was find $10.00.

The express which is going out this afternoon will be in two sections. The first with all first and second class passengers, will leave at five o’clock, and the second section with all sleeping car passengers, will leave at 5.20. Diners will be attached to each section.

Last night, many people who were out of their homes, were caught in the rainstorm, and taxis were kept extremely busy. At some periods between ten and eleven o’clock, it was practically impossible to get a car, as all taxis were engaged. The rain started last night about eight o’clock, and at between ten and eleven, it was falling in torrents. Gulleys and drains were soon choked, and in some places cellars and basements were flooded.


April 6 1941 AN APPRECIATION JETHRO POTTLE: A well known and highly respected citizen, in the person of Mr. Jethro Pottle of Gear Street, passed to his eternal reward on Wednesday morning last, after an illness extending over a period of years. It was however, only within the past year that he was confined indoors, and in fact, only within recent weeks did he find it necessary to keep to his bed.

The late Mr. Pottle was a native of Flatrock, Carbonear District, and came to St. John’s with his family over thirty-five years ago, to work at his trade as a Carpenter. For twenty years he was employed with the Railway on the Dock and in the Carpentry Shop, and about five years ago, due to ill health, was retired on pension. He was a faithful and conscientious worker and was esteemed by all for the many sterling qualities which he possessed.

Until poor health prevented it, Mr. Pottle was seldom, if ever, absent from the service of Wesley United Church, of which he was a loyal and devoted member, and was for many years, honored by re-election to the Board of Elders. Truly it may be said of him that everything in his life was well ordered and governed; the type of man whose word was his bond. To those whose privilege it was to share for many years the hospitality of his home, there will be many expressions of sorrow, to realize that they can no longer drop in for the friendly chat, and to seek his wise counsel and advice.

To his wife, children and stepchildren, and other members of the family, the writer extends heartfelt sympathy, in which the whole community will join. — J.P.L.


April 7 1941 OBITUARY SISTER MARIA GENEVIEVE: HALIFAX, March 10 — The news of Sister Maria Genevieve’s death on the evening of Friday, March 7, will sadden a host of friends in the Maritimes and elsewhere.

As pupil and religious, Sister spent the greater part of her life at Mount Saint Vincent. She succeeded the late Sister Mary Augustine as Teacher of Oral Expression there; and she herself established very successfully, departments of Public Speaking in the College and the Academy. Sister pursued her own studies at the Mount and the Emerson College of Oratory.

Sister Maria Genevieve’s tact, urabnity, gift of sympathy, and deep spirituality, made her an unusual influence for good in the class, and on the campus. She was the first and organizing Directress of Saint Genesius Guild in Halifax.

Sister’s requiem mass was celebrated on Monday morning at the Sanatorium of Our Lady of Lourdes, Lourdes, N.S. She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Otto Emerson, of this city, her brother Louis of Montreal, and other relatives.

April 7 1941 DEATHS HICKEY — Passed peacefully away on April 5th, after a short illness, Elizabeth, aged 47 years, beloved wife of Gerald Hickey. Leaving to mourn; husband, two sons, and two daughters, and one sister. Funeral, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 231 New Gower Street.

TUCKER — Died at 11 o’clock on Saturday morning, James Tucker; leaving to mourn a wife, Mrs. Sarah Tucker, a daughter, Mrs. Gordon Peckham, two grandchildren, Norman and Lillian Peckham, also four brothers and one sister. Funeral on Tuesday from his late residence, 402 Water Street. (American papers please copy.)

April 7 1941 THINNING RANKS DIAMOND — The death is announced of another Newfoundlander who braved the Atlantic in the stirring days of the last Great War, and helped to hold high, throughout the length and breath of the seven seas, British traditions and the Mercantile Marine. This time it is Alfred DIAMOND, aged fifty years, who passed away at the General Hospital Friday

The funeral took place Saturday afternoon from the residence of his sister, Mrs. Joseph Duffett, 121 Patrick Street.

VINCENT — The remains of the late Walter Pears Vincent, No. 2725, Royal Naval Reserve, who died in one of our city Hospitals, were taken to his home by train on Wednesday, when the usual final obsequies were observed. Interment was at Musgrave Harbor.

April 7 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The banking vessel Pan American, has returned for the Banks with 200 quintals codfish.

The weekly drawing in the Holy Cross Jubilee Sweep was held on Saturday night, and the prizes winners are advertised in the News this morning.

Two women residents of Waldegrave Street were before Court on Saturday, charged with obtaining liquor at the Board of Liquor Control, by using fictitious names. They were fined $50.00 each.

The express going out this evening will be in two sections, the first will all first and second class passengers and will leave at five o’clock, and the second section with all sleeping car passengers, will leave at 5.20. Diners will be attached to each section.


April 8 1941 OBITUARY JOHN FRANCIS STAPLE: ENGLISH HR., April 2nd. ---

Twilight and evening bell And after that the dark! Ad may there be no sadness of farewell When I embark.

For though from out our bourne of time and place The flood may bear me far, I hope to see my Pilot face to face When I have crossed the bar.

As the evening shadows closed the day of March 14th there passed away to his eternal rest here, Mr. John Francis Staple, aged sixty-four years. He was born at Harbor Grace, where he lived in the early days of his life. Afterwards his parents moved to Fortune, where he was taught the Shoe Making Trade by his father. From there, they moved to Channel, where they lived for a few years, and at the early age of seventeen, he went to St. Jacques, and started in the Shoe Making Business for himself, and also kept a small grocery store.

After a few years, he started out as a Photographer, and traveled over the whole island, and no doubt there are many homes all over Newfoundland today that have some photographs of their families still in their possession that was taken by him. He was engaged by the late Lord Northcliffe to take pictures of the Pulp and Paper Mills at Grand Falls when under construction. He could tell many interesting anecdotes of his travels over the country while in the photograph business.

In 1922, he was appointed Collector of Customs for English Harbor West, which position he held until the time of his death. He had been in failing health for over a year, still the end came rather unexpectedly, as he had not been feeling much worse than usual, until a few days before his death. Of a cheerful disposition, he was well liked, and had many friends by whom, including the writer, who was a personal friend, his loss will be keenly felt, and he will be sadly missed by all.

He was a good neighbor and was always willing to give a helping hand to any good work, and always interested in School and Church affairs. Of him it could truly be said, his friends were many and his enemies he had none. He was laid to rest on Sunday, March 16th, and his funeral was attended by people from here and nearby places, who came to pay their last respects to the deceased. His favorite hymns were sung at his home and at the Church and grave side: “O Help us Lord Each Hour of Need”, “How Bright These Glorious Spirits Shine”, “Son of my Soul, Thy Savior Dear,” “I Heard the Voice of Jesus say”.

He leaves to mourn; his wife, six sons, Otto in the United States, Corwin, at Botwood Airport, Dannolly on one of the Custom’s Boats, Lloyd, acting as Collector of Customs here, Douglas, teaching school at Mose Ambrose, and Mark living here. Also, two daughters, Mrs. James Petite and Georgina, both here, to whom deepest sympathy of bereavement.

Earth to earth and dust to dust Calmly now the words we say, Leaving him to sleep in trust Till the Resurrection Day. Father in Thy gracious keeping. Leave we now Thy servant sleeping. C.S. English Harbor West, April 2nd., 1941.

April 8 1941 DEATHS WALL — Passed peacefully away on Monday April 7th, Harry Wall, aged 46; leaving to mourn father, one sister, Mrs. John O’Reilly, step mother, 5 step sisters, 3 step brothers. Funeral on Wednesday, from the home of his father, Philip Wall, 8 George Street. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have Mercy on his soul.
April 8 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A special meeting of the City Inter-Club Bowling League will be held at the Guard’s Rooms tomorrow night at eight o’clock. Business of importance is to be discussed.

The second meeting of the representatives of U.S. and Canada Forces, and sports leaders in the city, will be held tomorrow night at nine o’clock at the Caribou Hut, when the special committee that went out to enquire as to the possibility of securing suitable playing fields, will report.

On April 2nd the following articles were shipped to W.P.A. Headquarters in St. John’s, from Bell Island Branch of the Association, 312 prs. Socks, 218 pullovers, 13 sweaters, 13 pairs hurricane mitts, 42 pairs gloves, 3 helmets, 144 scarves, and for the Red Cross: 120 pairs Hospital stockings, 30 pairs bed socks, 31 pairs pyjamas, 5 large dressing gowns, 9 dressing jackets, 3060 surgical dressings.

The final game in the inter-Club Card Tournament was played last night at Columbus Club, when members of the T.A. and Star of the Sea, competed against the K of C. The total scores for all three games will now be compiled and announcement as to the winners duly made. The presentation of prizes will be held after Easter, at the rooms of the winning club.

A Shopkeeper, who was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday for having in his possession during the month of January, liquor to the value of $141.90, not purchased by him from the Board of Liquor Control, was fined $100.00 or 30 days. On one charge of having in his possession liquor to the value of $178.60 in the month of February, he was convicted and sentenced was suspended; on a charge of selling liquor, he was convicted and fined $200.00 or 90 days. On another charge of having liquor of $108.80 between the 1st and 11th of March, not purchased by him from the Board, sentence was suspended.


April 9 1941 OBITUARY MISS ANNIE COSH: At Heart’s Content 8 o’clock on the morning of March 31st, 1941 Annie Cosh peacefully fell asleep, ending nearly forty-nine years of faithful and devoted service of help, in the home of Canon and Mrs. Smart. She was quiet, unassuming, and respectful in demeanor, soft spoken, and kindly, thoughtful, her character was marked throughout her life by honesty, loyalty, and truthfulness. Her religious life was notably sincere and earnest according to the measure of her opportunity. She loved Christ and his Church and willingly gave to them her service. For almost forty years, she made the altar linen her special charge, often adding to it by her skill as a needlewoman. She was a regular attendant at Church Service and the Sacrament at the Altar, until a week before her passing, always as she had been taught in her youth, making careful preparation before receiving the Sacrament and Thanksgiving after.

The Rector, Rev. H.W. Facey, B.A., officiated at the funeral service, which took place at 3 p.m on Tuesday, April 1st, and was very largely attended in spite of the disagreeable weather, showing the respect and esteem in which she was held by all. Her quiet and retiring disposition did not appear to keep from her the respect of the people of the community in which she lived for 33 years, a proof that the world sees true worth in one who passed her life as a helper in others peoples homes. When the casket bearing all that was mortal passed out of the “little home by the side of the road” and through the garden, which in summer is “a glory of color”, it left two sorrowful people who always regarded her as their benefactress.

They pass beyond our touch, beyond our sight, Never thank god, beyond our love and prayers. And even as, out of the darkness night, Dawn stealeth unawares, So from our night of sorrow and distress, We, who are left in loneliness below, May catch some vision of the blessedness Which our beloved know. SCRIBE.

April 9 1941 OBITUARY EDWARD KIRBY, Holyrood.

GANDER, April 3 — On March 5th there passed peacefully away at Holyrood at the age of 81 years, one of the oldest and most respected citizens, in the person of Edward Kirby. The deceased, while not enjoying his usual robust health for the past three years, had been ill but a few days, and his death came as a direct shock to his many friends and acquaintances. Skipper Ned, as he was better known, was of the old pioneer stock, and nothing will verify this fact more, than that epoch making journey to the Klondike Gold Rush of ’98. Bringing his rugged constitution and dogged determination to the acid test, he in company with his brother William, also deceased, made the perilous trip from his native Holyrood, to Dawson City in three months, and over wind and snow swept trails, through blizzards, and over dangerous mountain passes, he eventually arrived at the gold fields. Many and varied were the stories related by Skipper Ned of this eventual episode. The trek to Alaska, the crossing of the Chilcoot Pass, and of the fortunes amassed and spent overnight at the magic Dawson City.

Previous to that, the deceased had been engaged at the Bank Fishery, sailing for many seasons with the redoubtable Frank Leary of Banking fame. Returning from the gold fields after an absence of three years, the late Mr. Kirby engaged at the fishery and farming industries at Holyrood, and in these as in all his undertakings, with a marked degree of success.

In the commercial life of the community, the name of Edward Kirby was well and favorably known, and none enjoyed the confidence of the business firms and the general public, more than did the deceased. His home and property at Holyrood stand today, as a fitting memorial to the energy and zeal of a true son of the soil.

In the political and religious life of the Country, Edward Kirby played a prominent part. In the old election days, his stand was known to all. None fought a harder, nor cleaner, political fight, than did he. For a period of over forty years he was a staunch member of the Star of the Sea Society of this place. His passing from the ranks of the society is a severe blow to that body, as from the founding of that Association, to the time of his death, he not only took a very keen interest in all its undertakings, but at a time when the very existence of the Society was in jeopardy, he came forward and saved the situation, by a personal contribution. His place will not be filled within the ranks and today the Society mourns the passing of a true and tried friend.

His funeral was held on March 8th and Solemn Mass of Requiem was celebrated by Rev. Fr. Murphy, Parish Priest. A large concourse of citizens attended, and the Star of the Sea Society attended in a body, to pay their last respects to their late brother member. The remains were then laid to rest in the South Side Cemetery, Holyrood , a spot in which he had taken a long and active interest.

He is survived by his widow, Mary Kirby, four sons, Leo at Alberta; Edward at Saskatchewan; Herbert at New York; and Rupert at home. Three daughters, Mrs. A. Gaudiano of Massachusetts; Mrs. C.W. Hawco and Mrs. Felix Byrne of Holyrood, also two brothers in the U.S.A., and one sister in British Columbia, to whom the sympathy of the entire community is extended.

As the birch and spruce of the Butterpot Mountains keep a lonely vigil, and the West wind whistles a mournful funeral dirge over the grave of a stout hearted Newfoundlander, his friends will unite in silent prayer for the eternal repose of his soul. COM.

April 9 1941 DEATHS POWER — This morning, Mary Joseph (Jose) Power, aged 88 years. Funeral Friday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence 240 Duckworth Street. R. I. P.
April 9 1941 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR This paper assumes no responsibility for the opinion of its correspondents.

TREATY O.K.

Editor Daily News,

Dear Sir: – I have to “scuff back” and recede somewhat from the position I took on the Base Treaty. I was afraid that a foreign Country might in the future try to take advantage of us, I am no longer worried. The suburbs of St. John’s are no longer under a foreign flag. According to official statement made by the Commission of Government in a legal document, the British Empire includes the United States.

In the regulations promulgated under the Post and Telegraphs Act, which were published in your issue of 8th April, 1941, you will find at the top of the second column, a section which reads in part thus: “Newspapers addressed to Great Britain and all places within the Empire, including the United States of America, are accepted” etc. Now you will note it does not read “Newspapers address to the United States of America and to Great Britain and all places within the Empire”. Nor does it say “and also to the U.S.A.” - No, it distinctly say “Within the Empire, including the U.S.A.”

Now Mr. Editor, we are dealing with a legal document, and the plain grammatical sense of the word is, that the Empire includes the U.S.A. or that the U.S.A. is included in the Empire. Our Commissioners do not make mistakes in legal documents.

So why worry? The fact that the United States is included in the British Empire, means that we need no longer worry about the future, it is true that the fact has not yet been revealed to wise Winston Churchill or prudent Franklyn Roosevelt, but to the mere babes (comparatively speaking) who rule in Newfoundland!

Look granny, put your finger in his mouth. The baby’s got a tooth, maybe it’s a wisdom tooth!

Yours truly, WARWICK SMITH

April 9 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE At a general meeting of the Co-operative Society at Codroy Valley, held last week, it was decided to build a new store on the premises of Mr. D. White near Upper Ferry School.

A Chauffeur, who was given in charge by his wife for being drunk and disorderly in their home on Monday night, appeared before the magistrate’s Court yesterday, but was discharged, as his wife did not appear against him.


April 13 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. MINNIE CAHILL: After an illness of many months, Mrs. Mary O’Leary Cahill, widow of Frederick Cahill, entered into rest yesterday morning at her home at Parade Street. On the death of her husband, Frederick Cahill, who was Cashier in the Department of the Assessor, the deceased was attached to the staff of that department, retiring some 15 months ago owing to ill health. For the past five or six months she steadily grew weaker, until yesterday morning, when death came quietly.

She leaves to mourn two sons, Frederick, with Read, Watson and Leith, Gerald at home, three daughters, Frances (Mrs. Patrick Berrigan) and Eleanor, and Joan at home; mother, Mrs. Captain Frank O’Leary; three brothers, Joseph at the Newfoundland Airport, Francis M. of F.M. O’Leary Ltd., and Stan with Bowater’s at Corner Brook, and one sister, Mrs. W.P. Meehan.

The funeral takes place tomorrow, Sunday, at 2.45 p.m. from her late residence, 17 Parade Street.

April 13 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE During the past week, Council employees made connections with the six inch water main in the Boulevard, for the American Base at Quidi Vidi.

Three youths who were charged with breaking into various places, and were arrested last week after Bon Marche was entered and various goods stolen, were before Court on Thursday afternoon. The oldest was sentenced to three months. In the case of the other, sentence was suspended.

A man who has no home and was arrested on a charge of vagrancy, was before the Magistrate’s Court on Thursday, and was sentenced to ten days imprisonment.

A few ardent Waltonians spent yesterday whipping various favorite fishing resorts, and though the weather was cold and conditions not too pleasant, they were rewarded for their discomforts.

On the 22nd April, the eve of the general holiday, a dance will be held at Columbus Club. Music will be provided by a six piece orchestra and supper will be served, Dress will be informal.

On next Friday night, the Kinsmen Club will hold a formal dance in the Newfoundland Hotel. In future, dances will he held on Friday nights, instead of Thursday as heretofore.

The quarterly meeting of the St. John’s War Service Committee (operating the Caribou Hut) will be held on Tuesday next at 8 p.m. A cordial invitation is extended to all who have assisted in the work in any respect.

On Thursday afternoon, a horse owned by M.J. O’Brien & Co., bolted and fell on Springdale St. It was seen that the animal was seriously injured, and a veterinary was called, who found the horse’s shoulder was broken. It perished shortly afterwards.


April 15 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. LUCY BYRNE: HOLYROOD, April 9 — On Wednesday morning the 2nd April, this town was startled by the news of the sudden passing of one of its most respected citizens, in the person of Mrs. Lucy Byrne, relict of the late William Byrne. The deceased was in her 72nd year and was active and in her usual good health the night of her death, which was the result of heart failure. She attended to her household duties and entertained company at her home until 11 o’clock on Tuesday night. This feature of sociability was one of her characteristics.

She then retired, and within a half hour was still in death, the hand of which had grasped her before aid could be summoned. The Rev. Fr. Murphy, P.P., was hurriedly on the scene, and imparted the spiritual benefits of the Church that could be had under the circumstances. The case was made sadder, and much more so to the surviving children, by the fact that her late husband was also a victim of heart attack only a few years ago. Thus rendering it so, that two sons and daughter did not have the consolation of witnessing the passing of kind and loving parents. She was a truly good and devoted Catholic and always took an active part in Church work — a model mother and true friend.

She leaves to mourn; two sons, William and Fred at home, and one daughter, Mrs. James Parsley at Harbor Main, besides two brothers residing at Salmonier. The funeral took place on Thursday morning and was largely attended by mourners and sympathizing friends. Solemn Requiem Mass was celebrated by the Rev. Fr. Murphy, P.P., for the repose of her soul. Interment took place in the cemetery on the hillside, where the mortal remains of a good woman were laid to rest to await the trumpet call. — R.I.P.

April 15 1941 MARRIAGES WHITE — MARSHALL: At the Church of England Cathedral April 12th, 1941, by the Bishop of Newfoundland, Phyllis Jean, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Marshall, LeMarchant Road, to Sergt. Pilot Randell George, son of the late Dr. A.E. and Mrs. White.
April 15 1941 DEATHS RYAN — Passed peacefully away yesterday morning at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, after a short illness, Thomas J. Ryan; leaving to mourn their sad loss; three sisters and one brother. Funeral on Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his sister residence, Mrs. F.A. Callahan, 163 Patrick Street.

PEDDLE — Passed away suddenly on April 13th, James peddle aged 69 years; leaving to mourn a wife, three daughters, one at home, Mrs. J.O’Brine, and two at Buchans, Mrs. Walter O’Toole and Mrs. James Lee; three sons at home, one son serving overseas, and one sister Mrs. Margaret Bursey. Funeral on Wednesday (owing to delay of express) at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 59 Franklyn Avenue. “Sacred Heart of Jesus have Mercy on his soul.”

EARLE — Passed peacefully away early this morning after a very short illness, Martha Earle, beloved wife of William Earle: leaving, husband, one son, Herbert J. Adey, one daughter, Mrs. M Pike, and one step-daughter, Mrs. Dundan Jones, residing in New York, and eight grandchildren to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Thursday at 2.30 p.m., from her son’s residence 313 LeMarchant Road.

April 15 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The price asked for flippers from the S.S. Neptune early yesterday morning, was $4.00 per dozen, but few purchasers were found at that price, and later it was dropped to $3.00, at which many were bought. Later in the day, some of the men sold them for $2.00 per dozen.

The driver of a motor truck was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was charged with being drunk in charge of a truck. His license was suspended for six months.

A resident of St. Thomas’s, who was arrested on Saturday for being drunk in charge of a horse, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday and was fined $1.00. It appears that under the new Highway Traffic Act, there is no section which deals specifically with persons drunk in charge of horses.

Several carloads of material have arrived at Corner Brook for the erection of the branch establishment of A.E. Hickman Co. Ltd. The site chosen is along the water front, West of Bowater’s Garage, almost opposite the Railway Station. — Western Star.

The final card game for the members of the teams of the T.A., Star of the Sea, and K. of C., will be held at the Star Club Rooms on next Monday Night. At this event the presentation of prizes will be held. The tournament was won by the Star Club.

A gang of workmen under the direction of Mr. Edward Butler Sr., have been engaged for some time in making improvements to the road over the Scotia Pier Hill. The turn which formerly existed in this road has been taken out, and the road has been cut down at the top and filled in at the bottom. Conditions at this place will be much improved as a result of this work. – The Bell Islander.


April 17 1941 OBITUARY JOHN E. MACKAY: CARBONEAR, April 9.

“It is not the tear at the moment shed, When the cold earth has just been laid o’er him That can tell how beloved is the friend that is dead Or how deep in our hearts we deplore him, “Tis the tear thro’ many a long day wept. Thro’ a life by his loss all shaded, “Tis the sad remembrance fondly kept. When all other griefs are faded.”

It is with deep regret that we record today the passing of a highly respected and prominent citizen of Carbonear, in the person of John F. Mackay. His death occurred at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, St. John’s, as a result of a heart attack following as operation. He had been suffering for a long period from an incurable malady, which he bore with Christian resignation; and when Death came to claim him, he met it with the same philosophical spirit and confident smile, which characterized him throughout life, and enabled him to maintain through years of suffering, to the last moment of his life, a cheerful and loveable disposition.

Deceased was in his fifty-sixth year. He was son of the late Lawrence Mackay, J.P. and Cecilia Mackay of Carbonear, and his educational training was received under tutorship of his father, who ranked in the first class as a scholar and a Teacher. He later completed a successful course at St. Bonaventure’s College, St. John’s. On leaving school, he engaged in the teaching profession, first at King’s Cove, afterwards in his own home town; here he labored until ill health forced him to resign.

The late John Mackay possessed many fine and sterling qualities of mind and heart, which could only be appreciated by those who knew him intimately. He leaves to mourn a wife and seven children, to whom, as to his other relatives, the writer extends the expression of his sincere and heartfelt sympathy in the great loss they have sustained.

The large attendance to his funeral evidenced the high esteem in which he was held by all classes of the community.

The Right Rev. Monsignor McCarthy, cousin of the deceased, officiated at the obsequies.

Eternal rest grant unto him O Lord And let perpetual light shine upon him. AMECUS.

April 17 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Mr. William White of Catalina, while engaged in tearing down his former home last week, fell from the rafters in the upper story, and struck his head. He was rendered unconscious and his head was badly cut in two places.

Weather for yesterday’s half holiday was not all that could be desired, but many availed of the time off to do household work and other necessary things. Next week there will be a general holiday — Wednesday the 23 rd St. George’s Day.

A branch of the Red Cross was recently formed at Spaniard’s Bay and is making good progress under the guidance of four Graduate Nurses.

The dance held at the T.A. Hall last night was attended by a large number. Music was provided by Mickey Duggan and his orchestra. It was a most enjoyable event.

The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon. At this meeting, the notice of motion given last week by Councillor Meaney, referring to labor within the control of the Council, will be introduced.

The annual meeting of the G.W.V.A. Grand Falls Branch, will be held tonight at the K of C Hall, Grand Falls.

Recently, a house collection for the W.P.A. was taken up at Bishop’s Falls, and a sum of $132.28 was realized.

Plans are now underway at Spaniard’s Bay, for the celebration of the Golden Jubilee of Holy Redeemer Church, which will be held on May 4th.

It is currently reported that the business premises formerly owned by the Bonavista Produce Co. Ltd., has now been sold. This premises is better known as Templeman’s Ltd. So far the identity of the purchaser has not been made public — Fisherman’s Advocate.

The express going out this afternoon will be in two sections. The first with all first and second class passengers, will go at five o’clock, and the second, with all sleeping car passengers at 5.20. Diners will be attached to each section.

A resident of Buchans was before Magistrate Hollett at Grand Falls last week, charged with breaches of the Game and Inland Fisheries Act. Evidence of Game Warden Tilley and Constable Bond, was that they had visited the camp of the accused on April 3rd and found eighty-six rabbits. Of this number, thirty-one were unfit for human consumption and had to be thrown away. The accused stated the rabbits were not his. The man was convicted of being in possession of rabbits during the closed season, and permitting the meat of the others to decay. He was fined $50.00 or one month in goal on each charge.

A party of sixteen men left Bonavista last week for the Newfoundland airport, where they have secured employment, according to an item in the Fishermen’s Advocate.

The Agathuna Correspondent of the Humber Herald, writing about snow conditions on the Topsails says, “Why not tunnel this section or build a snow shed. It would give employment to a good number of men who need work.”

The bi-monthly meeting of the Carpenter’s Protective Association will be held in the S.U.F. Hall tonight, at 8.15 o’clock. At this meeting nomination of officers of the ensuing year will be held. All members of the Union will cease work at 6 p.m.


April 17 1941 TWO CREW MEMBERS DEAD TWO MEMBERS CREW TERRA NOVA DIED DURING VOYAGE. SHIP ARRIVES WITH 8600 OLD AND YOUNG SEALS

S.S. Terra Nova, Captain Stanley Barbour, arrived in port yesterday morning, hailing for 8600 pelts of young and old seals. Flags flew at half mast on the ship as she entered, for two members of the crew; WILLIAM FLEET of Trinity, and Food Controller JESSE BISHOP of St. John’s, had died during the voyage. The Terra Nova found the same conditions at the ice as S.S. Neptune, which arrived in port Sunday last, ice being in small strings and seals singly or in pairs.

The ship left port on March 5th and proceeding North, met the three other ships on the 8th and they all went North to Wolf Island, Labrador. Coming South, the ship entered the Strait of Bell Isle where S.S. Eagle, S.S. Neptune and S.S. Ranger had gone the day previously. Working through the ice out of the Straits, The Terra Nova received the same news as the others, of seals being taken in Green Bay. The first whitecoats were taken off Twillingate. Proceeding West and North to Groais Islands, a small patch of young harps were struck, and about 2,000 were secured. The ice broke apart, and the seals shared the same fate as those of the three other ships. North to Englee, a small patch was struck, and about 900 pelts secured.

