NLGenWeb Newspaper Transcriptions

Daily News

EVENTS NOVEMBER 1907

Reprinted courtesy of Robinson-Blackmore Printing and Publishing Any monetary or commercial gain from using this material is strictly prohibited and subject to legal action.

The records were transcribed by JOHN BAIRD, SUE O'NEILL.  Formatted by GEORGE WHITE
While we have endeavored to be as correct as humanly possible, there could be some typographical errors.
 

  

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EVENT

DETAILS

November 1 1907 ROUGH WEATHER IN STRAITS The S.S. Home returned to Bay of Islands at 6 p.m. yesterday, from Battle Harbor and Straits ports. Since leaving to go North she has experienced terrible weather — the worst for the season. There has been a continuation of storms, accompanied by snow, and the ship was forced to harbor several times. On the return trip, the weather was not much better, and harbor had to be made each night. The home brought a large quantity of freight and a number of passengers. The work for the season is now practically over in the straits, and snow and frost has been felt already.
November 1 1907 A DESERVING CASE A most deserving case for the charitably disposed was brought under the notice of Inspector William O’Brien, of the Heath Department, a few days ago, being that of a woman with five orphan children, residing on Cabot Street, and with no visible means of support. Four of the children are at present in the Fever Hospital with scarlet fever. There was practically no food or clothing in the house. Wednesday, Inspector waited upon Mrs. D.J. Greene, the President of the Ladies St. Vincent de Paul Society, and informed her of the facts, and that lady shortly afterwards sent around a supply of new clothing etc. The Men’s St. Vincent de Paul Society will send the usual supply of coal to the house. Dr. Brehm has also interested himself in the woman’s behalf, and will procure further supply of necessary articles.
November 1 1907 GOVERNOR BACK His Excellency Sir William MacGreger and Mr. W.D. Reid, who had been caribou shooting up country the last week, returned to town yesterday in the private car Terra Nova. Since leaving here the weather has not been a bit too fine, but nevertheless the party had an enjoyable outing, and got good sport. Unfortunately however, the heads secured were not as would be desired, it being impossible to hunt because of weather conditions. A number of ptarmigan were shot by the party, but they were not plentiful. Sir William and Mr. Reid look quite well after their trip.
November 1 1907 DAMAGE DOME AT GRAND FALLS From passengers, who arrived by last evening’s express, we learn that the rain of Wednesday and Thursday last, raised the Exploits River over two feet, and on Thursday night, two sections, each of about 30 ft., on the cofferdam, broke from its foundation and was swept with terrific force against the Forebay Flood Gates. This let the water in along the whole length of the upriver side of the dam, on the North side of the river, about 500 feet in length, and flooded the Forebay, the course of the river being diverted from the main opening in the dam, and rushing with great force down the incline at the upper end of the Penstock line of excavation. The only damage done, was the floating out of place of about 100 feet of crib work which was being constructed along the front of the concrete dam, as an apron, to serve as a protector from heavy ice rafting. The cofferdam is only a temporary structure to turn off the water during the building of the concrete dam. It is built of logs and ballasted with rock and plank on the up river side. A serious fatality was averted by its going at night, as thirty men were working on the river bed between the cofferdam and the completed concrete dam, and had it broke away while they were thus engaged, there is no doubt but some of them would have been killed and drowned, as the violence of the inrush of water would sweep the men through the forebay gates and down the rapids, where no earthly power could save them, and there was also great danger of their being crushed against the dam, and nipped under the debris of the broken cofferdam. It will not retard the work very seriously, and the cost of replacing the cofferdam and apron crib work will not be very heavy. The river is now higher than at anytime since last spring.
November 1 1907 HEALTH NOTES The house of James Deady, No. 35 LeMarchant Road, where one of the inmates had been suffering from scarlet fever for some time, underwent disinfection yesterday, and will be released from quarantine today. George Whiteway, 2 ½ year old, at 40 Duckworth St., developed scarlet fever yesterday and was removed to the Fever Hospital. The house was also disinfected yesterday, and will be released from quarantine today.
November 1 1907 BOY INJURED AT GOOSE BAY Wednesday last, a 12 year old boy named Reader, while playing with other school children near his home, in Goose Bay, tripped on a stone, and falling, broke his right leg below the knee. The boy suffered intense pain for several hours. Dr. Fred Pilot was called and set the broken limb, at night. The little fellow is a bright intelligent lad, and the Doctor hopes to have him around again within a short time.
November 1 1907 RESCUED IN MID OCEAN London — Oct.26th — The crew of five on the Labrador Anna of Labrador, bound for Gibraltar with dry fish, was rescued in mid ocean by the Dominion liner Ottoman.
November 1 1907 BELL ISLAND, FROM PIT TO PIER "Belle Island, Oct. 29 — A slight change has occurred in the weather here – quite marvellous in itself – but beyond that, nothing of any public importance has happened during the past week. There were quite a number of steamers however, arrived to both companies, principally coal and log laden, and departed hence, freighted with ore.

On Sunday last, Rev. Fr. McGrath celebrated Mass in the little school chapel at Wabana. This is a rare occurrence, as the Church is situated near the town proper, a distance of nearly two miles from the mining settlement. A large congregation assembled. The Rev. Gentleman gave a short discourse on the dedication of the month of November to the Rosary and the Souls in Purgatory, which was listened to with rapt attention. The Church will be shortly taken up.

Messrs. Whiteway and Dowden have both left the Island to pursue their different avocations, the former in St. John’s, and the latter in Carbonear. They were two well known figures in the settlement and much esteemed by all, and general regret was felt at their departure. It is probable that Mr. Bowden will return at New Year, and resume his business of watchmaking on the Island.

The Technical School of Engineering will likely be opened for tuition about the first of November. Everything is nearly ready, and the gentlemen promoters deserve every praise for the indefatigable exertions put forward by them, to promote this laudable undertaking.

On Sunday evening last, your correspondent attend an invitation to what is known as the Front of the Island. The “track” route was taken as the shorter. A beautiful Aurora scene was visible on the return, more brilliant perhaps, than I had ever seen before. It was an unique feature of the walk to see all pedestrians – men and women – moving in and out, each provided with a lantern, which lit up the surrounding darkness, much more than one would imagine.

A large number of labourers arrived here the beginning of this week, and were immediately put to work; they came from the surrounding settlements, from all appearance, work is to be had on this Island for any who wish to find employment for the winter months.

The working men of Wabana are thankful to the News for voicing through your correspondent, their sentiments in regards to certain existant evils hitherto rampant here. Head Constable Dawe has since taken a more moderate turn in his dealings with the public. True it is, the Head Constable’s presence here has done a large amount of good; but when he attempts to “bluff” the people, and is over zealous, it becomes necessary to resort to public print to “call down” such unwarrantable actions. As I said before, the “Head” is capable of promoting a large amount of good, and it is to be hoped that the criticism of this previous action will result beneficially to al concerned.

Owing to the weather of the past two months, many potato gardens and hay fields have not yet been touched, and are now not likely to be, the winter being so near at hand.

No accident worthy of mention has occurred, and the health of the Island is excellent. There is no one large, as far as I can learn, sick from any cause.

Mr. T. McGrath goes to the city, permanently, next week.

CORRESPONDENT."

November 1 1907 DR. DOBSON DEAD The Rev. Dr. Dobson, one of the best known of Canadian Ministers, died at Charlottetown, P.E.I., on Sunday, at the age of 61. He had an attack of typhoid fever some months ago, but revived; and perhaps too soon, resumed his duties. Recently, pneumonia supervened, with fatal results. Last year, Dr. Dobson was President of the New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island Conference. He has filed the most prominent pulpits in the Methodism of the Maritime Provinces, his preaching ability being of an exceptionally high order. Many in St. John’s know Dr. Dobson personally, whilst his name is a household word in many a Methodist home.
November 1 1907 HOME REPORT The S.S. Home returned to port early Thursday morning, bringing a large inward freight and a great many passengers. But for the storm on the 21st and 22nd., her trip would have been one of the quickest for the season. She lay up for nearly two days at Hawk’s Bay, unable to do anything while the storm lasted. Nearly all the Newfoundland fishermen have left the Labrador Coast, and the Labrador men will have to face a long winter, as after the Home’s trip are over, they do not hear from Newfoundland again till April. Baine Johnstone & Co. third steamer load of Labrador fish left Battle Harbor on the 15th. Mr. J.T. Croucher, Agent for the firm, left for St. John’s by last Virginia Lake. It rumoured that the Marconi Wireless System would be in operation between Battle Hr. and Fogo, the coming winter. This would be a great boom; but we fear the report is only a rumour. The whale factory at Hawke’s Bay has been closed for the season and the employees will be returning home. The home sailed from here again, Friday night. She took onboard, from Fisher’s Mill, Corner Brook, 13,500 feet of lumber and 6,000 shingles for Blanc Sablon, and West St. Modest. — Western Star.
November 1 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Kite sails for Gilliesport this morning. S.S. Almerianan left Halifax at 11 a.m. yesterday for this port. S.S. Silvia left New York on Wednesday for St. John’s, via Halifax. S.S. Adventure left New York Wednesday morning for North Sydney to load coal for here. Schooner Pointer arrived from Battle Harbor yesterday with fish to Baine Johnston & Co. S.S. Pors is due today from Sydney with a cargo of coal for Morey & Co. Schooner Piyho will finish loading tomorrow, and will sail for Liverpool, Monday next. Walrus was at Catalina yesterday, and landed several Bonavista crews, returned from the Labrador. S.S. Rosalind, Clarke, sails for Halifax and New York at noon today, taking thirteen additional steerage passengers.
November 1 1907 WESTERN NOTES "(From the Western Star)

The Francis Willard, Capt. Hall arrived Saturday from Bay St. George for herring cargoes.

For being drunk and disturbing the peace, two young men were fined $5 and cost on Thursday.

The marriage of Mr. Elias Basha and Miss Maggie Gallant takes place at the Roman Catholic Chapel this afternoon. A reception will be held at 6 o’clock at the residence of the groom’s parents.

Large shipments of merchandise have been arriving of late; and nearly every freight train brings from one to four carloads of goods, which proves the healthy condition to trade in this place.

The S.S. Atlantic, Capt. D. Zinck, arrived Monday afternoon from Lunenburg, via Sydney. This steamer will be used by the Atlantic Fisheries Co., in connection with herring fisheries in the Bay.

The Roman Catholics of Port au Port are building a Parish Hall. The first story will be used as a school, and the second one will be the amusement room. Such a building has been long needed in that place.

The schooner Conqueror, Capt. William Wheeler, from Halifax, arrived at Bonne Bay on the night of 22 nd. Oct. When at Bay St. George, she met the storm of the 21st., which was the worst October storm ever encountered by anyone on board.

During the past week, caribou have been reported very plentiful in various section of the country. Every day, hundreds of them have been seen crossing the railway track, everywhere between Grand Lake and Bishop’s Falls, and hunters are meeting with fairly good success.

About five tons of iron ore have been brought out from Steel Mountain, nine miles from St. George’s, and will be shipped to Sydney, shortly. The D.I. & S. Co. have taken an option on the property for one year. If the samples are satisfactory, there will be a mining boom there next spring.

Mr. Charles Janes, of Benoit’s Cove, had the misfortune to loose a herring net in the storm of the 22nd. It was supposed by three bouys, painted red at both ends, and had a name “JAMES” marked thereon. The owner is a poor man, and the person picking up the net would confer a great favour, by returning it to the owner.

The storm of last week was felt very severely here, and caused destruction to some floating property. A number of small fishing boats were driven ashore and wrecked. Rev. Mr. Petley’s gasoline launch sunk near Angwins Wharf, and Murray’s schooner the Brothers, dragged her anchors and went ashore, causing considerable damage to the hull.

The 19 ton schooner, Eliza Mary, owned by Baird Gordon & Co., St. John’s, with part cargo lobsters, fish etc., bound to Bay of Islands, was lost at Bear Cove during the storm of the 18th October. She was anchored at Fox Island River when the gale came on, and parting her chains, drove ashore. The little craft soon became a total wreck on the rocks, and we learn, very little of her cargo was salved.

The steamer yacht Zera, with a party of American capitalists on board, is now on the way to Hawk’s Bay. The Americans are largely interested in the manufacture of pulp and paper, and have gone North to look over the timber areas owned by Noseworthy and others, and also to examine the water power of the rivers in that vicinity. If conditions are favourable, another industry as that at Grand Falls, will be started next spring at Hawk’s Bay.

The American vessel Senator, Gardner, went adrift in the storm of the 22nd and fell in across the head of O’Brien’s wharf, where she pounded heavily for some time, and when the tide ran out, the vessel was striking the bottom. The Greshman was requested to render assistance, which was long delayed; and in the height of the storm, the Fiona went to the rescue and towed the vessel out of danger, but not before parting one or two lines. Capt. English was highly recommended for his timely assistance.

The S.S. Active, Capt. Edward Seeley, from Halifax, touched at Lark Harbor Thursday, and came in here during the night. She left next morning for Bonne Bay, and returned again yesterday. This vessel has been chartered by the Gordon-Pew Fisheries Company, of Gloucester, and will be used in this Bay during the present herring fishery, towing boats and vessels belonging to the firm. There are quite a number of vessels belonging to the firm here, and the Active will be very serviceable to them.

HERRING FISHERY. Nearly all our fishermen are now in readiness, and are prosecuting the herring industry. The vessels have mostly gone to Wood’s Island and Middle Arm, and there the chief interest is now centered. Large schools of herring were seen in that vicinity last week, and some of the nets had good catches, the highest being ten barrels in one day. Several good fares were taken in Humber Arm, but this week there has not been much doing. The schooner Minnie M. Cook, chartered by Mr. McLean, Wood’s Island, has over 700 barrels, and expects to load this week. Her cargo goes to Boston. On Friday there was an abundance of herring in Lark Harbor, but most of the fishermen had gone fishing in the Arms. There has been fairly good fishing at Bonne Bay of late. Two American vessels – Bohemia and D H Lawson — are there fishing. The Atlantic Fisheries Co. have four vessels and a steamer here, well fitted with appliances for the fishery, and are hopeful of securing more cargoes than they did last year. Their Agent, Mr. Acker, is a hustling man, and he is ably assisted by Capt. D. Zinck, in whom the same characteristics predominate.

The American firms are all represented by good men, men who have a practical knowledge of the herring fishery, and in whom their owners can safely place implicit confidence. The Scotch firm at Drake’s Cove, has engaged some Bay St. George men, and the factory will be ready this week. All that is needed now is an abundance of herring to strike into the Arms and inside reaches, then the fishermen would soon get busy. The following American vessels arrived since last we went to press; Clintonia, Capt. Ralph Webber on Wednesday; A.M. Nickerson, Capt. A. Hudder, Thursday night, Avalon, Capt. T. Bohlin, Friday night; W. E. Morrisey, Capt. F. Upshell, and Rob Roy, Capt. Larkin, arrived Sunday. – Western Star."

November 1 1907 S.S. STRATHCONA The little steamer Strathcona, Capt. Bartlett, of the Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, with Dr. Grenfell, C.M.G., on board, arrived in port from Labrador Coast at 12.00 p.m. yesterday. The Strathcona has been engaged all the past season in the usual mission work among the fishermen and settlers on the Labrador. Dr. Granfell leaves for the United States next week, on business in connection with the mission. While in the city, he is the guest of His Excellency the Governor.
November 1 1907 WASHED OVERBOARD The schooner Wild Rover, Capt. Osmond, reached Bonne Bay Tuesday, 22nd October, with flag half mast, having lost one of her crew, in the storm of Monday night. The schooner was returning home from the fishery having a cargo of dry codfish on board, cured at Brig Bay, which port was left Monday morning. The craft had passed Port Saunders when the wind freshened, and towards evening, it was blowing with hurricane force. Sails were lowered, and the craft was scudding under bare poles. It was impossible to make a harbor, as there is none between Port Saunders and Bonne Bay. A blinding snow storm raged at the time. Seas were mountainous, and one huge wave swept over the taft rail and carried away the wheel, and everything movable on deck. Young Osmond, who was steering at the time, was washed overboard and never seen afterwards. – Western Star. (This is the schooner referred to in Monday Morning’s News)
November 1 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: S.S. Prospero arrived at Placentia at 4.15 p.m. yesterday, going West. S.S. Portia is still North of Baie Verte.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home arrived at Bay of Islands at 6 p.m. yesterday. Ethie leaves Clarenville this morning. Dundee leaves Port Blandford this morning. Clyde leaves Lewisporte this morning. Argyle left Marystown at 4.50 p.m. yesterday, going West. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Glencoe left Hermitage Cove at 3.30 p.m. yesterday, coming East."

November 1 1907 PERSONAL Dr. Fred Pilot arrived in the city last evening on a short visit. Mr. J.W. Noel, of the Crown Lands Department, arrived in town by last evening’s express. Mr. A. Pretty and Mrs. Pretty, who were visiting on the West Coast. returned by yesterday’s express. Mr. Frank Rendell, who was at Deer Lake on business, returned by yesterday’s express. Mr. E. Perez. who was sailing out of Boston as Engineer on a large steamer the last two years, arrived by yesterday’s express, on a visit to friends. Amongst those on the platform of the Third Normal Institute of Eastern Nova Scotia on Oct. 23rd, we are please observe the mane of Mr. Vincent Burke, Superintendent of Catholic Schools. Mayor McDonald presided, and representative educational leaders were present. The Rev. Dr. Workman, who by a vote of 10 to 17 members of a committee of 30, was called upon to resign the chair of Old Testament Exegeisi in the Wesleyan Theological College, Montreal, on the grounds of “heterodoxy”, pronounces the charge made against him foundationless, and announces his intention to remain a member of the Methodist Church. The students of the college are protesting vigorously the action of the Governor. It is the old story, “Orthodoxy is my doxy, every one else’s doxy is heterodoxy.”
November 1 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Magistrate Murray, Harbor Main, will be called upon today to renew the licences of the Liquor Dealers in the District. It is said that those holding them will again be given permission to sell.

An outport man named Davis, was assaulted on Queen St. last night, by two inebriated hooligans. Davis was given the names of his assailants, and he will have them summoned today.

The S.S. Ingraham left for Bay of Islands yesterday, to meet Mr. J.J. Murphy and a party of Americans, who are going to Hawke’s Bay to inspect some timber claims there.

The express arrived at 4.15 p.m. yesterday, bringing; His Excellency the Governor, W.D. Reid, W.J. Long, Frank Rendell, W. Noel, Dr. F. Pilot, A. Pretty. Mr. Pretty, J. Thomas, Miss White, and about 20 other passengers.

The T.A. Athletic Association held a dance and cauld cannon supper in the armoury of their hall last night, which was attended by about 50 couples. The catering was up to date and an enjoyable time was held.

The weather up North the last ten days, has been worse than for any time the season. Potato and turnip crops that were in the ground, have been ruined in consequence, while several fields of hay were also destroyed.

The Boston Scotsman rises to remark as follows: “This is the material with which we Americans licked the British. The Captain commanding the three last victorious yachts, is a product of the Clyde, Scotland, the entire crew are Scandinavians, and the builder of the defenders a German. If Peary ever discovers the North Pole he will be the only American on the ship, as his entire crew are natives of Newfoundland.”

Capt. W. Bartlett, Brigus, is at present in the city.

The November sitting of the Supreme Court opens today.

Mr. M.F. O’Toole, of Conception Harbor, is in town, and staying at the Crosbie.

Mr. H.H. Archibald, of Harbor Grace, arrived in town last night on business, and is staying at the Crosbie.

The schooner Ionia, Earle, Master, 24 days from Operto, in ballast to Bishop & Monroe, arrived in port yesterday afternoon.

Messrs W.C. Job and E.F. Harvey left for the Quarry by yesterday’s express to spend a few days caribou shooting.

About 20 outport schooners arrived in port between five and seven o’clock last evening. They were mostly from the Northward.

There were five arrests by the Police yesterday; three drunks, one drunk and disorderly, and one drunk and conveyed to the Station in a cab.

Miss Beatrice Baxter, who has been visiting here for the past three months, left by last evening’s express for New York. Mr. John Baxter accompanied her on a visit to his parents.

In reference to the ad. in yesterday’s News, in reference to a sum of money being picked up in the Long Room, we would say that the money was not in a purse as stated.

There is considerable snow along the West Coast, though not sufficiently deep to impede train traffic. Thursday night, it snowed, West from Terra Nova, and the weather was intensely cold.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday: H.P. Morgan, London; M.F. O’Toole, Conception Harbor, Thomas Moore, Bay de Verde; William Butt, H.H. Archibald, Harbor Grace.

A young woman named Sutton was run down by a passing horse and dray on New Gower St., last evening. She was not seriously injured, but received a bad fright. Mr. J. Doyle assisted her to her home.

It was exceptionally fine along the railway yesterday. It was also fine last night. The latest reports are: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Bay of Islands, N.E., light, dull, 38 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 21 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W., light, fine 20 above. Clarenville, N.E., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourn, N.E., light, fine, 40 above.

St. Andrew’s Choir meets for practice this evening at 8.15. A full attendance is requested

A Mrs. Adams of Shoal Harbor, was brought in by yesterday’s express, suffering from mental aberration, and was taken to the Asylum. The demented woman was in charge of her husband.

When the express that arrived yesterday was going West, some hundreds of caribou were crossing the track between Quarry and Howley. Train hands say they never saw them so plentiful or so many stags.

It was the coldest for the season along the line last night. At Quarry, the temperature registered 15 degrees of frost at midnight.

The schooner Mary M., Thomas Mullowney, arrived yesterday evening from Indian Arm, Bonavista Bay, laden with fish, oil, hoops and barrels."

November 2 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Messrs. Munn & Co.’s brig., Amy Louise, Capt. Sheppard, left New York on Wednesday, anthracite coal laden for this port.

Constable Grouchy who has been stationed here, arrived by Thursday night’s train and is now settling himself before going on duty.

Five fishermen left for Broad Cove by Wednesday morning’s train, and Mr. E. Parsons went to St. John’s by that evening’s train.

Mr. John Davis, Principal of the Methodist Superior School here, has been engaged to visit Bay Roberts weekly, to give instruction in singing to the C. of E. choir of that town.

The attendance at the Royal Moving Pictures at St. Paul’s Hall Tuesday night, was large, the building being packed during the greater part of the night. Much favourable comment on the entertainment was heard the next day.

A liquor case was before the Court on Wednesday and was partly heard. A witness, being unable to be present through illness, the Police asked for a postponement, and the case was adjourned sine die.

Mr. D. Scott, Superintendent of the Postal Telegraph, went to Upper Island Cove on Wednesday and opened telegraphic communication with the office here. It is not yet known when then the office will be opened for business.

The funeral of the late Thomas Walsh took place Wednesday afternoon and was largely attended. Deceased having been a member of the British Society, that body escorted the remains of their late brother member to their resting place in the C. of E. Cemetery.

The inner private office at the railway station here, has lately been wainscotted with hard pine, and now looks well, as the result of the good work done by Mr. A. Bridle, an employee of the Reid Nfld. Co. Extensive repairs to the platform of the station, are now in progress under the foremanship of the same party.

The season for dogs to roam in quest of plunder seems to have come round again, and reports of their depredations are heard almost daily now. From the Southside, tales of mischief by dogs, are told, cattle, sheep and poultry being the victims of their prowlings. A goat was killed by dogs on Water Street, one night this week.

The Royal Moving Pictures, at St. Paul’s Hall last night, had another full house.

Messrs. Munn & Co.’s schooner Estella, Silas Wells, Master, sailed for Sydney this morning, to load coal.

Posters are out today giving notice that the Nickelodeon expects to open to the public at the Academy Hall, next Saturday.

Miss Nellie Power, engaged at A.J. Harvey & Co.’s St. John’s, is now here spending a two weeks’ vacation with her friend, Miss Ellen Lahey

Mr. John Noseworthy while going home last night, was attacked by a vicious dog, which bit him severely about the knee. Today he made a complaint at the Court and the dog will be destroyed.

Mr. John Ash, formerly Watchman at the Harbor Grace Boot & Shore Factory, after an illness of about a fortnight, died this morning, aged about 65 years. Deceased was a member of the Orange Society. The funeral takes place tomorrow afternoon.

Four goats belonging to a poor woman living at the South Side of Riverhead, were killed this week by dogs. This woman has had five goats killed by these ravenous animals, and she feels the loss of her goats keenly. Dogs and goats are sometime a nuisance, and the only cure seems to be a persistent application of the Police remedy.

Are we really to have a marine slip built in this harbor, after all the rumours to that effect have seemed to pass away without a confirmation of its consummation being made? The latest rumour bearing upon the subject, is that within a reasonable time, plans for the building of a floating dock, capable of taking up a vessel of 200 tons, are about to be initiated, and that a capable man from this town, will likely be sent to Halifax, to select a plan suited to the requirements of our trade, and engage a practical builder of such docks to come here and construct one. Most people agree that a marine slip is very necessary here and that investors of capital need not fear for the safety of money put into such a venture. All will welcome the announcement that a new floating dock for Harbor Grace is to become a reality.

It is understood that the street light at Caplin Cove is to be removed to a post near Hall’s Lane. Before an alteration is made, it is to be hoped due consideration will be given to public interests. If those connected with the lighting of the town cannot see their way clear to add another light further East, they should be sure that by placing the light at Hall’s lane, a greater number will be benefited to the removing than by allowing it to remain where it is. Personally, the writer favours the removal further East. but he is not sure this would best serve the public. Lights at intervals, as far as the electric light poles run, are veery desirable, but if these cannot be obtained, a suggestion is here made that the Road Board rail all dangerous portions of the embankment, and so obviate risks of falling over the bank. This matter of railing the embankment has many times been agitated for, and it was understood that the Road Board contemplated doing the work this fall, but the season is getting advanced, and if the work is to be done this year, it is time a commencement were made. CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Oct. 31st. ‘07"

November 2 1907 NEWS "The S.S. Kite hauled alongside the S.S. Cocouna yesterday, to take aboard some pressed hay for the Gillisport Lumber Co., which will be used by the company’s horses during the winter. It is likely she will sail for there today. About 30 men leave from here, who have been engaged for a term of nine months, at $26 a month and found.

It is said that Dr. W.H. Parsons, now practicing at Bonne Bay, will leave shortly to practice at Harbor Grace, his native town.

A number of Salvation Army Officers, who were in the city attending Congress meetings, left for home by last evening’s express.

There has been a good sign of herring at Humber Arm this week, and good hauls were taken. At Wood’s Island good work was also done, and also at Lark Harbor.

A number of out harbor schooners left for home ports yesterday. During the afternoon, there were several arrivals, many of them anchoring in the stream for the night, and will haul in to the wharfs today.

Only a few boats went on the fishing grounds yesterday. After being out a short time, they had to leave and come in, the sea being very rough. Fish was found plentiful and had the water been smother, good fares would have been secured.

The schooner Minnie J. Hickman, Robert Young, arrived in port yesterday from Campbellton, with a cargo of about 150 thousand feet of lumber, to the Horwood Lumber Co. She is discharging at the Company’s East End wharf."

November 2 1907 OBITUARY This morning we record the death of Mr. John Skiffington, one of the oldest residents of Quidi Vidi and St. John’s East. For some time he has been seriously ill, and death was not unexpected by his family. Deceased, who had reached his 80th year, was very prominent in the fisheries of St. John’s for many years. In the sealing fishery he was a practical man in the fifties, and held various prominent positions with Captain Graham. For more than 14 years he was watching for the East End of the city, and was honest and trustworthy. Mr. Skiffington raised a large family, and those living today are: Richard, George, Patrick, James and John in Boston; Edward in St. John’s, and one daughter. To the bereaved family, the News extends sympathy.
November 2 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived in Port Aux Basques at 8.30 a.m. yesterday, with the following passengers; Mrs. N.J. Payne, Mrs. J. Strickland, Miss J Luther, J.J. and Mrs. Murphy, V.P. Burke, C.W. and Mrs. Rowlings, A. Moulton, R.F. Mercer, J.T. Joyce, J.R. Davis, R.J. Patrick, H Palsmore, J.A. Howland, W.H. Horwood, W.L. Hunter, J.R. Prince, J. Reid, J.W. O’Brien, W.J. Broker, R.S. Elliott, C.D. Blanchard, Capt. C. Cross, W.T. Davis, P.H. Reid, J.G. Augnow in saloon, and 43 second class. The express is due at 2.30.
November 2 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home left Bay of Islands yesterday, going North. Ethie left Clarenville yesterday. Dundee left Port Blandford yesterday a.m. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Argyle left Burin last evening, going West. Glencoe is due at Placentia this morning. Clyde left Lewisporte yesterday, on time.

Bowrings: S.S. Prospero left Lamaline at 11.27 a.m. yesterday, going West. S.S. Portia is North of Baie Verte."

November 2 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Florence will leave London for St. John’s direct, about December 1st.

Mr. V.P. Burke, R.C. School Inspector, who has been in Canada on a visit, returns by today’s express.

Mr. Frank Leicester left by today’s train for Harbor Grace, where he will sing at the Royal Theatre during next week.

The schooner Ellen, Pittman, arrived yesterday from Smith’s Sound, T.B., with 23,000 brick for H.J. Stabb & Co.

Two schooners, the Drummer’s Tax and Minnie Stone, arrived yesterday from the Trinity Bay Brick Yards, with full cargoes to the Horwood Lumber Co.

About half dozen boats were on the local fishing grounds, yesterday. They secured from one cwt. to three cwt. each, but the water being rough, they returned to port early.

The schooner Northern Light, Simmonds, with lumber and Coopers’ material, arrived in port yesterday, and is discharging at the Empire Lumber Company’s wharf.

At the 7 and 8 a.m. celebrations of the Holy Communication in the C.E. Cathedral tomorrow, intercession will be made for God’s blessing upon the work of the Men’s Bible Class.

Thursday last, a violent snow storm raged at Seldom Come By, with wind from North-East. The schooners anchored there had their decks covered with the snow to a depth of several inches.

Mr. J. Murphy, accompanied by Messrs S.R. Davis, R.H. Reid, W.L. Davis, R.S. Elliott, W.L. Bowker and J.W. O’Brien, a party of American capitalists, arrived at Bay of Islands by train yesterday, and will proceed to Hawke’s Bay in the D.P. Ingraham, to examine some timber properties, which the Americans contemplate taking over.

The weather along the line yesterday and last night was as fine as could be expected. Last night the following reports were received: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light, fine, 28 above. Quarry, calm, fine, 20 above. Bishop’s Falls, N, light, fine, 30 above. Clarenville, W., light, fine, 33 above. Whitebourne, calm, fine, 38 above.

The S.S. Ulunda, Chambers, arrived from Liverpool at daylight this morning.

The schooner Maggie E.Z., A Roberts, arrived from Herring neck yesterday, with a load of fish and oil.

The Ingraham is due to arrive at Bay of Islands this morning, and will take the party now there to Hawke’s Bay, to look over the property of J.J. Murphy and others.

The price of Labrador Fish has now dropped to $3.50 per quintal, and outport dealers now in town, yesterday could not obtain a higher price.

The inquiry into the death of William Bailey will be continued before Judge Conroy this afternoon, when Mr. J.W. Morris, Supt. Elect. Dept., R.N. Co., will probably be examined as to the working of the plant.

The whaler Puma, Capt. Christoplersen, arrived in port from Balana yesterday morning, after a good season’s work, she having secured eighty-three whales to date. The Puma is owned by the Newfoundland Steam Whaling Co., and will now refit for a cruise with the floating manufacturing station Sabraoh, due to arrive in a few days.

Drunkenness was very prevalent in the city yesterday and no less than six arrests were made by the Police before five o’clock. Three of these were simple drunks, two drunks and disorderly, and one drunk while in charge of a horse. Last night the streets were much quiter, and there were no arrests up to 11.30 p.m.

A case of scarlet fever was yesterday reported to the Health Authorities from 57 Plymouth Road, the patient being a seven year old boy. He was taken to the Fever Hospital, and the house will undergo disinfection today, and probably be released from quarantine tomorrow."

November 2 1907 DEATHS SKIFFINGTON — Last evening after a long illness, John Skiffington, aged 80 years, leaving a wife, six sons and one daughter. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, Quidi Vidi. Friends please attend without further notice.
November 4 1907 SATURDAY’S ACCIDENT At 4.15 Saturday afternoon, Frank Parks, a Fireman of the S.S. Argyle, had a narrow escape from being killed. He was sitting on the hand railing at the head of the stairway on the second flat of the Reid Company’s Office, and being suddenly attracted, he lost his balance and was precipitated to the floor below, a distance of about 18 feet. Before striking the floor, his head came in contact with a radiator, and was laid open from the forehead to behind the left ear, in a triangular shape. His face was also badly cut, and one of his legs was broken in two places. The Station was almost filled with people, awaiting the arrival of the express at the time, and several witnessed Park's fall. He was picked up in an unconscious condition, with blood flowing copiously from the wounds, while the fluid was also oozing from his mouth and ears. Constables Tobin and Savage procured a cab and had the injured man driven to the Police Station, where Dr. Randell attended, and after giving stimulants, ordered him to Hospital, where he was later taken in the Ambulance. The broken limb was set and further attendance given him at the Hospital, and last night the man was doing well. No serious result is anticipated.
November 4 1907 YOUNG MAN DIES IN WOODS Mr. Albert Jure, of Botwoodville, his two sons, and a young man named Nathaniel Hart, who were trapping at the head waters of the Exploits, came out to Badger Saturday evening, with the melancholy news of the death by drowning, of George, youngest son of Albert Jure. How the young man got drowned remains partly shrouded in mystery. It is supposed that being in an exhausted state, he fell into the river and was too weak to get out. It transpires that during the snow storm that prevailed on the 21st October, the poor fellow got astray from his companion, Hart, and being without food or means of making a fire, became faint from cold, want, and the heavy travelling. Heart found him on Wednesday, 23rd, by following his tracks in the snow. About one mile from where he found the body, he picked up the discarded gun. Little further on he found where he rested, till finally coming to the bank of the Victoria, he found the body of the unfortunate man floating in a still pool, or eddy of the stream. He took the body out, and then went in search of the father and brother. These he came across at their camp on the Exploits, over twenty miles from where he found the body. Together they went, taking the planks of an old boat with them. Of these boards they formed a sort of rude coffin, in which they tenderly placed the remains. Leaving the coffin, they at once proceeded to Badger, and from thence sent the sad news to the mother of the poor fellow. When the marshes and ponds will have frozen over, it is intended to bring out the remains for interment. George Jure was a young man of but 24 years, and was well liked by all who knew him.
November 4 1907 CARL E. RICHARD The schooner Carl E. Richard, Capt. Hilton, entered port at 3 p.m. yesterday from Port Mulgrave, to J & W Pitts. She left that port on Thursday morning and had splendid weather during the whole passage. She brought 95 head of cattle; 19 sheep, and 25 cases eggs.
November 4 1907 WALRUS ARRIVES FROM LABRADOR The S.S. Walrus, Capt. Batten, arrived from Labrador, Saturday 1st., via Carbonear. The Walrus left Battle Harbor, the 28th October, and called at Seldon Come By, Bonavista, Catalina and Carbonear, where she landed crews that were bought down by her in the spring. Tuesday, Oct,. 22nd., while at Battle Harbor, a heavy storm of wind, accompanied with snow, was experienced. The Walrus had a narrow escape from going ashore. About 4 a.m. the ring to which the ship had a line made fast to, gave out on shore, and steam had to be got up to prevent her from drifting on the rocks. The assistance of the land men was also needed to get another line made fast, otherwise matters would have been serious. The Walrus was somewhat damaged, her bow chocks being broken, and hauser pipe split. The gale was the season, and Capt. Batten and crew had a rather difficult jog to save the vessel from destruction.
November 4 1907 BRUCK PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived at Port aux Basques at 11.30 a.m. yesterday, having been delayed at North Sydney by the late arrival of the I.C.R. express. She brought the following passengers: Mrs. J. Mitchell, Miss C Lambert, Mrs. E.S. Wood, Miss M. Hillyard, C and Mrs. Bellamy, Mrs. J.C. Dunning, J.H. Mundoff, D.C. Sheppard, E.W. Spalding, Mrs. J.X. Cameron, Rev. W.J. Thistle. The express is due at 4 this afternoon.
November 4 1907 MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY The inquiry into the death of William Bailey was continued before Judge Conroy Saturday afternoon, Counsel engaged in the case also being present. The only witness examined was Mr. J.W. Morris, Supt. Elect. Dept., Reid-Nfld Co., who gave expert testimony as to the working of the system. Further hearing was adjourned until today, when several witnesses, who have been previously examined, will be recalled to have their evidence read over to them for correction. The inquiry will probably be finished today.
November 4 1907 TECHNICAL SCHOOL AT BELL ISLAND The Technical School about to be started at Bell Island Mines, will be in charge of Mr. J McDougall, Civil Engineer, brother of Manager McDougall, and Mr. Kneeland, Master Mechanic, both members of the Dominion Iron and Steel Co.’s staff at Wabana. This school will be conducted free of charge to the pupils, the company standing all incidental expenses, and will be open to all employees of the Mechanical Department. It has not yet been decided if a new building will be erected for the purpose, or the R.C. School at the Mines, hired for the accommodation of the classes.
November 4 1907 REV. JABEZ MOORE Honours are continuing to fall to the lot of the Rev. Jabez Moore, formerly of Carbonear, and more recently Presiding Elder of the Minot District of the North Dakota Conference. In the middle of October, Mr. Moore was elected as the head of the Delegation to General Conference, by the largest majority ever given to a delegate. Possibly he is the first Newfoundlander to be elected to this honourable position. The Conference commences at Baltimore next May, and will be in session for at least one month. Rev. Mr. Moore has also been appointed Presiding Elder of Grand Forks District, instead of Minot. He had served in Minot for five years, and had another year before his term expired, but at the request of Pastors of Grand Forks District, he was transferred there, and now commences a six year term. Mr. Moore intends to purchase a house in Grand Forks where he will in future reside. We congratulate this successful son of Nfld. upon the continuous promotion he is receiving in the Church of his choice, and hope 'ere long to greet him with the title of Episcopus.
November 4 1907 ULUNDA ARRIVES The S.S. Ulunda, Capt. Chambers, arrived in port, from Liverpool at 1 p.m. yesterday, after a tedious passage of 12 days. Strong gales with heavy seas were experienced during the run. She brought 585 tons cargo, a large mail, and the following passengers for this port: Mr. George Eldon, Mrs. Eldon and Olaf Janssen. The Almeriana being at Pitts wharf, the Ulunda anchored in the stream on arrival.
November 4 1907 ALMERIANA IN PORT S.S. Almerianan, Capt. Hanks, reached port from Halifax at 1.30 p.m. Saturday. She left that port at 11 a.m. on Wednesday and had beautiful weather during the entire passage. The Almeriana brought nearly 600 tons cargo for this port, including 1200 brls apples. She will move into the stream today to allow the Ulunda to discharge, and will sail for Liverpool on Thursday, having a full cargo leaving this port.
November 4 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Prospero left Harbor Breton at 7.30 a.m. Saturday, going West. There was no report from the Portia up to last night.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Ethie, leaves Clarenville this morning. Clyde leaves Lewisporte, this morning. Argyle leaves Placentia this morning, on the Red Island route. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Glencoe left Placentia at 7.25 p.m. Saturday, going West. Dundee leaves Port Blandford, this morning."