When the ship came to the vicinity of Long Point, Twillingate, some old seals were struck. Only a portion of the crew went on the ice, as when the ship was in the mouth of White Bay, half the crew went on strike because they wanted to give up the voyage. When the men had killed some 3,000 old seals, the others went on the ice and commenced killing. The ship steamed North and continued to pick up scattered seals until Tuesday of this week, when off Groais Islands, the Captain decided to abandon the voyage. Twenty tons of coal were given to the Eagle, and then the homeward voyage was made, the ship arriving off this port yesterday morning.

[Note; Unable to find any further information re the deaths of Fleet and Bishop. J Baird]

April 17 1941 NFLD BOYS MET LIEUT. WALWYN Two Who Served on U. S. Ship Now Home On Brief Furlough

By the express, which arrived here in the city this week, there arrived at their homes, Gunner Harry Powell of Grand Falls, and Wireless operator Frank W. Barrett of Botwood. These men had been serving on one of the United States ships which is now in New York undergoing repairs, and they took advantage of the opportunity to take a brief trip home.

Mr. P.H. Cowan, who met them whilst he was traveling from Boston, stated the men had most interesting experiences to tell of, and both of them stated that whilst their ship was at Gibraltar some time ago, they had the pleasure of meeting Lieut. Walwyn, son of His Excellency the Governor and Lady Walwyn, who was delighted to meet them, especially when he learned that their homes were in Newfoundland.

April 17 1941 OBITUARY ORESTES (RES) TAYLOR: It is with deep regret we record the sudden passing of Orestes, son of Mrs. and H.J. Taylor (Master Shipwright, Contractor and Diver) which occurred Tuesday April 15th at his late residence, 5 Barter’s Hill.

Res. as he was most popularly known, was loved and respected by all who knew him for his kindness and exceptional temperament. He was a friend to all, and a sincere one. When his sudden passing was learned, his relations and all others who knew him, could hardly realize that he should be called from amongst their midst at such an early age.

In his passing, he leaves to mourn; a loving wife, nee Miss Laura Burry Rodgers, mother, and father, four sisters, Mrs. Harry Fraser, and Mrs. Geo. E. Adams, St. John’s: Mrs. Eric B. Rankin, Trinity; Mrs. William G. Young, Toronto, and one brother, Leslie at home.

The funeral which took place Thursday afternoon, was very largely attended.

April 17 1941 WEDDINGS MYERS — MARSHALL: At St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, yesterday afternoon, the wedding took place of Helen Sutherland, youngest daughter of Mrs. and the late J.C. Marshall of this city, and Douglas Gee, second son of Mrs. and the late Harrison Carter Myers of Petersburg, Virgnia, U.S.A. The ceremony was performed by Rev. H. Scott, Grand Falls.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her brother, Mr. Walter M. Marshall, was gowned in brocaded starched chiffon, with long train, the veil being caught in a tiara of orange blossoms. She wore a bouquet of Easter Lillies. The bride was attended by Miss Betty Ford, who wore a frock of forget-me-not blue, and carried a bouquet of scarlet carnations. Mr. Lewis Ayre was best man, and the ushers were Mrs. Leslie Marshall, Mr. Harry Drover and Mrs. W. Knowling. The bride’s mother wore a gown of navy blue, with corsage of pink carnations and silver fox fur.

A reception was held at the home of Mr. Leslie Marshall, brother of the bride, Winter Place, when Dr. C. Macpherson, C.M.G., proposed the toast to the bride and groom, which was replied to by the groom, who proposed the toast to the bridesmaids, to which the best man replied. The groom also proposed the toast to the bride’s mother. Rev. Mr. Scott spoke briefly.

The bride’s going away dress was a navy blue and white ensemble, and had a corsage of red carnations. The bride and groom left by express yesterday afternoon for North Sydney, where they will pick up their car, and will motor through Canada and the United States, to Petersburg, Virginia, where the honeymoon will be spent. They expect to be absent for three months.

April 17 1941 MARRIGES MYERS — MARSHALL — At St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, by Rev. H. Scott, Helen Sutherland, younger daughter of Mrs. and the late J.C. Marshall, to Douglas Gee, second son of Mrs. and the late Harrison Carter Myers of Petersburg Virginia.
April 17 1941 DEATHS HOWLEY — Passed away suddenly this Friday morning, W.R. Howley, K.C. Funeral notice later.

GLYNN — Passed peacefully away Thursday, April 17th, Mrs Clara Glynn, leaving 6 daughters, 5 sons, 2 sisters, 1 brother, to mourn their sad loss. Funeral Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 64 Goodridge Street.

POWER — Passed peacefully away Thursday, April 17th at 6 p.m., Ann Power, aged 84 years. Funeral tomorrow Saturday, at 2.30 p.m., from N.J. Murphy’s Mortuary Rooms.

April 17 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE In the Juvenile Court yesterday, three boys were charged with stealing confectionery to the value of $ 3.00, from a store owned by Mrs. Ella Ralph. They were also charged with stealing kippered herring and codfish fillets valued at $3 to $4, the property of James J. Duff. They were ordered to pay $2.00 each as compensation. None of them attend school.

Fishermen at Port aux Basques and vicinity, are doing well with codfish. The catch is being purchased by Messrs. Job Bros. & Co., for filleting.

Mothers and wives of the Navy, Army and Air Force men serving overseas, are welcome to the Caribou Hut this afternoon at 3.30 o’clock. Talking pictures will be shown and a musical program rendered.

The first convictions under the new Highway Traffic Act have been registered at the Magistrate’s Court for speeding. Drivers of two cars and two trucks were charged, and fines of $3.00 each were imposed in three cases and $3.50 in the fourth. The driver of the latter had his speedometer out of order. The accused were informed that their licenses would be endorsed.

Members of the crew of U.S. Alexander, held a dance at the T.A. Armory last night. Music was provided by La Fosse’s orchestra.

During the week, the 9 inch sewer in Cornwall Avenue was opened at the head of Shaw Street, and it was found that fifteen feet of pipe had been broken.

A motor car owned by a resident of Bell Island, which was parked on Duckworth Street near the Crosbie Hotel yesterday afternoon, started on its own and ran across the street, and went through one of the plate glass windows in the Royal Stores building. No person was in the car at the time. No one was injured.

The following passengers have arrived from New York and Halifax: Mrs. M. Barlow, Master W. Barlow, J. Loveberg, W.W. Metcalf, A. Wells, R. LeDrew, A.L. Leaf, E. Macpherson, N. Nord, A Williams, P.H. Cowan, J. Thomas, R. Raymond, L.A.C.P. Allerston, R.C.A.F., Sgt. L. Jones, R.C.A.F., Sgt. K Moore, R.C.A.F., Corp, W. Robinson, R.C.A.F., W. Drodge, R. Neil, L.A.C.F. Adams, R.C.A.F., L.A.C., H.G. Day, R.C.A.F., Corp. N. Hamill, R.C.A.F., Corp W. Morrison, R.C.A.F., L.A.C.J. Wurtele, R.C.A.F.

The regular meeting of Mount Cashel Old Boys Association will be held at Mount Cashel on Sunday afternoon at three o’clock.

Material raked from different streets is now being used for backfilling on Military Road at the B.I.S. wall.


April 24 1941 DEATHS WHELAN — Passed peacefully away at 1 a.m. Wednesday, at. St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, James Whelan, aged 73 years. Leaving to mourn three sons ( one son Joseph serving in the Nfld Militia), two sisters, Mrs. James Ryan and Mrs. Matthew Murphy, three grandchildren, also a large circle of friends. Funeral on Friday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 46 Springdale Street. R.I.P.

WALSH — Passed peacefully away at 12.30 a.m. Wednesday, Luke Richard Walsh, eldest son of the late Patrick and Ellen Walsh. Leaving to mourn wife, (nee Madeline Lawlor), four daughters, two sons and three brothers, Patrick, John and Edward, also a large circle of friends. Funeral Friday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 39 Freshwater Road. R.I.P.

MALEE — Passed peacefully away on the 23RD April, Thomas, beloved husband of Sarah Malee, aged 80 years. Leaving wife, five sons and five daughters to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Friday at 2.15 p.m. from his late residence South Side East. May the Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on his soul. R.I.P.

MOORES — At Freshwater, Carbonear District, on Tuesday afternoon, April 22nd, Cicely, beloved wife of John Moore, formerly of the firm W & J Moores. Funeral at Freshwater this Thursday afternoon.

NEARY — Passed peacefully away at the General Hospital at 2.30 p.m. Wednesday April 23rd George Neary. Funeral tomorrow, Friday, April 25th, from his late residence at Neary’s Pond, near Portugal Cove.


April 25 1941 WEDDING BELLS JOHNSTON — WHITTEN: The Church of England Cathedral was the scene of a quiet and pretty wedding, when on the afternoon of April 23rd at 3 p.m., Elizabeth Florence (Betty), daughter of Mrs. and the late P.J. Whitten, became the bride of Sergeant Clifton H. Johnston, R.A.F., son of Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Johnston, the ceremony being performed by Rev. Canon Higham.

The bride, who was given in marriage by her uncle, Mr. M.A. Mitchell, was most charmingly gowned in pale blue crepe with hat and shoes to match. Miss Irma Johnston, sister of the groom, acted as bridesmaid and wore a beige frock with tan accessories. Both the bride and bridegroom carried a lovely bouquet of carnations. Mr. Fred Whitten, brother of the bride, ably performed the duties of best man. The organist of the Church presided at the organ and the choir, of which the groom was a member, assisted in the ceremony.

The reception was held at the residence of the groom’s parents. The usual toasts were honored and best wishes extended to the bride, after which happy couple motored to Woodstock, where a short honeymoon will be spent. The bride’s traveling costume was dusty pink, hat to match, and navy coat.

April 25 1941 OBITUARY Mrs CLARA GLYNN: On Thursday evening, April 17th, at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, there passed to her eternal reward, fortified by the last rites of the Roman Catholic Church, a well known and respected former resident of Aquaforte and Bay Bulls, in the person of Mrs. Clara Glynn. Although the deceased had been suffering for over a year from an internal complaint, her demise came with startling suddenness to many relatives and friends.

Mrs. Glynn, nee Clara Power, was born in this city fifty-three years ago, and was married twice; first to George Croft of Aquaforte, who predeceased her eleven years ago, having been drowned when the schooner Mary M. Bolton sank near Cape Broyle Head. A few years later she married Anthony Glynn of Bay Bulls, who died in 1938.

During the time she lived in Aquaforte, Mrs. Glynn took a prominent part in parish affairs such as dances, garden parties, etc., and was always a willing worker in any cause that would benefit the Church or her neighbors. Her whole character could be summed up in four words; “Simple faith and kindliness” and there are many people on the Southern Shore who can remember many favors received from her hand. After Mr. Glynn’s death, Mrs. Glynn took up residence in St. John’s where, as in Aquaforte and Bay Bulls, her good-natured disposition won for her a host of friends who regret her departure.

Mrs. Glynn leaves to mourn their sad loss six daughters, Mrs. A.J. Warren and Mrs. M.P. Murphy of this city, Mrs. George T. Jones of Boston, Mass., and Clara, Winiford and Mina at home. Also five sons, George, Angus (with the Mercantile Marine) and Alfred, of this city, and Raymond and Ernest of Aquaforte, and six stepchildren. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Ernest Starkey of England and Mrs. Chas. Reckless of Boston Mass., and a brother, William Power, Mundy Pond. The funeral took place on Sunday evening, followed by a large concourse of mourners to Belvedere Cemetery, after the last prayers were recited at the R.C. Cathedral.

April 25 1941 MARRIAGE JOHNSTON — WHITTEN: At the Church of England Cathedral, by Rev. Canon Higham, Wednesday, April 23rd, Elizabeth Florence, daughter of Mrs. and the late P.J. Whitten, to Sergeant Clifton H. Johnston, R.A.F., son of Mr. and Mrs. E.J. Johnston.
April 25 1941 DEATHS CARVILLE — Passed peacefully away at 11 o’clock yesterday morning, Alice beloved wife of the late Capt. S. Carville. Leaving to mourn one son, one daughter, three grandchildren and a large number of friends and relatives. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 127 Cabot street. (Boston papers please copy)

April 26 1941 OBITUARY VALENTINE RYALL: At noon on Good Friday, fortified by the rites of the Holy Catholic Church, the pure soul of Valentine Ryall entered into rest eternal. Those who knew him in social and business life, speak in the highest terms of that strict sense of duty, that scrupulous honesty, and kindly charity which characterized him. But those who knew him better, knew him in his home life, where a man’s true character is revealed, those with whom each night he knelt at the family rosary, only they can tell of his Christian virtues, the strong faith in his Creator, the hope and trust in God for happiness in the life beyond, his heroic patience in suffering, and that sweet abiding charity which speaks ill of no man, that true charity of which the slogan is, “Do unto others as you would they should do unto you” marked the every day life of Val Ryall.

A sweet simplicity and grandeur of soul were his; faithful to God, loyal and true to his friends, and ever silent to the faults of others. What a lovely world this would be if such could be said of all men. We who knew him feel safe in the belief that when his soul left its earthly prison, it winged its flight to the bliss of Heaven, and the words of his Master, “Enter in thou good and faithful servant” fell, with joy celestial upon his ears.

He leaves to mourn, one brother, Thomas, four nephews, three nieces, many cousins, and a large circle of friends. On Easter Sunday, his mortal remains were laid to rest at Belvedere, there to await the final call.

April 26 1941 BIRTHS BENNETT — At Grace Hospital on April 25th to Peg, wife of Dr. R.E. Bennett, a Son.
April 26 1941 MARRIAGE MOAKLER — DOWNS: At the R.C. Cathedral April 23rd by Rev. Msgr. Kitchin, Joyce Evelyn, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.B. Downs, to Sergt. Edward P. Moakler, R.A.F., son of Alfred and the late Bridget Moakler, both of this city.
April 26 1941 DEATHS ADAMS — Passed peacefully away last evening, April 25th Annie Adams, aged 16 years; leaving to mourn father, mother and three brothers. Funeral on Monday at 2 p.m. from her late residence, Blackhead Road.
April 26 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE During last week, potholes were filled with ashes by Council employees in Raleigh St., Pennywell Rd., Linscott St., Freshwater Rd., Merry Meeting Rd., Queen’s Rd., LeMarchant Rd., Harvey Rd., Shaw St., Blackmarsh Rd., Craig Miller Ave., Topsail Rd., Long’s Hill, New Gower St., Duckworth St.

The annual Masonic Church service in aid of the Tasker Educational Fund, will be held at St. Thomas’s Church on Tuesday evening April 29th at 8.15 o’clock. Brethren will meet in Canon Wood Hall not later that 7.45, for the purpose of donning regalia and forming in procession.

Crushing of stone for work on the city streets is now in progress at the Signal Hill plant, and two crushers are working.

A Laborer was before Court yesterday, charged with beating his wife. The case was postponed because the plaintiff was too ill to appear.

The regular meeting of the Star of the Sea Association will be held tomorrow afternoon at their rooms. Much business is to be transacted.

The filling in, behind the new wall on the B.I.S. property, has now been completed on Military Road, and yesterday the fence was removed. The top dressing needs to be leveled as yet.

A special train leaving St. John’s at eight o’clock Wednesday morning next, will make connection at Argentia for the Bay route of Placentia Bay. There will be no connection for this route by Monday morning’s train.

Last week, Council employees removed ice from King’s Road, Rennie’s Mill Rd., Forest Rd., Pennywell Rd., Bonaventure Ave., Prince’s St., Power St., St. Claire’s Ave., Hayward Ave., Leslie St., Franklyn Ave., Barnes Rd.

The trial of Abe Smith, Jr., charged with breaches of the Alcohol Liquor Act, and for keeping a house resorted to for lewdness, will take place today at the Magistrate’s Court. These are the charges which he was summoned to appear for on the day that he left town, and was subsequently arrested at Port aux Basques.

April 26 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. ANN GRACE: Easter Morn, with all its promise of glory and joy, was the day on which the soul of Mrs. Ann Grace was called home after its earthly sojourn, to hear the words, “Well done good and faithful servant”, and to receive its Heavenly reward for a life well spent.

Born at Placentia some 80 years ago, Mrs. Grace became one of that town’s most prominent citizens, being ever foremost in works pertaining to charity, and the welfare of the community generally. An outstanding Catholic, she spent herself freely in all activities connected with the Church. A great neighbor, she was ever ready with sympathy and kindness in time of sorrow and distress.

Stricken three weeks before her death, Mrs. Grace had the consolation of having at her bedside as death drew near, her four sons, Jim and Ned, of Corner Brook, Lionel and Mike of Fort William, Ont., and her daughter, Sister Mary Felicita, R.N., of the Presentation Convent, Cathedral Square. Her husband John, predeceased her some twenty years ago, while her son paid the supreme sacrifice in the last war. Her other daughter, Mrs. Alex Berro of Alexandria, Virginia, was unable to return home when her mother was stricken.

Fortified by the rites of the Holy Mother Church, administered by Very Rev. Father O’Flaherty, and surrounded by her children, united after twenty years, Mrs. Grace met death unafraid. For her it was but an opening into another life, which would be glorious and joyful, as her earthly one had been good and useful.

Her funeral took place on April 15th and was attended by practically everyone in the Parish, testifying to the great esteem and respect in which she was held. Requiem Mass was celebrated by Very Rev. Father O’Flaherty, and at its conclusion the concourse wended its way to Mount Carmel Cemetery, the final resting place of the deceased lady.

In her passing, Placentia had loss one of its best citizens, and the Church, one of her most devoted daughters. Mrs. Grace was one of that class that is fast passing on, and the world is the poorer for their passing. Though she is dead, her memory will live on, and for years to come, she will be remembered in the prayers of most of the friends she has left behind.

To her bereaved sons and daughters we offer our deepest sympathy, and pray that God will soften the great blow sustained by them. FRIEND.


April 28 1941 NECROLOGY OF THE WEEK L.C. M. Staunch they were and true as steel. They proved themselves As only Newfoundlanders Can! They rest content.......

JACK V CONWAY: The necrology of the past week is particularly sad, as we look through the list of those who have preceded us into the Valley of the Silent. Especially it is touching when one realizes that several of the names which have appeared in the columns of the Daily News, were not only familiar associates, but some of them had actually been with us in the temporary haven of refuge known as the General Hospital, in the early spring of the present year. One of these was Jack Conway — to all appearances a casual patient, one who, with some treatment, would easily regain his youthful flush of color, his cheerful manner, his quite way of comradeship. At least that is what we thought, as we met him in the corridor on his admission to the institution. How soon have we been disillusioned! All the old days — the pleasant recollections – our confidential chats — the warmth of the real friendship we knew — have vanished, with the knowledge that another friend of our youth and maturing years, is no longer with us.

Jack Conway leaves behind him a large circle of acquaintances, a host of associates, by whom he is highly respected, and to those who survive him, this little tribute although seemingly belated, is by no means the less sincere.

THOMAS MALEE: When on Friday afternoon there was laid to rest all that was mortal of the late Thomas Malee, there was interred in Mother Earth, one of the good, honest hardworking men, who had never spared himself for his home and family. When you climbed the steps leading to his house on the Southside Hill, you knew there always a welcome — the hearth was never cold, and it was never to late to light the fire and sweep the dust away. It was possibly his greatest pleasure, to stand in the kitchen when the lamp was burning, and have his wife and children around him. No one was lost in the gloom near the window — there was always a greeting. His patriotism was shown by the action of his sons, who went forward in the last war; one laid down his young life for his King and Country, another served faithfully and well. The others did “their bit” too. To his good wife, surviving sons and daughters, as well as to his many relatives here in the city, as well as on Bell Island, this tribute is well merited.

April 28 1941 BIRTHS MONAGHAN — On April 26th at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, to Mary, wife of Dr. T.T. Monaghan, of Corner Brook, a daughter.
April 28 1941 DEATHS NICOL — Passed peacefully away Sunday Morning after a long illness, Kathleen, wife of Rex Nicol. Leaving to mourn; husband, 3 sons, 3 daughters, mother, brother and sister. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, Portugal Cove Road.—R. I. P.

SHAPTER — Sunday morning at 9o’clock, Margaret, widow of Joseph Shapter; leaving three sons, George in Hoboken, N.J., Charlie in the Canadian Navy, Albert J, in this city, two daughters, Mrs. W.B. Colford (Jen), Union City, N.J.; Mrs. Mary MacKinnon, Sydney, N.S.; also one sister and two step-sons. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. Tuesday from her late residence 7 College Square. R. I. P.

April 28 1941 EXPRESS PASSENGERS The following passengers arrived at Port aux basques yesterday: – Capt. A. Temple, Mrs. L. Jamieson, L. Reid, L.W. Shaw, W. Young, W. French, W. McCarthy, J. MacKenzie, A.H. Deslauriers, W. Hamilton, S.F. Cullen, G. Anderson, R. Carnell, P.C.A. Morris, G.J. Walsh, A. Vatcher, A and Mrs. Ledingham, T.J. Mullin, C. Brady, C. Mclean, C.N. Falson, L. Downton, G. Frederickson, H. Mcneil, R.C. Morris, B. McNeil, W.P. Ryan, D.M. Gosse, M.K. Taylor, A. Polsay, H.P. Morgan, W.J. Learning, F. Bannikan, J. Maher, A. Brown, A. Archibald, A.B Budden, J. Fitzpatrick, A.L. Larson, P. Klein, W.M. Collins, H.J. Miller, V. Baum, R.F. Lainof, H. Thompson, G. Walters, D.M. Ferney, Miss E. Mercer, Mrs. T. Barrett, Mrs. W.J. Barrett, C. Cohen, M. Stein, F.K. Garrison, F. Paguette, M. Le Fresne, J. Daganais, A.J. Berne, T. Gallant, L. McFatridge, A. McKay, Mrs. L. Morris and two children, W. Boyd, H. Shurette, M.G. Bishop, Mrs. R. Martel, C. McLaurin, Rev. J. Jones, W. Parsons, J.H. Parker, T. English, G. White, A. English, Mrs. H. Chafe.
April 28 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE At St. Joseph’s Church at eight o’clock this morning, Requiem Mass will be celebrated, commemorating the fourth anniversary of the death of the Rev. A. M. GIBBS, C.C.

A man who was before Court on Saturday, charged with assaulting his wife, was fined $50.00 or two months in prison. The man also had to sign bonds in the sum of $100.00 to keep the peace in the future.

From the advance sales of tickets, it is evident that there will be a large attendance at the formal dance to be held at the B.I.S. Club Rooms on Wednesday night. Music will be provided by Walter Chambers Orchestra.

A dance will be held at the T.A. Club Rooms tonight. Mickey Duggan and his Orchestra will provided the music.

A truck driver was before the magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with passing a street car whilst passengers were alighting. He was fined $1.00.

The driver of a truck was fined $3.00 at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, after being convicted of driving at a speed of 30 m.p.h. on Duckworth St.

Another dance was held at the U.S. Sergeant’s Club, Duckworth Street, on Saturday night. Music was supplied by the ship’s orchestra. It was an enjoyable affair.


April 29 1941 WEDDING BELLS GLEASON — STONE: The Gleason – Stone nuptials, which took place Easter Sunday at St. Agatha’s R.C. Church, 49th St. and 7th Ave., Brooklyn, was one of the gayest weddings among Newfoundlanders in Brooklyn to be celebrated here for sometime,

The contracting parties were Mr. Charles R. Gleason, son of Hannah and the late Patrick Gleason of St. John’s, and Miss Mary Ellen Stone, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Stone of Bay Bulls. The ceremony was performed at 4.30 p.m. by Rev. Fr. Hoehn, in the presence of a large gathering of friends.

The bride was charmingly attired in ivory satin and carried a bouquet of East Lillies. She was attended by Mrs. J Gleason, who wore blue lace organdie. The bride was given in marriage by Mr. J Gleason, and Mr. Michael Eagan performed the duties of best man. On leaving the Church after the ritual, the guests returned to Chaplin’s Hostelry, 94th St. and 4th Ave., where the reception was held, and a sumptuous repast partaken of.

Toast to the bride and groom was made and responded to by the happy couple, after which dancing and entertainment was indulged in. Many and costly were presents received, showing the esteem in which the young couple were held. After a honeymoon in Massachusetts, the newlyweds will take up residence at 503 62nd. St., Brooklyn. — Newfoundland Weekly.


April 30 1941 PROLIFIC Five muskrats were taken to Prague in 1905, and their offspring have spread into upper and lower Austria, Bavaria, and Germany, and now number more than 100,000,000.
April 30 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Weekly Form was held at Columbus Club last night and was enjoyed by the members.

The Magisterial Enquiry into the accidental death of the late Mr. PEDDLE, was continued yesterday afternoon before Magistrate O’Neill. The Assistant Chief of Police is conducting the enquiry. Mr. R.A. Parsons is attending in the interests of the relatives of the deceased, and Mr. J.B. McEvoy for the Golden Arrow Coaches. Ltd.

A big card party is being held in St. Patrick’s Auditorium tomorrow night, in aid of the Boy Scouts. Fourteen prizes will be offered including two tons coal, hams, bacon, biscuits, vegetables and flour, as well as two cash prizes of $20.00 and $10.00, to be drawn for on Thursday, May 15th when the second one will be held

Weather conditions yesterday and last night were mid-winter like. It was snowing all day, and last night it was frosty, so that there was a coating of ice on some of the streets. People who were hoping that the sunshine of the past week or so, heralded an early spring, are consoling themselves with the saying, “April showers bring May flowers.”

This is a half holiday and stores will close for business at 12.30 p.m.

Passengers for points as far as Twillingate will leave St. John’s at 10 o’clock this Wednesday morning.

A number of boys have been summoned to appear before the Juvenile Court today, for breaches of the Highroad Traffic Act. These boys were riding bicycles and it is alleged they violated the Act in various ways.

A card party was held at the T.A. Club last night and was well attended. Cash prizes were given.

A large number of people traveled by the express yesterday evening, and it went in two sections, the first at six o’clock, and the second twenty minutes later.

A meeting of the Society for the Protection of Animals will be held at the Municipal Council Chambers on Monday night, for the purpose of making arrangements for the annual bridge.

Six Canadian Solders were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon, charged with loose and disorderly conduct on the public street. One was convicted and fined $2.00. The charges against the others was dismissed.

Many of the ponds on the Southern Shore are still frozen over, and in some of them, ice has not broken close to the shore. That will be of interest especially to trouters, who may have had it in mind to take a visit to some of their favorite haunts.

At the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, a man appeared charged with beating his wife. The woman stated that her husband had been ill-treating her for three years, and when he blackened her eyes and kicked her, she summoned him. The defendant asked for a postponement. His request was granted but he had to sign a bond to appear today.


May 2 1941 OBITUARY LOUIS BRIFFETT: Rosedale, Alexander Bay, April 23 — On April 10th, at the Grace Hospital, Louis Briffett passed beyond the shadows, into the eternal day. The youngest son of Susannah Elliott Stroud and Augustus Jean Briffett, of St. Malo, France, he was born seventy years ago at Greenspond, but in his boyhood, came with his parents and brothers to Rosedale, in Alexander Bay. For may years he was actively engaged in the lumber industry, and up to the time of his death, took a keen interest in everything connected with the forests of his native land. He was well and favorably known throughout the Country, and especially on the Avalon Peninsula, which he visited most often in the interest of his business. In late years, he was closely connected with the export of wood to the Old Country, and many cargos of pit-props have been shipped overseas from his timber block on the Terra Nova River.

In addition to a thorough knowledge of Newfoundland and its affairs, he took keen interest in the world in general. And no person could follow the course of the present war with greater zeal and understanding. Thirty-three years ago, he joined the Loyal Orange Association, and was a honorary member at the time of his death. His ready wit and outstanding qualities made his company unusually interesting.