November 4 1907 WHALER LYNX HERE The whaler Lynx, Capt. Amundsen, arrived from Beaverton, N.D.B., at 7 o’clock yesterday morning. The Lynx is owned by the Newfoundland Steam Whaling Company, and has secured 73 whales for her season’s work. Of these 42 have been killed in Notre Dame Bay, and the balance, while operating from the factory at Chaleur Bay. The Lynx will refit here and in company with the Puma, will go on a cruse with the floating factory, Sabraon, which is now due here.
November 4 1907 ACCIDENT TO BIG LINER OFF NEWFOUNDLAND London, Oct. 28th. — A wireless message has been received from Capt. Pollack, of the North German Lloyds steamer Kaiser Wilhelm, De Grosse, saying all were well on board and that they expect to reach Plymouth Tuesday evening. The Kaiser left New York on October 22nd., and should have reached Plymouth this morning. She was detained, however, by the breaking of her rudder on October 25th off Newfoundland. Since the accident she has been steered with her propellers.
November 4 1907 PERSONAL Dr. Fitzgerald, who was in the city last week on business, returned to St. Jacques by the S.S. Glencoe. Mr. W.H. Kennedy, Travelling Agent for the Thomas Smyth Co., left for the Northward yesterday on business. Mr. Angus Walker left for Bishop’s Falls by yesterday express, to superintend some masonry construction work. Mr. C.F. Bishop, who was in town last week on business, returned to Burin Saturday, by the S.S. Glencoe. Mr. H.D. Reid, left in car Terra Nova yesterday, for Grand Falls. Before returning he will spend a few days caribou shooting. The Premier’s brother, Rev. Geo. J. Bond, B.A., left last week for the Orient, with the object of writing up China, Japan, Tibet, Korea, etc. He was accompanied by the Rev. Mr. Westaway, Missionary to China and Mrs. Westaway.
November 4 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Another foreigner is endeavouring to secure the T.A. Hall, with the object of running a moving picture show there.

Mr. T.J. Freeman returned from Bay D’Espoir Saturday, where he had been on business for the past week.

The Glencoe took the following outward passengers from Placentia, Saturday: Dr. Fitzgerald, C.F. Bishop, H.P. Burden, Capt. Acsopp, H. Hue, J.F. Miller, Adj. Browne, Capt. Tulk, Capt. Cheeseman, Miss Inkpen, Miss Mulcahey, J. Mercer, Miss Ash, Lieut. Whitten, Sister M. Antoni, Sister M. Pius, J McShave, in saloon, and 8 in steerage.

The weather up country, was fine and warm yesterday; last night it was also fine: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 40 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light, fine, 34 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 37 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, dull, 45 above. Clarenville, W., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, S.W., light, fine, 38 above.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: H.D. Reid, F. Donnelly, J.W.N. Johnstone, Miss Sinnott, Mrs. R. MCDonald, A. Walker, R. Scott, W.H. Kenedy, H. Fraser, J. Budgen, J.B. Petipas, S. Carpenter, S. Parsons, J. Kelly, Miss Haynes, Miss E. O’Leary, Miss E. Domminy, Miss B Pardy, A. Miller, R. McDougall, N Campbell.

Mr. C.F. Taylor arrived from Baie Verte by yesterday’s express

The house at 59 Plymouth Road was disinfected, on Saturday, and released from quarantine yesterday.

The S.S. Aggie leaves Lewisporte this morning with some lumber men, who are going to cruise several properties in Hall’s Bay

Fred Roe and Mary Burke were discharged from the Fever Hospital on Saturday, having completely recovered from the disease.

A case of scarlet fever was reported to the Health Authorities from 44 Alexander St. on Saturday. The patient is being nursed at home.

The supper given by the officers of H.M.S. Brilliant at the Roller Rink Saturday night, was attended by about 120 ladies and gentlemen, and proved a very enjoyable affair.

The work of salving the lumber cargo of the wrecked Micmac, still continues and up to Saturday last about 1,000,000 feet had been landed. The ship is now broken off, but there is but little danger of her going to pieces for some time.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; J.W. Janes, Hant’s Harbor; R.F. Mercer, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Jessie Lentle, Providence; W.L. Hunter, New Glasgow; H.A. Thomas, Grand Falls.

Saturday evening, the schooner Laura May, Jas. Haden, and Capt. Michael Hann’s schooner, arrived from Petit Forte, after a good run of 24 hours. Although a strict lookout was kept for floating deals from the wrecked Micmac at Broad Cove, the Laura May struck one in Placentia Bay, but fortunately not hard enough to cause damage.

The Police had their hands full Saturday night, trying to keep order among the crowds on the streets, and drunkenness was much in evidence, no fewer than eleven arrests being made. Five of these were simple drunks, four drunk and disorderly, and two drunk and fighting. The five drunks were released yesterday morning, the others will appear before the Magistrate this morning. A Portugal Cove man arrested on Saturday by Constable Stapleton for indecent exposure, was released upon depositing $5 to appear this morning. Another drunk was arrested yesterday afternoon, and will have to answer for his conduct this morning.

The schooner Idalia, N. Mercer, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co. for C & A Dawe, Bay Roberts.

The Council should have Job’s Cove attended to. The drain is choked and a heap of mud is found opposite the gateway leading to the wharves.

The boats out fishing on Saturday found fish plentiful and secured good fares. Many of the fishermen have given up the work for the season. Only about half dozen still continue to go out and some of these will leave it off after this week.

The case of the shareholders against the Yarmouth Bank Directors, has resulted in a decision in favour of the Directors. Mr. A.B. Morine, K.C., and Hector McInnes, K.C., represented the shareholders, whilst Mr. Armstrong, K.C. and Mr. H.A. Lovitt, K.C. represented the Directors.

A number of schooners that arrived in port on Friday, berthed at the various wharves on Saturday and began discharging their cargoes of fish. Some of the wharves and docks are so crowded that many later arrivals had to anchor in the stream to await a chance to haul in, when those now at the wharves have finished discharging.

Mr. McDonald, wife of Magistrate McDonald, of Bay St. George, left for home by last evening’s express. Mrs. McDonald was at Torbay a few days, and placed her daughter at school in the Torbay Presentation Convent. Mr. J. McDonald, a teacher in the Torbay Superior School, is a son of Magistrate and Mrs. McDonald.

The schooner Veronica, John Downey, arrived in port Saturday morning fish laden, from Scilly Cove, T.B. The Veronica left New Perlican early Friday morning and went to Scilly Cove where she took on board a load of fish, and left there about dark Friday evening, arriving in port at 4 o’clock Saturday morning. This shows, that with fine weather and favourable winds, work that otherwise may take weeks to accomplish can be done in a couple of days. A Trepassey schooner, that arrived in port early last week, was five weeks in completing her load and getting to port, owing to unfavourable weather and adverse winds.

The funeral of the late Daniel Murphy, late of R.N.R took place yesterday. A squad of Reservists in charge of Mr. Blackmore attended, and hauled the remains in a gun carriage, the coffin being covered with the Union Jack. The C.C.C. Band, deceased being an ex-member of the Corps, was also present and played the Dead March when the body was taken from the house, entering the Cathedral yard and near the cemetery. At the Cathedral, the prayers of the dead were recited by Rev. Fr. Fyme. After the funeral the C.C.C. Band accompanied the Reservists to the ship, playing music along the line of march."

November 5 1907 FISHERMEN MEET AT CONCEPTION HR. On Saturday night, a mass meeting of fishermen from different parts of Conception Bay was held in the Academy Hall, at Conception Harbor, for the purpose of discussing the desirability of forming a union, which would look after the interest of the fishermen. Mr. M.F. O’Toole was appointed Chairman, and briefly explained the object of the gathering. Mayor Gibbs was also present, and addressed the meeting. Much interest was shown, and considerable discussion on the subject took place; and it was decided to form a United Fishermen’s Union. This union will have an Agent in the foreign market during the fishing season, who will keep them informed of the state of the market, and look after their interest generally. Mr. Gibbs is at present interviewing the different Merchants in Conception Bay, endeavouring to arrange a settlement re the price for the present season. Should this fail, a test case will be taken in the Supreme Court against one of the Shipping Merchants. We undrestand fishermen of Trinity and Bonavista Bays have signified their intention of joining in the movement. Mr. E. Kennedy, the leading Merchant in the District, interviewed by Mr. Gibbs, did not seem to be antagonistic to the movement, and stated his willingness to pay as high a price as any other Merchant, if the state of the market would warrant the price. Another meeting will be held in about a week’s time.
November 5 1907 WATERSIDE THIEVES AT WORK Saturday night, during the absence of the Captain and crew of the schooner Rosaline, at Ayre & Sons’ wharf, the cabin was broken into and the amount of $147 stolen. Beside this sum, there were three other envelopes, containing from $300 downwards, the entire amount at hand being $652. When Capt. Bishop was leaving the schooner, he made the companionway secure and left the money in a trunk. Returning, he found the cabin door broken and the above noted amount stolen. The money belonged to a freighter, whom Capt. Bishop brought fish to town for, and the loss to him will be serious. The matter was reported to the Police yesterday, but there is very little clues to work upon. It is evident that the person or persons who committed the theft were unaware of the large amount of money lying around, else it would have also disappeared. Up to last midnight there was no arrest made.
November 5 1907 HAD TO SKIP OR BE ARRESTED Some two weeks ago an atrocious act was committed in a Northern outport, by a prominent resident, the culprit being caught in the act by some fishermen of the harbor. He has been suspected of frequent similar offences, and it was decided to watch him. The matter was reported to the authorities, and Constable Bishop was sent to arrest the delinquent. The latter however, suspected this action and forthwith made himself scarce, coming to St. John’s, where he was met by his sister, it is said, who gave him funds, and he took passage by the express, and at present is in Canada.
November 5 1907 THE ORION’S MISSING CREW "All hopes for the safety of the schooner Orion, which left Battle Harbor, October 5th, for Grand Bank, are now abandoned, and it is believed that she went down in the storm that followed, the night after she left Battle Harbor. Some wreckage has been picked up at Gragamelle, with a dory marked ”Orion”, and it is supposed she struck near Twin Islands while coming up the Straits. The fact of a dory being found at Gragamelle, does away with the theory that the missing vessel may be fishing, or storm bound on the North East Coast. Following we give names and residential places of the crew: Edward Bungay, Captain, married, Grand Bank. Charles Piercy, Mate, married, Grand Bank. Joseph Piercy, Cook, married, Fortune. George Spencer, John Spencer, brother, both married, Mortier Bay. Thomas Ralph, married, Mortier Bay. John Hanrahan, married, Mortier Bay. William Dialee, married. Mortier Bay. Michael Farrell, married, Mortier Bay. Samuel Murley, married, Mortier Bay. William Hodder, single, Mortier Bay. Michael Power, married, Mortier Bay. Michael Kelley, single, Mortier Bay. William Price, single, Brunnette Island. Michael Ducey, single, Mortier Bay. Richard Dunford, single, Grand Bank."
November 5 1907 A FALSE ALARM CALLOUS REPORT It was reported about the city last evening, that a serious accident had taken place on the railway, and that a special train with three Doctors and a Clergyman, had left for the scene. The story was given credence, and people about the Station were anxiously awaiting the arrival of trains to get information as to who the injured ones were. Persons expecting friends were particularly anxious, and though informed that no accident had occurred, were inclined to be doubtful. The story originated owing to a special train leaving at noon with Dr. Keegan on board, for Fox Harbor, and as in many instances, irresponsible persons set the report going that there was an accident on the road. The canard caused such uneasiness, and those responsible for it should feel well ashamed — if they have any shame.
November 5 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Ulunda, Chambers, sails for Halifax, tomorrow night. S.S. Corean left Philadelphia at 9 a.m. Sunday for this port. S.S. Almerianan, Hanks, sails tonight for Liverpool, taking full cargo, fish, oil, etc. S.S. Rosalind arrived Halifax at 5 a.m. yesterday, and sailed again, last night for New York. S.S. Regulus arrived at Botwoodville on Saturday, having been detained by fog. She loads lumber for New York. S.S. Adventure arrived at North Sydney, from New York, at 7 p.m. Saturday, and will leave for St. John’s on Wednesday, bringing a cargo of coal. Schooner Carl E. Richard, Hilton, sails tomorrow morning, for Port Mulgrave, in ballast. She will not return here this year, but will go to South America for hardwood.
November 5 1907 ALONG THE LINE The 6 p.m. train yesterday, took out only a few passengers, mostly second class. The express arrived at 7.50 bringing: Rev. Dr. A. Howley, Mrs Cameron, H. Duder, J. Brocklehurst, W. Knox, Mrs. W. Winsor, Mrs. (Sergt) Sheppard, P.F. Brown, R. Dawson and about 20 second class. The shore train arrived at 9.35 last night. About 50 passengers came, among them being: J. Pike, F. Jerrett, J.W. Hiscock, P. Dumphy, J Davis.
November 5 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Dr. Ames of Broad Cove, was in town today.

Next Monday, Nov. 14th., is the anniversary of the consecration of His Lordship Bishop March.

Mr. C. Yetman, Agent here for the C.L. March Co., Ltd., intends going to St. Mary’s and vicinity next week on a business trip.

Messrs. Munn & Co.’s, steamer Louise, arrived this evening from Carbonear, where she recently landed fish brought from Venison Island, Labrador, to Messrs John Rorke & Son.

The Nickelodian at the Academy Hall opened for the first time this afternoon. Miss Mary Hanrahan as pianist, Miss A Hayse, singer. The pictures shown are said to be exceptionally good.

A Missionary meeting in connection with the Church of England, will be held here on the night of the 18th. November. Revs. W.C. White of Heart’s Content and Edgar Jones, Rector of Bay Roberts, will be the chief speakers.

Misses Maggie Ryan, of Riverhead, Annie Fleming and Mary Casey, School Teachers in the parish of North River, took occasion of Friday being a holy day, to spend a short time with friends, and arrived here by Thursday night’s train. They return on Monday morning

The schooner Pointer arrived this morning from St. John’s, with 100 tons coal to Messrs. R. Rutherford & Co. This small quantity will relieve for the present, the need of coal so generally felt in this town for some little time.

Mr. Kenneth Smith, a former resident of this town, has opened a shop on Water Street opposite Mr. Joseph Ross’s grocery store. His father, Mr. Michael Smith, carried on business here three or four years ago.

Mr. Leicester, singer for the Royal Moving Picture Co., arrived by last night’s train and put up at Cochrane House. Mr. Thomas Freeman of this town, will next week begin an engagement with the Company, as Mechanical Operator of the motion apparatus.

Business at the stores on Water Street this week, has been brisker than for some time, although the volume of trade done was not up to the expectations of the proprietors, but an improvement is expected during this month.

The Superintendent of the Water Company would prevent a cause for complaint if he would have the water fountain on LeMarchant St. boxed in; for if this is not done before winter, the high winds will blow the water about, so that the street near this tank will be a very slippery spot.

His Lordship Bishop March returned from his episcopal visit to Trinity Bay.

Mr. R.A. Squires, wife and child, arrived from St. John’s by last night’s train, and are staying at his father’s, Mr. Alex Squires, until Monday evening, when they return to the city.

A very interesting ceremony will take place on Wednesday afternoon at the residence of Mr. John Stapleton, when his daughter Annie will be united in marriage to Mr. Joseph Moriarty of this town. Congratulations offered.

At the Court today, a drunk and disorderly was asked to contribute $2.00 to the Court Treasury, which he did; and two drunks were requested to defray the cost of the process which required their attendance. In the District Court, two civil cases, one of which had been settled out of Court, were called. The other case was disposed of by defendant having to pay plaintiff the amount claimed by him.

The Harbor Grace Correspondent of the Telegram wishes to have that part of Military Road between Stratton’s Hill and Garland Street put in good condition. He urges the Chairman of the Road Board not to loose his good name for the sake of 50 or 60 yards of bad road. The Chairman in an obliging sort of man, and will no doubt, do all he can to meet the wishes of the Correspondent, but as he has spent a good deal of money to advantage this summer, he must find it difficult to have all roads in perfect order. If the Government would send along more money, the Chairman will, doubtless accommodate the Correspondent. The government should not neglect its friends.

The ladies of St. Paul’s congregation intend holding a sale of work at St. Paul’s Hall on 13th and 14th November, the proceeds from which will go towards placing a new front to the organ and putting new windows in the old part of the Church, the present windows being there for 70 years. Any contribution of candy, plain or fancy work, or any donations that friends may wish to offer, will be most thankfully received by the ladies committee.

A case brought forward by the Constable of Bay Roberts, at the instance of Inspector General McCowen, was heard at that town before Judge Seymour on Thursday. From the evidence submitted, it appears that three of the crew of the schooner Mabel B., fishing at Labrador, went ashore at Freetone Island, and coming up on a shack, entered it, and finding three trunks therein, containing goods usually sold by pedlars, broke open two of the trunks and took some of the goods to their vessel. The Captain ordered the men to take the goods back to the shack, but instead of doing so, when they went ashore again, they burned the goods. Defendants pleaded guilty and two were find $10.00 or one month each, the other $5.00 or 14 days. Mr. Kearney for defendants.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 2nd, ‘07"

November 5 1907 PERSONAL "Mr. F.A. Jerrett came in from Brigus by last night’s train.

Mr. A.R. Martin, of the Anglo staff at Heart’s Content, is now in town.

Mr. Peter Matthews, of New Perlican, is at present in the city, on business.

Rev. Dr. A. Howley, P.P., Salmonier, arrived in town by last night’s train.

Mr. J.W. Hiscock came in from Brigus by last night’s train, and is staying at the Crosbie.

Capt. J. Ryan, of Spaniard’s Bay is at present in the city, settling up his summer’s business.

Mr. P. Dunphy, Red Island, came to the city last night, and will remain a few days, on business.

Mr. M.P. Cashin, M.H.A. came in from Cape Broyle, yesterday on business, and is staying at the Crosbie.

Mrs. (Capt.) W. Winsor Sr., of Wesleyville, arrived in town by yesterday’s express, to visit her mother, Mrs. Whiteway, who at present is seriously ill.

The Rev. Ambrose Haygate, who previous to the fire of 1892, was senior curate of the Church of England in this city, has been appointed by the Bishop of Chester to be Rural Dean of Congleton.

English papers to hand by yesterday’s mail, contain the information that Mr. Frederick C. Bowring, cousin of Sir William Bowring, and brother of Hon. E.R. Bowring, has been selected as Liberal Candidate for the Castle Street Ward, Liverpool. Sir William Bowring, who is a strong supporter of the Campbell Bannerman Government, has for some years been leader of the Liberal party in the Liverpool City Council."

November 5 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The schooner Gladys B. Smith is now due from Sydney, with a load of coal.

The brigt. Bella Rosa is now due here from Oporto to A Goodyear & Sons.

The schooner Muriel is now due with a cargo of cattle and provisions, from P.E. Island.

The schooner Procyn, of Harbor Grace, is now in the stream, awaiting a chance to go on dock for repairs.

There was no sign of the S.S. Silvia up to press hour, she evidently being unable to make port, owing to fog.

None of the local fishermen ventured on the grounds yesterday, owing to the heavy wind; several however, went out last night.

A number of salmon were offered in the market yesterday. They weighted from ten up to fifteen pounds, and were taken in nets on the Southern Shore.

There are more outport schooners in port at present, than at any time for several years, and with fine weather, a large volume of business will be transacted along the water front.

There is a scarcity of coal in the city at present. The S.S. Adventure is now loading at Sydney, and several vessels are on the way here with cargoes, so the present situation will be relieved during the week.

The steamer Briaredene, Capt. Crowe, arrived at Halifax from Gillesport, Labrador, Thursday last, with 34 time-expired lumber men. A similar number left here in the S.S. Kite, to replace them, and will remain at Gillesport until July next.

Passengers who arrived by last evening’s express, say that there is a good sign of herring in the arms at Bay of Islands, and a few good hauls were made the latter part of the week. It is expected that some of the vessels will be ready for market during this week .

It would be wise for outport men to be careful about their cash in future, and see that it is properly put away, and the entrance to their schooners secured before coming ashore. If not, there is a possibility of some of them having Saturday night’s theft on the schooner Rosaline duplicated.

The weather along the line, yesterday morning, was stormy, there being a heavy S.W. gale, with rain. Last night it moderated, the latest reports being: Port aux Basques, S.E., light, foggy, 38 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light, dull, 50 above. Bishop’s Falls, S.E., light, dull, 48 above. Clarenville, S.W., light, raining. Whitbourne, S.W. light, fine, 38 above.

There were no cases of scarlet fever developed yesterday.

There were three arrests by the Police yesterday, one drunk, and two drunk and disorderly.

The schooner Atlanta, Mark Jones, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co’s wharf for H J. Earle, Fogo.

The Magisterial inquiry into the death of Wm Bailey was further adjourned yesterday afternoon, no business being done.

The residence of James Kearsey, Pennywell, will undergo disinfection today, and be released from quarantine tomorrow.

A patient undergoing treatment at the General Hospital, developed scarlet fever on Saturday, and was removed to the Fever Hospital Saturday night.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; M.P. Cashin, Cape Broyle; G.H. Burdaff, Boston; E.W. Spalding, Lincoln, C.V.A. Peel, Oxford, Eng., J.W. Hiscock, Brigus.

On Saturday last at Caplin Bay, Samuel Carter, of Witless Bay, secured a dory load of fish on fresh caplin bait. Caplin to be taken at this late season, is unprecedented in that District.

Mrs. Sergeant Sheppard, who returned from Howley by last evening’s express, where she was visiting her husband, spent an enjoyable time while up country. She visited the hunting grounds and succeeded in killing three caribou, one having an excellent set of antlers.

Surveyor Duder, J Brocklehurst and W Knox, who have been in the woods at Dog Bay and Gander Bay since June last, returned by yesterday’s express. Two others of Bay Roberts, who were with the party, detrained at Brigus Junction.

Mrs. Margaret Murphy died at her home, Hill Farm, Kilbride Road, yesterday, after an illness of only a few hours. Deceased was only in her 22nd year, and was a daughter of the late Patrick and Mary Feehan. She was only married about a year ago, and general sympathy is expressed her husband.

The schooner Grace, Roberts, of Twillingate, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co., for Herring Neck and Twillingate.

The S.S. Mary arrived from Bell island at 2.30 p.m. yesterday, and is loading freight for J.B. Martin, Bell Island, at George Neal’s wharf.

The schooner Janie Belle, James Handcock, Master, arrived in port Saturday night from Portland B.B. , laden with fish, oil, potatoes, billets, 2 cows and 8 sheep.

At the Empire Wood Working Co.’s, wharf, the schooner Renown, John Jones, Little Bay Islands, is discharging lumber from George Clarke’s mill, Hall’s Bay and the schooner Florence, William Brown, Bay Roberts, is also discharging lumber, from Gander Bay.

There were 105 steerage passengers arrived by the last Bruce. They were mostly miners from the Sydneys returning to their homes in Trinity and Green Bay.

Colonel Rees of the Salvation Army, has received a consignment of potatoes, carrots, and beets, sent as a gift to the Rescue Home in St. John’s. He owes these things to the generosity of Harry J. Crowe, Esq. of Botwoodville; they are from his farm, opened at Farmdale, Rushy Pond, and the Colonel testified that their superior quality gives substantial proof of the great capabilities of that part of the interior of the Colony to produce root crops. We understand that His Excellency the Governor visited this farm recently, and is of the opinion that much can be made of the land for agricultural purpose.

Mr. Stephen Hefferin, of Petit Forte, P.B., and Miss Lucy Squires of this city, were united in marriage at Petit Forte Saturday evening. The nuptial knot was tied by the Rev. W.P. Dountney, of St. Kyran’s, and the happy event was made the occasion of much rejoicing by the numerous friends of the young couple, who are well liked and very popular members of the community. After the wedding supper had been partaken of, dancing was indulged in by the younger folk, until the early hours of the morning.

The schooner Laura May, James Hayden, of Petit Forte, P.B arrived in port Saturday evening, after a quick run of 25 hours with a load of 500 qtls. dry fish. Friday night, while crossing Placentia Bay, a deal got across her stern, and one of the crew while endeavouring to clear it, came near being drowned. He was somewhat hurt about the head and lost one of his boots while in the water. The schooner Mary J., Patrick Hayden, also from Petit Forte, arrived early Sunday morning, after a remarkably quick run of 20 hours, fish laden."

November 6 1907 CARBONEAR NEWS "A number of young men and women went out by Friday’s express to winter in the land of Uncle Sam.

Duff & Sons’ schooner Pet, Hobbs, Master, arrived from Merchantman’s Harbor, Friday.

Rorke & Sons’ schooner Jessie, Jos. Hogan, sailed on the 30th for Bonavista Bay to load firewood, stakes, rails, etc., for that firm.

A company of young folk celebrated All Hallowe’en by holding a “snap apple” party in the rooms over the offices of the Electrical Co. Miss Williams, daughter of the Company Manager, presided as Chief Hostess, whilst others of the fair sex lent their assistance to make the affair a success.

November 1st being the Feast of All Saints, the usual holiday was duly honoured in the R.C. Church, and Masses were held same as on Sunday.

The S.S. Diana, Batten, arrived in port at 7 a.m. Thursday night, freighters were busy all day Friday, getting ashore their belongings. The congested state of things that existed on board this steamer in the spring was very much relieved on the homeward voyage, owing to several crews coming by sailing vessels.

The new wing, in course of erection on the Methodist Church of Freshwater, is now nearing completion, thanks to the united efforts of Pastor and people of that prosperous little settlement.

Capt. Jos. Westcott of the brigantine Beatrice, left Spain for this port on the 1st November. Estimating the run out by the jovial Captain’s past record, we may expect his appearance about the last of the month.

As a result of the meeting of fishermen, held at the Court house on Monday night last, we learn a prominent lawyer of the city has been retained by the committee to plead their grievance in the Autumn sitting of the Supreme Court, which will be held on the 20th November.

An excessive indulgence in the drinking of hop beer by our youth, has been quite noticeable for the past few months. The abuse has become so rampant hat the authorities have felt themselves justified in stepping in to ascertain just what the so called “hop beer” compound consists of. Samples of the stuff have been procured from six or eight venders for the purpose of undergoing analysis at the city. The iniquitous C.O.D. system still continues its barefaced evasion to the spirit of the law pertaining to the Temperance Act in local option towns.

Mr. W.H. Soper and crew arrived from Labrador Saturday, in his new schooner, the Manaloy, Rumson, Master.

The stagnated condition of trade prevailing of late by inclement weather, was somewhat revived during the past few days of sunshine.

The Horwood Lumber Co.’s Foreman, Mr. Roberts, is now able to reurn to work again after a short period of sickness.

Mr. Eben Taylor, of Duff & Sons, Ltd., and Miss Maria Young, of Heart’s Content, were united in Hymen’s bonds on the 30th October, by Rev. W.C., White. After the ceremony was performed, the guests repaired to the house of the bride’s father, and there sumptuously dined. At 7.30 p.m., the happy company wended their way to the Orange Hall, which had been hired for the occasion, and there kept up festivities until early morn. Very many choice presents were received by the bride. The duties of best man were admirably filed by Mr. Walter Taylor, brother of the groom, while the honour of bridesmaids were accorded to Miss Elsie Young and Miss Bessie Taylor. The groom’s presents to these were a gold stick-pin and gold bracelet respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Tayor said good bye to their friends of the cable city at p.m. the following day, and drove to their home at Carbonear, where all wish them a pleasant voyage over the matrimonial sea.

CORRESPONDENT."

November 6 1907 HERRING AT WOOD’S ISLAND "Editor Daily News:

Dear sir, — I notice a remark on the herring fishery in Wednesday’s edition of the Star, where it is stated that one of Mr. M.L. McLean’s vessels at Wood’s Island has 700 barrels of herring on board. This is an exageration. The plain fact of the matter is, she has not half that quantity. The Star should learn not to jump at conclusions, which only tends to deceive the public. The truth is, there is very little herring outside anywhere, and many think this may be the beginning of the end.

Yours truly, FISHERMAN, Wood’s Island, Oct. 30, 1907."

November 6 1907 PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY His Excellency the Governor in Council, has been pleased to appoint Mr. Hugh W. Simmons, (Colinet) to be a Surveyor of Lumber; Mr. Wm. Tulk (Burgoyne’s Cove, T.B. ) to be an additional member of the Church of England Board of Education for Smith’s Sound; Mr. Alfred Pittman, (Sopp’s Island), to be an additional member for the Road Board for North Side of White Bay, District of St. Barbe; Messrs, John Joy and Samuel Turley, to be members of the Road Board for Saint Patrick’s, District of Twillingate, in place of Messrs Henry Gillard and Michael Bouzan, left the locality; Mr. Francis Bowers, to be a member of the Road Board for Indian Burying Place, District of Twillingate, in place of Mr. George White, resigned; Messrs Simeon Osmond, Andrew Kelly, Peter Sullivan, James Beresford and Peter Cashin to be a Road Board for Mint Brook and Gambo, District of Bonavista; Henry Elliott, Esq., to be an additional member of the Road Board for Harbor Breton, District of Fortune Bay; Messrs Hugh Gillis, Julien Bruce, Paul Hall, Dugald Gillis and Ben Harvey, to be a Road Board for Gravels to Abarham’s Cove including Boswarlas, District of St. George; Messrs. Charles Duffy, Stephen Weller, James Carter and Joseph M Benoit, to be a Road Board of Abraham’s Cove to Cape St. George, District of St. George. Secretary’s Office, Nov. 5th, 1907.
November 6 1907 KILLED AT BOSTON By Monday’s express, a letter was received in town by Mr. Michael Brown, saying that his nephew Philip Brown had been killed in Boston on the 21st October, while jumping from a street car. He was on his way to Chelsea, but took the wrong car, and discovering his mistake, jumped. He was picked up in an unconscious condition and taken to the City Hospital, where he expired three hours later, without regaining his senses. Deceased was a former resident of the district of Bonavista.
November 6 1907 COASTAL STEAMER "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Argyle left Placentia at 4 a.m. yesterday, on the Red Island route. Dundee is due at Port Blandford tonight. Ethie left Carbonear at 3.30 last evening. Clyde left Lewisporte, yesterday morning, going North. Glencoe leaves Port aux Basques, this morning.

Bowrings: Portia left King’s Cove at 1.10 p.m. yesterday, and is due here at 6 a.m. Prospero left Birchy Cove at 11.30 p.m. Monday, for Sydney, and was due to arrive there last night."

November 6 1907 PERSONAL Mr. M. Drover went out to Green’s Harbor, T.B., by last night’s train. Mr. J. McRae arrived from Harbor Grace by last night’s train, and it at the Crosbie. The Revs. J.J. Durrant, of Botwoodville, and Solomon Hann, of Garnish, have been spending a few days in the city. Mr. R.S. Munn, of Harbor Grace, came over by the Louise yesterday on business, and is staying at the Crosbie. Messrs. A. Gowans and W.A. Mathieson, of the Ourown Woolen Mills, Hueville, came in by last night’s train on business. We regret to learn that Mr. Walter S. March’s illness continues critical, and is causing grave anxiety to his friends. Mrs. Hackett, wife of the Rev. Charles Hackett, of George St. circuit, left on Monday on a visit to her mother, Mrs. E.P. Gould at Carbonear. T Kyffin Freeman, Esq., the London Correspondent of the Free Press, has been honoured for a second time by election as Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Baptist Total Abstinence Association of England. Harvey Graham, Assistant General Manager and Director of the Nova Scotia Steel Company, died at New Glasgow last Thursday, after a year’s illness. He was 59 years of age, and one of the most prominent and honoured of Nova Scotia’s sons. Mrs. Fraser, wife of the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, is a daughter. Three other children survive Mr. Graham who twice married, but died a widower.
November 6 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Pors sailed for Sydney yesterday a.m. S.S. Cape Breton, is now due from Montreal, direct. S.S. Almeriana, Hanks, sailed last night for Liverpool. Schooner Dictator, is now loading at Crosbie & Co.’s for Oporto. S.S. Ulunda, Chambers, sails for Halifax on Thursday morning. S.S. Silvia, Farrell, sails for Halifax and New York on Friday. Brigt. Clementine, Tucker, left Harbor Breton, Saturday last for Oporto. Schooner Olive, Fitzgerald, left Santa Paulo, Oct.15th., for this port, and should now be nearing the Coast. Barqt. Ich Dien, Kennedy, sailed yesterday afternoon, from Pernambuco, taking 4,051 qtls. fish from Crosbie & Co. and G.M. Barr.
November 6 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The adjourned inquiry into the death of William Bailey was continued before Judge Conroy yesterday afternoon, when several witnesses who had previously been examined, had their evidence read over to them for correction, preparatory to signing the copies.

S.S. Carthaginian, is due from Liverpool today.

St. Vincent de Paul holds a special meeting tonight.

About thirty schooners arrived in port yesterday, fish laden, and about the same number left for home ports, laden with supplies.

Water side thieves are still operating, and within the last 48 hours several schooners have been visited and clothing, etc., stolen.

There is one case of typhoid fever and a case of scarlet fever at Spaniard’s Bay. Neither is serious and medical treatment is being given both.

Mr. T. Coady, who was at Philadelphia, studying Dentistry is now on his way home for medical treatment, having contracted muscular rheumatism.

The thief who stole the $147 from the schooner Rosaline, at Ayr & Sons’ wharf, is still at large, and owing to the meagre information given, the Police have but poor hopes of capturing him.

Mr. Thomas Clarke, a well known fisherman of Petty Harbor, died at his home suddenly, Sunday last. He was in his 64th year and enjoyed good health up to half an hour before death.

A fisherman boarding a schooner at Baird, Gordon’s wharf last night, got overboard, and had a narrow escape from drowning. He was under the influence at the time, but the cold bath sobered him up.