A generous neighbor; A loyal friend; his passing will be deeply regretted by all who knew him. He leaves to mourn their sad loss, his wife, Adeline Sweetapple, five sons, Willis, Philip, Bert, Douglas and Eric; one daughter, Josephine; six grand-children, and a large circle of other relatives and friends.

Mrs GEORGE FAOUR: It was with deepest regret that the many friends of Mrs. George Faour learned of her death on April 1st. Fortified by the rites of the Holy Catholic Church, the deceased passed away peacefully after a long and lingering illness. The late Mrs. Faour, who was 75 years old, was a native of Mt. Lebanon, Syria. Following the death of her husband, Mr. George Faour, at Mt. Labanon, which was a great blow to her, she arrived here about twenty five years ago, with her son Edward, where they ran a successful tobacco business until the time of Edward’s death about 15 years ago, which came as another great shock to her, as she was practically all alone. But still she managed to carry on with a small fruit and confectionery business, up to the time of her death.

Honest in her business dealings, and with a kind word for everybody, she was well liked by her many friends and customers, and will be sadly missed. She is survived by one son, Simon, now residing at Burlington, Vermont, one daughter in South America, fourteen grandchildren, and one granddaughter, Mrs. William Vokey. The funeral took place from her late residence No. 58 New Gower St., to the Roman Catholic Cathedral. Following the Requiem Mass she was buried at Mt. Carmel Cemetery. R. I. P.

May 2 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A bus driver was fined $2.50 at the Magistrate’S Court yesterday, when he was convicted of driving at 30 m.p.h. on Duckworth St.

A bus driver who pleaded guilty to having the speedometer on his bus out of order, was permitted to go on suspended sentence at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

The train leaving on Monday morning next, instead of tomorrow morning, will make connection at Argentia for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route.

The May Devotions began at the R.C. Churches last night. At the Cathedral, St. Patrick’s, and St. Joseph’s, there will be devotions every evening during the month, beginning at 7.30.

Four boys were before Court yesterday, charged with riding bicycles with others on the handle bars. They were fined 50 cents each and cautioned against a repitition of the offence.

The Deer Lake Correspondent of the Western Star, states that Mr. Max Whelan is at present there, together with a number of men, in connection with work on the Humber River Bridge, which has now resumed.

The Newfoundland Timber Co., completed their logging last week at Flat Bay Brook, and are now preparing for the drive, according to the Western Star Correspondent from St. George’s, who also says that Mr. Pomeroy stated, that although operations were on a small scale this year, they were very successful.

The second in a series of Card tournaments will be held at the Star Hall tonight. Cash prizes will be offered for tonight as well as for the series.

A bus driver was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday and was convicted for overtaking a motor car on Harvey Road without first seeing that the traffic way was clear. The accused collided with a motor car when he cut ahead of it. A fine of $2.50 was imposed.


May 3 1941 OBITUARY JOHN WESLEY CLOUTER: Buchans, April 29 — The community of Buchans was shocked to hear of the sudden death of the late John Wesley Clouter, who passed away early on Saturday morning, April 26th at his residence. The deceased was born at Catalina, June 17th, 1890, son of the late Solomon Clouter.

He leaves to mourn; his wife Fannie, formerly Miss Fannie Courage of Catalina; five daughters; Genevieve now living at Dildo, married to Mr. J.A. Pretty; Elva, married to Mr. Gordon Heale at Buchans; Opal employed with the E.V.R. Stores Ltd.,; Dulcie, and Shirley, attending school; also one son, John W. Junior, employed with the Buchans Mining Company Ltd.

Previous to his death, he was employed with the E.V.R. Stores Ltd., where he worked some seven years, and those who knew him in his business life, speak in the highest terms of his strict sense of duty. He was energetic and efficient, always at his work, striving to do his very utmost at all times to please everyone. He will not only be missed by his co-workers, but by all with whom he came in contact. He possessed an individual quality admired by all.

As a Church member, he was very active in all matters in connection with the United Church. He greatly distinguished himself with the Choir, where his voice will be missed by all Church goers. Beside being a member of the Choir, he was also a member of the Board of Stewards, and during his seven years of Church work, he gained esteem and admiration among all her members.

He was a past Grand Officer of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Newfoundland, having joined at Catalina, and a Sir-Knight of The Royal Black Preceptor also of Catalina, and a member of the S.U.F. (Society of United Fishermen). Recently, he had been elected a member of Buchans Public School Board.

In his passing, Buchans has lost one of its best citizens, and the United Church, one of her best members. He was foremost in all maters in connection with charity, and did his utmost in helping the war effort.

A memorial service was held in The United Church on Sunday morning at 11 a.m., and a very large number of people attended to pay their last respects. A very inspiring address was delivered by the officiating Minister, the Rev. Thomas Evans. The service was opened with the Doxology, followed by the singing of the hymn — “Thy way, not mine O Lord” which was the late Mr. Clouter’s favorite. A solo was sung by Mrs. James Hart, “He wipes the tears from every eye.” Music was by the Organist, Mrs. C.A. House.

The burial ceremony was read at 4 p.m. at the home, where music was supplied by Mrs. Evans, and at 4.30 the funeral began to proceed. A very large crowd attended, numbering some seven hundred people. The casket was almost encircled with beautiful floral wreaths and sprays. The wreaths and sprays, as well as all other messages and cards of sympathy, showed that he had many friends, who, with his wife and family and relatives, mourn his loss.

The funeral procession was led by the Ladies Orange Benevolent Association, Tweedsmuir Rebekeh Lodge, Loyal Orange Association, and the Royal Black Preceptory. The members of the family followed the corpse by car. The Manager and employees of the Exploits Valley Royal Stores Ltd., were next in the procession. On reaching the train, the corpse was removed to the express car, to be carried to Catalina for interment.

All arrangements were under the personal supervision of Mr. C.L. Courage, who also arranged with Mr. E.E. King to accompany the remains to its final resting place. His wife, son, and daughter Opal, also went to Catalina with the corpse for burial.

The writer, as well as his many friends, extends heartfelt sympathy.

May 3 1941 BIRTHS PARSONS — On April 20th to Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Parsons, Harbor Grace, a son.
May 3 1941 IN MEMORIAM MILLER — In loving memory of Myrtle Miller, Portugal Cove, who died May 3rd, 1936.

Softly at night the stars are shining, On a sad and lonely grave Where we laid our darling Myrtle Whom we loved but could not save.

Inserted by Father, Mother, sisters and Brother. To the bereaved family and relatives:

“Smooth let it be or rough”, It will be still the best, Winding or straight it leads, Right onward to thy rest. Peace Perfect Peace. H. R. B. 

May 3 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Messrs. George H. Tapp and George Burdock have arrived here from Halifax. The former is en route to Harbor Grace.

In the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, a man who is a Bailee was charged with stealing a suit of rubber clothes. The charge was dismissed.

Passengers for the South Coast, St. Pierre, and Halifax: service leaves St. John’s at 10 o’clock this morning.

The Western Star Summerside Correspondent, states that it is rumored that work on the much discussed fish meal plant is to begin shortly. It is a subject of much interest to people on that side of the Bay.

The Magisterial Enquiry into the cause of the death of the late Mr. PEDDLE concluded yesterday afternoon before Magistrate O’Neill. The man died at a result of injuryies sustained when he was hit by a bus on New Gower Street.

May 3 1941 WEDDINGS Two weddings took place in Codroy last week. Miss Susan ANDERSON, Teacher at Cape Anguille, became the wife of Mr. Thomas GALE, and Miss Cynith SAMMS of Cape Anguille was married to Mr. John EVANS, of Codroy. — Western Star.

May 5 1941 DEATHS MURPHY — Suddenly on Saturday, May 3rd, James Murphy aged 72 years. Leaving wife, seven sons, three daughters, and one sister, to mourn their sad loss. Funeral today, Monday, at 2,30 p.m. from his late residence, 64 Brazil’s Square.

WOODFORD — Passed peacefully away Saturday May 3rd, Ann, beloved wife of James Woodford in her 87th year; left to mourn their sad loss, husband, one sister Mrs, Badcock, residing in the U.S.A., one grandson. Funeral this afternoon, from her late residence, 45 Cabot Street. (American papers please copy)

May 5 1941 OBITUARY JAMES MURPHY: The sudden passing of Mr. James Murphy, at his residence on Saturday afternoon, came as a severe blow to his relatives, and a distinct shock to his many friends, some of whom had been speaking to him on that same day. For some months past, the deceased had not been in robust health, though he was able to be about and never ill enough to stay indoors; advancing years had not affected his heart condition and his Physician had advised his taking things easy.

On Saturday, he went out as usual, and after conversing with some of the men on the street and making a call to the residence of one of his daughters, he returned home. Scarcely was he in when he was stricken with a severe attack, and death followed soon afterward.

The late Mr. Murphy was well and favorable known in the city, and indeed in many parts of the Island. In his early days he was an Electrician with the Light & Power Co., and was one of those who helped install the street lighting system and to kelp keep it in operation. These were the times when street lights needed constant attention and carbons had to be inserted almost daily. Later, he retired from this work and went into the coastal steamship service. For several years he was engaged on this service, in fact up to the time of his retirement from active work. At first he was with Bowring Bros., when they were operating the coastal trade, and latterly with the Newfoundland Railway. His last ship was the Glencoe, on which he served the last nine years of his life.

The late Mr. Murphy was not a man who took an active part in the public or the sporting life of the Country. He was one of those who was wrapped up in his family and in his calling, and these always took first place in his thoughts. Despite that however, he kept himself posted on current affairs, and could and did intelligently discuss all matters of the moment. He was held in high respect by all who knew him, as a man of honor and industry.

Left to mourn his passing are; his wife, seven sons, John J., Tinsmith; William J, Painter; Michael, Peter, Frank of this city; Thomas residing at Sydney, and James residing in New York: three daughters residing in the city viz Mesdames J. O’Connell, M. Colford, and Thos Power, as well as one sister, Mrs. E. Pittman. To all, sympathy will be extended by many friends.

The funeral takes place at 2.30 this afternoon, from his late residence 64 Brazil’s Square.

May 5 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Feildians Club will hold a smoker tomorrow night, when the special speaker will be Mr. C.E. Hunt. K.C.

A meeting of the Ladies committee for St. Patrick’s Hall annual sports, will be held tonight at eight o’clock, at the school, when preliminaries in connection with the usual Field Day will be taken up.

A youth, whose home is in St. Philip’s, was before Court on Saturday, charged with forcibly taking a ring, valued at $7.50, from a boy aged 7 years, on Lime St. The ring was recovered and the accused was put under bond in the sum of $50.00.

A dance will be held ast the T.A. Club Rooms tonight with music being supplied by Mickie Duggan’s Orchestra.

The train leaving at 8.30 this morning, will make connections at Argentia for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route. The train leaving this morning will make connection at Argentia for Western Route and Placentia Bay.

A van driver was before Court on Saturday, and was find $3.50 for driving at 32.m.p.h. on New Gower Street. An Army driver was fined $3.00 for driving at 30 m.p.h. on Harvey Road.

A meeting of the Society for the Protection of Animals will be held tonight at the City Hall. Business in connection with the annual card party and bridge will be discussed.

Two or three boys were before the Juvenile Court on Saturday, charged with riding on bicycle handle bars, etc. Fines were imposed, and the boys were warned against repeating these breaches of the Highway Traffic Act.

The women’s Patriotic Association, house to house collection in St. John’s, will begin this week. The ladies hope that they will meet with generous response in view of the importance of this work.

A truck driver was fined $4. at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, for having defective brakes on his truck. The evidence was that a collision was caused by the condition of the brakes. Another was fined $5.00 for the same offence. This driver knocked a man down on LeMarchant Road.

A lecture will be given tonight, under auspices of the Nfld Historical Society, at the Chambers of the Council of Higher Education, by Rev. H. Kirby, whose subject will be: “The Inland Past History of Newfoundland”. A cordial invitation is extended to all who care to attend.

Newpapers are not the creators of democracy; they are creatures of democracy — Manchester Boddy, Los Angeles Publisher.

According to the latest figures, 6748 civil aircraft were produced in the United States during the year 1940, an 81 per cent increase over the number produced in 1939.


May 6 1941 OBITUARY NATHANIEL SHEPPARD: News was received by Mr. H.W. Sheppard, Spaniard’s Bay, on April 1st, of the serious illness of his brother, Nathaniel, in the Hospital at Lynn, Mass. Daily communications were kept up, and it was learned that despite the efforts of Specialists, who performed two major operations, complications set in from which he could not rally, and he passed away in the early morning of April 12th.

The late Mr. Sheppard was born at Spaniard’s Bay, 52 years ago, one of Mrs. Alfreda and the late Levi Sheppard. He went to the U.S.A. when a very young man, and has been a resident of Lynn., Mass., for about 30 years. He was an employee of the General Electric Co., of that place, for 24 years. He was Council Man on the Local Maintenance Union, and his efforts on behalf of his fellow workmen won him the esteem of all. In a tribute to the deceased, one of his associates wrote; “Nath was a quiet, pipe-smoking, solid type of man, who believed in social and economic progress in the democratic ways.”

An impressive funeral service which was attended by several hundred relatives and friends, including a delegation from the General Electric Co., was held Tuesday, April 15th. About 50 employees of the General Electric Co., formed a guard of honor at the Church, and the pall-bearers were officials of the Local Maintenance Council. Service at the graveside, was conducted by the Rev. Albert Chafe, Rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, of which the deceased was a member. Interment was at Riverside Cemetery, Saugus, Mass. Details from the Police Department of Lynn and Saugus, Mass., escorted the funeral cortege.

The profusion of beautiful floral tributes, as well as the numerous messages and expressions of sympathy, testify to the esteem in which the late Mr. Sheppard was held.

Left to mourn the passing of their loved one are his wife, formerly Miss Myra Snow of Bay Roberts, two sons and three daughters, all of Lynn, Mass., his mother, one brother, Mr. H.W. Sheppard of Spaniard’s Bay; three sisters’ Mrs. Katherine Neil , Spaniard’s Bay, Mrs. Winnie Smith, Bishop’s Cove, and Mrs. Bertha Yetman, Bryant’s Cove, C.B., to all of whom sympathy is extended.

May 6 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The dance held at T.A. Club Rooms last night was largely attended and enjoyed to the full. Music was provided by Mickey Duggan and his orchestra.

An important meeting of Dairymen will be held at Brookfield School House tonight at 8.30 o’clock.

A motorist who was before Court yesterday charged with the driving of his car on which there was no tail light, was find $1.00.

The brass band which is attached to the Canadian Forces, was on Church parade on Sunday past, and attracted much attention and favorable comments.

It is expected, that work on the Nfld. Light & Power Co.’s Water Power at Tors Cove, which was carried on only on small scale during the winter months, will soon re-open in full swing again.

An item in the Evening Telegram yesterday, headed, “Asking for Trouble”, makes reference to a placard displayed in the rear window of a motor car, and on [Copy ends here! GW]

A man who was given in charge of his wife for being drunk and disorderly in their home, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and was ordered to sign bonds to keep the peace in the future.


May 7 1941 DEATHS PEARCE — Suddenly Monday, following an operation at Hove, Sussex, England, Beth, wife of Capt. R.H. Pearce, R.N. and daughter of Mrs. S.K. Bell, of this city.

LIDSTONE — Passed away at the General Hospital at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nathaniel Lidstone, leaving wife, one son and two daughters at Montreal. Funeral today, Wednesday, at 2.30 p.m. from Pentecostal Tabernacle, Casey Street.

May 7 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual meeting of the Newfoundland Permanent Savings and Investment Association will be held in the Newfoundland Board of Trade Rooms this evening at 8 o’clock.

Work on the new Prince’s Theatre is progressing favorably, under the direction of Foreman Carpenter George Normore. He and his men are now at work on the interior of the building, which will be thoroughly modern in every particular. It is expected to be completed and ready for opening by the end of June. — Bell Islander.

Six small boys from Windsor were before Court in Grand Falls last week, charged with stealing oranges from a freight car at the Railway Station. Mr. Sheppard of the Freight Shed told the Court, that much trouble is being caused by boys and there is always danger of fire. The boys were convicted and fined $1.65 each, the cost of the oranges.

The F.A.G.A. are holding another informal dance at Bishop Feild College Hall on Friday night at 8.30. Gordon Foley’s orchestra will provide the music.

A Seaman was before the Court yesterday and was charged with being drunk and causing trouble aboard his vessel. He was remanded till the ship is ready to sail.

It is proposed to begin the St. John’s-Fogo-Lewisporte service on Saturday the 10th May. There will be a departure on that day and every second Saturday thereafter, and one from Lewisporte on the 16th May, and every second Friday thereafter.

A card party will be held at the T.A. Club tonight when the usual cash prizes will be offered.

A young man was before Court yesterday charged with stealing the sum of approximately $70.00 from his employer. He was remanded and released on bail.

A test blackout will be held in the towns of Grand Falls, Windsor, Bishop’s Falls, and Botwood tonight. Similar arrangements will be in force as on the last occasion.

The express which went out yesterday was in two sections. The first with all first and second class passengers, left at 6 p.m., and all sleeping car passengers left at 6.20. There were a large number of travelers.

A fifty-three year old man who lives on Prospect Street, was before Court yesterday charged by a resident of King’s Road with entering her home whilst drunk, and going to bed there. He was fined $5.00 and put under bond in the sum of $50.00.

The marriage took place in Notre Dame Cathedral, Montreal, on Saturday April 26th, of Mr. Louis PETRIE, Wabana, to Miss Hazel MACDONALD of Port Mulgrave, Nova Scotia. Mr. And Mrs. Petrie are taking up residence at Arvida, Quebec, where the groom has a good position on the Engineering Staff of the Aluminum Company of Canada. — The Bell Islander.

Objection was raised in the Civil Court yesterday, to summonses issued by a departmental store, on which the initials of the delinquents appeared. Mr. Gerald Tessier, Solicitor for the plaintiffs, pointed out that it is usual rather than the exception, for mercantile firms to use the initials rather than the full name of their customers. Judge Browne pointed out that in future, unless the Christian name in full is given, the writs will not be issued.

Visitors to New York from Newfoundland recently, were Mr. T.W. Collingwood, Managing Director of Baine Johnston & Co., Ltd., Mrs. S.W. Moores of the firm W. &. J Moores, Carbonear, and Mr. Clyde Lake of St. John’s, were here on business connected with their firms. Mr. Lake returned from a trip to Jamaica, B.W.I., and will visit Montreal before returning to Newfoundland; Messrs Collingwood and Moores will return via Boston: – Newfoundland Weekly.


May 8 1941 WEDDING BELLS DICKSON — BUTLER: A very pretty wedding took place at St. Thomas’s (the old Garrison Church) May 6th, when Evelyn May, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Butler, became the bride of Major Henry E. Dickson, R.C.E., son of Mr. and Mrs. C.H. Dickson of Sydney, N.S.

Captain J. Bennett, Chaplain of the Canadian Forces stationed in Newfoundland, performed the wedding ceremony.

The bride was charmingly attired in power blue ensemble with corsage of roses, and was attended by Mrs. Robert Barrett as matron of honor, who wore navy blue crepe with accessories to match, and Miss Marjorie Pitcher, bridesmaid, wore dusky rose with navy accessories. Lieut. D.M. MacLeod, R.C.E. was best man.

The brides mother was dressed in navy blue crepe with corsage of carnations.

After the ceremony, the bridal party proceeded to the home of Mrs. H.P. Pitcher, Hayward Ave., where a small reception was held and the usual toasts honored.

A large number of the groom’s fellow officers were present at the wedding ceremony, and the happy couple were the recipients of many valuable gifts.

Major Dickson has been transferred back to duty with his regiment, to Sydney, and the bride and groom will take up residence there, after spending their honeymoon touring the Maritimes, Quebec and Ontario.

May 8 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A card party was held at the T.A.. Club last night and was well attended. Cash prizes were given.

The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon, and some important matters will beup for discussion.

A meeting of the Regatta Committee will be held tomorrow night at the City Hall, when important business will be discussed.

Nomination of officers of the L.S.P. Union for the coming year, will be held at the hall tonight at 8 o’clock.

The annual meeting of the Newfoundland Automobile Association will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel tonight at 8 o’clock.

A number of cases for breaches of the Highroad Traffic Act, were heard at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, and fines were imposed in most cases.

Arthur Priestman Cameron, “The man from Yorkshire”, with Alan Pittman, will be on the air tonight at 8 o’clock over radio Station VOCM.

The express going out this afternoon will be in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at 6 p.m., and all sleeping car passengers at 6.20 p.m.

A message received from Winterton T.B. yesterday, stated that the cod fishery had started there and that one man who had gone on the grounds and secured a half quintal.

On Empire Night , May 24th, a Cinderella Dance will be held at Columbus Club. Dancing will begin at 7.30 and continue till midnight, and music will be provided by the Imperial Orchestra.

Despite the winter like conditions existing for some time past, there are signs of spring, and it can be noticed that grass is turning green and that flowers are beginning to sprout. A couple of fine warm days would make a lot of difference.

The annual bridge and auction forty-five tournament, under the auspices of the S.P.A., will be held at Bishop Field College Hall on the afternoon and evening of Thursday the 29th May. Proceeds will be for the joint purpose of the W.P.A. and S.P.A.


May 9 1941 BIRTHS ISNER — At. St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, on Thursday, May 8th to Mr. and Mrs. C.N. Isner, St. John’s, a son.
May 9 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mr. John Skinner and Mrs. Arthur Cook and families, wish to thank those who helped in any way, in their sad bereavement, in the death of their loving mother.

For Sprays — Mr. and Mrs. Jack Quinlan, Mr. and Mrs. Tasker Cook, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Cook, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cook, Mr. and Mrs. George Cook and family, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Heale.

For Wreaths — The employees of A.H. Murray Ltd., Mr. P.D. Brothers, Mr. John Sinnott, Mr. Thomas Reddy, Mr. William Crocker, Mr. Ralph Purchase, Mr. Joseph Lane, Mr. Harry Ford, Mr. Harry Fogarty, Mr. Francis Lawlor, Mr. Jack Luscombe, Mr. H Hynes, Mr. Leo Steele, Mr. B. Baggs, Mr. Herbert Randell, Mr. George Pike, Mr. Thomas Newhook, Mr. Thomas Murphy, Miss Donnelly, Miss Walsh, Miss Benson, Miss Mosdell, Mr. James Brewer, Mr. James Kehoe, Capt. P. Rumsey, Mr. Albert Spencer, Mr. Randolph Crocker, Mr. Dominica Slaney, Mr. Albert Street, Mr. Jol Morry.

For Acts of Kindness — Dr. T. Anderson, Rev. J.T. Rhodes, Mrs. Robert Horwood, Mrs. Joseph Cook, Mrs. Ronald Cook, Mrs. Arch Mitchell.

For use of Telephone — Mr. and Mrs Harry Diamond.

For sympathy Cards — Mr. and Mrs. John Hammond, Mr. and Mrs Ronald White, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cook, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Horwood, Mr. and Mrs. Caleb Chaytor, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Clooney and family, Mr. and Mrs. A. Stacey, Mr. and Mrs. Ivany and family, Mr. and Mrs. George Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. Chas, Hall, Miss Muriel Pynn, Miss Marjorie Randell, Miss Dorothy Morris, Miss Ena M. Coombs.

May 9 1941 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd., wish to thank the following who so kindly send magazines, playing cards, etc., to them during the month of March and April, for the use of Recruits joining the various Services, and the men of the Mercantile Marine: — Mr. S. King, Jr., Mrs. L.C. Outerbridge, Masters A. Chatwood and D. Morgan, the Hotel Barber Shop, Miss M. Frew, Miss M Parker, Mrs. P. Jackman, Mrs. A. Brown, Mrs. J.R. Stick, Mr. G.F. Pike, Mrs. G. Crosbie, Mrs. J.C. Baird, Miss Kent, Mr. E.P. Conroy, Mrs. C. Hookey, Mrs. B.B. Stafford, Mrs. V. Stephens, Miss P. William, Mrs. C. Pope, Miss G.C. Carter, Mr. J.R. Steele, Mrs. C.R. Bell, Mrs. D.M. Baird, Mr. A Stevenson, The Morris Sail-workers, Miss M. Fitzpatrick, Mrs. G. Stirling, Mr. H.A LeMessurier, Mr. A White, Miss H Lodge, Miss M Worsley, Mrs. D. Murray, Mrs. A.G. Williams, Mrs. A.E. Capstick, Mrs. G.M. Bowrnrigg, Mrs. Cole, Mr. H.G.R. Mews, Dr. J.B O’Reilly and Mr. W.A. Doner.
May 9 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The third in the series of card tournaments will be held at the Star Hall tonight. The usual cash prizes will be given tonight, whilst there will be special prizes for the best scores in the series.

A resident of Torbay, was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with selling potatoes that were not in accordance with Grading Regulations. A plea of not guilty was entered for the prosecution. On motion of Mr. J.D. Higgins, for the accused, the case was dismissed.

Repairs were made with gravel and shale rock, last week, to St. Claire’s Avenue, Hamilton Ave., Pennywell Road West. Repairs were made with gravel to Howley Avenue Extension, Raleigh Street sidewalk, Pleasant St, Quidi Vidi Road, Signal Hill Road and Pennywell Road sidewalks.

A motorist charged with operating a car without having a drivers’ license, was before Court yesterday and pleaded not guilty. He said he had a license for last year, and his employer had gone to the office several times this year to get a new license for him, but there was such a rush that he could not wait. The case was dismissed.

A motor car driver who was charged with exceeding the speed limit on Waterford Bridge Road when another vehicle was approaching in an opposite direction, was find $2.50 at the Magistrate’ Court yesterday. A Traffic Officer stated he had trailed the man, who was doing 35 m.p.h. West of Caribou Hill.

A meeting of the S.P.A. will be held at the City Hall on Monday night next.

A meeting of the Plumbers and Pipe-Fitters Association was held last night at the Crosbie Hotel.

The F.A.G.A. are holding an informal dance at Bishop Field College Hall tonight. Music will be provided by Gordon Foley’s Orchestra.

During the past week, adjustments were made to the controlling valves at Bell’s Hill, with a view to curtailing the supply of water to George’s Pond Reservoir at Signal Hill.

A motorist before Court yesterday for driving at 30 m.p.h. on New Gower Street, was fined $2.00. A truck driver was fined $3.50 for doing 35 mph on Harvey Road.

Council employees. in the past few days have filled potholes with tar mix in Cochrane St., Church Hill, Robinson’s Hill, Long’s Hill, Hamilton St., Duckworth St., Queen’s Road, King’s Bridge Road, Cavendish Square, Pennywell Road, Rawlin’s Cross, Military Road, Freshwater Road, Job St., LeMarchant Road.

Capt. John and Mrs Shears were in Curling last week, and to a Western Star Representative, Capt. Shears said that between four and five million feet of lumber had been cut along the North West Coast the past winter. His cut was about three quarters of a million. At Lomond, about 11, 500 cords pit-props were cut, but this timber will likely remain un-driven this season, because of shipping difficulties. Speaking of seals, Mr. Shears said about 150 old ones were taken at Port aux Choix in March, and some were also taken at Anchor Point.


May 11 1941 WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT Mr. and Mrs F.H. Hue announce the marriage of their daughter Ruth, to Mr. Rex E. Rood at Halifax, N.S. The wedding took place at Halifax, May 23rd.

The wedding of Molly, youngest daughter of the late William O’D. Kelly of this city, and John J., son of the late John J. and Mrs. Coady of Burin North, takes place with Nuptial; Mass, today at St. Mary’s Cathedral, Halifax. Nova Scotia.