Fish was fairly plentiful at Red Island and vicinity last week, and good work was done with trawls. If the weather is fine, the fishermen will continue their avocation for another couple of weeks.

A few of the local fishermen were on the grounds yesterday, and were fairly successful. Fish is plentiful, but owing to the unsettled state of the weather, it is dangerous for the boats to remain any length of time on the grounds.

At present there is an abundance of labour in the city particularly along the water front. Besides fish handling, there are a number of steamers in port, and those desiring work can easily find employment. These conditions however are not expected to last long.

Residents of the locality near Cavendish Square and Forest Road, complain of the hotel foundations at ForT William, which is a favourite resort for persons of ill-repute, and is also used for other than ordinary purposes. The Council should take steps to remedy the matter.

A Southern Shore man was set upon at the foot of Queen’s Street last night, by a gang of hooligans, and badly treated. The interference of some citizens got the fisherman clear of the ruffians. This section of the city is infested with scamps, though strict Police attention is given nightly.

A fisherman of the schooner Lucy Ann reported to the Police yesterday, that during his absence from the schooner, some unwelcome visitor came on board, and went off with a coat and vest that was hanging up in the cabin. It is a good thing the schooners are well fastened to the wharves or they might also be taken away.

The S.S. Bruce is due at Port aux Basques this morning.

There were only two arrests by the Police last night, both being drunk.

The T.A. Club will meet tonight at 9 o’clock on important business. A full attendance is requested.

Some other shipments of ptarmingan were received in town yesterday, but the price is still 90 cents a brace.

Dr. Keegan, who went out by special train Monday to attend M.M. Davis, of Fox Harbor, returned by last night’s train.

Yesterday was Guy Fawkes’ Day, and was duly celebrated. At the North Battery, several bonfires blazed, and muskets was fired during the night.

The shore train arrived at 11 last night, bringing: A. Gowans, R. Mathieson , Dr. Keegan, J. Davis and about 30 others passengers.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday: Mrs. F.J. Dunn, Harbor Grace; F.J. Haley, Bradford, Eng.; R.S. Munn, Harbor Grace; A Gowans, W.A. Mathieson, Hueville; J McRae, Harbor Grace, John Young, Sydney.

Yesterday was one of the busiest days along the water front for some months. Some thousands of quintals of fish were landed from schooners, and also many thousands were out drying.

It is estimated that there are about 125,000 quintals of fish afloat in the harbor among the many schooners. This is the largest quantity of fish to be in port at one time, at this date for many years.

There were three Furness line steamers in port together last night, the Almeriana, from Halifax, Ulunda from Liverpool, and Shenandoah from London. The Almeriana sailed for Liverpool last night. The Ulunda sails for Halifax tomorrow and the Shenandoah remains in the stream until the latter is finished discharging.

Parties arriving from Harbor Main district last night say that three liquor licences have been renewed in the district, and that the other applications are still under consideration. From other sources however, we learn that no licences have yet been renewed.

The brigt. Bella Rosa, 27 days from Oporto, reached port yesterday evening. She has a cargo of salt, corkwood, etc., consigned to A Goodridge & Sons. The passage over was fairly fine until the Newfoundland Coast was reached. Monday night the vessel was in the thick of a S W. storm, but came through without damage.

The weather up country yesterday, was the finest for some days, the temperature averaging about 50 above. Last night it was a little colder, the following being the latest reports: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 35 above. Bay of Islands, Calm, fine, 33 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W.,light, fine, 30 above. Clarenville, W., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, N.W., light, fine, 30 above.

There were no cases of scarlet fever reported since last issue.

Inspector O’Brien was at Torbay, inspecting milk farms and dairies.

At present there are three schooners bearing the one name – “Madonna” – at Baine Johnston’s wharf.

The schooner Pilot, owned by William Hiscock, arrived from Brigus yesterday, laden with oil, fish, etc. After discharging she will load supplies for J.W. Hiscock, Brigus.

The work of erecting new stables for the Reid-Nfld Co. began on Monday. The stables will be situated opposite the machine shops near the trestle.

There are four steamers now on the dry dock, namely S.S. Strod, the wrecking tug Petrel, and the whalers Puma and Lynx. These will all receive a through overhauling and painting.

The schooner Annie C. Hall, Archibald Elliott, of Change Islands, is discharging 500 qtls. of fish at Bishop & Monroe’s. She has also on board, 5m lumber from Dog Bay, which will be discharged at the Horwood Lumber co.’s wharf.

The S.S. Louise, owned by Messrs Munn & Co. of Harbor Grace, arrived in port from that place at noon yesterday, with a cargo of fish, oil, etc. Mr. R.S. Munn came over by her on business.

A girl named Dantels, working at Wood’s Aerated Water Works, Hamilton Street, had her hand badly lacerated yesterday afternoon, by the busting of a lemonade bottle. The girl became unconscious from the loss of blood and fright, and had to be driven home, where she was immediately attended.

A meeting of the local committee of the R.M.D.S.F. will take place at Government House, on Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. His Excellency the Governor and Dr. Grenfell will be present. Dr. Grenfell expects to leave for New York in a few days.

By Thursday’s train, here is expected the Rev. T. H. Billings, M.A., of Montreal, one of the Associate Secretaries of the Student Department of the Y.M.C.A. The purpose of his visit is to interview the principles of the colleges and the students in the Y.M.C.A. movement. Mr. Billings was one of the Canadian delegates to the recent student Volunteer Conventions in Japan, and has promised to speak at the Missionary meeting at George Street Church on Sunday night next, when he will report on that gathering, and its influence on the Japanese."

November 7 1907 WHY COAL IS SCARCE The cause of the shortage of coal in the city at present, is due to the inability of the Companies at Sydney to load steamers or vessels for this port. There are a number of charted steamers fo the Company being loaded daily, and rushed up the St. Lawrence, where orders have to be filled before navigation closes. While these boats are at Sydney they are given the preference, and a local concern is now two weeks waiting to get a steamer loaded. The Adventure is expected to leave there today for this port, with a full cargo.
November 7 1907 NEW CURATE FOR ST. THOMAS’ By the Carthaginian from Liverpool yesterday, arrived Mr. E.L. Birchby, who has been appointed to St. Thomas’s Parish, as Junior Curate. Mr. Birchby received his clerical training at St. Paul’s Missionary College in Burgh, Lincolnshire. Mr. Brodie, a new Curate for Heart’s Content, also arrived. Both of these gentlemen will be ordained by His Lordship the Bishop of Newfoundland, at the Ordination Service to be held at Heart’s Content on Sunday next, at 11 a.m.
November 7 1907 CAPE BRETON ARRIVES The S.S. Cape Breton, Capt. Reid, reached port from Montreal direct, shortly before eleven o’clock last night, after a fine passage of four and one half days. She brought a full general cargo under hatches and a quantity on deck, and one passenger. The ship berthed in the stream last night, and pulls into Harvey & Co.’s premises this morning to discharge.
November 7 1907 PORTIA BACK FROM NORTHWARD The S.S. Portia, Capt. Kean, arrived back from the Northward at 5.45 a.m. yesterday. The weather experienced on the run North was fairly fine. Coming South between Conche and Englee, a heavy gale was met, and at the later place, it was blowing so hard that no freight could be taken on board. For the remainder of the passage, fine weather was had. An ususally large number of passengers were carried on this trip, nearly three hundred being landed at this port alone. The Portia brought a full cargo including a quantity on deck, and as passengers: Segt. Cox, Messrs Ryan, Crocker, Fowler, Hiscock, Cher, Curlew, Colonel, Sawyer, Penny (2), Brewer, Moore, Fillier, Hancock, Duggan, Wasfield (2), Lind, Glavina (2), Lodge, Gardner (2), Malcolm, M. Crawford, Coffin, Hodge, O’Neil, Rowe, Jeffre, Parsons (2), Robins, Hann, House, James, McKnight, Abbott, (2), Rowsell, Rev. Athinson, W. Ryan, Crocker, Fowlow, Hiscock, Coombs, Day, Avery, March, Mesdames, Guy, Lockyer, Feehan, Hiscock, Buney, Coombs, Misses Bishop, Noble, Roberts, Brown, Templeton, Jones, Hiscock, Hopburg, Avery and 225 in steerage.
November 7 1907 CARTHAGINIAN IN PORT The S.S. Carthaginian, Capt. Williams, arrived in port from Liverpool at 5 p.m. yesterday. She left port on Wednesday last, and experienced fair weather for the entire run. The ship brought a full cargo, including 700 tons to this port, 9 bags and 3 baskets mail matter, and as passengers: Messrs Ralph Bishop, E.L. Birchby, Brodie, Rev. E.J.R. Nichols, Madames F.W. Ayre, Baird, R.K. Bishop, W.H. Crowdy, E. Matassarin, and infant, A. Nichols, F. Nichols, Messes Crowdy, M. Matassarin, B. Poole, E. Ray, Master J Matassasrin, and 3 in second class cabin. In transit for Halifax are 3 in saloon, 18 second cabin and 199 steerage.
November 7 1907 A NARROW ESCAPE THE SCHOONER Mary, Maurice Wiffin, arrived in Port Tuesday night from Fox Harbor, Placentia Bay. After leaving Trepassey Tuesday morning, where she had been harboured the night before, a heavy breeze of North West wind began to blow and soon the sea was white with foam. The schooner was kept as near as possible to the Western shore of Trepassey Bay, and when off Cape Pine, a sea that swept over, washed one of the crew, John Foley, over the taff-rail. He chanced to catch a rope, when the sea swept him off his legs, and luckily for him, the end of it was fastened on board. To this he clung until the other members of the crew pulled him in over the rail. His escape from a watery grave was a narrow one, but after changing his wet clothing, he felt nothing the worst for his adventure, and helped to work the schooner into port.
November 7 1907 BODY FOUND The body of the missing man Chafe, was found at Petty Harbor yesterday afternoon, by some berry pickers, quite near his home. Chafe left to go berry picking the morning of Thursday, Oct. 10th, and though an almost continued search was kept up, it took exactly four week before his remains were found. The body was in a bad state of decomposition and was found at the foot of the main river, and it is believed the old man met his death by drowning.
November 7 1907 CRIMINAL ACT George Cole of Colliers, C.B. was before Magistrate O’Donnell at Bell Island Monday last, charged with un-gripping ore cars from the cable, Sunday night. The charge, a very serious one, was proven and he was sentenced to 30 days hard labour. The Magistrate severely reprimanded him for his act, as had the cars started running, it is possible that serious damage or perhaps loss of life would have occurred.
November 7 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived in Port aux Basques at 9.35 a.m. yesterday with the following passengers: Lieut, D. King, S.A., Mrs. C. Major, Mrs. J Udell, Adjt., and Mrs. Barr and child, W.W. Dillon, T. Lesellier, Master Reid, W.S Bates, Rev. T.H. Billing, W.T. Moulton, C. Le Moine, F.C. Patten, in saloon, and 56 in steerage. The express is due at 2 o’clock.
November 7 1907 FISHERMEN AND CULLERS A number of fishermen, now discharging their’s catches, complain of what they call “too strict a cull” and on almost every wharf there is more or less trouble between the fish owners and cullers. Skipper Dunphy of Red Island, P.B., had a dispute with his culler yesterday, and refused to continue landing without a new man being put on. The trouble was over the difference between “large” and “small” fish. Mr. D. claimed that the culler was throwing out “large” for “small” and backed up his argument by taking his fish off the board.
November 7 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is due at Tilt Cove. Ethie arrived at Clarenville at 7.15 p.m. yesterday. Dundee arrived at Port Blandford at 8 p.m. yesterday. Clyde left Springdale at 3 a.m. yesterday, going North. Glencoe left La Poile at 4 p.m. yesterday coming East. Argyle leaves Placentia this morning, going West.

Bowrings: Portia sails North at 10 a.m. tomorrow. Prospero left Rose Blanche at 2.55 p.m. yesterday, coming East."

November 7 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. Joseph Pumphrey of Messrs R. Rutherford & Co.’s employ, has been laid by several days with a heavy cold. His re-appearance at the shop is looked for within a few days.

Re. Dr. Robertson of St. John’s occupied the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church here on Sunday, Rev. Joseph McNeil having gone to the city during the past week.

The street light on Harvey St., at the foot of Garland Street, has been out for several nights, and up to Monday evening was not replaced. The sooner a new bulb is furnished at the place indicated, the better will the public appreciate the service of those responsible for keeping the lights in order.

Mr. H.H. Parsons arrived from Flowers Cove, where he had been all the summer, by Saturday night’s express. Rev. Dr. Robertson, Lawyer C. Hutching, Mr. Fred Horwood and Mrs. Allan Parsons and daughter, also came from St. John’s that night. The lady and her daughter are staying a few days at Gordon Lodge.

Mrs. Noseworthy, relict of the late Charles Noseworthy, died at Bryant’s Cove on Saturday, at the age of 69 years. Some weeks ago the deceased lady was operated upon for appendicitis, when it was seen gangrene had complicated the trouble. She leaves one son, Mr. Selby Noseworthy, C of E. Schoolmaster and Lay-reader at Bryant’s Cove, to mourn the loss of an affectionate parent. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon.

Master Alex Parsons, son of Mr. E. Parsons, Cabinet Maker, while attempting to board the yacht of Mr. G. Parsons on Sunday afternoon, stepped upon the gunwale of a small boat, and his weight capsizing the tiny craft, he fell into the water near the wharf formerly known as Paterson’s. Two young men whose names are withheld, hastened to the rescue, and being unable to take the lad into their boat because of its smallness, they towed him to the wharf where he was landed in safety. Alex was in the water five minutes.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooners Estella and L. E. Young were at Trepassey yesterday bound to Sydney for coal.

Munn’s steamer Louise left for St. John’s this morning taking a quantity of cod oil. Mr. R.S. Munn went passenger.

His Lordship Bishop March entertained some visiting Clergy and other guests, at dinner on Monday evening at the episcopal residence, it being the anniversary of his consecration.

Mr. Robert French, of Charles, of Courage’s Beach, after an illness of several months, died this morning on his 68th birthday. He leaves a widow, three sons, Mark, Charles now in the Yukon Country; Joshua and one daughter, Mrs. James Martin in Montreal, to mourn the loss of an esteemed husband and affectionate father. The funeral takes place tomorrow afternoon.

The hearing of a postponed liquor case was resumed at the Court this morning. The witness, whose illness delayed the case, testified that no liquor was called for and bought, but that some brought by one of the witnesses was drunk upon the premises. The case was dismissed. Mr. Kearney for the defence. In the District Court, Dr. Strapp had the Reliving Officer present, for refusing to pay bills contracted by him as Poor Commissioner. Mr. Squires pleaded not liable, and after the matter had been trashed out in Court by the principle, the case was dismissed, the Dr. being assured by the Court that payment would be made.

“Hello Quills “ Where have you been lately? I have not seen anything of you for some time.”

“Oh my movements are so uncertain because of my peculiar vocation, that my appearance in town is not always regular. Have you anything of interest to communicate. Pills?”

“Well,"" replied the person questioned, “Things are becoming so advanced in this ancient town of ours, that we hardly know whether life will be worth living, if we should relapse into our former mode of existence. What, with moving picture exhibition and agricultural shows, one hardly knows if the seven years of plenty, recorded in Egyptian History, is not being repeated in Harbor Grace. If so we may look for the seven years of famine.”

“Moving picture exhibitions and agricultural shows!"" exclaimed Quills, “You mystify me.”

""Have you not read the daily paper lately?"" questioned Pills. “These give glowing accounts of the wonders to be seen nightly at the various halls. You should go and see them before you leave us.

”Yes, yes” assented Quills, “But I think I am more interested in the agricultural show. You have an agricultural society here, have you not?”

“I should say we have,” said Pills, waxing eloquent on the subject, ""And an enterprising and energetic body it is. Let me tell you of the show. Thanks to the untiring zeal of the society, an organization was permanently founded and arrangements made to hold an agricultural show here this fall. Circulars were sent out enumerating the classes of products for which prizes would be given. It is said the Government gave $300 towards the holding of the show. Now let me point out what results have arisen from the project. Had you been here during the past fortnight, you would have gone six nights out of the week to one of our halls where the exhibits were exposed, and you must have been awed by the display. There you would have seen turnips of different kinds, many of which weighed 22 pounds, cabbage, the variety of which cannot be enumerated, as large as a soup boiler, weighing from 16 to 30 pounds; parsnip, carrots, beet, cucumber, apples, etc., which it would be impossible to dilate upon, the largest ever grown in the country; pigs, of Berkshire breed, black as your coat, sleek and plump, climatized by being bred and reared in the country, and sheep and cattle of different kinds, which deafened the ear with their melodious noises. A brass band was nightly in attendance and kept time with the subdued effect of the lowing of the cattle. Ice cream was served in abundance free of charge to all patrons. An entrance fee of 5 cents was charged, and so well attended was the show, that all expenses were met by the admission collections. Not one cent of the Government grant of $300 has been touched. Talk about moving pictures concerns! They are not in it with agricultural shows.”

“You surprise me much,” exclaimed Quills. “What a wonderful show I have missed! Let know when it re opens; I’ll be there.”

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 5th, 07 "

November 7 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Siberian arrived at Glasgow yesterday afternoon.

The S.S. Carthaginian sails for Halifax and Philadelphia tonight.

Our thanks are due Mr. A. Munro, Chief Steward S.S. Carthaginian, for late English papers.

The Virginia Lake is now ten days North of Tilt Cove, and evidently meeting bad weather on the Labrador Coast.

Inspector General McCowan arrived by the Portia, seriously ill, and yesterday was attended by Drs. Randell and Scully.

Mrs. Guy of Twillingate, arrive by the Portia yesterday to enter the Hospital. She is suffering from an internal trouble.

Mr. H.D. Reid and party left Grand Falls for Patrick’s March last night, and will spend a few days shooting at the latter place.

Sergt. Cox, who was down to Englee and La Scie, to bring up witness in connection with a battery case to be tried in the Supreme Court shortly, returned by the Portia yesterday.

Hon. E.R. Bowring and J Harvey, and Messrs J.A. Paddon and W.C. Job, who were caribou shooting at Howley, will arrive by today’s express. They all secured good heads, and enjoyed the trip splendidly.

The body of Mrs. Gardner, of Groais Islands, arrived by the Portia from Change Islands, for interment here. The deceased lady was on a visit to the latter place and while there was taken ill, death resulting from an abscess on the brain. Undertaker Martin took charge of the remains upon arrival.