May 11 1941 DEATHS ABBOTT — Passed peacefully away at 7.30 Friday evening, Alphonsus Abbott, aged 57 years; leaving to mourn 2 sons, 1 son Aiden, in a Scottish Regiment overseas, 2 daughters, one sister, 2 step sisters, 2 step brothers and a large circle of friends. Funeral Sunday, at 2.30 from his late residence 24 Pennywell Road. R. I. P.
May 11 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Banker, Alice Bowles, has arrived from the Grand Banks with 100 qtls. Codfish.

The monthly meeting of the St. John’s T.A. & B. Society will be held tomorrow afternoon at their rooms.

The banking vessel, Christie and Elinor, secured 500 qtls. Codfish on the Banks, and has arrived at her home port.

The Western Star states, that up to last week, no lobsters had been caught at Lark Harbor, though gear had been set.

The enquiry into the death of the late Private Fillier, of the Newfoundland Militia, is all but concluded at the Magistrate’s Court. It is being held before Magistrate O’Neill, and only a couple of witnesses remains to be examined.

Feed for the twenty-five horses at the Sanitary Stables last week, cost the City a total of $123.05. They consumed 3500 lbs hay at a cost of $47.25; 25 sacks oats costing $66.00, and 3 sacks bran costing $2.10. Straw cost $3.50

The express train leaving Tuesday next, will make connection at Port aux Basques for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route.

There were fifty-eight men working in the Sanitary Department last week, with twenty-two horses. A total of 559 loads of ashes and garbage were carted to the dumps.

Salomon was for sale in the city yesterday for the first time this season. The price asked in the stores was forty cents per pound. No large quantities were available, and when there is more, the price will be reduced. Lobsters have been selling for some time.

As yet, dandelion has not made its appearance in the local market except in very limited quantities. Householders are hoping that today, country people will be able to supply some.

The Overland Limited goes out tomorrow night as usual, and will depart in two sections. The first with all first and second class passengers, will leave at nine o’clock, and all sleeping car passengers will go at 9.20.

A man charged with being drunk and disorderly was fined $5.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. He was arrested yesterday morning on George Street, after he had been in a fight. He has his face badly cut and had to get treatment at the Hospital after being arrested.

Five boys were before Magistrate O’Neill at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon, and were charged with breaking eighteen bulbs, outside the Capitol Theatre on Sunday afternoon. They pleaded guilty. Their parents were in Court. Magistrate O’Neill fined them $1.50 each — the cost of the bulbs, and stated that if they appear again on the same charge, they will incur the maximum penatly.

An eighteen year old man was before Court yesterday, charged with stealing gasoline from Eli Clarke, St. Philips. He was fined $50.00 or six weeks imprisonment, as well as paying compensation for the gasoline. The evidence was that the accused and two others companions, left their home to attend a dance on Thorburn Road. The accused dropped the two others at a shop, and then proceeded on to St. Philips, where he broke open a gas tank owned by Mr. Clarke, and filled up a four gallon tin, which he took away in the car. The owner of the tank stated that a check-up showed fourteen gallons stolen or spilt.


May 12 1941 DEPUTY MAYOR CHALKER PASSED AWAY TODAY Prominent Business Man Was Foremost In Philanthropic Endeavors.

This morning, at his residence, Forest Road, James Rich Chalker, Deputy Mayor of St. John’s, passed away after an illness of nearly two years. The deceased visited Montreal some months ago, and consulted leading specialists, but in spite of all that medical skill could do, the past months he had been confined to his room.

Born at Brigus September 9th, 1871, son of George and Fannie Chalker, he was educated at Brigus Public School. Coming to St. John’s, he entered the plastering business in 1904, and many of the public buildings and private homes in the city are monuments to his ability. In 1907, he established a fish and oil refining business, and in 1913 took over the Score’s Lime Kiln and formed the Newfoundland Lime Manufacturing Co., Ltd., of which he was Managing Director, at the same time continuing the limestone quarries at Cobb’s Arm, N.D.B. He was also Managing Director of Chalker & Co., Ltd., curers of hams and bacon.

First elected to the Municipal Council in 1929, and again in 1933, he was re-elected in 1937, and re-elected Deputy Mayor of the city for the second term. He was a member of St. John’s Lodge No. 79 A.F. & A.M., E.C., and of Royal Oak L.O.L. He was one of the founders of the Orphan Aid Club and a member of St. John’s Rotary Club, Past President of the St. John’s Curling Club, Past Vice-President of Childrens Playgrond Association, and on the executive of the Fish and Game Society.

Besides his wife, he leaves to mourn: four sons, George C. at Cobb’s Arm, C. Richard at Toronto, Thomas R. of Chalker & Co, and James R. Jr. of the Newfoundland Lime Co. and Chalker &Co., Ltd. Two daughters, Dorothy at home, and Sybil (Mrs. Edward Hiscock); one brother Thomas at Brigus, and three sisters, Mrs. E. Downton of this city, Mrs. Capt. John Clarke of Brigus, and Mrs. C.R. Howell of Boston. The funeral takes place Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, Forest Road.

May 12 1941 NFLD LADY DIED AT HALIFAX HALIFAX, MAY11 (C.P) — Evelyn Sohie Dinham, aged 27, daughter of the late Captain Isaac Dinaham of St. Jacques Newfoundland, died in Hospital here today, following a lengthy illness.
May 12 1941 MAIL MATTER LOST AT SEA It is notified for information, that all mail, letters and parcels, posted in St. John’s and vicinity, between the 18th and 23rd, April 1941, for the United Kingdom and Europe, has been lost at sea by enemy action.
May 12 1941 OBSEQUIES LATE ALPHONSUS ABBOTT Prominent Citizen Laid to Rest Yesterday

The funeral of the late Alphonsus Abbott took place from his late residence, Pennywell Road yesterday afternoon, and was attended by a large number of citizens. At the R.C. Cathedral, prayers were recited by Rev. F. Bradshaw and interment was at Belvedere Cemetery.

The deceased was a well known and most highly respected citizen. For some years past he was a member of the staff of H.M. Controllers. Though he had not been in robust health for the past four or five years, he was able to be at work, and though he passed away on Friday last, he was working during the week. He was fifty-seven years of age.

Earlier in life he was a great oarsman, and was prominent in many amature races on Quidi Vidi. He always took a great interest in the Regatta, and that continued up to his passing. Generally though, the late Mr. Abbott was of a retiring and modest disposition. Genial, painstaking, and methodical, he was a valued official, and he made many friends who held him in high esteem. His loss is a severe one to his wife and family, and to them, sympathy of friends and acquaintances is extended.

Left to mourn are one sister, two step-sisters, and two step-brothers, two daughters, and two sons, Patrick at Bowden & Co., and Aiden who left here with the Newfoundland Contingent Royal Artillery, and is now serving with a Scottish Regiment.

May 12 1941 OBITUARY THOMAS MACKEY: On Sunday morning, April 27th, Mr. Thomas Mackey of Riverview, North Arm, Woodford’s, after only two hours illness, passed to rest in his seventy-seventh year. For the past forty years he kept a general store business, and was well known in commercial circles. In Church and community life he was an enthusiastic worker for the benefit and interest of those amongst whom he lived. In his younger days, he spent many years at the Bank Fishery, and was also employed at the steel works in Sydney, Nova Scotia. His funeral took place from his home last Thursday, to the cemetery at Holyrood, where he was laid to rest in the family plot. A large number of friends and relatives showed their esteem of his life and works, by attending the last rites. The officiating Clergy at the High Mass and office, were the Rev. Fathers Murphy, Kavanagh, and Terry.

Mr. Mackey leaves a widow, four sons: John and Harold in New York, Richard in Texas, and Thomas at home; also four daughters: Mesdames William Healy, North Arm, Patrick Sullivan, Hr. Main, Philip Healy, Holyrood, and Miss Rosella Mackey at home, to whom we extend our sympathy. May his soul rest in peace. — Q.

May 12 1941 MERCHANT MARINE MAN MISSING Information has been received by the Department of Public Health and Welfare, from the Registrar of Seaman, Cardiff, that CHESLEY FIFIELD of Corner Brook, who was serving with the Mercantile Marine, is missing at sea, his ship being torpedoed the end of April. Steps were at once taken to have his next of kin, his mother, Mrs. L Fifield, Corner Brook, notified accordingly.
May 12 1941 BIRTHS MARSHALL — At Grace Hospital Saturday, May 10th to Mary, wife of Dr. Kelvin Marshall, a daughter.
May 12 1941 DEATHS ANTLE — Passed peacefully away 11 a.m. Saturday, May 10th, Thomas Parsons Antle in his 77th year. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 129 Patrick Street to S.A. Citadel.

RUBY — Passed peacefully away at 5 p.m. Saturday, Kenneth, beloved husband of Jessie Ruby; leaving to mourn; a wife, one son, Gordon of H.M. Customs, and one daughter, Mrs. Eric Baird, one sister, Mrs J.C. Pippy, one step-brother and one step-sister. Funeral takes place today Monday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence Wateford Bridge Road.

CHALKER — Passed peacefully away this Monday morning Thomas Rich Chalker in his Seventh year; leaving to mourn; wife, four sons, two daughters, one brother and three sisters. Funeral Wednesday at 2.30 p.m. from his residence, Forest Road.

May 12 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Large numbers of people visited Quidi Vidi yesterday to see the progress of the work going on there, and many others visited Carpasian, where a small town has sprung up in the past few weeks.

More than 3000 C.P.T.P. graduates have been accepted by the Army and Navy Air Forces and are now undergoing advance training in military flying — 22 per cent, in fact.

Salmon was fairly plentiful in the market yesterday and a few fishermen secured good catches. The price was down to 18 to 20 cents by the whole salmon, and was retailing for 25 cents in some of the stores.

Word has been received that the farmer’s house, owned by Mr. Harold Mitchell on his property at Harry’s River, was destroyed by fire a few days ago. The origin of the fire is not known. Mr. Mitchell is now at his farm.

The week May 19th to 25th is “Save the Forest Week” throughout the country, according to a proclamation issued by His Excellency the Governor in Commission. Arrangements have been made for a campaign to urge the necessity of care in preventing forest fires, etc.

According to latest U.S. Army figures, 39 per cent of its cadets with no previous flight training are washed out, while only 16 per cent of those with CPTP flight training are disqualified.

The weekly dance for men of the service will be held at the Caribou Hut tonight. The catering will be in the hands of the B.I.S. Ladies Auxiliary.

The following have left here for places on the St. John’s-Lewisporte service: Hon. Capt. Abram Kean, G.H. Laing, R. Learning, C. Bartlett, Mrs. C. Bartlett, W. Lawrence, C. Tizzard, Mrs. T.W. Peckford, W.J. Pike, W.J Whalen, G. Evans, N.D. Bishop, G.W. Abbott.

The “Mock Trial” which takes place in Holy Cross Auditorium tomorrow night, is creating interest amongst those who remember how enjoyable these trials were in the past. The charge to be heard this year is, “Base Treason” and it will produce a laugh a second.

The Grand Falls Advertizer stated that it learns that Constable Ray Martin has resigned from the Constabulary.

The weekly meeting of the city Council will be held this afternoon at three o’clock. There are several important matters to be discussed.

“Dandelions” which have been longed for by the many who like this in the spring of the year, are now selling in some of the stores, and will probably be offered from door to door after this.

Constable E.C. Abbott has been transferred to Grand Falls as Traffic Officer. He has already taken up his duties there. He is succeeding Constable Pike, who left the force to join the Mercantile Marine, and Constable Crummey, who resigned last year and is now in the Royal Air Force.

The regular express leaving this evening, will be in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at six o’clock, and all sleeping car passengers will leave at 6.20 p.m.

At George St. Church Lecture Hall this evening, an Illustrated lecture will be given on the subject, “The Church Carries On”. It was to have been delivered by Rev. H. Maxwell Dawe, but owing to the illness of the Reverend Gentleman, the lecture will now be given by Mr. Frank Penney.

It is probable that Band Concerts will be held regularly in Bannerman Park this summer. Already, applications have been made to the Council for the use of the bandstand by the C.L.B. and Mount Cashel Bands. The latter band also made application for the use of the stand at Quidi Vidi Lakeside.

During the past few days there has been speculation as to whether by-elections will be held for the vacancies in the City council, created by the deaths of Deputy Mayor Chalker and Councillor Ruby. A general election is due this fall, in December, and for that reason it is unlikely that there will be a by-election beforehand.


May 16 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A man was before Court on Saturday, charged with beating his wife, and was remanded for eight days.

The monthly meeting of the St. John’s T.A. & B. Society was held on yesterday afternoon and much business was transacted.

Rev. R.F. Mercer, Rector of St. Peter’s parish, Catalina, underwent a serious operation at St. Claire’s Hospital, St. John’s last week, and had an eye removed. He has since left Hospital and is feeling as well as may be expected. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

Two prisoners, LeBlanc and Buchans, who were convicted before Supreme Court on Circuit at Grand Falls for assault and robbery of a Chinese at Botwood, arrived by the express on Saturday. They were each sentenced to nine months imprisonment.

The regular monthly meeting of Terra Nova Council No 1452 Knight of Columbus, will be held tomorrow night at 8.30. Under the heading of “Good of the Order,” a lecture will be given by Mr. John B. Ashley, B.A. and the subject he has chosen is “Oxford.”

In the window of the Tourist Development Board, Board of Trade Building, there is now on display a very fine exhibition of National Mark Farm Products. This was prepared by the Department of Agriculture and Rural Reconstruction. It consists of potatoes, turnips, lettuce, white and brown shelled eggs. This display attracted considerable attention on Saturday afternoon and night.

Writs have been issued out of the Supreme Court, by Mr. James D. Higgins, acting for the husband and children of the late Mary Cook, who was drowned at Quidi Vidi Lake September 1939. The deceased, it will be remembered, was a patient at the Fever Hospital, and escaped from there. Her body was found in the water of the lake some time later. The writs have been issued against the Superintendent, Matron, and two Nurses who were on duty at the time of her disappearance. The claim is for $10,000.

May 16 1941 DEATHS WHITE — Passed peacefully away Tuesday midnight, Lucy C. Edgar, wife of the late William H. White (formerly of Greenspond); leaving to mourn three daughters. Funeral today Thursday at 230 p.m. from 64 King’s Road.

May 18 1941 BIRTHS MARSHALL — On May 14th, to Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Marshall, 101 Quidi Vidi Road, a daughter.
May 18 1941 MARRIAGE NOTICE DROVER — STRONG: At Little Bay Islands, on April 30th by Rev. Rowsell, Gerald M. Drover, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Drover, of this city, to Miss Dorothy Haddon Strong, daughter of Mrs. Belle and the late W.A. Strong, of Little Bay.
May 18 1941 DEATHS SCOTT — Passed peacefully away on Friday May 16th Catherine, relict of John P. Scott. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 93 Monkstown Road. R. I. P.

DAVIS — Passed peacefully away at the Sanatorium on May 14th, Frank Davis, aged 18 years, leaving to mourn his mother, Mrs. Bonia, one sister, one brother, three uncles, two at Colinet, on at Grand Falls, one aunt, Mrs. Hughie Simmons, at Colinet, and an aunt, Mrs. C. Tobin, Falcon House, St. John’s, Interment at Colinet

MOORE — Passed away suddenly yesterday afternoon, John C. Moore, son of the late James and Elizabeth Moore, aged 81 years. Leaving to mourn three sons, Alexander of Millertown, John of City, Ralph of Buchans, also one brother, Alfred of city. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from his son’s residence 63 Colonial Street.

May 18 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE. Passengers for regular points on the St. John’s-Hunbermouth service, will leave St. John’s at 10 a.m. Wednesday, May 21st.

The work of laying a concrete floor at the Victoria Park Swimming Pool is progressing well.

The opening dance of the Area Tennis Club at harbor Grace will be held on May 23rd.

A sailor charged with being drunk and doing damage in the Do-X Store, was fined $2.00 at the Magistrate’s Court.

The train leaving for Argentia at 8.30 Monday morning will make connection for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

Leo Cooper, formerly of St. John’s, Newfoundland, where he was in the employ of Messrs Ayre & Sons Ltd., Grocery Department, was, his many friends will be sorry to learn, a member of the crew of a ship which was torpedoed in December last, and presumed lost with all on board. He was on a sister ship when she was torpedoed in September, and subsequently transferred. He was a nephew of Mrs. E. Dyke, 494 17th Street Brooklyn. — Newfoundland Weekly.

During the week, Council employees dipped and carted away refuse from 167 gullies in the city and cleaned 53 gullies.

A special meeting of the Star of the Sea Association will be held tomorrow afternoon at three o’clock.

The quarterly meeting of the Benevolent Irish Society will be held at St. Patrick’s Hall tomorrow, Sunday morning, immediately after last Mass.

The Overland Limited tomorrow night will leave in two sections. All first and second class passengers leave at 9 p.m. and all sleeping car passengers at 9.20.

In the Sanitary Department last week, fifty-seven men and twenty-two horses were working, and a total of 576 loads of ashes and garbage were deposited on various dumps.

Operations at the sealing plant of Ashbourne’s Ltd., started last week. Men were engaged skinning the pelts and the steam grinding machines reduced the fat. — Twillingate Sun.

Construction work on the new warehouse for A.E. Hickman Co. Ltd., has been started at Corner Brook. The site is just west of the Railway Station on the waterfront. The building will extend beyond the shore, for wharfage accommodation and shipping facilities.

A truck driver was before Court yesterday, charged with being intoxicated whilst in charge of a motor vehicle. He pleaded not guilty. He was arrested on Thursday night after a collision with a pole on Flowers Hill, and smashing some glass in a shop there. Some evidence was taken, after which adjournment was taken until today.

Last week, the steam mixer at the East End Yard of the Council was working, as well as the Springfield roller, and all trucks and crushers were in continuous operation. A total of 215 tons stone were delivered to the East End Yard from the Signal Hill crushing plant. Maintainer No. 23 is now working at Victoria Park 


May 19 1941 MARRIAGES COADY – KELLY: At St. Mary’s Cathedral, Halifax, N.S., with a Nuptial Mas, on Saturday, May 10th, Mollie O’Donovan, daughter of the late William and Anne O’Donovan, of this city, to John J Coady, of Burin.
May 19 1941 DEATHS HEARN — Passed peacefully away on May 17th Isabel Maud Hearn, aged 18 years, only and beloved daughter of Patrick and Isabel Hearn. She leaves to mourn; father, mother, and two brothers, Allan serving in the Royal Navy, Patrick at home, and a large circle of friends to mourn their sad loss. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 108 Water Street East.

HYNES — Passed peacefully away on Saturday, May 17th, at 8.30 p.m., Charlotte Louise, aged 19 years, youngest daughter of George and Amelia Hynes, leaving to mourn her sad loss; father, mother, two sisters, Poebie and Estelle, and three brothers, Windfield serving in the R.A. overseas, Francis and Leslie at home. Funeral today Monday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, Signal Hill.

FILLIER — Passed peacefully away at Grace Hospital, May 18th, John Fillier of Clarke’s Beach, leaving to mourn two sons, Chesley at Clarke’s Beach, and Raymond at Rochester, New York, and one daughter, Mrs. Elsie Chard of St. John N.B., and a wide circle of friends. Funeral notice later.

FARDY — Passed peacefully away at Brigus, Friday, May 16th, at her daughter’s residence, Mrs. B. Lambe, Mary, relict of the late Thomas Fardy, Architect. She is survived by 5 sons, Mark at home, Dominic at Detroit Michigan, James at Allston, Mass., David at Quincy, Mass., Thomas at Dorchester, Mass., and an only daughter, Mrs. B. Lambe. Also a large circle of grandchildren, one sister of Charity at Hamilton Memorial Hospital, North Sydney,(Boston, Detroit and North Sydney papers please copy). May the sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.

May 19 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The Canadian Army Brass Band was on Church parade again yesterday morning, and their music was admired by the large number of people who watched the Soldiers go by.

A special meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1452 Knights of Columbus, was held yesterday morning at Columbia Club.

The express which arrived on Saturday was in two sections. The first arrived at 10 a.m. and the second at 4.30 p.m.

The regular quarterly meeting of the Benevolent Irish Society was held yesterday morning after last Mass.

The regular train leaving at 8.30 this morning will make connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia.

The schooner which ran ashore last week is now berthed at one fo the waterfront wharves. The vessel’s deck is awash, and part of the aft railing has been carried away.

Four owners of motor cars were before court on Saturday for driving vehicles after sunset without tail lights showing. Fines of $1.00 were imposed in three cases, and in the fourth, a fine of $2.00 was imposed.

The charge against the truck driver who was arrested last week, charged with being intoxicated whilst in charge of a motor, and damaging a store on Flowers Hill, was partly heard on Saturday. The owner of the store estimated the damage done at $150.00. The accused stated he had taken only two drinks of rum and the last of these was three hours before the accident. The hearing continues today.

Mary Johnson of Gorman’s Lane was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, and was charged with selling Alcoholic liquors and being in possession of four bottles of liquor from which the labels had been removed. She pleaded not guilty. Eight bottles legally purchased, were produced as evidence, four of the eight bottles of rum had no labels, and the Police said the accused was engaged in putting labels on them when they arrived. The charge of selling liquor was dismissed for want of evidence. On the second count, the accused was fined $100. At the request of the Assistant Chief of Police, the premises of the accused was interdicted for twelve months.


May 20 1941 ANIMAL DIED IN STRUGGLE A most unusual incident occurred at the Front on the Island last week, when a cow owned by Mr. Patrick Miller, had its neck broken, in a fight with a cow owned by Mr. James Brown. The fight took place in Kavanagh’s Lane and was reported by Mr. Dan Kavanagh to Mr. Miller, soon after his cow was injured. The services of Mr. Perrin, Butcher, Lance Cove, were immediately secured by Mr. Miller, and the injured animal was mercifully despatched. In the week previous, Mr. Miller also had the misfortune to loose a fine lamb, which was run over by the ore cars on the Scotia Track. — The Bell Islander.
May 20 1941 WEDDING BELLS COADY — KELLY: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at St. Mary’s Cathedral, Halifax, on Saturday morning last, when Miss Mollie O”Donovan Kelly of this city, became bride of Mr. John J. Coady of Burin. A Nuptial Mass was celebrated by Rev. Father Frecker, a friend of the happy couple, the music being rendered by the Cathedral Organist.

The bride was charmingly attired in a beautiful Alice Blue claque crepe ensemble, trimmed with beige fox, a Schiparelli model, with accessories to match, and carried a bouquet of Talisman roses. Miss Gertrude Coady, sister of the groom, was bridesmaid, and was beautifully gowned in an ensemble of sky blue, with a large picture hat, and wore a corsage of pink and white carnations.

The groom was attended by his cousin, Mr. Richard Reddy of Marystown.

The wedding party, with many guests, breakfasted at the Nova Scotia Hotel, where the toast to the bride was proposed by a friend of the family, Captain Max Blandford, and was very ably responded to by the groom. Later the bride and groom left for an extensive tour of Canada. The bride looked resplendent in a finger-tipped silver fox coat, with Schiparelli accessories.

After spending some time in Canada, Mr. and Mrs. Coady will take up residence in Burin, where Mr. Coady is prominently identified with the Commercial life. We wish them many happy years of happy wedded life.

May 20 1941 IN MEMORIAM M. F. ROLLS: Widespread regret was experienced at the recent passing of Mr. M.F. Rolls, one of Newfoundland’s most popular citizens. It is somewhat difficult to pay tribute to the memory of a man, and even more difficult, when the man is of the stature of Mike Rolls. Mike, as he was known to his numerous friends, was an athlete of no mean ability, and played the game fair, square, and above board, and because of this, was admired and held in high esteem by all. His participation in sports, particularly in the more peaceful days, needs no introduction other than to say, no game seemed complete without his presence. The writer who was privileged to be a teammate of the deceased, can truthfully say, one of Mike’s main ambition was, “Give to the world the best you have, and the best will come back to you.” In public life too, he had played a big part. The Newfoundland Fisherman’s Star of the Sea Association, of which the deceased was a most energetic worker, is much the poorer because if his passing. The part he had played in our annual Regatta is outstanding, and when another August day has rolled around and we gather on the green at Quidi Vidi, there will be sighs of regret because a friend we loved is resting peacefully in the cemetery, overlooking the place where he had loved to labor.

Only recently, when games were played in aid of the Spitfire Fund, he gave a stellar performance, as he took his accustomed place in the forward line. His weight of years seemingly mattered little, and in the words of the Poet:

Until we cease with joy to share In all life’s work and fun And the burdens we must bear Old age has not begun.

And now for big hearted Mike Rolls, the game is over, the final whistle has sounded, and he has gone forward unafraid of the final result — not as to whether he won or lost the game, but how he played it.–H.F.

May 20 1941 DEATHS FILLIER — Passed peacefully away at Grace Hospital, May 18th, John Fillier of Clarke’s Beach; leaving to mourn two sons, Chesley at Clarke’s Beach and Raymond at Rochester, New York, and one daughter, Mrs. Elsie Chard of St. John N.B , and a wide circle of friends, funeral at Clark’s Beach at 2.30 this afternoon.
May 20 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The adjourned extraordinary meeting of the Imported and Employers Association was held late last night at the board of Trade Rooms.

The club house at Murray’s Pond opened for the season yesterday. Fishing will begin on June 1st.

A truck driver before Court yesterday for speeding on Duckworth Street, was fined $2.00. Another for failing to stop for a Traffic Officer was fined a similar sum.

Passengers for regular points on the St. John’s-Humbermouth service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock Wednesday morning.

The dance held at the T.A. Hall last night was well attended and enjoyed to the full. Music was provided by Harold LaFosse and his orchestra. A dance will be held at the T.A. Hall tonight. Music will be provided by Harold LaFosse and his orchestra. A grand dance will be held at the T.A. Club Rooms tomorrow night, in aid of the T.A. Juvenile Society’s annual free picnic. Harold LaFosse and his orchestra will provided the musical program.

The Bonavista Correspondent of the Fishermen’s Advocate, states that potatoes are scarce in that vicinity, and many people will not have sufficient to set their gardens. Turnips are unobtainable.

The express train leaving tomorrow evening at six o’clock will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay service.

Passengers for points on the St. John’s-Humbermouth service will be leaving St. John’s at ten o’clock tomorrow morning. Carbonear and Trinity will be additional places called at, going.

The price of Salmon on Saturday was down to ten cents per pound, and in the stores it was retailing for fifteen cents. At that price vendors have little trouble in disposing of it.

Mrs. Charles White of Bell Island, met with a painful accident last week when she had her hand caught in the cloths wringer of an electric washing machine. Seven stitches were required to close the wounds. - The Bell Islander.

The humming bird has a tube like tongue with which it sucks up nectar from flowers.

The opossum is the only American marsupial or mammal that carries its young about in a pouch.

The finest wool on a sheep grows on the cheek or back of the ear.


May 26 1941 BIRTHS RUBY — On May 24th, at the Grace Hospital, to Sybil, wife of Gordon Ruby, a daughter.

FRASER — At St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, May 24th to Ruth, wife of Claude Fraser, a son.

May 26 1941 NOTE OF THANKS Mrs. John Mackey and family wish to express their sincere appreciation to all those who helped in any way to alleviate their sad bereavement, in the loss of a devoted husband and kind father; especially those who sent wreaths, Mass cards, messages and letters of sympathy.
May 26 1941 DEATHS KENNEDY — Passed peacefully away Sunday May 25th, Madeline, widow of the late C.L. Kennedy of Harbor Grace, leaving to mourn two daughters, Margaret and Agnes. Interment at Harbor Grace, tomorrow, Tuesday morning.

NOSEWORTHY — Passed away suddenly on Sunday morning, May 24th, William Noseworthy, age 56, Cooper, son of the late Edward and Jessie Noseworthy, leaving to mourn: wife, 3 daughters, 2 sons, Charles of Ayre & Sons, also 3 sisters, Mrs. H. Taylor and Mrs. T. Williams of St. John’s; also 4 brothers, James and Frank, St. John’s; Harry of Corner Brook; Clifford of Boston, and a number of friends. Funeral from his late residence, 303 Pennywell Road 2.30 p.m. today, Monday. (Boston papers please copy.)

May 26 1941 STRANGE FELLOW “That’s Jim Blank,” she said. “What sort of a bloke is he?” “Well he came to see me the other night and we were sitting in the drawing-room when the lights went out. He spent the rest of the evening fooling around with the fuses!”
May 26 1941 JUST IMAGINE! Tom had just put one over on Jim. The latter, out to even things, leaned across the table to ask, with a grin: “Do you know that of the 50,000 people in this town, three-fourths are Clergymen?” “Rot!” snapped Tom. “Its’s true. The Rev. Mr. Fourth and his two Parson sons!”
May 26 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual garden party in aid of Manuels Parish has been set for July 20th

Passengers for regular points on the Labrador service as far as Grady, will leave St. John’s at noon tomorrow.

A cargo of salt was landed at Port Union last week. About one hundred men were engaged at work.

A dance will be held at T.A. Club Rooms tonight. Music will be provided by Mickey Duggan and his orchestra.

A card tournament was held at the Star Club rooms on Saturday afternoon and was well attended. Cash prizes were given.

The monthly meeting of the Star of the Sea Association was held on yesterday afternoon at their rooms when much business was transacted.

The regular train leaving this morning at 8.30 will make connection at Argentia for the Bay route of Placentia Bay.

A meeting of the Society for the Protection of Animals will be held this evening at eight o’clock at the Council Chambers, City Hall. Important business is to be transacted.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock Tuesday morning. No call will be made at Argentia.

Farmers in sections were very busy the past few days, ploughing and getting their seeds in. The change of weather was very much appreciated.

Men who were cutting firewood and fishing room material the past winter, have begun to boat of same from the Bay. Up until a few days before, the fuel situation was getting acute, and some men got to burning fencing and flakes. – Twillingate Sun.

The Trinity Enterprise says: “The first sign of codfish in this section for the season was got at Dunfield on Saturday last. On Friday, Mr. Robert Woolridge set afloat. [Maybe this means “a fleet” – GW] On the following morning, three codfish of a large size were meshed in the net. The first salmon for the season were also secured at Dunfield on Monday, when Robert Woolridge had two fine salmon. Baxter Clare had one and another man had one. It sold for twenty cents a pound.

The Overland Limited on Sunday will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay route.

Passengers for regular points on the Labrador service as far as Grady, will be leaving St. John’s at noon on Tuesday next, the 27th May.

The express yesterday went out in two sections. The first took all first and second class passengers and second section all sleeping car passengers.

A motorist who was driving without a license was find $2.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Another was fined $3.00 for the same offence.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay, will leave St. John’s at 10 a.m. Tuesday, May 27th. There will be no call at Argentia.

Tomorrow afternoon at three o’clock, a card tournament will be held at the Star Club Rooms. Cash prizes will be given. This is a special card tournament and is not included in the regular series.

A motorist who was charged with speeding on Harvey Road, and failing to produce his licence when asked to do so, was fined $4.00 at the Magistrate’s Court.

The vessel which went ashore entering the harbor last week, and was subsequently refloated, is now at Mudge’s Premises and is being dismantled. The spars have been taken out of the vessel, and all equipment around the decks removed.

A number of boys trouting at the Long Bridge last night, caught several large trout. Some people were there watching them and some of the American Soldiers got a great pleasure from seeing the “big” ones landed.

Sixty men were working in the Sanitary Department last week with twenty-one horses. A total of 557 loads of ashes and garbage were deposited on various dumps, and in addition, 179 gullies were dipped, cleaned and the refuse carted away.

A special meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1452 Knights of Columbus, was held last night at which there was an exemplification of the first degree of the order.

The work of laying the concrete bottom in the swimming pool at Victoria park is progressing favorably.

A number of cases of measles are now being treated in Port aux Basques and Channel, but they are of a mild type

The train leaving on Monday morning will make connection at Argentia for the Bay route of Placentia Bay.

The annual meeting of the Guards Athletic Association will be held on Friday the 30th May at the Club rooms.

The Overland Limited on Sunday night, will leave in two sections. All first and second class passengers will leave at 9 p.m. and all sleeping car passengers at 9.20 p.m.

A bus driver was before Court yesterday, and was find $5.00 for carrying more passengers that the bus could accommodate. Sergt. Pitcher stated that he stopped the bus near King’s Bridge, and there were seventeen passengers standing in it, besides all seating accommodation filled.

A Red Cross Tag Day Drive was held last week at Curling, Corner Brook, and Hunbermouth, and the sum realized approximately $2,500.00. Several places in the Humber District including South Brook, Deer Lake, and Howley, were still to be heard from, when this report was published in the Western Star.

During the past week, potholes were filled with tar in the following streets: Lemarchant Road, Freshwater Road, Monkstown Road, Rennie’s Mill Road, Job’s Cove, Newtown Road, Military Road, Bonaventure Avenue, Hamilton Street, and Harvey Road. .

The Codroy Valley Correspondent of the Western Star states: “Mr. Bonia, Road Inspector, is here at present, and repairs work is going on at a great speed on roads in each section. Bridges are receiving attention too. Motor trucks are being used for hauling stone and gravel. For the first time in history, a definite move in all direction for our country roads. This consideration has a great effect on the morale of our people, and they appreciate the efforts of the Commission of Government in the enterprise


May 27 1941 WEDDING BELLS SMITH — HAYWARD: A quiet and pretty wedding took place at the Cathedral Church of St. John’s the Baptist at 11 o’clock on Saturday, 24th May, when Flora, daughter of Mr. H.S. and the late Mabel Hayward, and Gordon H., son of Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Smith of Hull, England, were united in the bonds of holy matrimony, the Rev. J. Brinton officiating. The bride was attended by Miss Minnie Ford, and Mr. Fred Hayward, brother of the bride, supported the groom.

The bride looked charming in a dress of Alice Blue, with a flowered toque of the same shade and white accessories, and carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations; the bridesmaid in dusk rose, with hat of the same shade, had wine accessories and a bouquet of sweet peas. The Rev. F. Rose presided at the organ.

After the ceremony, the wedding party drove to Smithville, where luncheon was served.

May 27 1941 OBITUARY JOHN CARTER — Greenspond: May 24th — There was committed to Mother earth, today at Greenspond, one of our longest and perhaps one of our best known coastal men, in the person of John Carter of Ship’s Island. He served with the late Capt. Darius Blandford. Perhaps for the want of education he never reached the position of Master, but as Second Mate and Mate. I think he served on more ships North and South, than any other man I knew of, and whoever he served, and wherever he went, he commanded the appreciation and respect of all he came in contact with. He was a man who could be relied upon for doing his work, sober and attentive to duty. I never knew a man that did not have a god word for John Carter.

He had been laid up for some months with an incurable disease, and two day ago at the age of sixty-four years, he entered into rest. The Orange Society, of which he was a member, [This is exactly as written – GW] and after the funeral service was read, the Dead March in Saul was played, and then the body was laid to rest in the historic cemetery of Greenspond. I was glad to have the privilege of attending the service, and when I entered that Church I had stirring memories; not the least among them was the fact that 74 years ago, his mother and myself were members of the Choir. I am now the only one of that Choir left.

For Mr. Carter, the end has come. He has given his last command, and while general regret will be felt by his many friends, I believe the most of us believed the life has been well spent, and we trust he has merited the reward of all men who have obeyed the Golden rule of doing to others as he would have others do to him. To his sorrowing wife and family I offer my heartfelt sympathy. A. Kean

May 27 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. ANNIE GRIFFITHS: BUCHANS, May 24 — General sympathy was expressed on May 4th at the sudden and unexpected death of Mrs. Annie Griffiths, (age 24 years) and infant daughter, at the Hospital here.

The deceased was one of gentle disposition, affectionate and charitable. She was an active worker in St. Teresa’s Parish, always one of the first engaged in promoting or helping Church work. At future events, her cheerful disposition and genuine help will be sadly missed by her former co-workers, with whom she was a general favorite. Now that she has left this vale of tears, her good works will linger as memories, and become an inspiration to those who take up the Parish work, which God has removed her from.

Mrs. Griffiths was formerly Miss Annie Quirk of Fortune Harbor. Her many friends there will be sorry to hear of her sudden death. The funeral, which was one of the largest seen here, took place from the Hospital to St. Teresa’s Church, where the funeral services were rendered by the Pastor, Rev. Fr. O’Neill, then to the train en route to Grand Falls, where interment took place on the following day.

She leaves to mourn the loss of a loving wife and devoted mother, her husband, also her father, one sister and brother at Fortune Harbor, and two sisters residing here. To all of whom the writer extends sincere sympathy. E.J.C.

May 27 1941 BIRTHS LYNCH — On May 23rd to Sheila wife of J Gordon Lynch, a daughter, at St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital.
May 27 1941 MARRIAGES SMITH – HAYWARD: At the Cathedral Church of St. John the Baptist on Saturday the 24th May, by the Rev. J.H. Brinton, Flora, daughter of Mr. H.S. and the late Mabel Hayward, to Gordon H., son of Mrs. and Mrs. J.H,. Smith of Hull, England.
May 27 1941 DEATHS JERRETT — Passed away early this morning at the Grace Hospital, Frederick George Jerrett. Leaving to survive; two daughters, Mrs. Ethel Steeves, and Mrs. Stella Smith of Amherst, N.S., and one son, Eric of this city. Funeral notice later.

MERCER — Passed peacefully away on Sunday, May 25th, Eliza Frances, wife of the late Samuel Mercer, aged 86 years; leaving to mourn two sons, William K., of this city, and Richard at Boston, Mass., U.S.A., one daughter, Florence K., at home. Funeral today Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 92 Springdale Street.

May 27 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A card party will be held at the T.A. Club rooms tonight. The usual cash prizes will be given.

The Labrador service will begin today, and at noon, passengers for as far as Grady, will be leaving St. John’s.

Abe Smith, who was arrested on Sunday night after he had escaped from the Penitentiary, has been remanded to the Penitentiary.

The dance held at the T.A. Hall last night was well attended. Music provided by Mickey Duggan and his orchestra was very popular.

Passengers for the South Coast and Fortune Bay route will be leaving St. John’s at 10 o’clock this morning. No call will be made at Argentia.

Ranger Charles Holland of Hr. Breton is now in the city, having arrived at the end of the week with two patients for the Mental Hospital. He returns again today.

The last regular meeting of the Humbermouth Branch of the women’s Patriotic Association, the sum of $200.00 was voted from the funds of the Association, to be sent overseas to provide comforts for our boys, when sick or in Hospital — Humber Herald.

A Canadian Soldier was before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with indecent assault of a young girl. He pleaded not guilty. The girl gave evidence to the effect that the accused stopped her, and asked her the way to Lime Street, and then insisted on seeing her home. On the way, he dragged her into a lane and roughandled her. She said he caught her by the throat and her screams attracted residents. She identified the accused, amongst a number, who were paraded before her at headquarters. Further hearing was postponed.

The Wesley Dramatic Troupe will repeat their play “Wild Flower on the Hill” tonight, at George St. Church Lecture Hall.

Some very fine trout were on display yesterday in the window of Messrs, Bowring Bros., who conducted a competition for the holiday. The window was the center of attraction whilst the trout were there.


May 28 1941 OBITUARY Mrs. JOHN MOORES: As the sun was setting on the beautiful afternoon of April 22nd, 1941, there passed peacefully away, Cicely, the beloved wife of Mr. John Moores Sr., partner of the firm of W. & J Moores, Ltd., of Carbonear.

Although a sufferer from arthritis for a number of years, she bore her affliction with that true sense of Christian character which was always exemplified in her. No one who took an active part in Church or community work, was ever more keenly interested in the welfare of the Church and community, than she was, and none more ready to help. Although confined to her home, and for years to her bedroom, it was a privilege and a comfort to visit her and talk with her. She was never heard to murmur or complain about herself, although at times her sufferings were almost unbearable, but she always had a cheerful word and a sunny smile for all who visited her. A faithful member of the Women’s Missionary Society, although not being able to attend the meetings, she always helped financially, and was always eager to give to one and all alike. Truly it can be said of her, she was indeed a “Mother of Israel”. Although her life was overshadowed with darkness caused by the deaths of her two sisters, the Misses Annie and Mina Vatcher, within three months of each other, yet she thought still of the well being of others, and not of herself, yet it was the silent thought, that brought many a tear to them she loved and held most dear.

Her funeral took place on Thursday afternoon and was largely attended. A most impressive service was held at the home, conducted by Rev. A.W. Osborne, assisted by Revs. H.M. Davis and Dr. C. Howse of Carbonear. Mr. Alex Parsons, U.C., Organist, presided at the piano. The favorite hymn of the deceased, “My Heavenly Home is Bright and Fair,” and, “How Bright These Glorious Spirits Shine”, followed by “Abide With Me”, were sung, after which the members of the Women’s Missionary Society softly and slowly sang, “Rock of Ages”. Rev. Osburne in his address, spoke of her as a heroine, not of the world, nor of Church, nor war, but her own bedroom, where she spent so many years. The beautiful floral-laden casket was preceded by the W.M.S. members, followed by Sunday School, (as her husband was for many years Sunday School Superintendent.) Quite a few relatives from near and far, followed in the procession. Interment was at McCannister Hill Cemetery. At the Gates, the members of both the W.M.S. and the Sunday School, lined each side of the street, and sang, “Safe in the Arms of Jesus,” a fitting tribute to the life of one of whom it can be said.

And still her silent ministries Within our hearts have place, As when on earth she talked with us And met us face to face.

To her sorrowing husband, who in his advanced years will miss her companionship so much, we offer our sincere sympathy. She leaves to mourn, beside her husband, one brother, Mr. Anthony Vatcher, J.P. of St. John’s.

May 28 1941 FUNERAL NOTICE JERRETT — A funeral service for the late Mr. F.G. Jerrett will be held at his son’s residence, Monkstown Road, on Thursday morning at 11.30 O’clock. Interment will take place from St. George’s Church, Brigus, at 3.45 p.m.
May 28 1941 DEATHS KEEFE — Died at Boston May 22nd. Pauline, aged 45 years, beloved wife of Thomas Keefe, and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Judge of Placentia. She leaves to mourn her sad loss, husband, six sons, one daughter, father and mother, and five brothers and five sisters. R.I.P.

DRISCOLL — Passed peacefully away on Tuesday, May 27th at 6 p.m., Phyllis Jean, aged 21 years, beloved daughter of Georgina and the late Charles Driscoll. Left to mourn are; mother, two sisters, and one brother. Funeral on Thursday at 2.30 from her late residence, Pine Bud Avenue. “Safely, safely Gathered In.” (Boston papers please copy.)

May 28 1941 MAGISTRATE'S COURT At the Magistrate’s Court yesterday afternoon, before Magistrate O’Neill, a woman was charged with neglecting her children. The charge was made by Major Standbury of the Probation Office. She had been charged with a similar offence before, and was placed under bond. Her husband was present and stated that since the last time, he had paid over $8.00 weekly for the support of the children, but they had no house as yet. His Honor told him that his responsibility did not cease when passing over money, but it was his duty to see that the children were looked after. The woman was ordered to sign another bond and to have a surety signed by another person, before she would be released from custody.

At the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, a member of the crew of the U.S.S. Edmond B. Alexander, who was arrested last week for assaulting Taximan Ronald Martin, was before the Judge Browne. The man stopped the taxi and demanded to be taken to the ship. He was refused because there was a passenger already in the car, but the man insisted, and then broke the glass in the door of the car and hit the Taximan. He was fined $10 or ten days for the assault, and was ordered to pay $23.00 in compensation for damage done. He has been in custody five days and was ordered to serve two more.


May 29 1941 WEDDING BELLS FREEMAN — KING: A quiet but very pretty wedding, was solemnized in Gower Street United Church on May 24th, when Jennie Louise, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James King of Brigus, and Clarence Stephen, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Freeman of St. John’s, were untied in holy bonds of matrimony.

The bride looked very charming in dusk pink with accessories to match, wearing a corsage of pink carnations, baby’s breath, and maiden hair fern. She was attended by her sister, Maud, who wore navy blue with accessories to match, wearing a corsage of sweet peas, baby’s breath, and maiden hair fern. The groom was supported by his brother, George. The bride entered the Church on the arm of her brother, Harold, to the tune of the Bridal Chorus. The Rev. J.E. Bell, B.A., officiated. The bridal party motored to the Popinn, Topsail, where a reception was held and the usual toasts were honored. The bride was recipient of numerous gifts. The honeymoon was spent at Topsail and at the home of the Bride’s parents at Brigus. A. FRIEND

May 29 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The B.I.S. are holding a Flannel Dance on next Wednesday night, June 4th at their rooms.

At Fogo, a Magisterial Enquiry was held into the cause of the death of RONALD FREAKE, aged 14 years. Nine witnesses were examined before Magistrate Abbott — Twillingate Sun.

Many people who have small plots of land, availed of yesterday’s half holiday for planting seeds. Others were ploughing and getting the ground in readiness for planting.

The Summer Sunday Special will resume operations on Sunday next. The train will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock every Sunday morning for regular points to Argentia, including Placentia, and returning will leave Argentia at 6 p.m. and arrive in the city 10.30 p.m.

The Aguathuna Correspondent for the Humber Hearld, states that work at the quarry there has reopend after the usual winter close down.

May 29 1941 MARRIAGES FREEMAN — KING: At Gower Street United Church on May 24th, Jennie Louise, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James King of Brigus, to Clarence Stephen, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert Freeman, of St. John’s.
May 29 1941 DEATHS BOWNS — Passed away at Lower Island Cove Tuesday May 27th, Sarah, beloved wife of William Bowns. Leaving to mourn her sad loss, husband, 3 daughters and 1 brother. Boston papers please copy.

QUINTON — Passed peacefully away on Tuesday night, May 27th, at Princeton, Ann Helena, wife of Joliffe Quinton of Princeton, in her 69th year, leaving to mourn husband, three sons, J.I. of St. John’s, William of Princeton, Rev. J.L. of Greenspond, and three daughters, Mrs. A. Mills, Mrs. H King of St. John’s, and Mrs T. Jenkins of Trinity. Funeral on Friday at Princeton.


May 30 1941 DEATH BRADBURY — Passed peacefully away on Thursday, May 29th Charles W. Bradbury. Surviving are his wife, two daughters and three sisters. Funeral on Saturday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 104 Circular Road.
May 30 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A jumble sale will be held in the Lecture Hall of George Street Church tonight.

The United States has 303,000 miles of urban streets.

The Overland Limited on Sunday, will make connections at Lewisporte for the Green Bay route.

Passengers for the St. John’s-Lewisporte service will leave St. John’s at 10 o’clock tomorrow, Saturday morning.

The weekly card tournament will be held at the Star Hall tonight. The usual cash prizes will be offered in addition to the special ones for the series.

Codfish is fairly plentiful at St. George’s now, according to the Western Star, which states that Mr. Stephen Gorman, the veteran railroader, (retired) has landed 15 cwt. to date.

The jumble sale of the Child Welfare Association, which was postponed last week, will now be held at the C.L.B. Armory this afternoon, beginning at 2.30 o’clock.

Repairs were made with gravel, during the past week, to Empire Avenue, William St., Hamilton Avenue Extension, Rennie’s Mill Road, Bennett Avenue, Pennywell Road West, Campbell Ave., King’s Bridge Road, Raleigh St. sidewalks; Victoria Park, and Richmond St.

The laying of the concrete base for the erection of the retaining wall at Victoria Swimming Pool was completed last week.

Repairs are now being made to the Western section of the Court House building on Duckworth Street.

Concrete steps at the City Terrace, which were in bad state for some past time, have now been repaired by City council employees.

A dance will be held at the T.A. Club Rooms tonight, with music being supplied by Harold LaFosse and his orchestra. The proceeds will be devoted towards the annual free picnic for the Juvenile T.A. & B. Society.

Passengers for the South Coast and Halifax service will be leaving St. John’s at noon tomorrow.

Steps have been taken to prevent the spread of measles at Stephenville, where it is said there are quite a few cases of the disease.

A number of drives have been completed on Deer Lake and others are doing well. There was a mild outbreak of measles in the camp at Rocky Brook, and the Doctor isolated the camp. The men have recovered.

A card party in aid of the St. Patrick’s Hall Sports, was held last night at the Aula Maxima of St. Bon’s College, under the direction of Mrs. D. Walsh. It was well attended and enjoyed. Some twenty five prizes were given.

Notice is given in the advertising columns today, by the Master Plumbers and Heating Contractors, to the effect that owing to the increased cost of material and labor, the rate of $1.40 per hour for men and helpers will have to be charged in future.

The Stephenville Correspondent of the Western Star, states that although the weather has been somewhat unsatisfactory, work at the Base is steadily increasing, and already the installation of lighting units has been undertaken. Road building and repairing continues, and already transportation facilities are greatly improved.

During the past week, potholes were filled with tar mix on Harvey Road, LeMarchant Road, Barnes Road, Bonaventure Avenue, Rennie’s Mill Road, Duckworth Street, Forest Road, Merrymeeting Road, Wateford Bridge Road, Military Road, King’s Bridge Road, Quidi Vidi Road, George Street, Water Street East, Gower Street, Freshwater Road, Hamilton Avenue and Cornwell Avenue.

The postponed case of the Canadian Solder, charged with assault of a girl on Boncoddy Street, was concluded at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, when the case was dismissed. The defense set up an alibi and produced witnesses to show that at the time the assault was supposed to have been committed, the accused was in Barracks. Judge Browne stated in passing sentence, he had a grave suspicion that it was the accused who attacked the girl, but he had to be guided by the evidence.


May 31 1941 OBITUARY CHARLEY BRADBURY: Thursday night, after a brief illness, brought to a close the life of another of our good citizens, Charlie Bradbury. A native of Harbor Grace, from where so many fine citizens have come. Industry, thrift, and appreciation of a job well done, were amongst his characteristics. A master in the line of carpentry, he leaves in this city, many evidences of his skill and art. For many years he was associated with the Contractors Messrs E. &. G. Davy, during which time he was frequently assigned the special work of the spring carpentry of the S.S. Stephano. To is surviving wife and relatives the warm sympathy of many will go out.
May 31 1941 WEDDING BELLS ROOD — HUE: An interesting wedding in Halifax, Friday evening, May 23rd at 7 o’clock, was that of Miss Ruth Hue, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Hue, of St. John’s, Newfoundland, and Rex Elmer Rood, of North Sydney, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Rood, Halifax. The ceremony took place in Bethany United Church, Armdale, Rev. J.D. Archibald officiating. The Organist, Miss Sadie Hopkins, presided, and the Choir sang, “The Voice That Breathed O’er Eden.”

The bride was given in marriage by John A McCurdy. She was smartly attired in a grey ensemble, the simple dress on princess lines, and trimmed with a band of rose at the shoulder, and the pockets of her fitted dress length coat, being touched with the rose shade. She wore grey accessories and carried a bouquet of Roses and Lilly of the valley.

Miss Mary Hue, St. John’s, the bride’s sister, was her bridesmaid, and she wore a jacket dress of green with a small white flower mofit, a large white hat, and carried a bouquet of sweet peas. Mitchell MacDonald, Halifax, was the best man, and the ushers were Eric Rood, brother of the groom, and James Rood, a cousin.

The reception was held later at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John A. McCurdy, Cobury Road. Mrs. Rood, the groom’s mother, wore a beige dress with brown accessories, and Mrs. McCurdy, was attired in a blue ensemble with white trim. Mrs. J.F. Rood, aunt of the groom, and Mrs, L.S. Hue, aunt of the bride, poured tea. The table was decorated with lavender sweetpeas and baby breath, white lighted candles, and a wedding cake. Yellow gladiolas and lavender sweetpeas were used throughout the rooms.

Mr. and Mrs. Rood have left on a brief trip through the Annapolis Valley, and will later take up residence in North Sydney. 

May 31 1941 TRAIN SCHEDULE Passengers for the St. John’s-South Coast-St. Pierre-Halifax service, will leave St. John’s at 6 p.m. instead of noon today.

The express train leaving on Tuesday, will make connection at Port aux Basques of the South Coast and Fortune Bay.

The express train leaving on Tuesday next, will make connection at Humbermouth for regular calls to St. John’s.

The regular train leaving at 8.30 Monday morning will make connection at Argentia for the Western route of Placentia Bay.

The overland Limited tomorrow night will leave in two sections. First and second class passengers leave at 9 p.m. and sleeping car passengers at 9.20.

May 31 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The annual meeting of the Feildian Athletic Grounds Association will be held this Saturday evening at 7.15 in the Harold C. Hayward Memorial Room, at the College.

The final game of a series of card tournaments, was held last night at the Star of the Sea Club rooms, and was well attended. Cash prizes were given for the night’s play.

Passengers for the St. John’s-Lewisporte service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock this morning.

A Seaman who was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk on a public street, was released to the Naval authorities.

During the past week, Council employees raked several streets, and sidewalks, in various sections of the city, were also given attention.

The adjourned quarterly meeting of the Benevolent Irish Society will be held tomorrow morning after last Mass.

The Overland Limited leaving tomorrow night at nine o’clock, will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay route.

Two Sailors were before the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, charged with stealing and causing damage to a motor car. They were fined $50.00 each.

A special meeting of the Newfoundland Dairymen’s Association, was held at Brookfield school last night when important business was discussed.

Because of the bad weather yesterday morning, fishermen were unable to get on the grounds, and no codfish were for sale in the markets. Some salmon caught the previous day, met ready purchase, and the price was up a little, being 12 cents per pound.

The Business Ladies Bowling League is holding a dance and supper to conclude their season this year, instead of a dinner as in the past. The event will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel on next Tuesday night.

Employees of the Sanitary Department, last week numbered sixty, twenty-one horses were working. A total of 528 loads of ashes and garbage were carted to various dumps. Some 176 gullies were cleaned and dipped and the refuse taken away.

The farewell performance of the Camer Revue will be given at the Arena tonight, when another dance will be held and the full show will be seen. Walter Chambers orchestra will attend. The members of the revue leave for the United States tomorrow.

The Summer Sunday special will resume service tomorrow, and on every Sunday till further notice, will leave St. John’s at 10 a.m. for points to Argentia, including Placentia. Returning, the train will leave Argentia at 6 p.m. and arrive in St. John’s at 10.30 p.m.

June 3 1941 IN MEMORIAM JIMMY CANDOW: On an evening early in April, as the setting sun was casting its golden rays on the hilltops, news flashed over the wires that another of Newfoundland’s gallant sons has passed on. Jimmy Candow has found a calm and peaceful resting place beneath the ocean. He died, in the service of his King and Country, keeping Britain’s sea lanes open. A member of the Mercantile Marine, in which service Newfoundlanders are playing such a splendid part, he had on several occasions, sailed within danger zones, and was about to return home, when his ship became the target of a ruthless enemy. Though not on the field of battle, yet truly did he give his life in freedom’s cause. Greater love hath no man than this, he laid down his life for his friends.