Yesterday morning it snowed at Port aux Basques for about an hour, but the remainder of the day was fine all along the road. Last night’s reports were: Port aux Basques, calm, fine, 40 above. Bay of Islands, N.E., light, dull, 30 above. Quarry, N.W., light, dull, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 29 above. Clarenville, calm, fine, 40 above. Whitbourne, S.W.,light, fine, 40 above.

Mr. Ernest Lind arrived from Little Bay by the Portia, to enter Hospital for treatment. Last winter Mr. Lind was at Three Arms on a visit, and one day, while walking down to one of the stages, his foot went through between the longers, and he wrenched his leg considerably. He did not give the matter much attention at the time, but recently, the limb became very painful, and he cannot now put it to the ground, necessitating his coming on here for careful treatment.

S.S. Mary sailed yesterday morning for Bell Island.

The schooner Iona, Herald, is discharging sand from Oporto, at Kennedy & Mullaly’s wharf.

The schooner Mary, Maurice Wiffin, arrived Tuesday night from Fox Harbor P.B., with fish, oil, herring and salmon.

The schooner Orange Blossom, Elias Brown, arrived Tuesday night from Musgravetown, B.B., laden with fish, oil, potatoes and cattle.

The schooner Jubilee, John Stephenson Master, of Fox Harbor, arrived in port yesterday morning, having on board a load of 500 qtls. of dry fish.

Robert Hiscock, of Flat Island, B.B, is discharging his summer’s catch of 500 qtls. fish from his schooner Island Bird, at Goodridge's wharf.

The schooner Energy, William Small, is loading supplies at Tessier’s wharf for J.B. Osmond, Moreton’s Harbor; Thomas French, and R. Boyd, Tizzard’s Harbor.

The Municipal Council will meet at 7.30 tonight instead of Friday night, and employees will be paid tomorrow instead of Saturday, which is the King’s birthday.

An insane man from Clark’s Beach, was brought to town last night, in charge of Constable Bishop, and taken to the Asylum. The unfortunate man is suffering from religious mania.

Mr. J.J. Mullaly left for Sydney by the S.S. Pros to engage some cargoes of coal; for the firm of Kennedy, Mullaly & Co. before returning, he will visit his uncle at Halifax.

The schooner Puma, Charles Butt, from Brown’s Arm, Green Bay, arrived yesterday with forty thousand feet of lumber to Horwood Lumber Co.

The shore train arrived at 9.45 last night bringing; Capt. T. Bonia, Mrs. W. Wills, Mrs. Dawe, Mrs. A Parsons, Miss Parsons, J. Murphy, Constable Bishop and about 40 others.

During the season past, the fishermen at La Manche secured about 2,000 qtls. fish but to date only 800 qtls have been shipped here. The backward weather prevented it being cured, and now it is almost impossible to get the remainder freighted to St. John’s.

Mr. Donald Morison, K.C., left by last evening’s train for Carbonear, where he has gone at the request of the fishermen, who have retained him to safeguard their interests in the differences which exist between buyer and seller over the price of fish.

Mr. Stevens of Logy Bay, asks us to correct some mistakes which crept into a report of the fire at his house on Oct. 19th. He was not left the house and the furniture had not been removed. As a matter of fact the fire was, he informs us, caused by the upsetting of a lamp which he himself was carrying. His family had come to the city as is their custom, during the fall and winter months, but his cattle and the gathering of the crops necessitated his continuous presence there."

November 8 1907 HOW OSMOND WAS DROWNED During the past season, Capt. Benj. Osmond, with four of his sons, on board their little schooner Young Builder (23 tons), made their annual fishing voyage up the straits of Belle Isle. On the 26th of August they returned to Brig Bay where they landed and dried their voyage of cod, which they reloaded on their schooner and sailed for home (Bonne Bay) on the morning of the 21st October. The wind was E.N.E. which was favourable, and the weather, promising for a quick run home. At 10 p.m. Capt. Osmond judged himself to be off Pond's River. The wind had hauled to the N.E., and increased to a gale with snow, so he shortened sail and ran the little vessel under two-reefed foresail until midnight, by which time the sea was in mountains and the wind blew a hurricane. So they then took in sail and ran their little craft under bare poles. At 3.20 a. m. , with the storm at its height, an unlucky sea broke with such tremendous force on the stern of the Young Builder, that those on board did not know but that their craft was going down stern foremost. When she had freed herself of water, the Wheelman was gone, the wheel was carried away, the cabin doors smashed, the slides gone, and the cabin full of water. At 7 a.m. on the 22nd., the storm began to abate, and four hours later the Young Builder, battered and storm tossed, entered her port with her flag at half mast. The missing Wheelman was Arthur Osmond, 25 years of age, unmarried, and a member of one of the best families in Bonne Bay. Young Osmond was a quite, unassuming young man, steady and well thought of in the community where he was born and bred, and his tragic death will be long remembered in Bonne Bay. — Western Star.
November 8 1907 “HOME’S” REPORT The steamer Home, returned Thursday evening from Battle Harbor and intermediate ports of call. Blustery weather and dark nights somewhat detained the ship. She reported the storm of October 21st to have been severely felt along the Norther parts of the Coast. A schooner belonging to Williams, Current Island, was upset at her moorings, so fiercely did the wind blow. At Brig Bay, a schooner owned by Jackman and Sheppard was driven ashore, so also was Coomb's craft at Ferrole. Both of them considerably damaged, but their owners hope to be able to repair them for the coming winter. Numerous small boats were wrecked and stages and wharves in several of the harbors were completely demolished. The Home had great difficulty in taking out 13,500 feet of lumber and 6,000 shingles in the Straits ports, as it all had to be rafted alongside the ship. Operations have been resumed at Hawk’s Bay Whale Factory, and eleven fish were captured there lately. The steamer’s inward cargo consisted chiefly of whale oil and guano. — Western Star.
November 8 1907 THE LIMIT Yesterday, a city tradesman, who is more fond of liquor than work, played a contemptable trick on his better half. The latter who was ill, sent the husband to make a few purchases at a grocery store — where the family gets a week’s credit — and procuring them, went aboard an outport schooner and sold them at about half price, while an anxious wife and child were waiting at home for breakfast. The husband returned about noon, in an inebriated condition, and then attempted to clean out the house furnishings. This morning, application will be made to get him on the”Black List” — which is not likely to improve him.
November 8 1907 DESTROYED BY FIRE The Postal Telegraph Office at Stephenville Crossing was totally destroyed by fire Wednesday night. The fire was first discovered about 2 a.m., by Messrs V Gallant and J Keefe, who were awakened by the roar of the flames. They hurriedly alarmed the settlement, and in a short while, all the people were at the scene; but the fire had gained such headway that it was impossible to extinguish it. Close by were the railway freight shed and station, surrounding these were the dwellings and stores. The people fought the flames in earnest, and it is a wonder that they kept other buildings from being destroyed. The railway platform was considerably burnt and the freight shed slightly scorched, but no further damage was done. The origin of the fire is unknown, but it was no doubt due to carelessness on the part of someone. Preparations are being made for the erection of a new building, but in the meantime, Postal and telegraphic work will be conducted in the McKay Hotel. — Western Star.
November 8 1907 NAUTICAL "S.S. Corean is due to arrive from Philadelphia today.

S.S. Halifax City left Liverpool for here at 4 p.m. on Tuesday

S.S. Ulunda, Capt. Chambers, sailed for Halifax at 3 p.m. yesterday, taking six passengers in steerage.

Schooner Davis Morris, Morris, Master, arrived at North Sydney yesterday, and will load coal for C & A. Dawe, Bay Roberts

S.S. Carthaginian, Capt. Williams, sails at noon today taking as passengers; Miss Cowan in saloon, and two intermediate for Halifax.

S.S. Shenandoah berthed at Pitts’ premises yesterday afternoon to discharge. She had to go outside the heads to turn. She sails for Halifax today.

Baine Johnson & Co.’s steamer Euphrates, went to Heart’s Content on Wednesday to tow down the Lake Simcoe, which brought a cargo of coal there from North Sydney. They had not arrived here up to an early hour this morning.

S.S. Silvia, Capt. Farrel, sails this afternoon for Halifax and New York, taking full cargo and the following passengers; Messrs. Charles Liddy, W.A. Thorburn, Misses Ida Drover, Annie Rabbitts, E.L. Thorburn and eight in steerage."

November 8 1907 WESTERN NOTES "(From the Western Star)

The Toratta, Capt. S. Shaw, arrived Saturday from Bay St. George, and will take a cargo of herring from here.

The Willis C. Hudson, Capt. George Hudson, of St. George’s is now in Middle Arm, procuring a cargo of herring.

The Athlone, Capt. W. Bennett, of St. George’s sailed from there Monday, to come to Bay of Islands for a cargo of herring.

The B.G. Anderson, Capt. Wm. Morris, sailed from St. George’s yesterday, taking a cargo of barrelled herring and dry codfish to Halifax.

Mr. W.A. Gabier has resigned from the Post Office and Telegraph Office at Lark Harbor. His place is being occupied by Willis Parsons, who went there by the Home.

The S.S. Louisburg, Capt. Gould, arrived Friday, bringing 2100 tons of coal for the R.N.C., which she discharged at the railway pier. She sailed again yesterday afternoon.

Messrs. R.W. Stedman and Mason Benner, of Dayton, Ohio, who here hunting along the upper Humber, came here Monday. They returned home today, each with three good caribou heads, trophies of their hunt.

A small schooner owned by Mr. P. Doman, was driven ashore Wednesday night in Frenchman’s Cove. With the assistance of the residents and of two Canadian schooners, she was refloated Thursday night, without sustaining any damage.

The Oblique was out on her trial trip Friday afternoon. The boat was formerly propelled by gasoline, but it proved so unsatisfactory that Angwin & Co. removed the engine and had the launch docked early in the summer. The boat was cut in two and made longer by twelve feet. A steam engine was then installed, from which the owner expects better satisfaction.

A terrible railway accident happened on Oct. 15th, near Shrewsbury, London, when an express train jumped the track, with the result that 19 passengers were killed and 40 injured. J.F. Stewart, well known in Bay of Islands, was on board the same train with his ten year old daughter, and miraculously escaped unhurt. They were in the rear coach, which accounts for their escape.

A man who was before the Police Court and fined some time ago, and being given a certain time to pay the money, left the country without so doing, and for whom a commitment to the Penitentiary was issued, returned by one of the steamers a few days ago. Yesterday he was arrested and taken to the Pen.

HERRING FISHERY: There has been a great improvement in this fishery the past week, and the fishermen are feeling jubilant over the prospects of a good voyage. Good catches of herring have been taken this week in Humber Arm, the highest being eighteen barrels in one day for a boat. In the Middle Arm the fishery is better, and boats have taken as high as twenty four barrels in one day, and on Monday, Kennedy’s crew secured about seventy barrels. This is a very good showing, and it looks as though the fishery will be a good one after all. By the end of the week there will likely be three or four cargoes ready for market, the chartered vessel of Mr. Mclean’s will be the first to get clear, as she is almost ready now. The following American vessels have arrived since last report: Dauntless, Capt. Thorp., Blanche, Capt. McCuish, arrived Wednesday, S.P. Willard, Capt. Peterson came Friday. There is now a fleet of 41 American and Canadian vessels in the Bay and a number of local craft. Other vessels are to leave Gloucester in a day or two, and the fleet will likely total sixty before the end of the season. — Western Star."

November 8 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "There were three arrests by the Police yesterday, two drunks and one drunk and disorderly.

The Newfoundland Highlanders meet for drill at the C.L.B. Armoury at 7.30 tonight.

The Police are now working on a serious criminal cases, and an arrest will likely be made today.

A case of scarlet fever was yesterday reported to the Health authorities from 133 Bond St. The patient is being nursed at home.

Patrick Boggan, of Portugal Cove, died at the Signal Hill Hospital yesterday, cancer of the stomach being the cause of death.

Mr. Pike’s residence on Pennywell Road, and Mr. Whitten’s on Wickford St., were released from quarantine yesterday morning.

Three employees of the Reid Co.’s Electrical Works resigned their positions yesterday, owing to a difference arising with the Foreman.

Adam Randell of Harbor Deep, who was brought up on the Portia a few trips ago to enter the Lunatic Asylum, died at the institution a short time ago.

The tenement house at Rope Walk Range, where the case of typhoid fever developed on Wednesday, was disinfected yesterday, and will be released from quarantine today.

A skating party and five o’clock tea was given at the Roller Rink yesterday afternoon, by Mrs. F.H. Donnelly and Miss Madeline Donnelly, about eighty ladies and gentlemen being present.

Watchman James Kennedy of the Reid Co.’s Station, found a $5 gold piece in one of the cars, Wednesday night. He promptly returned it to the owner, Mrs. W. French of Coley’s Point, C.B.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; J.T. Murphy, Halifax, W.W. Dillon, J.G. Angwin, Sydney; W.S. Bales, Brandford, Ont.; W.H. Kennedy, Harbor Grace; Jas. C. Jones, P.F. O’Reilly, Placentia, George Ingerman and wife.

The schooner Active, Dan Winsor, of Wesleyville, arrived in port Tuesday with a full cargo of dry fish. The Active fished at Dead Island, Labrador and secured a full voyage, but it took two months to cure it, owing to weather conditions.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including; E.M. Spalding, Rev. E.W. Nichol, Mrs. P. O’Neill, S.R. Knight, J.W. Small, R. Boyle, Mrs. O’Dell, Miss Harris, Miss Ryal, F.W. Rioux, B. Janes, Adj. Ogilve, S.A., Adjt. Parsons, S.A., Ensign Downey, S.A.

A special meeting of St. Vincent de Paul was held on Wednesday night. The Secretary of the Council of England wrote, asking for a correct list of the officers of the local Society, and for a copy of the last report. These were ordered to be furnished him. One new member was admitted to membership.

The schooner Will-of-the-Wisp, was brought yesterday from Alex Goodyear & Sons by Thomas Lake of Heart’s Content, who sold his schooner, Florence, to Mr. J Barret, of Change Islands, both skippers being well pleased with their new purchases. The two schooners are moored at Goodridge’s wharf and will load supplies for their home ports.

Mrs. Edward Chafe wishes to thank all who helped in the search for her husband. The men of Petty Harbor and other places will please accept her thanks.

The local committee of the Royal Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen meet at 3 o’clock this afternoon at Government House. We understand that business of an interesting and far reaching character will be brought forward by Dr. Grenfell, who leaves for New York in a few days.

Mr. Charles Liddy, son of Mr W.H. Liddy of Torbay, leaves on the Silvia today for Southbridge, U.S.A. to take a position with the American Optical Co. of that place. His brother who is working with the same company secured the position for him. The many friends of Mr. Liddy wish him every success in his new work.

The schooner Belle Franklin, A Haynes, is at Duder’s wharf, taking in freight for Bell Island.

The schooner Alabama ,Samuel Maker, master, arrived Wednesday night, from Open Hall, having on board a full load of fish. she is now anchored in the stream.

The schooner NellieM., Stephen Mullowney, arrived Wednesday night from Sweet Bay, B. B., laden with fish oil, cooper’s lumber and hoops, which are being discharged at G. Browning & Son’s wharf.

There was some trouble at one of the wharves yesterday evening, about towing a schooner up the harbor. Two tugs, seeing a signal in the schooner’s rigging, arrived at the same time, and both claimed the job. One of them backed out and left the other to do the towing. Some hitch arose in passing the line from the schooner to the tug, which caused those on board to loose patience, and she also quit the work, leaving the schooner with all lines uncast and a stiff breeze blowing from across the harbor. The schooner’s crew had to hustle to fasten her to the wharf again.

The schooner Maud, Cornelius Whiteway, arrived yesterday from Musgrave Harbor, having a full load of fish and oil on board.

The M. Lloyd Morris, Capt. Williams, sailed from Fogo on the 4th November, with 3,500 qtls prime codfish, shipped by the firm of J.W. Hodge.

At 10.30 last night, several outport men had a “scrap” in Bowring Bros’ Cove, but no one was hurt. Being told that the Police were coming, they hastened to their schooners.

The schooner Maggie Sullivan, Capt. George Downer, which left port at 2 p.m. last Saturday for Fogo, arrived at her destination at 11 a.m. next day, making the run in twenty-one hours.

The schooner Larkspur, Howell, arrived Wednesday night from Cat Harbor, Straight Shore, with 900 qtls of fish on board, after a passage of twenty-four hours. She is now anchored in the stream."

November 9 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. Terenee Kennedy is now raising the roof of his residence at the corner of Cochrane and Water Street.

The steamer Progress towed the wrecked steamer Nereus from Bell Island on Wednesday. The latter is to be placed on the slip here for repairs.

Mr. McLachlan, Government Inspector of Boilers, was in town on Wednesday. Mr. Pitts arrived by Tuesday night’s train and put up at Gordon Lodge. Rev. J McNeil returned from St. John’s that night.

The owner of a vicious dog which recently bit a man, was before the Court on Wednesday for having said animal in his possession. He was ordered to destroy it immediately. Several civil cases were disposed of the same day.

The funeral of the late Robert French took place on Wednesday afternoon, many citizens paying their last tribute of respect to the departed man. The British Society attended the funeral and interment was made at the C of E Cemetery.

The funeral procession, planned to take place on Nov. 5th, did not occur that night and has been postponed indefinitely, because the promoters of the petitions asking for the widening of Kerry Lane have been informed that the petitions will be laid before the Government-in-Council. Nothing like promised cremations to make representatives notice petitions.

Mr. Reuben Gordon’s mare had twin foals this week. This is a rare occurrence. Only one of the foals is living.

Mr. T.C. Badcock of Carbonear was in town on Wednesday and Dr. Ames, wife and children of Broad Cove today, the last named putting up at Gordon Lodge.

Mr. Thomas Hanrahan, R.C. School Inspector, returned from his inspection tour North on Tuesday, having come to Carbonear by the S.S. Ethie that morning.

Messrs. Munn & Co. received word yesterday that their steamer Louise would take freight to Bell Island and proceed to Cobb’s Arm to load lime stone for Mr. F. Score of St. John’s.

The directors of the United Towns Electrical Company, held a meeting at Carbonear on Wednesday afternoon. It was decided to begin the erection of poles to Bay Roberts and Freshwater as early in the spring as possible.

The writer learns from Dr. Allen that M. Bigourdan, a well known Astronomer, has announced that the planet Mercury will pass in front of the sun on next Thursday, Nov. 14th. This happens only once in a hundred years.