The deceased was formerly employed at Bowring-Harvey Ltd., and had made application for enlistment in the Royal Artillery and Navy, and not being eligible, and anxious to play a part in defense of the principles we hold so dear, he enlisted in the Mercantile Marine Service, where he has earned for himself, a name that will prove as a source of inspiration to all. He was married and leaves a wife and three children, to whom sincere sympathy is extended. Jimmy Candow has passed on, but the years in their passing, cannot erace from our hearts, the memory of a true son of Newfoundland, whom we own –

Worthy of the wreath that crowns the conqueror’s brow and trust that fame will give his name a niche where all may bow. By H.F.

June 3 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The driver of a truck was fined $2.00 yesterday, for passing a street car whilst passengers were alighting from it.

The express leaving this afternoon, will make connection at Humbermouth for regular points on the Humbermouth–St. John’s service.

The Felidian Athletic Grounds Association will hold another dance on Friday, with music supplied by Gordon Foley’s orchestra.

A good sign of codfish was secured with jigger at Bonavista last week. Men are now preparing for the trap voyage, and there is much activity.

The work of laying the concrete sidewalks has been completed on the East side from Water Street to George Street, and the concrete curb and gutter has been completed from Water to New Gower Street.

The annual installation ceremony of Lodge Harbor Grace, will take place at the Masonic Hall, Harbor Grace, on tomorrow night at eight o’clock. It is expected that several city brethren will attend the ceremonies.

The fifteen ton schooner Jessie and Maud, O’Brine Master, went ashore on Saturday at Trepassey, and was badly damaged. Constable Power reporting the matter to the Chief of Police, stated that the cargo has been landed from the vessel.

Returns from the Tag Day Collection, sponsored by the Great War Veterans Association, in aid of the Lord Mayor’s Fund for Air Raid Victims, show that a total of $2,763.54 has been received to date, with the logging camps yet to report. — Humber Hearld.

The driver of a car who was doing 40 m.p.h. on the Portugal Cove Road, was fined $4.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Another, who failed to stop entering Topsail Road from Road de Luxe, was fined $3.00, and another, for making 30 m.p.h. on Water Street, was fined $3.00.

In future, all executive meetings of the L.S.P.U. will be held on Friday evening instead of on Mondays as heretofore.

Thee men were before Court yesterday, charged with doing damage to the extent of $37.00 to a taxi. The case will be heard at three this afternoon.

The regular meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1452, Knights of Columbus, will be held at Columbus Club tonight at 8.30.

The express train leaving this evening will be in two sections. First and second class passengers will leave at 6 p.m., and sleeping car passengers at 6.30

A motorist was before Court yesterday, charged with driving at a speed of thirty miles per hour on LeMarchant Road. He was fined $3.50. Another, for driving without a licence, was fined $1.50.

At the Executive Meeting of the N.P.A. (Trinity Branch) held recently, it was announced by the Treasurer that the house to house collections held at Trinity, Dunfield, Goose Cove, and Lockston, amounted to $179.75, which amounted was forwarded to St. John’s. — Trinity Enterprise.

The storm which raged here on Friday, was felt in full force on Bell Island. There was a heavy fall of snow and motor traffic on some sections was held up. Poles, wires, flagpoles, and fences were blown down, and many telephones were out of commission, while the power supply was interrupted for some time.

George King, young son of Mr. and Mrs. H.S. King of Catalina, had a serious accident last week when he caught his fingers in the cog wheel of a pile driver, while playing around with some boys. Dr. Templeman was called, and found it necessary to amputate two fingers at the first joint. The hand is badly mangled but the Doctor hopes to save the remaining fingers. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

A man was before the Court yesterday afternoon, charged with being drunk, with attempting to steal one of the American motor trucks, and with assaulting members of the Military Police. For the first offence he was fined $5.00, and for the second $20.00. Judge Browne reserved judgement on the third charge. He said he could not fine anything in the act to give power to the M.P. to make an arrest.


June 6 1941 ENGINEER FALLS OVER WHARF AND IS DROWNED Was in water Some Time Before Rescued, Artificial Respiration Fails Restore.

Arnold Rested, an Engineer, was accidently drowned last night when he fell over the wharf of Job Bros. & Co. Ltd, North Side, and after a period in the water before being rescued, died at Hospital.

Shortly before 9 o’clock last night, Constable E. Coleman, Guard at the Police Station, was informed by telephone, by the Watchman at Job’s Premises, that a man was in the water between the piers of the premises, and Constable F. Murphy, E.T. Martin, J. Grouchy and L.C. Andrews responded.

When the Police arrived, Mr. William Sceviour, after the man had been taken from the water, commenced artificial respiration, and continued until the Police Van arrived, when the deceased was taken on board. All the way to the Hospital, the Police continued artificial respiration without results. At the Hospital at 9.23 p.m., Dr. Marshall pronounced life extinct. The body was removed to the morgue.

June 6 1941 MAIL FOR NEWFOUNDLAND LOST AT SEA The Daily News has been informed by the Secretary for Post and Telegraphs, that letters and printed papers, posted in the United Kingdom for Newfoundland, between the 28th and 30th April, 1941 approximately, have been lost at sea owing to enemy action.
June 6 1941 NAVAL CASUALTY The Director of Recruiting has been informed by the Trade Commissioner for Newfoundland in London, of the following Naval casualty: KEATING — Bernard, Stoker, First Class, KX98861, previously reported dangerously wounded on war service, now reported died of his wounds in 64th General Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt. Next of Kin, Mother, Mrs. Mary Keating, Salt Pond, Burin, Newfoundland,(Stoker Keating enlisted on H.M.S. “Berwick” at St. John’s, in 1938.
June 6 1941 CONFLAGRATION STARTED EARLY THIS MORNING Canadian Soldier Enters Burning Building to Rescue Small Child

House Contents Totally Destroyed

In a blaze that lit the Eastern sky over the Narrows this morning, the homes of Messrs. Lewis, Rogers, and Garland, were destroyed by fire, and fortunately, no lives were lost. Some Soldiers discovered the blaze, which suddenly burst out through the side of the Lewis residence, and an immediate alarm was given. Sergeant Morton heard that all the persons in the Lewis home were not accounted for, and went into the building, rescuing a small child.

The Central Fire Department, under Superintendent Codner, answered the fire alarm, but there is no water main as far out as the burning buildings. Canadian Solders, Firemen, and residents, formed a bucket brigade, with buckets furnished by the Canadian troops in the main, and they all did yeoman service.

The alarm was sent in at 2.40 a.m. today, and before the Firemen returned at 4 a.m., the three buildings had been completely destroyed, each of the house owners losing everything. Mr. Levi Rogers had his cod trap in his house, and lost this as well as his household goods.

June 6 1941 PLEADS GUILTY CHARGE BIGAMY SUPREME COURT Joseph Boone Sentenced Six Months. Emma Atkins Gets Three Months For Aiding and Abetting.

The Grand Jury was in attendance at the Supreme Court yesterday, and was addressed by His Lordship the Chief Justice, on a bill of indictment charging Joseph Boone with bigamy, and Emma Atkins with aiding and abetting the commission of a felony.

The Jury, after a brief deliberation, brought in a true bill. [?] Carter, K.C. for the Crown, asked that the prisoners be arraigned forthwith. The prisoners were arraigned and pleaded guilty. Boone was sentenced to six months imprisonment, and the woman was sentenced to three months.

Boone committee the offence on January 18th last, at Bay Roberts, during the lifetime of his wife, Jessie Boone, whom he married at Bell Island.


June 7 1941 PERSONAL Doctor Walter Sellars of Bonavista, a graduate of Dalhousie University, has been appointed an Interne at the General Hospital, and takes up his duties there in the near future.

Rev. Brother Strapp, who has been a patient at the General Hospital for some time past, where he underwent a serious operation, is now well on the road to recovery, and will be leaving the Hospital today.

June 7 1941 FUNERAL SGT. MAJOR WHITING CANADIAN FORCES Soldier Who died Suddenly Accorded Full Military Honors. Interment at C. of E. Cemetery.

The funeral of the late Sergt. Major WHITING of the Canadian forces, who died suddenly at the Barracks on Wednesday, took place yesterday afternoon with full military honors.

The remains, in charge of Undertaker Carnell, were covered with the Union Jack, and the helmet and haversack of the deceased were on the casket, which was covered with floral tributes. Preceding the hearse was a company of Soldiers, marching with arms reversed, and following them, came the Firing Squad, and the Brass Band of the unit. Officers then walked in a body, followed by the Sergeants of the unit, and representatives of the Sergeants Mess of the Newfoundland Militia. Then followed the members of the Company.

Inside the Church of England cemetery, the remains were removed from the hearse, and carried shoulder high, by pall bearers, all of whom were Sergeant Majors. At the grave-side, the committal service was conducted by the Chaplain of the Forces, following which, three volleys were fired, while The Last Post and Reveille sounded by a Bugler, and taps played by a Drummer.

The service was most impressive and quite a few citizens saw the funeral, as it passed by, and were at the cemetery to see the service.

The deceased was 31 years of age and was born in Texas, U.S.A. He served in the U.S. Forces before joining the Canadian unit, and held a fine Army record. His funeral was the first of its kind to take place in the city.

June 7 1941 PROMOTION FOR ST. JOHN’S BOY The Halifax Mail of May 2nd last, carries a new item, that Sub-Lt. Fabian A. O’Dea, R.C.N.V.R., after nine months training, has been appointed Instructor in Torpedoing Subjects, and in charge of the torpedo training of new officers.
June 7 1941 COMMITTED FOR TRIAL S. COURT Earl R. Gilson, American Soldier, was yesterday committed for trial at the Supreme Court, on a charge of manslaughter, arising out of the death last Saturday, of Maud Bragg of Cuckhold’s Cove. The preliminary enquiry was held before Magistrate O’Neill, and concluded yesterday morning
June 7 1941 DEATH CALLS ANOTHER WAR VETERAN No. 1333, MICHAEL J EZEKIEL, Royal Nfld. Regiment:

“His strong, warm hand I held in mine Till his soul passed out through the picket line, Where an Angel awaited the countersign To get from him.”

Death is only a turn in the road, and beyond that curve we know, a lot of old friends — Members of “Ours” — will be awaiting for us; but as each one of these Comrades give the countersign, we look once more to see what is already filed in the archives of the past.

One of the few things left to a returned War Veteran — to the advancing years — is memory. The twilight days of life are happy or sad, as we re-live 1914-1918. They are both very pleasant and a little poignant, as we recall No. 1333, Michael J Ezekiel, whose passing this week at Harbor Main, has come as a shock to his many friends.

“Mike” sailed from St. John’s on the Transport “Stephano”. He was a member of “E” Company, and after his preliminary training at Edinburgh and Stobs, went to Gallipoli with the first Battalion. On returning to England, he was at the Depot for a while, and thence proceeded to the B.E.F., where he received serious war wounds.

At the 3rd London General Hospital — the home for the sick and wounded Newfoundlanders — he was a patient for some time. With development of a penchant for poetry, and because of his “nom de plume”of “Paddy”, he was generally recognized by that time, “Paddy” wrote in “The Gazette”, and fine stirring words about the Ward and his fellow patients, came from his pen.

In due course he returned to Harbor Main, and settled down with his good wife Grace, who came from the land of the heather. No old friend ever drove through the main road, past the Hr. Mmain Post Office, without stopping to see”Paddy”, and there was always a warm reception — a hospitable greeting from the family.

Severely wounded, sustaining the loss of a leg for his King and Country, Mike Ezekiel kept faith till the last, and was cheerful and contented. With his passing, another loyal member of the “Old Guard” has answered the Roll Call, and to all who survive, the G.W.V.A. extends sincerest sympathy. L.C.M.

June 7 1941 RECORD NUMBER AT YACHT CLUB The dance held at the Yacht Club last night was the most successful for the season. There was a record crowd in attendance, and all enjoyed the music of Mickey Duggan’s swingsters to the full. The program was varied and was highly approved of by all who attended.
June 7 1941 VESSEL REPORTED NEED ASSISTANCE A message was received yesterday from Pinchard’s Island, stating that the schooner Maxwell R., Captain R. Hounsell, had passed there in a storm, and that it appeared to strike a rock, and to be in distress. The message was broadcast early last night over station VONF, asking anyone at Wesleyville or Newtown, to go to the schooners assistance as soon as possible.
June 7 1941 WEDDING BELLS BARNES — MOSDELL: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist on Wednesday afternoon, when Margaret Almira, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mosdell, was united in the bond of Holy Matrimony, to Isaac, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Barnes. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. T. Greavett, assisted by Rev. Canon Higham.

The bride entered the Church on the arm of her father, and looked very pretty in a dress of white satin, designed on Princess lines. She carried a bouquet of carnations and roses, and maidenhair fern. Miss Minerva Mosdell, the bride’s sister, and Miss Florence Marshall, friend of the bride, were bridesmaids, and looked charming attired in lemon and green organdy, carrying bouquets of sweetpeas and maidenhair fern. Mr.Edgar Butler, a friend of the groom, performed the duties of best man, and Mr. Harry Barnes, brother of the groom, was usher.

During the signing of the Register, Schubert’s Serenade was beautifully rendered by Rev. Ross, Organist of the Cathedral.

After the ceremony, the wedding party motored to Woodstock, where the reception was held. The toast to the bride and groom was proposed by Rev. Greavett, to which the groom responded in a few well chosen words. The toast to the bridesmaids was proposed by the groom, and responded by the best man, and that to the parents of the bride and groom, by Mr. Harold Pippy, to which Mr. Mosdell fittingly responded.

The bride and groom were the recipients of many and valuable presents, and the best wishes of all their friends for a long and happy wedded life together.

After the honeymoon, which will be spent touring the Avalon Peninsula, the happy couple will take up residence at 59 Prescott Street. B.E. 

June 7 1941 POLICE FIND INJURED MAN ON NEW GOWER ST. Died While en route to the Hospital

Police Place M. O’Rourke Under Arrest, Charge Not Disclosed

C. I. D. Conducting an Investigation

THOMAS FLEMMING, married, of Edinburgh Street, was found by the Police at 10.15 p.m. yesterday, lying on the ground at the corner of New Gower Street and Prince’s Street. He was conveyed to the General Hospital in a car, and before arriving at that institute he was dead. The C.I.D. under Sergeant Case, commenced an immediate investigation, and about midnight, M. O’Rourke of Blackhead Road, was detained for questioning, and later that morning, was placed under arrest, the charge not being disclosed.

Constable John Roche, doing duty on New Gower Street, shortly after 10 o’clock last night, was informed that a man was lying on the street near Prince’s Street. Going to the scene, he found the man, who on first appearance was unconscious, and appeared to be absolutely helpless. He placed the deceased man in a car, and decided to take him to the General Hospital, but before doing so, stopped at the Police Station, where Sergeant Efford was on duty, who accompanied him to the Hospital. It was evident that the man was dead before entering the Hospital. The body was examined by Dr. Stentaford who pronounced life extinct.

The C.I.D. started an investigation and interrogation of a number of people who might know something prior to the finding of the body, and later took in M. O’Rourke, who was placed under arrest.

June 7 1941 HONORED ON OCCASION OF SILVER JUBILEE Friends of Mr. and Mrs. J. O’Reilly, Assemble On 25th Anniversary of Wedding Day.

On Wednesday night, Mr. and Mrs James O’Reilly of Bond Street, celebrated the 25th anniversary of their wedding, with a function which took place at Ryan’s Hostelry, Torbay Road. Some fifty guests were in attendance, and the Chairman for the occasion was Mr. Clarence Day.

After a sumptuous repast was served, a toast to the jubilarians was proposed by Mr. L.J. Kavanagh, who on behalf of the gathering and of many other friends not present, extended congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. O’Reilly, and the wishes of all, that they will have many more years of wedded bliss. Following a solo by Mrs. J Simms, a presentation of a silver service was made by the Chairman, Mr. Day, as a token of the esteem in which Mr. and Mrs. O’Reilly are held. Pleasing reply was made by Mr. O’Reilly, on behalf of his wife and himself. Cards and dancing were taken up. Prizes for the cards were won by Mrs. V. Willshire and Mrs. Ray Earles, and the elimination dance prize was won by Mr. Charles O’Reilly and Mrs. D. Ryan.

June 7 1941 VOLUNTEERS FOR ROYAL ARTILLERY 1227—HICKS ,WILSON, 41 South Side East.

1228—MIRON ,THOMAS JOS., 69 Lime Street.

1229—CLEARY, PATRICK JOS., 60 Livingstone Street.

1230—BENNETT, JOHN GEORGE, 228 Water Street W.

1231—KEOUGH, JAMES JOS., 47 LeMarchant Road.

1232—CHAFE, WALTER, Mount Pearl Park.

St. John’s Office, June 4, 1941

TUCKER, MOSES, Thorburn Line, St. Phillips.

SQUIRES, EDGAR S., Thorburn Line, St. Phillips.

BLUNDON, William E., 75 Campbell Avenue

HEALEY, MAXWELL, 36 Belvedere Street.

REARDON, GEORGE EDWARD, 121 Carter’s Hill.

BREEN, PATRICK JAMES, 25 Job Street.

FOWLER, FREDERICK, Topsail.

IVANY, RALPH, 53 Flowers Hill

COONEY, MICHAEL JOS., 4 Adelaide Street.

GARDNER, CYRIL JOS., 24 Brazil’s Square.

BOONE, ALLAN W., 22 Flowers Hill.

DOWNTON, ARTHUR C., 60 Prince of Wales Street.

June 7 1941 BIRTHS LAHEY — At St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital on Tuesday, June 3rd, to Mr. and Mrs. R.J. Lahey, a daughter.

COURTNEY — At the Grace Maternity Hospital on Friday June 6th, 1941, to Albert and Myrtle Courtney of this city, a son.

June 7 1941 MARRIED BARNES – MOSDELL: At the C. of E. Cathedral on Wednesday June 4th, by Rev. T. Greavett, assisted by Rev. Canon Higham, Margaret Almira, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. Mosdell, LeMarchant Road, to Mr. Isaac Barnes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Barnes.
June 7 1941 DEATH EWING — Passed away suddenly this morning, Sophia Elizabeth, aged 57 years, beloved wife of Arnold J Ewing. She leaves to mourn besides her husband, two sons, William at home, James serving in the Royal Navy, and one daughter, Florence. Funeral takes place Sunday at 2.30 from her late residence 50 Hayward Avenue.
June 7 1941 ODDITIES Some Heat — If an ordinary coin could be heated to the temperature of the interior of the sun, life could not exist within thousands of miles of it.

About Bats — Bats have super-sensitive sense organs in their wings, enabling them to fly blindfold through a room, closely strung with wires, without touching a single wire.

Cheese is Popular — In the dining room of the British House of Commons in 1939, there was consumed 1417 pounds of cheddar, 408 pounds of Gorgonzola, and 216 pounds of Gruyere cheese.

Some earthquakes begin as deep as 450 miles below the ground before they rock the surface of the earth.

In August 1912 , a single day’s rain fall in Norfolk County, England, amounted to 670,720,000 tons of water.

Texas has lived under six different flags: French, Spanish, Mexican, Texas Republic, Confederate and the United States.

June 7 1941 OFFICE BEARERS LODGE HR. GRACE Ceremony held at Masonic Hall Harbor Grace On Wednesday

The first of the Masonic installations for 1941 of out of town Lodges under The Scottish Jurisdiction, took place at the Masonic Hall Harbor Grace, on Wednesday, June 4th.

The District Grand Master, R.W. Bro. D.M. MacFarlane, was unable to be present, so the ceremony was performed by the Deputy D.G.M., W. Bro H.E. Cowan, who was accompanied by the following officers: W. Bro. S. Russell as D.G.S.W.; W. Bro. E.L. Oke as D.G.J.W.; W. Bro. L.J. Harum as D.G. Secty; W. Bro. E.F. Peters as asst. D.G. Secty; W. Bro. Dr. L. Curtis, D.G. Chaplain; W. Bro. R.D. Munn as D.G.D. of C.; W. Bro.C.O. Butler as D.G. Inner Guard; W .Bro. F. Davis, D.G. Steward; also W. Bro. A.G. Williams who represented the District Grand Master of the English Jurisdiction.

Lodge Harbor Grace had a very successful year under the Mastership of W. Bro. R.L. Tapp who was re-elected for the ensuing year. The other officers invested were: W. Bro. R.D. Munn — I.M.P., Bro. W.H. Pike — D.M., Bro. J.W. Dove — S.M., Bro.E. Yetmen — W.S.W., Bro L Pike — W.J.W., W. Bro. T.G. Ford, P.M. —Secretary. Bro. S.D. Grant — Treasurer., Bro. O.S. Grimm — D of C., Bro. Rev. C.R. Blount — Chaplain., W. Bro. W.H. Parmiter, P.M. — B.B., W. Bro. L.A. Whitman, P.M. — Organist., Bro. G.H. Noseworthy — S.D., Bro. R.F. Cron — J.D., Bro. R.A. Tapp — S.S., Bro. F. Sheppard — J.S., Bro. W.T. Tapp — I.G., Bro. H Parmiter — Tyler.

A social hour was held at the close of the meeting when the following toasts were duly honored. During the banquet, a telegram from Clift Lodge, Bell Island, was read extending best wishes.

Toast List:

The King and the Craft — Prop., R.W.M.; resp. National Anthem. The M.W. The Grand Master, Mason of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, Lord Traprain — Prop.; R.W.M.; resp, Grand Honors. The District Grand Lodge of Scottish Freemasonry in Newfoundland – Prop. Bro. Rev. C.R. Blount, Chaplain Lodge Harbor Grace; resp., W. Bro. H.E Cowan , D.G.M.D. The District Grand Lodge of English Freemasonry in Newfoundland — Prop., W. Bro., R.D. Munn, I.M.P. Lodge Harbor Grace; resp., Wor. Bro. A.G. Williams D.G.J.W. Sister lodge and Visiting brethren — Prop., W. Bro. Eugene Yetman, W.S.W. Lodge Harbor Grace, resp., Bro. K.C. Skuce for Lodges under English Jurisdiction; W. Bro. R.W. Press for Lodge Tasker, W. Bro. F. Davis for Lodge Carbonear, W. Bro. A.R. Gosse for Lodge MacKay, W. Bro. C.O. Butler for Lodge St. Andrew. W. Bro. E Pugh for Lodge Heart’s Content. Lodge Harbor Grace 476, and its R.W. Master — Prop., W. Bro. Rev. Dr. Levi Curtis, District Grand Chaplain; resp.; Wor. Bro. R.L. Tapp. R.W.M., Lodge Harbor Grace. 476, S.C. Tyler’s Toast — prop., W. Bro. E.F. Peters. GOD SAVE THE KING. Toastmaster — Wor. Bro. R.D. Munn, I.P.M. Lodge Harbor Grace 476, S.C.

June 7 1941 ACADEMY OF OUR LADY OF MERCY Operetta by Grades 1 and 2 “Patty Sue’s Birthday Party”

No event is looked forward to more eagerly, especially by the actresses themselves, that the annual operetta for Grades 1 and II at the Academy of Mercy. This year, “Patty Sue’s Birthday” was staged very successful, adding about ninety more names to the already long list of “Talented performers”. Of the many delightful story book characters who were invited to the party, King Cole was in his own, and in everyone else’s estimation, the prince of them all, and acted his part right royally. The Old Woman in the Shoe production, Bo Peep, Jack and Jill, Miss Muffett, and all the other lovable little people of story land. There were aviators, and sticks of candy, as well as party girls, all doing honor to the charming Patty Sue, who acknowledged the attention lavished on her with perfect simplicity and composure.

The costumes were extremely pretty, the different shades all blending into a perfect harmony of color. The singing, dancing, and elocution were excellent and showed careful training. Altogether, “Patty Sue’s Birthday Party” was a very delightful affair, and teachers, performers, and the busy mothers who provided the dainty costumes, deserve to be congratulated on its success.

The Sisters wish to express their gratitude to Mr. Frank James, who so ably arranged the stage effects.

Cast of characters was: — Patty Sue, D NASH; Her mother, B KAVANAGH; her friend, M MURPHY; Hop O’ Thumb, B. MURPHY; Old King Cole, M DARCY; Man with the pipe, L. McCORMICK; Man with the bowl, P. CASEY; Fiddlers three, M. O’GREADY, N. CROTTY, P. MAHER; Hearlds, M. FOLEY, K KAVANAGH; Train bearers, A. LEWIS, M. FLYNN; Coach girl, M. WALSH; Old woman in the shoe, P. KELLY; Jackie Horner, P. DALY; Mistress Mary, B.McGRATH; Bo Peep, K. NORRIS; Miss Muffett; B. MURPHY; Jack and Jill, C. LAWLOR, M. LAWLOR; Puss in Boots, M. VAVASOUR; Boy Blue. G. TOBIN; Red Riding Hood, M. CHRISTOPHER; King and Queen of Hearts, J. ABERY, E. SHARPE; Bumble Bees, D. WHITTEN, B. CAULE, K. BROGAN; Flower girls, S. O’REGAN, M. O’MARA, S. RALPH, J. STEPHENSON; Chefs, F. CAREW, G. WELLMAN, Party chorus, Aviators, stick of Candy.

June 7 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Codfish is plentiful at St. George’s but there is no bait and no salt. There is a good run of salmon and net fishermen are doing well. — Western Star.

On Wednesday night last, the wedding of Miss Belle Carew, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T.D. Carew, to Mr. Michael Noah, was solemnized at St. Patrick’s Church by Rt. Rev. Monsignor Flynn.

The Overland Limited tomorrow night, will leave in two sections. First and second class passengers will leave St. John’s at nine o’clock and sleeping car passengers at 9.20.

The dance held at the T.A. Hall last night in aid of the Juvenile Society free picnic, was well attended and enjoyed to the full. Music was provided by Harold LaFosse and his orchestra.

The first game of a series of card tournaments, was played at the Star Hall last night and was well attended. Three cash prizes were given and there will also be cash prizes for the best scores in the series.

Overland Limited tomorrow night will make connection at Lewisporte for the Green Bay.

The curb and gutter and concrete sidewalks has now been completed on the East side of Adelaide Street, from Water Street to New Gower Street and work on the West side has begun.


June 9 1941 BIRTHS SQUIRES — On Sunday morning June 8th to Mr. and Mrs. John Squires, Plymouth Road, a daughter.
June 9 1941 DEATHS CLEARY — Killed by enemy action, June 6th, Captain Alban Cleary, son of the late Philip J and Catherine Cleary. R. I. P.

HICKEY — Passed peacefully away Sunday, June 8th, Margaret Hickey, beloved wife of P.J. Hickey. Leaving to mourn husband, four sons, one daughter, one sister at Harbor Grace, two brothers in U.S.A., also a large circle of friends. Funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 65 pleasant Street. R.I.P.

MURPHY — Passed peacefully away on June 7th, at 11.45 p.m., Clara Mary, daughter of Bride and the late Patrick Murphy. Leaving to mourn mother, one sister, one brother, also one stepbrother and a large circle of relatives and friends. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence, 20 Alexander Street. R.I.P.

FLEMING — Suddenly June 6th, Thomas Fleming, aged 31 years. Leaving to mourn wife, mother, father, and a large circle of friends. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence, 34 Edinburgh Street.

KEAN — Passed peacefully away on Saturday, Thomas aged 81 years, son of the late Patrick and Mary Kean of Topsail Road. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. today Monday, from Connolly’s Mortuary Rooms, Adelaide Street. R.I.P.

PRETTY — Passed peacefully away at 2.45 a.m Sunday, after a brief illness, Ida Stewart, wife of Samuel Pretty; leaving to mourn husband, two sons, two daughters and two sisters. Mrs. J. Grills and Mrs. W. Robson. Funeral at 2.15 p.m. Tuesday, from her late residence, 49 Avalon Terrace, Topsail Road. R.I.P. (Boston papers please copy)

TOBIN — Passed peacefully away on June 7th, at 11 p.m. Bridget Ann, widow of the late ex-Customs Detective, James Tobin, in her 69th year. Leaving three sons, Michael, Gerald, and James; two daughters, Mrs. Joseph Goobie at home, and Mrs. Frank Byrne, Corner Brook; also two sisters, Mrs. William Breen at Cape Broyle, and Mrs. Peter Murphy, Topsil Road, and one brother, Michael Kelly at Cape Broyle. Funeral today, Monday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, 82 Cabot Street. R.I.P. (St. John N.B., and New York papers please copy)

June 9 1941 EXPRESS PASSENGERS The following passengers arrived at Port aux basques yesterday: --- W. D. WHITE, Mrs. D. P. HORWOOD, L.F. UHL, C. EIMDOIL, B. WAROSEN, M. COX, H. JOHNSON, J.BUFIFFER, J. WESTHAVER, E. DEIR, J. DEWLING, J.H. CRIST, H. BURABANK, G.C. CARTER, D.F. LITTLE, N. CAMPBEAU, A. FINLAYSON, Miss M. CULLIAN, J.L. BURKE, W. MORECROFT, H. O’CONNOR, H.M. LAY, D.F. MURRAY, E. EBDRES, P. KENNEDY, R.H. WILKIE, T. HUTVHINSON, C. ALLEN, W.E. MURPHY, N. SMITH, J. BAILEY, Mrs. S. WHITTINGTON, Sergt. H. CRONIN, D. LERICHE, T. GEE, Mrs. D. GEE, R.C. GEE, Mrs. W. FILLIATRE, C. FILLIATRE, W.D. McARTHUR, W.A. DIAMOND, H. PAYNE, H. NOSEWORTHY, Sergt. LESLIE, H. HUNNENCRAFT, J.F. DOUCHE, A. M. HERIC, J. D. HENDRICK, A. PALOVICI, R.A. PROSSER, J.D. RAWLINS, W. REMORISCK, F. SCHIESINGER, C. PIKE, Mrs. E. BROWN, J.H. BROWN, D. BROWN, R. DEREMER, F. SUTHERLAND, Lt. L.S. WATSON, C. ROBERTS, G.C. MORRIS, M.T. McPHAIL, J.A. HAYWARD, E. BEAUCAGE, A.V. GALLANT, Mrs. S. GALLANT, Col. W.S. HADDEN, J. KRYOLEDRY, C. McKAY, C. PAYNE, R. OLDFORD, Wing. Com. A WOODS. Mrs. M. MUSHELL, Mrs.M. MANSFIELD, Mrs. E. PARSONS, Miss M. NEIMA, Miss. H. SIMMS, A. McKINNON, H.C. JENKINS, Miss M. KENNEY, Miss. M. COOMBS, Mrs. M. COOMBS, E.G. RAYMOND, A.R. HENNERS, G.W. HOLMES, C. PARKER, S. MILLER and three children, E. HARRISON, R. GARLAND, E. BEARD, R.J. HARRIS, E. BILLARD, L. WRISON, D. STRAUS, R. DESLUNIER, W.D. SWINSON, W. HEAD, G. BOULTIER, M.D FREEMAN, G. RIDEOUT, S. INNMAN, G.L. TOMPKINS, R. FREEMAN, B. KINNEY, M. KERSTED, M. LAWSON, B.J. EARLEY, H. BRAULT, H. FITZGERALD, J. LOUIS, J.W. READ, R. BOYCE, R. WILSON, J. McISAAC, Miss E. ELLIS, C. BENNETT, I. HARMIN, R. THORBURN, Mrs. M. KEEPING and child, Miss. M WOOD, Comm. KELLY, Comm HARLACK.
June 9 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A resident of Holyrood was fined $3.00 on Saturday for driving a car without a license.

A Seaman was before Court on Saturday, charged with being drunk and being in possession of a bottle of liquor on which was a defaced label; he was fined $5.00

Passengers for regular points on the Labrador Service as far as Holton, will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock Wednesday morning.

A number of panes of glass in various stores on Water Street, Duckworth, and New Gower Streets, were broken on Saturday night and early yesterday morning.

The quarterly meeting of the T.A. & B Society was held yesterday afternoon and was well attended. Rev. P.J. Kennedy, Spiritual Director, was present and addressed the members.

A meeting of the Benevolent Irish Society was held yesterday morning after last Mass, where important business was transacted.

The regular train leaving this morning will make connection at Argentia for the Bay routes of Placentia. Bay.

A meeting of the Executive of the Playground Association will be held at the Newfoundland Hotel tomorrow, at 1.10 p.m.

Thursday next, the Feast of Corpus Christi is a holy day of obligation, and Masses in the R.C. Churches will be celebrated at the same hours as on Sunday.

The trophies won in the Commercial and Inter-Club Bowling Leagues are now on exhibition in the window of George Langmead & Co. It is one of the finest display of trophies seen in the city at any time.

The Feildian Athletic Ground Association will hold another informal dance on Wednesday night at Bishop Feild College Hall. Gordon Foley and his orchestra will be in attendance.

A motorist was fined $4.00 at the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, after being convicted of traveling at a speed of 40 m.p.h. whilst approaching another car on the Portugal Cove Road.

The Summer Sunday Special went out yesterday morning, to point as far as Argentia, including Placentia, and a large number availed of the opportunity going out. Return was made at 10.30 last night.

An eighteen-year-old man was before Court on Saturday and was convicted for being drunk. His Honor Magistrate O’Neill, remarked that an investigation should be made as to where persons under age were obtaining liquor.

A meeting of the society for the Protection of Animals will be held on next Saturday night, when the appointment of a Chief Agent, in succession to the late Dr. Smith, will be taken up.

A motorist was before Court on Saturday and was charged with passing cars on the Topsail Road at a speed greater than twenty-five miles per hour. He was fined $6.00. The evidence of the Traffic Officer was that on the Seal Cove Road, the car had passed four or five other cars, approaching fifty miles per hour.

June 9 1941 SAFETY FIRST If every one who drives a car could lie a month in bed With broken bones and stitched up wounds, or fracture’s of the head And there endure the agonies that many people do They’d never need preach safety any more to me and you.

If every one cold stand beside the bed of some close friend And hear the doctor say, “No hope” before the fatal end, And see him there unconscious, never knowing what took place The laws and rules of traffic I am sure we’d soon embrace.

If every one could meet the wife and the children left behind And step into the darkened home, where once the sunlight shined. And look upon “The Vacant Chair” where Daddy used to sit. I’m sure each reckless driver would be forced to think a bit.

If every one would realize pedestrians on the street, have just as much the right of way as those upon the seat. And train their eyes for children who run recklessly at play, This steady toll of human lives would drop from day to day.

If every one would check his car before he takes a trip, For tires worn, loose steering wheels, and breaks that fail to grip, And pay attention to his lights while driving roads at night. Another score for safety could be chalked up in the fight.

If every one who drives a car would heed the danger signs, Placed by the Highway Engineers who also mark the lines To keep the traffic in the lane and give it proper space. The accidents we read about could not have taken place.

And last, if he who takes the wheel would say a little prayer. And keep in mind those in the car depending on his care, And make a vow and pledge himself to never take a chance The great crusade for safety then would suddenly advance. — C. E. WEISER


June 13 1941 PRESS COMMUNIQUE At the five hundred and forty-eight meeting of the Commission of Government, held on Wednesday June 11th, 1941, a Bill entitled “An Act to Give Effect in Newfoundland to an Agreement made between Newfoundland and the Government of the United Kingdom, and the United States of America, Relating to the establishment of Naval and Air Bases in Newfoundland, and to Authorize the Execution of a Lease Under the said Agreement, and for other Purposes”, was read a first, second and third time, passed and recommended to His Excellency the Governor for enactment.
June 13 1941 ANNOUNCEMENT Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Halley wish to announce the engagement of their eldest daughter, Eileen Marie Agnes, to Dr. Thomas Newton Sheen of New York City. Dr. Sheen is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Newton Sheen of Peoria, Illinois, and a brother of Rt. Rev. Mgr. Fulton J Sheen of the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.
June 13 1941 DEATH CARROLL — Passed peacefully away last evening, Catherine, beloved wife of Capt. Thomas Carroll, and daughter of Matthew and the late Alice Murphy, leaving to mourn; husband, father, two daughters, one step-daughter, two sons, one step-sister, and one step-brother. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m., from her late residence 37 Wickford Street.
June 13 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Passengers for the South Coast-Halifax service will be leaving St. John’s at ten o’clock tomorrow morning.

According to the Bell Islander, a fisherman of Portugal Cove was before Magistrate Mulcahy at Bell Island last week, charged with operating a motor boat for transportation of passengers, without being surveyed and licenced. The accused was fined $10.00.

The Western Star states that work has begun in earnest at the new plant at Quigley’s Cove. Some lumber has arrived and an office has been erected. Cement is being put on the spot and already the quiet little nook has become a busy place.

Two boys were before Court on Wednesday afternoon, charged with the larceny from Harvey & Co. shed of 7 boxes of chocolate bars, 2 tins cocoa, three dozen bars of soap, 8 bottles tomato juice. They pleaded guilty and were remanded for sentence till this morning.

An interesting case was heard before Magistrate Mulcahy at Bell Island last week, when two Miners were charged with riding the loaded trip of ore cars, on the main slope of No. 2 mine, in contravention to rule 378 of the Company’s special rules. They pleaded guilty and a fine of $3.00 each was imposed. This is in addition to a penalty of two weeks lay-off by the Company, as announced in a special notice made several months ago. — The Bell Islander.

Some action was taken at the monthly meeting of the Men’s Patriotic Association on Bell Island, to recognize the boys home on leave. No money was voted but a reception committee was appointed, to make suitable arrangement for the entertainment of the boys, with the assistance of their friends. A donation of $10 per month was voted to the smokers fund of the G.W.V.A. — The Bell Islander

The Newfoundland Weekly states than “An Interesting letter was received from Mr. Hugh A. Anderson from Hollywood, where he went a few weeks ago to join his brother, John Murray Anderson, the Nationally known stage production and creator. We understand that Mr. Anderson is planning to open a showplace in Hollywood on the style of the Diamond Horseshoe in New York, which has proved so successful, and with which Mr. Anderson’s artistry is so closely associated. Hugh reports meeting another old St. John’s boy in Hollywood quite frequently — John Gallishaw — who is doing well in the film capital.”

A sixteen year old boy was before Court on Saturday, charged with stealing a bicycle, and was find $10.00 as well as $15.00 compensation for the machine. At first he stated that he had purchased the bicycle from another youth for $9.00, but he later admitted to the theft.

The annual Summer School will be held this year between July 5th and August 9th.

The weekly meeting of the City Council will be held this afternoon at three o’clock.

The dance held at the T.A Hall on Wednesday night, was very largely attended and was enjoyed to the full. Music was supplied by Harold LaFosse and his orchestra.

A man who was before Court on Wednesday charged with being drunk, and being in possession of a bottle of liquor on which there was a defaced label, was fined $10.00.

The second in a series of card tournaments will be held at the Star of the Sea Hall tonight at 9.30. Three cash prizes will be given tonight in addition to the special prize for the series.

The Belleoram Correspondent of the Western Star, stated that lobsters are scarce in Fortune Bay this spring. Several buyers are there, and pay cash any day that the fishermen require it. Codfish is scarce as well, but there are not many people trying as yet, although likely after the lobster season closes, there will be many more taking up codfishing.

The new warehouse and office building as a branch establishment of A.E. Hickman Co., Ltd. at Corner Brook, has the foundation and first floor completed – 80 by 100 feet. It is expected to open the premises for business around the end of July.

Very much contrary weather conditions on this side of the Island, are those described in the following item from the Codroy Valley Correspondent of the Western Star, who says, “We have just enjoyed a week of beautiful weather. A little rain at the moment would be appreciated by the farmers.” We would be willing to share with them in that respect.

A female resident of Goreman’s Lane was before Court on Wednesday, charged with interfering with Constable Carter in the discharge of his duty. The Constable was making a search of the woman’s premises for liquor, and was examining the back of a calender, on which there were numbers notations, when the accused grabbed it and threw it into the fire. The only notions he could remember being on it was, “One flask $1.30, seven drinks $1.75, and one bottle $2.60.” The accused was convicted and fined $20.00.


June 15 1941 A TRIBUTE H. J. ABBOTT: BONAVISTA, June 9 — The spirit of H.J. Abbott winged its flight to realms celestial on Easter Sunday morning, April 13th at his residence, after a long and protracted illness.

Henry, as he was usually called, possessed an individual quality, which created profound admiration and respect, and was deservedly held in high esteem by all classes, but especially by those who had opportunities to know his fine sterling qualities.

He was modest, very hospitable, and always inclined to be gay and cheerful. He did not aspire after things that were pleasing, but after things adapted to his capacity. He always acted on principle, and his actions were a proof of his integrity and trustworthiness, and carried with them the assent of the reason, the approval of the conscience, and the sober judgment of the intellect. He did not undervalue life, as does a great majority of mankind, but he took it as a grand opportunity to do and to achieve good things, and to help those less fortunate than himself. He was never the one to make up by fraud and appearance, that which he lacked in reality. He had his own views of duty and did not rely upon others, but possessed in his own bosom, a calm, deep, decided, and all pervading principle. His conversation was seasoned with the salt of truth, honor and manliness.

This is the kind of men we want in these days when so many give a commercial value to morals, and the voice of conscience seems to be given very little consideration. In his death, Bonavista has lost a citizen whose record is worthy of emulation. The United Church, of which he was a devout and active Christian worker, has lost one of its best members, and which is difficult to duplicate. His energetic and enthusiastic work toward the upbuilding and uplifting of matters pertaining to the Church, is well worthy of the greatest appreciation, and warrants the general approbation of all concerned.

At the time of his passing, he was Chairman of the Board of Stewards, Clerk of the Board of Session, member of the Trustee Board, and Lay Reader. He was Sunday School Superintendent for fifteen years and Choir Master for five years. These facts indicate that he was ever ready to do all in his power to impress upon the general public, that the Church stands for a better community. He was also affiliated with various fraternal organizations where he was very active in all matters in connection therewith, and where his voice and good council will greatly missed.

In these fraternal Societies he greatly distinguished himself. He was a Past Grand Officer of the Provincial Grand Orange Lodge of Newfoundland, Past Grand Master of the Royal Black, Past Master of the Society of United Fishermem, and Past Master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

It is consoling to think that death, so mysterious and yet so common to the human race, is but a transformation that carries us out of this world, into the mystic realm of unchanging happiness. It simply opens the portals to Eternity and:

“Those we love so long, and see no more, Loved and still love — not dead, but gone before.”

We are strong in the faith that, if present joys are gone, re-union beyond the veil will bring richer recompense.

To his widow, sisters and others relatives the sincere sympathy of the writer goes forth. I fully realize that it is hard to assuage grief, and that a tribute to the memory is inadequate to soothe the stricken relatives. Mourning there must be, but theirs is the consolation that he leaves a legacy of life well spent, a life of service, passing, “To put his armour off and to rest in heaven.”

Servant of God, well done, The glorious, warfare’s past, The battle’s fought, the race is run, And thou are crowned at last. JOHN ABBOTT.

June 15 1941 WEDDING BELLS DEVINE — GALWAY: A very quiet wedding was solemnized at St. Teresa’s Church on Wednesday evening, June 11th by Rev. Fr. Summers, when Katherine, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. Galway, was united in marriage to Maurice G., son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Devine, M.B.E.

The bride who was given away by her father, was attended by her sister, Miss Mary Galway as maid of honor, while the groom was ably supported by Mr. James D. Donahue.

After the ceremony, the bridal party returned to Shalowar, Blackmarsh Road, the home of the bride’s parents, where the health of the happy couple was duly toasted.

June 15 1941 OBITUARY Mrs L.W. PARKER: Mrs. L.W. Parker, wife of Rev. L.W. Parker, retired Minister of the United Church of Canada, passed away after eight months’ serious illness, at her home in Truro, Nova Scotia, on Tuesday May 20th.

Surviving her, besides her husband, are; one brother Robert MacKelvie, Rainier, Alberta, six sons, and one daughter. The daughter, Mrs. A.F. Hoddinott, resided for four years in Newfoundland, where her husband, Rev. D.F. Hoddnitt, held Pastorates in the United Church at Buchans, and at Heart’s Content.

Mrs. L.W. Parker was Past President of the W.M.S Maritime Conference Branch of the United Church of Canada. Recently she was Candidate Advisor for young women entering upon Mission Work, and always gave herself devotedly to the cause of Missions.

Funeral service were conducted at St. Andrew’s United Church, Truro, by Rev. A.A. Rogers, a former Minister of George Street United Church, St. John’s, Newfoundland, on Thursday, May 22nd.

June 15 1941 MARRIAGES KEARNEY — EDSTROM: On June 8th., at the Oratory of the Sacred Heart, by Rt. Rev. Mons. Kitchen, Mary, daughter of George F. and the late Anna M. Kearney, to William, son of Emma and the late James Edstrom.

DEVINE — GALWAY: At St. Teresa’s Church by Rev. Fr. Summers, on Wednesday June 11th Katherine, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J Galway, to Maurice G., son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Devine.

June 15 1941 IN MEMORIAM KEOUGH — In loving memory of Mary Keough, who departed this life June 15th 1940, aged 26 years. R.I.P.

All tears are vain, we cannot now recall her, Gone are her loving smile and dear sweet face, Gone from home where we sorely miss her Where non can ever take her place.

Inserted by father and mother, sisters and brothers.

June 15 1941 DEATHS HIBBS — Selina, beloved wife of Robert Hibbs, Kelligrews, suddenly at 10 p.m. June 13th. Funeral at Kelligrews 2.30 Sunday afternoon.

WHELAN — Passed peacefully away after a short illness, Elizabeth, only daughter of Thomas and the late Mary Whelan. Funeral to take place from the residence of Mrs. George Myers, 27 Spencer St., Sunday, June 15th at 2.30 p.m.

BUTLER — Passed peacefully away at Burin, June 13th Mrs. Martha Butler, leaving to mourn two daughters, Mrs. W.H. McDougall and Mrs. L.M. Burgess at Burin, 2 sons, Harold at Bell Island, William at Boston, Mass., also 1 brother, Mr. Charles Bailey at Oderin.

June 15 1941 ODDITIES Armed Forces — The United States has spent approximately $36,500,000,000 on its Armed Forces, since 1914. A total of $1,217,000.000 was spent in 1919 alone, making it the greatest actual expenditure of any year.

Trout of all sizes — The lake trout is the largest of all the trout.

June 15 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The work of relaying the 12 inch earthernware sewer in Duggan St. progressed during the past week, and of a total of 170 feet, 146 feet of new pipe were used to replace broken pipe.

The Summer Sunday Special goes out again tomorrow morning, leaving the railway station at ten o’clock for points to Argentia, including Placentia. Returning, the train leaves Argentia at 6 p.m. and is due back in the city at 10.30 p.m.

The Canadian message which was published yesterday, referring to two Newfoundland Nurses who had graduated from Montreal General Hospital, stated that Miss A.B. Allison Laite was from Bonavista. That was an error as her home is in Brittannia.

Last night, Mickey Duggan and his orchestra were in attendance at the Yacht Club. Tonight the first is a series of “Cindrella” dances will be held, and Gordon Foley’s orchestra will be in attendance. This is a new feature and it is hoped it will be popular.

During the week Council employees laid 96 feet of cast iron, 6 inch pipe, to the Monroe Export Co. Cold Storage Plant, Water St. A four inch, cast iron main, was laid at the Dry Dock. A four inch, anti-freezing hydrant in Kink’s Road, was replaced with a six inch compression hydrant.

Due to scarcity of railway cars and increased tonnage arriving, the Clarke’s Steamship Co. at Corner Brook is now assembling equipment for the driving of piles, and the erection of another warehouse at their pier. The new building will be 50 by 140 feet. — Western Star.

With the rivers gone low and the entire absence of rain in May, the spring drive which usually runs in the third week, has now about ended after less than two weeks driving, leaving considerable pulpwood for the early fall rains. A few of the larger streams and rivers have specially constructed dams, and will give a little more driving for a while yet, but the main drive has ended. — Western Star.

The Overland Limited tomorrow night, will leave in two sections. First and second class passengers will leave at 9 p.m. and sleeping car passengers at 9.20.

The annual installation of the Office Bearers of Lodge Carbonear will be held at Masonic Hall in Carbonear on Wednesday evening next at eight o’clock.

A man charged with being drunk and disorderly, and with breaking a pane of glass in a Chinese café, was before Court yesterday. He was fined $3.00 and ordered to pay $2.50 compensation for the damage done.

Passengers for the St. John’s-St. Pierre-Halifax service, will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock this morning.

At Adelaide Street, 200 feet of curb and gutter and sidewalk were laid last week, repairing of the concrete steps on Garrison Hill was completed. In Linscott St., 36 feet concrete inverts were laid, and on Mayor Avenue, 400 ft.

Cutting has started at some of the camps in Humber area. Woods men will please note there is a surplus of men waiting to be employed in the woods at present, and enquiries as to the labor situation should be made by the men before leaving home to search for work. — Western Star.

William Young, aged 19 years, of Corner Brook, was before Court yesterday charged with riotously assembling with others, and doing damage to H.M. Penitentiary. The accused was serving a term and took part in the disturbance, which occurred in the Penitentiary on April 13th. He was arrested after leaving the Penitentiary following the completion of his term. He was remanded. On Wednesday, Stephen Janes was charged with the same offence.

A meeting of ex-pupils of St. Patrick’s Hall Schools, was held last night at the O’Hurley Memorial Room, when final plans for the annual Field Day were discussed. The Field committee will be getting St. George’s field in readiness next week, and it is hoped that as many as possible will turn up. The Field Day is next Wednesday.

During the past week, Council employees filled potholes with tar in Prescott Street, Queen’s Rd., LeMarchant Rd., Allandale Rd., Military Rd., Gower St., Water St., South Side Rd., Patrick St., Forest Rd., Merrymeeting Rd., Hamilton Ave., Hamilton St., Pleasant St., Cornwall Ave., Promenade, McBride’s Hill, Kenna’s Hill, and Job St.

Two eleven year old boys were before the Juvenile Court yesterday, charged with breaking into the store of the Canada Packers Ltd., and stealing goods therefrom. They told the Police they had entered the building and broke open boxes of fruit, smashed bottles, and did other damage. They were each fined $10.00 compensation for the damage, and sentenced to one month in prison.


June 16 1941 WEDDING BELLS TIZZARD — SKIRVING: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin on Wednesday, June 11th, at 7.30 p.m. by the Rev. N.S. Noel, assisted by Rev. Canon A.B.S. Stirling, when Jeanette Monroe, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs Peter N. Skirving, was united in Holy Bonds of matrimony to Harold, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Tizzard.

To the strains of the Wedding March, the bride entered the Church and was given in marriage by her father. She looked charming in a dress of ivory duchess, satin and lace and a flowing veil, with coronet of orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of red carnations, baby’s breath and fern, tied with Scotch plaid streamers. Miss Stella Ash acted as maid of honor and wore peach net over taffeta, and carried a bouquet of sweet peas and fern. The bridesmaids were Misses Thelma and Joan Skirving, nieces of the bride, and were attired in blue organdie over satin, made with tight bodices and long flowing skirts, poke bonnets and floral muffs. The duties of best man were performed by Mr. Derek Marshall, and the ushers were Messrs Ernest Nicholle and Harvey Skirving.

The reception was held at “Woodstock” Topsail, where the usual toasts were honored, after which the bride and groom left on their honeymoon. The bride’s going away costume was a rose tailored coat with navy blue accessories and silver fox.

June 16 1941 BIRTH FRECKER — At. St. Claire’s Mercy Hospital, June 15th, to Helena , wife of G.A. Frecker, a son.
June 16 1941 MARRIAGES TIZZARD — SKIRVING: On June 11th, at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin, by Rev. N.S. Noel, assisted by Rev. Canon A.B.S. Sterling, Jeanette Monroe Skirving, to Harold Tizzard, both of this city.

KEARNEY — CLEARY: At Beaconsfield on June 14th by his Grace, Most Rev. E.P. Roche, D.D., George F. Kearney, to Josephine M., daughter of the late Philip J and Katherine Cleary.

June 16 1941 DEATHS WATSON — Passed peacefully away early this morning, June 16th William Watson, retired Dockmaster, in his 76th year. Funeral notice later: no flowers.

LEE — At St. Mary’s at midnight, June 11th, Stephen, aged two and a half months, only son of Owen and Frances (Bonia) Lee.

CARTER — Passed peacefully away on Saturday afternoon at her residence, Rennie’s Mill Road, Gladys, youngest daughter of the late George J and Viola Carter. Funeral today, Monday at 2.30 p.m. by motor hearse. No Flowers.

MILLER — Died suddenly Sunday at 8 p.m., James Miller, in his 75th year, leaving to mourn wife, three brothers, nephews and nieces. Funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, 27 Aldershot Street. R.I.P.

McBOUBREY — Passed peacefully away Sunday, June 15th, George McCoubrey, aged 86 years, leaving to mourn, wife, two sons, Albert and John at New York, and one daughter, Mary at Detroit. Funeral tomorrow, Tuesday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 34 McFarlane Street. New York papers please copy.

June 16 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE An American Soldier was before Court on Saturday, charged with being drunk whilst in charge of a motor vehicle. He pleaded not guilty and the case was postponed for a week.

At the R.C Cathedral this morning, His Grace the Archbishop will administer the Sacrament of Confirmation. On Wednesday, His Grace will officiate at St. Patrick’s, and on Friday morning at St. Joseph’s Church.

Germans armies have expanded, and in the first eight months of 1940, they were operating 110 per cent more route miles than at the close of 1939.

Two Canadian Soldiers were before Court on Saturday, charged with drinking liquor in a public street and breaking a bottle on the street. One was find $3.00 and the other $1.00.

A laborer was before Court on Saturday, and was find $2.50 for being drunk and disorderly on the public street. He was arrested, after he had kicked in the panel of the door in the Imperial Café.

In spite of urgent requirements of the Military Air Force, England currently is maintaining its Empire Air Service at better than 90 per cent of the pre-war basis.

A dance will be held at the Avalon Pavilion tonight with Walter Chambers and his orchestra, Gordon Foley will be attending tomorrow night, and Mickey Duggan and his swingsters on Wednesday.

The Summer Sunday Special which went out at the regular hour yesterday morning, had many passengers for points as far as Argentia. Though she was delayed on the way back, her arrival in St. John’s was not much later than the regular time.

A new core shed will be erected at Corner Brook and piling has now started. The shed will be 400 feet long and 37 feet wide. A greater quantity of cores must now be kept in stock, and the present storage for same is insufficient. – Western Star.

The concrete sidewalk on the West side of Adelaide Street is now practically completed from Water St. to New Gower Street. That on the East side is finished. A great improvement bas been effected in that section.

During the recent gale, practically all salmon gear at Bonavista and Spillar’s Cove was severely wrecked. Much of it is beyond repair. As the season is far advanced and the price of salmon is low, the damage will result in the curtailment of at least fifty per cent of its former operations. — Fishermen’s Advocate.

Five Canadian Soldiers were before Court on Saturday, charged with being drunk and disorderly on a public street. They were in a disturbance on New Gower Street near the Ritz Tavern. The case against one was dismissed, as it was shown that he was trying to get his brother out of the trouble. The others were fined $5.00 each.