The marriage of Miss Annie Stapleton, daughter of Mr. John Stapleton, and Mr. Joseph Moriarty, took place at the residence of the bride’s father at 5 p.m. Wednesday. The ceremony was performed by Rev. W. Finn, of the Cathedral. Mr. Richard Hayden, uncle of the bride, gave his niece away. The bride was beautifully attired in a gown of white silk, with bridal veil and wreath, and carried a shower bouquet of white hyacinths. Misses Aggie Thomey and Sadie Hayden attended the bride, as first and second bridesmaids respectively, the former being tastefully arranged in cream net with black picture hat, the latter in pale blue with hat to match. The groom was supported by Mr. Michael Stapleton, brother of the bride, and his own brother, Mr. Edward Moriarty. After the ceremony, a reception was held at which about 40 guests were present. Fr. Finn, in a very pleasing manner, complimented the happy couple upon the auspicious occasion and paid a deserving tribute to each upon the good opinions held of them in the community. During the entry of the bridal party into their retirement from the room, where the ceremony was performed, Miss Casey played Beethoven’s Wedding March. A very pleasant evening was spent by the assembled guests, singing and dancing being indulged in. The groom’s present to the bride was a handsome gold bracelet those to the bridesmaids; gold brooches. The bridal presents were many, useful and valuable. Mrs. Moriarty will remain at her parental home a short time before going to her new residence.

The house recently infected with scarltina on Kitchen Hill, has been fumigated and the quarantine raised. The father of the family down with the disease, is a man trusting to his daily wage to obtain support for his household, and when he was prevented from seeking work by reason of the quarantine, he had to depend upon the Relieving Officer for the maintenance of his family. Owing to the peculiar circumstances of this case, when the quarantine should have been released, the house could not be fumigated, and the father could not seek employment until disinfection had been performed. True, this case was exceptional, and may not occur again, but the privations to the family were none the less felt. Cannot something be done in future when contagious diseases appear, whereby patients may be removed to an improved established Hospital or lazaretto for treatment and care, and so allow bread winners to go about their daily work? Some such way out of the difficulty is understood to exist at St. John’s, then why should not some such institution be allowed in this town? The cost would not be very great and the obstacles in the way are not so numerous as to make the proposition impracticable. Public monies are granted for public uses, and no better use could be made of them than for the preservation of the health of a community. St. John’s does not contribute the entire revenue of the country, of which much is spent there, and although it may desire to have the share of the money, it surely does not want all the diseases of the Island carried to the capital. Will nobody speak for the outports?

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 7th, 07"

November 9 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The T.A. Society holds its regular monthly meeting at 2.15 p.m. tomorrow.

S.S. Silvia sails at 11 a.m. today taking additional passengers Miss B. Furlong, in saloon, and 18 in steerage.

The St. John’s Rifle Club’s annual dinner will be held at Donovan’s Thursday next, the 14th November.

A Levee will be held at Government House at 11 a.m. today in honour of the birthday of His Majesty King Edward VII

The marriage of Mr. H.N. Burt to Miss M Milley takes place in Cochrane St. Church, on Thursday next Nov 14th.

There were four arrests by the Police last night; two were drunk, and two were drunk and disorderly, one of whom was given in charge by his mother.

Mr. W.B. Payne, yesterday received a message from Port Saunders to the effect that Flatts' steamer, Matilda, had arrived there O.K. Thursday night.

Miss Amy Hickey is now at Glace Bay, where she is vocalist with a moving picture show, being run by Mr. R.J. Macadam, who was here with the Robinson Opera company, last fall.

The schooner Annie M Sproul, Arch Elliott of Change Islands, arrived in port Thursday with a cargo of seventy-five thousand feet of lumber from Dog Bay, which is being discharged at the Horwood Lumber Co.’s East end wharf.

The S.S. Euphrate, Penny, which went to Heart’s Content Wednesday, left here Thursday with the Lake Simcoe in tow, but had to put into Trinity out of the gale. They will probably arrive here today.

Captain William Cluett takes passage in the S.S. Silvia, from his home in Gloucester, where he resides with his sister, Mrs. Pine. The Captain will be in command of a schooner of the large class and he expects to be back in Bay of Islands for a cargo of herring a fortnight hence. Last winter he was Manager for a number of schooners there in the interest of a syndicate of owners.

The schooner Blue Jacket, William Kent Master, is loading general cargo for H. Week & Co., Bay Bulls.

The schooner, May Queen, Andrew Aspel, Master, is loading general cargo at Bowring’s wharf for M. P. Cashin, Cape Broyle.

The schooner Rose May, Solomon Budgell, Exploits, is landing a cargo of 50,000 feet of lumber from Brown’s Arm, Exploits Bay at the Horwood Lumber Co.’s East end wharf.

The vessels Helen Stewart and Monie and Minnie, left P.E.I. yesterday, with full cargoes of oats for G. Neal. Both will be due here about Tuesday next.

The schooner Mabel, George Jones, arrived in port Wednesday night from Little Bay Islands. Yesterday she hauled into Bishop & Monroe’s wharf, and began discharging her cargo of 13,400 qtls of fish, shipped by Strong & Murcell.

Mr. P.J. Davis, of Fox Harbor P.B. is in town in connection with his fishery business. Mr. Davis' schooners did well fishing at Cape St. Mary’s past summer. He is expecting one of them to arrive in port today, laden with dry fish. His crews will make high wages as the result of their summer’s fishery."

November 9 1907 DEATHS ANDREWS — Yesterday the 8th November, after a long and painful illness, Sarah J Andrews. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from the residence of her brother-in-law, 11 Mullock Street. Friends please accept this, the only intimation.
November 11 1907 FATAL ACCIDENT "Joy Turned to Mourning.

A shocking accident occurred yesterday, between 3 and 4 in the afternoon, at Logy Bay, through which James Hedderson lost his life by the bursting of a gun. A wedding party had just started for Torbay and some of the younger men and boys were firing joy guns in honour of the event. A young lad, standing near Hedderson, was about to fire a gun, into which he had put an extra large charge, when Henderson asked to be given the fire arm, and it was handed over to him. The gun, which no doubt was old and unfit for use, exploded. A piece of the metal struck the poor fellow on the left cheek and entered his head, killing him almost instantly. When the man fell, a messenger was despatched immediately to Clovelly Farm, about a mile distance, to telephone the city for medial aid, but before the service of a Doctor could be procured, another messenger arrived with the information that he was dead. Hedderson was married, about 34 years old, leaves a wife and four children to mourn their loss. He was a native of Turk’s Gut, near Brigus, where his father, mother and sisters are living. His wife belongs to Logy Bay, where he has also a sister married. The sad affair has cast a gloom over the settlement. Deep and sincere sympathy is expressed for the bereaved family in which the News joins."

November 11 1907 BACK FROM LABRADOR The S.S. Virginia Lake, Capt. W. Parsons, arrived from Labrador Saturday night. The entire passage, excepting one day, was fine and the round trip was the quickest for the season — 14 days. The weather along the Labrador Coast is exceptionally mild for this time of the year, and not a bit of snow on the hills. There has been no frost experienced up to the time the Virginia left Rigoulette. The natives of the Coast are now preparing for the winter’s work, and some are getting ready to go inland until the spring. At different places there is still a sign of fish, but the voyage has been given up. All the visiting fishermen have left the Coast. The Virginia brought 200 casks of whale oil, 700 sacks of guano, 40 casks of cod oil, some other small freight, and the following passengers: J March, Customs Officer Bradburry and family, and Misses Swoffied (2).
November 11 1907 SIX MONTHS FOR ASSAULT Constable Quinlan arrived Saturday night from Bay of Islands with a prisoner named Henry Cornein, aged 26 years. Cornein was before Magistrate McDonald last week, charged with criminally assaulting a girl fifteen years old, and the case being proven, he was sentenced to six months hard labour. A warrant has been issued for another jack-o-tar, who it is said committed a similar offence, and he will be brought before the Magistrate at an early date.
November 11 1907 NEW TRAMWAY AT BELL ISLAND The Dominion Iron & Steel Co., Bell Island, began work last week on a new tramway from the ore pits to the loading pier on the front of the Island. The cars on this tram will not be haul by an endless cable, operated by a stationary hauling machine at the end of the line. Instead, a locomotive, or traction engine, will be used to draw a train of loaded cars. To avoid the steep gradients over which the cable tramway passed in a straight line from pier to pit, the new line has to take a more circuitous route. It will follow roughly the course of the East end road, then passing West near Murphy’s Hotel, and through Kelly’s farm to the pier, thus avoiding Chapel Hill and other high grounds, which always were a source of trouble to the cable road. This will be an immense improvement, being much less dangerous that the cable system. It will also facilitate the work of getting ore to the storage pockets quickly, when several steamers are to be loaded. Much larger cars will be used, and a steamer’s cargo can be rushed from the stock pile to the loading pier, in a very short space of time, when all arrangements in view are perfected. It is said that a steel framed pier trestle will be erected next summer, so as to obviate loss and delay from fire, such as occurred the past season. The various construction and works at Bell Island, already perfected by the two Companies operating the mines, are far ahead of and greatly eclipse, anything of an industrial nature yet attempted in Newfoundland.
November 11 1907 YESTERDAY’S FIRE ALARM An alarm of fire was sent in from box 28 at 11.45 yesterday morning, which brought the West and Central Firemen to the house of John English, 42 Long’s Hill. The blaze was only a slight one, and was caused by some kindling wood in the oven of the kitchen stove igniting, and filling the house with smoke. A few buckets of water put it out, and the service of the Brigades were not needed. No damage resulted. The all out signal was sent in at 11.50.
November 11 1907 GOOD WAGES Capt. Patrick Carrol, with a crew of four men, in the schooner J.T. Dunphy, of Red Island, P.B., did remarkably well fishing at Cape St. Mary’s the past summer. They stocked $2,900 for their season’s catch, and the crew shared $290 a man, being the third best in the fleet. Albert Rielly of Argentia, and his crew of four men, were high liners, stocking $3,300 which gave each man a very nice sum of $330 for his summer’s wages. J. Dunphy’s crew in the Mary Joseph, shared $260 a man and a crew in one of Davis’s boats, Fox Harbor, P.B. made $320 a man.
November 11 1907 CAPLIN SCHOOL When the Prospero was coming South from Placentia to St. John’s, Capt. Fitzpatrick reports seeing what was evidently a large school of Caplin, the birds were hovering about in all directions, and to all appearances, were following the caplin to land. Caplin were taken on the Southern Shore last week, and it appears that they are still in that vicinity – an unknown happening at this time of the year to any of the present generation.
November 11 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrive at Port aux Basques at 8 a.m. yesterday with the following passengers; M. and Mrs. Cowan, W.M. Butt, Dr. C.J. Howlett, C.T. Young, George Rowe, S.H. Steele, Walter Rowe, H.H. Smith, J.M. Howley in saloon and 45 in second cabin. The express is due at noon.
November 11 1907 PERSONAL "Mr. W.K. Piercey left for Botwooville by last evening’s train.

Councillor Ellis left for the West Coast by last evening’s express.

Dr. Grenfell left by last evening’s express on his way to New York.

Mr. White, Light House Inspector, left by train last evening for the Northward.

Dr. C.J. Howlett, who was in Canada the last two weeks, returns by today’s express.

Mr. G.M. Goddard of Burin, who was in town on business during last week, left for home Saturday last.

Mr. V. Turpin of St. Lawrence who was visiting the city during last week, left for home by the S.S. Glencoe.

Mr. N. Fisher, of Bay of Islands, who was on business in the city last week left for home by yesterday’s express.

On Oct. 29th at St. Bernard’s Church, Enfield, Nova Scotia, Miss Josephine, daughter of Mr. Cornelius Hogan, of this city, was married by Rev. Father Kinsella, to Mr. William J King, of Wellington, N.S.

The pulpit of Gower Street Church was occupied yesterday morning by the Rev. Mr. Angwin, a Newfoundlander by birth, son of a well known Missionary of earlier days. This is Mr. Angwin's first visit for 47 years. Mr. Angwin of Bay of Islands, is a brother. "

November 11 1907 PROSPERO BACK FROM WESTWARD The S.S. Prospero, Capt Fitzpatrick, arrived from the Westward at 4 p.m. yesterday, after a fairly fine trip. The Prospero left on 30th Oct. and experienced fine weather until after leaving Port aux Basques the 3rd Nov., when heavy Southerly winds, with dense fog was encountered, which continued up to the 5th. Tuesday night last at 11, the steamer reached Sydney for bunker coal, and left again at 2 a.m. Wednesday. The weather was fine on the return trip, until Grand Bank was arrived at Thursday night, when fog again was run into, and for the next twenty-four hours there was no change. Saturday and yesterday it was fine and clear. The Prospero brought 400 packages of freight and the following passengers: Capt. Manley, J. Morrey, H. Coady, Misses S. Kearley and Condon in saloon and 80 second class.
November 11 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The St. John’s Clerk’s Association holds its monthly meeting tonight, after the store closes.

Messrs Beeton and Wool of the Harmsworth Co., arrived from Grand Falls by Saturday’s express.

H.M.S. Brilliant sails this morning for Quebec and Montreal, and later will go South. A number of Reservists go by her.

A large ship named the Fortune is now at Lewisporte, loading lumber from the Newland Co., for Buenos Ayries. She will be ready to sail this week.

The Harmsworth Co. will commence cutting pulp wood at Red Indian Lake at an early date, and a large number of men will be engaged at the work during the winter.

John Mead of Pushthrough, Fortune Bay, was brought in by the S.S. Prospero yesterday, to enter the General Hospital for medical treatment. He is suffering from an internal complaint.

The Glencoe took the following outward passengers from Placentia yesterday: Col. Sawyer, Dr. Mattarrissn, wife and three children, G.M. Goddard, G.J. Cummen, V. Turpin, G.J. LeMoine, A.R. Hadden, Miss Keeping, Miss Parsons, Mrs. Darby, Miss Harding.

By Saturday express, two experts arrived from Toronto bound to Cape Race, where they will install an improved oil tank at the Lght House. Its installation will do away with the necessity of bringing the oil by hand to the lamps, as an automatic pump will be attached. They leave for the Cape by the S.S Prospero.

The weather along the line yesterday, was fine excepting at Port aux Basques, where it was raining. Last night’s reports are: Port aux Basques, S.E., strong, raining, 38 above. Bay of Islands, calm and dull, 60 above. Quarry, S.W., light, raining, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 48 above. Clarenville, S.W., light, dull, 48 above. Whitbourne, S., light, dull, 42 above.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: Miss Dawe, Miss Peach, J.J. O’Reagan, R. Goodyear, J Williams, P. Berry, Howlland, Dr. Grenfell, Miss Malachi, R. White, G.W. Pike, T.C. Culleton, P.S. Patten, Miss O’Reilly, N. Fisher, B.I. Walsh, T. Pippy, Councilor Ellis, O. Emerson, J. Walsh, W.K. Piercy.

Mr. Michael Brien, of Outer Cove, and Miss Bridget Roach, of Logy Bay, were married yesterday afternoon at Torbay. The wedding party which consisted of a large number of friends of the bride and groom, drove in carriage from Logy Bay and Outer Cove to Torbay, where the ceremony was performed by the Rev. M.J. Clarke. On returning to Logy Bay, the rejoicings of the party were ended through the news of the accident, through which James Hedderson lost his life, as noted in another column, was learned. The usual wedding festivities were dispensed with, out of sympathy for the bereaved family.

The schooner Ethel Grace, Herbert Pike, is taking a general cargo for E Penny & Son, Carbonear.

The Virginia Lake reports having seen the S.S. Kite near Battle Harbor, Wednesday last, going North.

From Channel to Rose Blanche there is a good sign of fish, and when the weather is suitable, the fishermen do well.

The funeral of the late Mrs. J Murphy took place yestrerday and was largely attended. Interment was at Belvedere.

The T.A. Society held its regular monthly meeting yesterday, at which fourteen applicants were admitted to membership.

The schooner Avon, John O’Driscol, sails this morning for Conception Harbor, laden with winter supplies for several people of that place.

The S.S. Alcides of the Donaldson Line, reported missing last week, arrived in St. John N.B. on Tuesday night. She had been delayed by heavy weather, but sustained no damage.

An unfortunate woman was arrested on Water Street Saturday night, in a drunk and disorderly condition. She will appear before the Magistrate this morning to answer the charge against her.

Last week John Murphy of Battle Harbor, had a try on the fishing grounds, and jigged a full boatload, six quintals. Last year, Mr. Murphy secured fish at Battle Harbor until the ice froze on the Harbor.

The Prospero brought five Naval Reservists yesterday, who came to put their drill on board H.M.S. Calypso. They are M.B. Cox, E. Ashford, S. Chapman, from Harbor Breton and H. Murphy and P Kennedy from Fermeuse.

Four drunks, and one drunk and disorderly, were arrested and brought to the Police Station Saturday night. All were given their liberty yesterday morning; the drunk and disorderly having to make the usual deposit of five dollars.

One of the livers at Rigoulette almost blew his hand off in a gunning accident more than two weeks ago. He had to wait until the arrival of the Virginia Lake to have the injured member dressed by FR. Boyle, and it was in a bad state when the Dr. reached him.

The schooner Golden Hope, James Houlian, arrived Saturday from Placentia with a load of fish and oil.

Mr. George Penny of the firm of John Penny & Sons, Ramea, arrived in town Saturday on a short business trip.

Hudson’s freighter, Abib, is loading freight at Steer Bros. wharf for Adam’s Cove and other places on the North Shore.

The schooner Britianna, A Butler, sails today for Middle Arm, White Bay, to load lumber at Pilley’s mill for R. Templeton.

The schooner Maggie Sullivan, Downer, arrived in port Saturday morning from Twillingate, fish laden to Crosbie & Co.

The schooner Shamrock, George Dicks, is loading provisions at Baird, Gordon & Co.’s for R. Dunford, Hemitage Bay, and John Penny & Sons, Remea.

The schooner Spotless Queen, from St. Kyran’s, Virginia, Mary H. and Clematis, Fox Harbor P.B., Mary, Cape Broyle, and Cappa Hayden, Fermeuse, arrived in port Saturday, all laden with dry fish.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, is loading freight at George Neal’s wharf for J.B. Martin, Bell Island. She sails this morning. The Belle Franklin, A . Hynes, is also taking freight at the same wharf for other business men on Bell Island.