Three Canadian Solders were before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, charged with taking a motor truck without the consent of the owner, and operating it. The evidence was that the truck was parked on Water Street, and the men got into it and went East. A Police wagon gave chase and stopped the truck near Cochrane Street. The men were convicted and remanded for sentence.

Vera Lowe, who was before Court last week charged with aiding and abetting Abraham Smith, who escaped from the penitentiary, and also with the larceny of various goods from the summer house of Walter Thistle, was before the Magistrate’s Court on Saturday. Last week she asked to be tried before the Supreme Court, but later asked for summary trial, to which the Justice Department consented. She was convicted for the larceny and sentenced to two months. On the other charge, the Assistant Chief of Police stated he had no evidence to offer.


June 17 1941 OBITUARY RICHARD WALSH: BAY DE VERD, June 11 — Truly, in the midst of life we are in death, and this was sadly certified in the person of one our esteemed young men. Richard Walsh, aged 22 years, who was the victim of the awful tragedy which occurred at Baccalieu Fog Alarm, when this smart young man met his untimely end beneath the icy cold waters of the ocean.

For over two years, this young man has been employed as Assistant Keeper of the Fog Alarm Station, and gave general satisfaction in the discharge of his duties. The first news of the tragedy was sent to Rev. Fr. Casey, P.P. here, whose sad duty it was to break it to the parents of the deceased, and on hearing it, a number of men in motor boats went to the scene of the accident, and in a short time, recovered the body, which was brought here and landed at the public wharf, from which it was conveyed to the home of the parents, Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Walsh, followed by a large number of sympathizing friends, anxious to offer their condolence to the bereaved ones, for he was well known and highly esteem.

In disposition, he was quiet and genial, and acquaintances were shocked at his sudden passing under such tragic circumstances. With the bloom of youth on his brow, he met his end on that fateful day of Friday, 16th June.

The terrible accident, because of its suddenness and unexpectedness, was one of the saddest and most heart rending in our history, and brings vividly to our minds, the necessity of being at all times prepared to face the “Grim Reaper” and the tragedies of our rough island story. In praying for the eternal repose of the departed one, we pray also for the parents and relatives left to mourn, that they may be enabled to bear the cross laid upon them, in a spirit of true Christian fortitude and resignation.

Their faith and trust in their Heavenly Father must not waver, for they know and feel with the certainty of faith, that in His own good time, He will sent them consolation that will compensate for the heavy cross He has laid upon them. The funeral was one of the largest seen here for many years. The R.C. Church was crowded by people of all classes and creeds, the esteemed Pastor, Rev. Father Casey, read the burial for the dead. The casket was covered with floral tributes testifying to the esteem in which he was held.

Left to mourn are his parents, two brothers, one sister to whom our sincere sympathy is extended. — R.I.P.

June 17 1941 MARRIAGES HANRAHAN — O’BRIEN: On Saturday June 14th at Holy Cross Church Holyrood, by Rt. Rev. John M. O’Neill, D.D., Bishop of Harbor Grace, Edmund D. Hanrahan, son of the late Dr. Hanrahan, Supt. of R.C. Schools, and Mrs. Hanrahan, to Gertrude M. O’Brien, daughter of the late Morris O’Brien and Mrs. O’Brien, all of Harbor Grace.
June 17 1941 NOTE OF THANKS The family of the late James Clarke, Dunfield, Trinity, wish to thank all those who in any way helped them in their recent bereavement, and especially the following: —

For Wreaths: — G.W.V.A., Trinity Branch; Mr. and Mrs. Eriksen, Trinity; C. of E. School Children, Dunfield; Miss Hettie Samson, Dunfiled; Miss Hilda Dawe, Dunfield; Mr. and Mrs .W White, Trinity, Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Clarke, Trinity; Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Clarke, Dunfield; Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Bellows, Dunfield; Miss Pearl Clarke, Dunfield; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Johnson, Trouty; Mr. and Mrs. Arch Johnson, Trouty

For Telegrams — Rev. H. and Mrs. Torraville, Bay Roberts; Rev. R.S. Sheppard, Joe Batts Arm; Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Newman, Barr’d Islands; Mrs. Maud Giles and family, St. John’s; Mr. and Mrs. Charles King, St. John’s; Mr. and Mrs. Mark Clarke, St. John’s; Mr. and Mrs Hezikiah Wiseman, St. John’s; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Miller, New Bonaventure; Messrs. George Ford, Henry Little, Samuel Ford, Argentia.

For Cards and Letters: — Rev. M. Andrews, Trinity; Mrs D. Andrews, Trinity; Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Goldsworthy, Trinity, Mrs. L Kane, Trinity; Mr. and Mrs. J Fowlow, Trinity East (card and flowers); Mrs. E. Evelley, Trinity East; Mrs. Rhoda Bartlett and family, Goose Cove; Mr. and Mrs. L Bartlett, Goose Cove; Mr and Mrs. Cyril Bartlett, Goose Cove, Mr and Mrs. Stephen Clifford, Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr and Mrs. Arthur Morris, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs. Ern Adams, St. John’s; Mr. and Mrs. Elder Crane, St. John’s; Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Spurrell, St. John’s; Mr. Jack Bellows, St. John’s; C.E.W.A. Amherst Cove; C.E.W.A. Trouty; Mr and Mrs. John Miller, Trouty; Mrs. Samuel Morris, Trouty; Miss Maude Clarke, Montreal; Miss Gladys Bartlett, Toronto, G.W.V.A. Trinity Branch.

For Acts of Kindness: — Rev. G.M Andrews, Trinity; Rev. L. Norman, Bonavista; Miss Willis, Bonavista; Mr and Mrs. E. Rankin, Trinity; Dr. B.N. Sinclair, Trinity; Mr and Mrs. George Ford, Amherst Cove; Mr and Mrs. Pearce Ford, Amherst Cove; Mr and Mrs. George Clifford, Trouty; Mr and Mrs. William Spurrell, Dunfield; Mr. and Mrs. John Clarke, Dunfield, Mr and Mrs Samuel Clarke, Dunfield. 

June 17 1941 DEATH KOOLERY — Passed peacefully away on Sunday, June 15th, George Koolery, aged 86, leaving to mourn, wife, two sons, Albert and John at New York, and one daughter, Mary, at Detroit. Funeral today, Tuesday, at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence 34 McFarlane Street. (New York papers please copy.)
June 17 1941 WEDDING BELLS HANRAHAN — O’BRIEN: The marriage of Mr. Edmund D. Hanrahan to Miss Gertrude M. O’Brien, took place at Holyrood R.C. Church, Saturday last. His lordship, Bishop O’Neill officiated, assisted by Rev. Father M. Murphy, the Parish Priest, and Rev. Mark Dwyer, P.P. Harbor Main. A reception was afterwards held at Mrs. Dunphy’s Hotel, at which the toast to the health of the newly wedded pair, was proposed by the Bishop. Congratulatory speeches were also made by Father Dwyer, Dr. Strapp and Capt. Anderson.

The bride was attended by Mrs. Anonsen, and the groom by Dr. Gerald A. Strapp. The bride looked charming in a beige ensemble and carried a bouquet of maiden hair fern. The wedding march was played by Maureen Anonsen. The honeymoon is being spent at the Newfoundland Hotel. The happy couple will leave by car tomorrow for Placentia where they will make their future home.

June 17 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE The schooner Minnie and Muriel, which cleared from Harbor Breton for the Banks fishery, has returned with 100 qts.

The banking vessel Robert Esdale, of English Harbor, secured 600 qtls. codfish on the Banks, and is now discharging.

The annual Triduum in preparation of the Feast of the Sacred Heart, will begin at the R.C. Cathedral tomorrow evening at 7.30 o’.clock.

A dance will be held at the Arena tonight from 9 o’clock and ending at 1 a.m. Music will be supplied by Mickey Duggan and his orchestra.

Codoil, which earlier in the year recorded some slackening in demand, is now in more active demand, and fairly strong prices for this product are also expected. — Nfld Trade Review.

At the Yacht Dance Club tonight, the music will be provided by Gordon Foley’s orchestra. Their appearance on Saturday night was popular, and they will now be heard on certain nights at the club.

The Banker Beatrice Beck, has arrived at her home port from the Banks with 1100 qtls. Codfish. The banking vessel Gerldine Anna, of Harbor Buffett, has arrived from the Banks with 220 qtls. Codfish.

A Seaman was before Court yesterday, charged with being drunk, and having in his possession a bottle of liquor on which was a defaced label. He was find $5.00.

The preliminary enquiry into the charge of murder against Matthew Joseph O’Rourk, began at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, before Magistrate O’Neill. Eight witnesses were examined. The enquiry resumes on Thursday.

Three men before Court yesterday for being drunk and disorderly, were fined $3.00 each.

The banking vessel Progressive, has returned to her home port from the Banks fishery hailing for 600 qtls. Codfish.

A special meeting of Terra Nova Council No. 1452 Knights of Columbus, will be held tonight at Columbus Club.

The express train this evening will leave in two sections. First and second class passengers leave at six o’clock and sleeping car passengers at 6.20.

About one hundred survivors of the Merchant Navy are now being billeted at the Caribou Hut, and would greatly appreciate it if motor cars owners would spare an hour or so to show local sights to these friends. Anyone who is wiling to do so is asked to communicate with Mrs. A.C. Holmes, telephone No. 395 or 3828, or at the Caribou Hut , No. 93.

Markets for medicinal cod liver oil are strong. There has recently been an tendency by some foreign buyers to hold off, in the hope that new season’s oil can be procured at lower levels. Belief is expressed here that this will be unlikely and a firm market is seen for both livers and cod oil. — Trade Review.

During the past few weeks, large numbers of fishermen from Bay Roberts, and other Conception Bay towns, have been proceeding to their various stations on the Labrador Coast. A large number, who hitherto followed this occupation all their lives, are absent from it this year, many of them being employed on the various construction jobs throughout the country. — Bay Roberts Guardian.

Rumor has it, that work will begin shortly on piling and rebuilding Klondyke Bridge. This important roadway linking Coley’s Point and Bay Roberts, has long been neglected, the bridge itself not being safe for heavy traffic or pedestrians to cross. The roadway is also washed away in many places, and at high tides is impassable. We understand that a new concrete bridge will replace the old wooden structure and piling will be done, from the Seventh Day Adventist Church at Bay Roberts, to where the bridge joins at Coley’s Point. — Bay Roberts Guardian

A man who was before Court yesterday charged with being drunk and disorderly on the public street, and having in his possession a bottle on which was a defaced label, was fined $10.00 by His Honor Judge Browne.


June 18 1941 WEDDING BELLS FLYN — HICKS: A very pretty and interesting wedding took place at Whiteburn on June 8th when Miss Bernadine, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hicks of that place, was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Mr. Cyril Flyn of Avondale. Rev. Fr. Cullen performed the ceremony.

The bride looked charming in a dress of white satin and long flowing veil with halo cap, trimmed with orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of see box ferbel rose buds and maiden hair fern. She was attended by Miss Annie Flyn, sister of the groom, who was dressed in dust pink chiffon, and carried a bouquet of pink flowers and maiden hair fern, the best man being Mr. Harold Hicks, brother of the bride.

After having supper at the bride’s home, the happy couple left for their home in Avondale by motor car. We wish them many happy years of wedded bliss.

June 18 1941 MARRIAGES NEWHOOK — CUMMINGS: Married on Saturday, June 7th at the United Church, Topsail, by the Rev. F. Thompson, Gwendolyn, oldest daughter of Mrs. Beatrice and the late John T. Cummings, to Fred J., only son of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Newhook, Trinity East.
June 18 1941 DEATHS McKINLAY — Passed peacefully away at his home, 21 Cook Street, James T. McKinlay, Chief Engineer. Funeral Thursday at 2.30 p.m.

KAVANAGH — Passed peacefully away at noon, June 17th Patrick Kavanagh, aged 67 years, leaving to mourn, wife, one daughter, Mrs. J Hearn, and one brother, Edward, and 8 grandchildren and a large circle of friends. Funeral on Thursday at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence 20 Dick’s Square. — R. I. P.

METCALFE — Passed peacefully away at Brigus, Friday June 6th in his 76 year, William Metcalfe; left to mourn are his wife at home, 4 daughters, 3 sons, also a brother, Isaac, all residing at Toronto. Five months ago he was stricken with paralysis from which he never recovered. His funeral took place on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. which was largely attended to St. George’s Church. The casket was covered with floral tributes. The sermon was preached by the Rev. Grouchy, after which all that was mortal of a good man was laid to rest in mother earth, to wait the Resurrection Call. (Toronto, New York and Boston papers please copy.)

June 18 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE A Magisterial Enquiry, into the cause of the death of a Norwegian Seaman who was drowned about three weeks ago in St. John’s, began yesterday before Magistrate O’Neill. Witnesses were examined by the Assistant Chief of Police.

Employees of the High Roads Department were engaged yesterday filling potholes on the Portugal Cove Road in the vicinity of Kent’s Pond. This section is in need of attention as there are many holes in it.

A Seaman was before Court yesterday, charged with assaulting a Taximan. He was fined $2.00 on the assault and $1.50 compensation for damage done. The Taximan stated that he did not desire to press for punishment of the man.

Mrs. Guy Williams, Brooklyn, formerly of St. John’s, accompanied by her daughter, Peggy, will visit her uncle James Cramford, of Bar Harbor, Main, formerly of the Southside, St. John’s. Mr. Williams son Stanley, is serving in the U.S. Marine Corp. and is stationed at Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. Her husband is a retired ex-Sergeant, formerly attached to the U.S. Field Artillery — Nfld Weekly.

The Bell Islander, states that indignation has been expressed over alleged charges made by taxi drivers, of men of the Royal Navy who visit the Island. One Seaman is reported to have been charged $4.00 for a drive from Lance Cove, and seven others are said to have paid $14 between them, to the driver, who took them to the mines and back. To the credit of a large percentage of the motoring fraternity, it can be stated that private car owners have gladly offered their cars free of charge, for the transportation these men. Company trucks have also been engaged with out remuneration.

June 18 1941 ODDITIES That Mormon Organ — The Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, houses an organ containing 6,868 pipes.

Uncovered History — Little Missenden, England – Using a penknife and razor blade on walls and windows of his 1000-year-old Church in this Bucks Village, Rev. W.H. Davis uncovered historic frescoes, which were restored and rededicated by the Bishop of Oxford.


June 20 1941 WEDDING BELLS DOWSLEY — MANSTAN: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at Wesley Untied Church on Wednesday, June 18th when Helen Marjorie, daughter of William and Maud Mansatan, was united in marriage to Lance Corporal Douglas Dowsley, R.C.E. of Toronto, Canada, the Rev. W.B. Perry officiating.

To the strains of the Wedding March, the bride entered the Church leaning on the arm of her father, and looked lovely in a gown of white georgette, with flowing veil and coronet of orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of pink and white sweet peas, carnations and maiden hair fern. She was attended by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Howard Manstan, who wore peach chiffon, with a shoulder length veil and accessories of the same shade, and carried a bouquet of sweet peas, carnations and maiden hair fern. The groom was supported by Lance Corporal William Slavin, the ushers being Walter Chambers and Howard Manstan. The music was supplied by Mr. Bob McLeod.

After the ceremony, the bridal party motored around Bowring Park, then to the home of the bride’s parents, where the reception was held and the usual toasts honored. After the reception the bride and groom left on a short honeymoon to Holyrood.

June 20 1941 MARRIAGE DOWSLEY — MANSTAN: At Wesley United Church, on June 18th, 1941, by the Rev. W.B. Perry, Marjorie, daughter of Wm. and Maud Manstan, to Lance Corporal, Douglas Dowsley, R.C.E., of Toronto, Canada.
June 20 1941 DEATHS BENNETT — Passed peacefully away at Holyrood on June 7th, Julia Bennett, wife of the late Francis Bennett, aged 77 years; left to mourn their sad loss are two daughters, Mrs. James Dwyer, Mrs, Robert Leyman, both in Boston, 2 sisters, Mrs. Ellen Halley, City, Mrs. Margaret Talbot, Newton Center, also two brothers, Mr. Thomas Turbett, North Arm Holyrood, and Mr. Martin Turbett, Grand Falls. May the sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul.
June 20 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Passengers for the St. John’s-Humbermouth service will leave St. John’s at ten o’clock on Tuesday morning next.

During the past week, Council employees built five new gullies with outlets on Adelaide Street, in conjunction with curb and gutter work there. The building of gullies and laying out outlets in Queen Street is now in progress.

The Triduum in honor of the Feast of the Sacred Heart, continued at the R.C. Cathedral last night. Today, the Feast of the Scared Hheart will be marked with special ceremonies. The week’s devotions concludes tonight with the “Holy Hour”.

The U. S. Artillery Unit started their anti-aircraft practice yesterday morning, but discontinued after a few shots were fired, because of the weather conditions.

A meeting of the Newfoundland Dairymen’s Association was held last night at Brookfield School House. Important matters were discussed.

At St. Joseph’s Church this morning, His Grace the Archbishop, will administer the Sacrament of Confirmation to children of the Parish, and also from Mount Cashel.

Motor boats and sail boats have been bringing firewood from the Bays recently. The crews had a winter’s cut to get down and are doing so before entering upon the fishery.

Gordon Foley and his orchestra were in attendance at the Yacht Club last night. Tonight Mickey Duggan and his swingsters will be in attendance, and tomorrow night Gordon Foley again.

The Overland Limited on Sunday night, will make connection at Port aux Basques for the South Coast and Fortune Bay.

The preliminary enquire into the charge against Matthew O’Rourke was continued yesterday afternoon before Magistrate O’Neill

A Motorist who failed to stop entering Water Street from McBride’s Hill, was fined $2.00 at the Magistrate’s Court yesterday.

Trap-men at Crow Head, loaded their boats last week, but traps East of Long Point and the Arms, did not fare so well. Some traps at Black Harbor did little. - Twillingate Sun.

An item in yesterdays paper, stated that a man had been before Court and convicted of breaking into the premises of Messrs. James Baird Ltd. The item should have been credited to the Bell Islander, the last issue of which had the information, and it referred to the Wabana store of the Company.

Excavation of the twelve inch sewer in Empire Avenue, West of Winchester Street, is now in progress. To date, 200 feet have been opened, one hundred of which is ready for pipe-laying. Thirty men are employed at this work, which is being done by the City Council.

Potholes were filled with tar mix, the past week, in LeMarchant Road; Power St: Patrick St; Pleasent St.; King’s Bridge Rd.; Kenna’s Hill; King’s Rd.; Harvey Rd.; Mayor Ave; Parade St.; Topsail Rd.; Newtown Rd., Springdale St., Brazil’s Square, Waterford Bridge Rd., Long’s Hill., Pennywell Rd., Quidi vidi Rd., South Side Rd. West.

A man who was before Court yesterday charged with assaulting his married daughter, was fine $25.00 by Magistrate O’Neill. The evidence was that he knocked her unconscious by a blow to the head, and also blackened her eyes. He also ordered that $10.00 of the fine go to the complainant for compensation, and that the accused sign bonds in the sum of $100.00 to his future good behavior.

At the Magistrate’s Court yesterday, two men were charged with the larceny of a carton of canned goods from the warehouse of Harvey & Co’s pier 2. One of the men pleaded not guilty; the other was not in Court when called, and it was stated he had gone away in a ship. The evidence was that eleven tins of the goods were found hidden beneath a sack, and some more were found in the pockets of the coat of the accused. The man who was in Court, stated that he had picked up the articles. He was convicted, but because of his previous good record, sentence was suspended, though he was ordered to pay costs. The absent man was convicted, but sentence was deferred until his return.


June 24 1941 BIRTHS COOK — At Montreal on June 22nd to Margaret, (nee McNeily) wife of Douglas Cook, a son.
June 24 1941 DEATHS MYRICK — Passed peacefully away at 11 a. m. Saturday, Francis Patrick Myrick, son of the late Patrick and Margaret, and former Lighthouse Keeper at Cape Race; leaving to mourn their sad loss, wife, six daughters, Mrs. J.F. Ryan, Cape Race; Nurse M.G. Ryan, St. Albans; Mrs. J. Fitzgerald, Frances, Teresa, and Annie; four sons, Patrick, Gerald, and Francis at Cape Race, and Thomas at home; two brothers, Michael at Trepassey and Edward in St. John’s. The funeral will take place from his late residence 58 Franklyn Ave, at 2.30 p.m. today (Monday)

FIELD — Entered into rest on Sunday, June 22nd at 1 a.m. Nan; beloved wife of Capt. John Field; left to mourn are husband, 2 daughters, 2 sons, 1 brother and 3 sisters. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesday from her late residence, 107 Gower St. “Thy will be done.” Boston and New York papers please copy.


June 25 1941 LAID TO REST A Veteran In Both Wars

The last obsequies of Joseph Ingram, who passed away at the Grace Hospital on Saturday, were conducted with simple but impressive ceremony on Monday afternoon.

The funeral, which took place from the Masonic Temple, was attended by a long line of motor cars; the casket being covered with the Union Jack and surrounded by several beautiful wreaths. A short service at the Temple was conducted by Rev. A Shorted.

Interment was in the Masonic plot in the Church of England Cemetery, where the service was taken by Rev. J. Brinton, and the G.W.V.A. Ritual, read by Capt. L.C. Murphy, followed by the ceremony of remembrance by Officers of Lodge Tasker. President W.D. Edwards and Secretary W.R. Martin represented the G.W.V.A. Mr. Gordon Oke was undertaker.

Deceased was one of the splendid types making up the Merchant Navy. He served faithfully and well in the War of 1914-1918, and again came forward in the present conflict. His passing came as quite a shock to the circle of friends in which he was known, and sincere sympathy is expressed at the death of another Veteran, who was able to serve his King and Country on two occasions in time of crisis.

June 25 1941 WEDDING BELLS MARSHALL — MAUNDER: Cochrane Street Centennial Church was the scene of a very pretty wedding on Saturday afternoon, June 14th, when Ruth Elaine, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Maunder, was united in matrimony by the Rev. E.C. Knowles, to Cyril Frederick Marshall, son of Major Fred W. and Mrs. Marshall.

The bride entered the Church to the strains of the Wedding March, played by Mr. Evan Whiteway, and was given in marriage by her father. She looked charming, attired in a dress of white sheer marquisette, tipped with metallic silver, cut on princess lines with sweetheart neck, high puffed sleeves. Her coronet was of sheer marquisette and orange blossoms, with flowing veil of net, and carried a bouquet of carnations, baby’s breath and fern. The bridesmaids were Miss Ellie Holwell, and Miss Doris Ritcey, who wore dresses of the same material with matching floral coronets and shoulder length veils, carrying bouquets of pink and white carnations, sweet peas and ferns. The duties of best man were performed by Mr. Derck Marshall, brother of the groom, and Mr. Arthur Collingwood acted as usher.

The reception was held at Woodstock, Topsail, and the usual toasts were honored. In proposing the toast to the bride’s parents, a pleasant surprise was given the guests, when Mr. R.W. Ritcey announced that the day was also the silver anniversary of the bride’s parents.

The bride’s going away costume was of blue, with white accessories. Immediately after the reception, the bride and groom, amidst showers of confetti, left for Placentia where they will in future reside.

To the newly wedded couple was extend wishes for a happy future.

June 25 1941 DISCHARGED FROM THE ROYAL NAVY The following have received their discharge from the Royal Navy and have returned home.

Seaman BURKE, JOHN, J., Logy Bay, St. John’s East.

Seaman COLLINS, ASHTON, Mount Pearl.

Seaman SPRATT, HERBERT, AUGUSTUS, 44 Pennywell Road.

Seaman C/JX195257 MILLER ,THOMAS E., 46 signal Hill Rd.

Seaman JX195269 . MERCER, THOMAS G., Bay Roberts, West.

Seaman WAKEHAM, PETER, Petite Forte

Seaman MURPHY, JEREMIAH, Dunville, P.B.

Seaman JX246708 , BROWN, ABRAHAM, Cook’s Harbor.

Seaman JX228068, EVANS, W.R. (Transferred from Forestry) Codroy

Seaman JX2034790, HARNUM, ERNEST, J., Green’s Harbor, T.B.

Seaman JX180925, HAMMOND, JAMES C., Portugal Cove.

Seaman CJX211411, BRENNAN, SAMUEL, Summerville, B.B.

Seaman JX181417, PICCO, JOHN FRANCIS, 14 John St.

Seaman DROVER, GEORGE, Upper Island Cove.

Seaman MURPHY, JAMES C., Cornwall Avenue.

Seaman JX187445, MEANEY, PATRICK JOS., Calvert.

Seaman P/JX220996, GRIFFIN, ROBERT J., Iona, P.B

Seaman P/JX181307, HEALY JAMES J., Windsor, Grand Falls.

SeamanJX188793, TRICKETT, L, ROY, Spout Cove.

Seaman LT/JX211486, MaCPHERSON, PATRICK, Baie Verte, White Bay.

Seaman LT/JX220920, FREAKE, GEORGE G., Joe Batts Arm .

Seaman JX246710, DECKER, MAXWELL LLOYD, Cape Onion, W.B.

Seaman EDISON, HERBERT, Blackhead Road.

Seaman McLEAN , DANIEL (Transferred from Forestry), Stephenville

Seaman P/JX200076, O’BRIEN, ALBERT, Topsail.

June 25 1941 MARRIAGES ANDREWS — GREEN: At Wesley United Church on Tuesday, June 17th, Rev. W.B. Perry officiating, Rev. Professor Elias Andrews, to Flora Shannon Green. Prof and Mrs. Andrews will reside in Halifax.
June 25 1941 DEATHS HAMLYN — Passed peacefully away yesterday, June 24th Arthur Hamlyn, age 76 years; leaving wife, five sons, one daughter, and four grandchildren to mourn their sad loss. Funeral from his late residence Shaw Street.

LUNDRIGAN — Passed peacefully away on Tuesday morning at 10.30, Theresa Lundrigan, aged 71 years, leaving to mourn three sons, one daughter, one brother and two sisters. Funeral on Thursday, at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence 84 George Street. Sacred heart of Jesus have mercy on her soul. (Boston papers please copy)

June 25 1941 CITY AND ELSEWHERE Three young men were before Court on Monday, charged with assaulting a Canadian Soldier on New Gower St. on May 10th. The evidence of three or four soldiers was that their companion was attacked from behind, knocked down, kicked into unconsciousness, and had his jawbone fractured. None of the Soldiers could identify any of the accused as being those who participated in the assault. All three were put under bonds in the sum of $100.00 each.

Mr. Harold Earle, who arrived here this week, reports good hauls of codfish around Twillingate and on the North side of the Bay, but comparatively little around Fogo. This is attributed to continuously Easterly winds. Although Mr. Earle has made preparations for an extended pack of his canned codfish product, and reports from Britain showed it met an excellent reception in the market, action of the Food Ministry has upset plans for production so far. — Nfld trade Review.

A man was summoned by his wife on Monday afternoon, for attempting to assault her. She stated he had followed her with a poker. The man admitted that he had done so but claimed he was driven to it. He was, he said, trying to keep off relief and make both ends meet, and on Saturday, gave his wife $15.00 that he had earned. They owed a grocery bill, something over $8, and she paid only $5 on it. He was put under bonds to keep the peace. She was ordered to be more thrifty, and Magistrate O’Neill told the man, in future to pay all bills himself.


  NOTE: THERE ARE NO FURTHER PAGES AVAILABLE FROM JUNE 26TH TO JUNE 30TH 1941. CHECKED FILES NO PAPERS WERE FOUND.—JOHN BAIRD

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