The schooner Advance, William Keefe, is loading at George Neal’s wharf for P. Templeman, Bonavista.

A lady’s brown neck fur, which was picked up at 8 last night, was left at the Police Station, where it may be had by the owner.

The schooner Ada, Peard, is discharging coal at Baine Johnston’s Southside premises, under the supervision of Mr. Kent, who has taken a contract for the work.

There are three schooners, each bearing the mane of “Mary”, now at Goodridge’s wharf, one each from Cape Broyle, Fermeuse and Fox Harbor, P.B.

George Neal’s new house flag was hoisted for the first time on Saturday, in honour of the King’s birthday. The design is a white crescent partly enclosing a whit five pointed star, set in a dark blue ground, and is one that will be easily recognized. We hope 'ere many years, to see the flag of this progressive business concern flying from may other poles o'er land and sea.

Mr. William Taylor, of Clark’s Beach, made a trial shipment of eight bundles of sea grass by Burke’s schooner, David M. Hilton, which arrived from Brigus a few days ago. The grass is used in the upholstering business, and Mr. Taylor found a ready market for it. Large quantities of it can be gathered at South River, and if properly looked after, it could be made quite a paying industry.

Mr. Weston Hunt of Bell Island, arrived in town Saturday and will return today. Mr. Hunt has been for many years a trusted employee of the Dominion Steel Co. He is now going into business for himself, and will open an up-to-date Blacksmith Shop on Main Street, West Bell Island.

Between 11.30 and 12 Saturday night, an express man, who was late on his rounds, had a narrow escape from a serious accident. At the top of Long’s Hill, near Rice's stable, there is a part of the street which is very dark. A Grocer’s boy, who was into some house nearby, left the hand cart standing across the middle of the street. The express man did not see the cart, was driving his horse at a rapid pace down the hill directly for it, when fortunately for him, a gentleman who was coming up the hill, saw the obstruction and springing before the horse, stopped him just a few feet from the car, thereby averting an accident which would undoubtedly have ended in serious injury to both horse and driver. Young lads who are out delivering parcels should be warned by their Masters to be more careful, and leave their cars when it is necessary to do so, at the side of the street near the sidewalk."

November 11 1907 DEATHS BUGDEN — On Sunday morning at Pilot’s Hill, Mary, wife of the late Benjamin Bugden, of Trinity, in the 75th year of her age, leaving four sons and one daughter to mourn their sad loss. Canadian and American papers please copy. The remains will be taken out by Tuesday morning’s train for interment at Trinity.
November 12 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. John Duff, of Carbonear, was in town today.

Mr. James A Power went out by this morning’s train to North River, where it is likely he will remain over Sunday.

The S.S. Virginia Lake arrived from Labrador at 5 p.m. today, and after a short delay, left for St. John’s

Mr. Frank Severn is expected from Brooklyn, B.B., by Monday’s express. His household effects are being brought by schooner to Port de Grave.

A bargantine was seen in the Bay this afternoon. She is supposed to be the Amy Louise, Capt. Sheppard, from New York, with anthracite coal, and will probable reach port during the night.

Flags were displayed at the various Mercantile Premises and some private residence here today, in honour of the King’s Birthday. May His Majesty live to see many returns of its anniversary.

Mrs. Cowperthaite, wife of the Pastor of the Methodist Church here, who had been very unwell for the past ten days, is still not much improved, but hopes are entertained that in a few days her health will be much better.

A number of gentleman intend driving to Heart’s Content tomorrow (Sunday) to be present at the ordination service to be held in the Church of England there that day. His Lordship Bishop Jones and several Clergymen, passed through here to Carbonear by this afternoon’s train, to proceed to Heart’s Content.

“Diamond Jubilee” Lodge S.O.E. proposes holding a soiree at the British Hall next Monday night, in the honour of the King’s birthday. As the notable day fell on Saturday this year, it was decided to commemorate the event on Monday. A very pleasant night is anticipated. Mrs. Hyden caters for the occasion.

Mr. James Ryan of Spaniard’s Bay, Hon. Eli Dawe and Mrs. Arthur Barnes, was in town on Friday. Mr. German Pilley, of Shoal Bay, B.B. who was staying at Cochran House all the week, left for St. John’s by that evening’s train. He leaves for home by Sunday’s express. Mr. Charles Howell, of Green's Harbor, T.B. who carries on business, was in town the same day selecting goods for his fall trade .

The Presbyterian congregation here deeply regret that Rev. Joseph McNeil, who came to supply for two months, cannot be prevailed upon to accept the charge of the Church. Circumstances which the Rev . Gentleman cannot control compel him to seek work elsewhere; but it is with real sorrow the congregation contemplate his departure, which takes place about the end of the present month. Another Clergyman is expected here, to take his place by that time

The Road Board had men today repairing that part of Military Road between Garland Street and Stratton's Hill, and also the sewer at Kitchen’s Hill. Repairs to French’s Lane and other places badly needing such, will be done next week. The members for the District, when in town yesterday, visited the new public wharf at Caplin Cove and expressed themselves pleased with the work done there. The Chairman of the Road Board should feel gratified by the compliment. This wharf will be planked as soon as material can be had.

It does seem a pity that old men, who have spent all their lives in hard toil, should be denied work when they apply for it. Of course employers want to get as much work done as they can, and will rather employ young and able men when they can be had; but the old men think after toiling hard all the summer, they should not be denied work in the fall, even though young men are ready to take the work offered. There is some reason in the complaint of the old men, but how to meet their vies, appears to be a most difficult problem.

The Harbor bouys were taken in this week, probably it is the custom to remove them for the winter during the early part of this month, but it is not in the interest of those who “occupy their business in deep water” that the bouys should be removed so early in the season. Craft are constantly coming and going at this time of the year, and when entering port at night, now that the nights are long, it is very difficult to see the logs which have replaced the bouys. It would be better to allow the bouys to remain put until the coming and going of vessels have become less frequent.

The street light at Harvey Street at the foot of Garland Street, seems to have caused much trouble to those who look after the lighting of the town. It is said more new bulbs have been put in at this place than at any two poles in the town. It would appear that boys, who frequent the locality, have in sheer wantonness broken the bulb there time and time again, by throwing stones at the light. Cannot a watch be set to catch the mischievous urchins who deserve the utmost rigor of the law?

Our citizens must be pleased to learn that the Historical Society of St. John’s, at its quarterly meeting held this week, enthusiastically admitted Claudius Watts, Esq., of this town, an honorary member of that Society. This was done in recognition of the obligation by the Society to Mr. Watts for valuable information furnished by him, who is in his 97th year. Mr. Watts is an exceptional man in body and mind, and although the former is gradually weakening, the latter seems to be still quite active for the bright intelligence which today marks the marvellous intellect, of the old gentleman, cannot fail to call forth the admiration of anyone privileged to converse with him. His mind truly is a store house of varied information, especially on matters related to the musty part. May it be as clear to mark the centenary of his birth as it is now!.

Correspondent, Harbor Grace, Nov. 9th, ‘07"

November 12 1907 WEDDING BELLS COPPIN — JANES: November 6th will be a day long to be remembered at Glovertown, for on that day Rev. H.G. Coppin, a former and esteemed Pastor, was united in matrimony to Miss Beatrice, oldest daughter of Ambrose Janes, Esq., J.P. Early in the morning, bunting was flying from many poles which spoke forth the esteem in which the contracting parties were held. The ceremony was performed at the residence of the bride’s parents, which was beautifully decorated for the occasion, the Rev. J.R. Saint, S.T.L. of Fogo, officiating. The bride charmingly gowned in white satin and lace veil and orange blossoms, was attended by her sister, Ida, who was handsomely attired in pale blue silk and silk chiffon. The groom was supported by Mr. Wesley Janes, brother of the bride. After the ceremony, numerous guests sat down to tables which fairly groaned beneath the weight of good things provided. After doing justice to the supper served, short speeches were made wishing the newly wedded pair every happiness. The bride was the recipient of many valuable and useful presents, the groom’s present to the bride was a handsome silver toilet set, and to the bridesmaid, a chaste gold locket and chain. Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Coppin will shortly leave for their future home, Nipper’s Harbor, followed by the good wishes of the entire community. T.J.J.
November 12 1907 ARRESTED FOR SPIKING TRACK During last week, the railway track near South River, was spiked by some unknown persons, but was fortunately discovered by the Sectionman, before any danger resulted. The matter was reported to the Police Authorities at Brigus, and Constable Bishop was given the matter to work up. Though he had little evidence to work on, he arrested three young men yesterday, who are believed to have committed the offence. This morning they will appear before Magistrate Thompson at Brigus.
November 12 1907 SCHOONER HISPANOLA SEIZED AT SYDNEY The banking schooner Hispanola, Capt. Walter Kennedy, was seized at North Sydney a few days ago by the Canadian Authorities. It is alleged that Captain Kennedy failed to report to the Canadian Customs early last spring, hence the cause of the seizure. Capt. Kennedy, we learn, contends that his failing to report was due to circumstances over which he had no control. The ice pack was off Sydney Harbor, and to report he would have had to walk over the floe, with continuous danger surrounding him, and even then would not possibly meet a Custom's Official. Under the circumstances, it is expected the vessel will be released without any fine imposed.
November 12 1907 SPLENDID CATTLE FROM WEST COAST Yesterday’s freight train brought thirty head of cattle from Grand River, in charge of Mr. Archie McIsaac and Mr. John McLellan. These beasts are in exceptionally good condition and are equal to, if not superior to, cattle imported from Canada. The Farmers of Grand River and Little River find a ready market here in the city for all the cattle they can raise, and the prices that have been realized in the past, and particularly this season, is a great inducement for even further efforts on the part of the industrious Farmers of the West Coast.
November 12 1907 S.S. HARMONY REACHES PORT The S.S. Harmony, Capt. Jackson, arrived in port yesterday morning, from Moravian settlements, having visited Macovic, Hopedale, Nain and Herbron. She passed the Dianna on Oct 22nd going North. Capt. Jackson reports fine weather up North, with no snow or frost. Mr. Heath, the Company's Agent at Nain, came as passenger, and also two children from the Mission who are going to Germany to attend school. As freight, she brought 2,600 quintals of fish, 600 barrels of trout, and a quantity of salmon, furs, etc. The schooner Columbia is reported as having been ashore North of Nain, and that part of her cargo was jettisoned before she was refloated. The Harmony will discharge her cargo here and then load for London.
November 12 1907 WRONG HOUSE Sunday night, an outport man, having about $16 in cash and a bank book worth $500, walked into the West End Fire Station, and asked the chances of having a night’s good enjoyment. He was told he had struck the wrong place, but could not see eye to eye with the Guard, with the result that he was locked up. Yesterday morning he was brought before the Magistrate and pleaded he had made a mistake. He was allowed to go free, with a warning not to make another such error.
November 12 1907 GOT A FRIGHT Daniel Walsh of Holyrood, who came in from Kelligrews by yesterday morning’s train, received a scare when he could not find his purse containing $120. He left Holyrood Sunday afternoon and walked to Kelligrews, where he put up at the house of Mr. Tilley, taking yesterday morning’s train to town. He did not miss the money until after he reached the city, having paid his fare from some loose change, which he had in his pocket. After communicating with Kelligrews, it was found that he had left the money at Mr. Tilley’s house.
November 12 1907 NAUTICAL "The S.S. Dageid is due today from Montreal and Sydney.

The S.S. Regulus will leave Botwoodville today for New York.

Schooner Canada finished loading today at Bowring Bro and sails for Brazil.

S.S. Dictator is now at Smith Co.’s awaiting a chance to load fish for market.

S.S. Coban is now at Placentia, discharging coal for the Reid-Newfoundland Co.

The S.S. Bonavista left Montreal at 2 a. m. Saturday last. She is due here next Saturday.

Schooner Ionia, Hearld, will finish discharging her cargo of sand at Kennedy & Mullaly’s today.

The S.S. Adventure arrived from Sydney Sunday morning, coal laden, she began discharging at A. Harvey & Co premises yesterday

The S.S. Smyra will leave Montreal the 20th November for this port. This will be the last boat from Montreal for the season and a large quantity of flour and other food stuffs will come by her.

A report from Halifax that the schooner Selia which left here for Burgeo on October 29th, was missing, is unfounded. She arrived at Burgeo on Friday last, all well. The Selia belongs to Mr. Moulton.

The three top mast schooner, Helen Stewart is due here this morning from P.E.I. with a full cargo of oats. S.S. Cape Breton leaves Sydney today with a cargo of coal for Lewisporte, for the Reid-Newfoundland Co."

November 12 1907 PERSONAL "Mr. F.C. Jerrett returned to Brigus last evening.

Messrs Walter Tucker and A. Earle, of Carbonear, were amongst the visitors to the city last week.

Mr. J. Foots of the D.I. and S. Co.’s Employment Agency, Bell Island, arrived in the city last night.

Mr. G. Penney of Ramea, is at present in the city on business, and is a guest at the King Edward.

Mr. M.F. O’Toole, Conception Harbor, is at present in the city on business, and is staying at the Crosbie.

Mr. S. Churchill of the Public Works Office, who was along the line on business, returned by last night’s train.

Mr. E. Pike, of Channel, has been in town the last few days on business. He leaves for home by this afternoon’s express.

His Lordship Bishop Jones, who was at Heart’s Content, officiating at the ordination ceremonies, Sunday last, returned by last night’s train.

We learn on good authority that the report that Messrs Patten and Forsey has dissolved partnership is incorrect. These gentlemen, two of the most popular and enterprising of Grand Bank’s citizens, are extending their business, and the rumour probably took its rise from the sale of a number of small vessels which was done in order to purchase vessels of a larger build. "

November 12 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Virginia Lake will take a full cargo of freight to Labrador this trip. She sails at 6 this afternoon.

Passengers who arrived by yesterday’s express, say that caribou have been scarce along the line the last week. Those in the interior, near Howley and vicinity however have done well.

The shore train arrived at 10.40 last night bringing: His Lordship Bishop Jones, Rev. G.H. Bolt (?), G. Adams, S. Churchill, Mrs. G. Kearney, and about 40 second class.

The latter part of last week the herring fishers at Bay of Islands were getting on an average of 25 barrels a day for a fleet of five nets, and several vessels were almost loaded and ready for market.

As a result of a disagreement with a high official, a number of members of one of the city organizations resigned on Sunday last. It is expected however, that the matter will be amicably settled.

The last few nights there has been considerable annoyance caused the residents of George Street by the presence of some of the rough elements, and the Police have been called to give the place special attention.

Eighty four of the schooners which were in port the past three weeks, were represented by thirty sevens names, in some instances three, and even four, vessels were named alike. This condition of things must have been very confusing to shippers.

The weather conditions along the line yesterday, were favourable, it being fine and warm all day. Last night’s reports are: Port aux Basques, calm , fine, 48 above. Bay of Islands, S.W., light, dull, 50 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 40 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 48 above. Clarenville, calm, raining, 42 above. Whitbourne, S.W., light, dull, 43 above.

The News received the following from Messrs Job Bros. & Co., yesterday: “The harmony reports that the Columbia, Capt. Carroll, which was chartered by the Moravian Missionaries to bring cargo from their station, got ashore North of Nain, jettisoned part of her cargo, but was got off again. She was only slightly damaged, and is coming South. Capt. Carroll had one of the Moravorian Missionary Pilots on board at the time she struck. The Diana is reported by the Harmony passing North of Okak, on the 22nd Oct. going to Chidley to load the Moravian goods there, and should be back here next week.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, will sail this morning, with a full load of freight, for Bell Island.

The city was very quite last night, only one drunk being arrested. He was let go after be had sobered up.

Constable R. Quinlon, who arrived from St. George’s Saturday night with a prisoner, returns home by today’s express.

Fish was found plentiful on the local ground yesterday, one of the boats that remained out all day came in at dark, loaded.

F. Jerrets schooner, Puritian, left Burin, last night, for Green’s Harbor, Trinity Bay, where she will be repaired during the winter.

Two prisoners were arrested yesterday under warrant. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning to answer the charges against them.

The S.S. Ingraham is due back to Bay of Islands tomorrow with Mr. J.J. Murphy and party, who were inspecting some timber claims in Hawke’s Bay.

The brig Amy Louise, passed Cape Spear at 5 p.m. yesterday, bound for Harbor Grace, with a load of hardcoal from New York, for Munn & Co.

Men from the Central, East, and West Fire Stations were out box testing yesterday. Every thing was found to be in working order, which very much reflects on the efficiency of the Fire Department.

Messrs. Archie McIsaac and John McLellan, who arrived yesterday from Good River, report a very poor harvest in the Codroy Valley, hay and oats being almost an entire failure, on account of the long continuance of wet weather

The schooner Monnie and Mannie, which is coming consigned to George Neal, with a cargo of oats, put into Trepassey last evening. She left P.E.I. on the 7 Nov. and evidently had a fair run down. She should arrive here today.

The schooner Muriel, Capt. Hilton, arrived in port yesterday morning from Port Mulgrave, after a passage of six days, having harbored at Louisburg on the way. She brought 96 head of cattle, 18 sheep, 1 horse, and 75 cases of eggs to J & W Pitts. This is the last trip the Muriel will make to St. John’s this season. She sails today for Bridgewater, N.S. All the cattle brought by her were sold yesterday, at Pitts premises and fetched good prices.

The schooner Shamrock, Capt. G. Dicks, sails tomorrow morning, laden with general merchandise for Hermitage and Remea.

The man named Snow, of Boncoddy Street, who was working at Smith Co., met with an accident on Saturday, which laid him off work. A fish drum fell from a height of nearly twenty feet and struck him on the shoulder, bruising it badly. Dr. Leslie was called and on examining the injured, found there was no fracture of the bone. Snow has had to remain in bed since Saturday and will not be able to get about again for a few day's

The residents of the Western part of Merry Meeting Road, McNeily Street and Summer Street are badly in need of a public well. At present, they are depending on a private source for their water supply. At times this well becomes fouled and its water is not fit for use. The nearest tank is where the line or new water pipes crosses Merry Meeting Road, about a quarter of a mile away. In winter times, it is a great hardship on women and children to be forced to go such a distance for water, especially so as there is no protection from the wind along the road, which is in the most exposed part of the city. Some time ago a petition was sent to the City Council to have one or two wells, fitted with pumps, sunk near Summer Street. The matter was then referred to the City Engineer, and has not been attended to since. Meanwhile the people of this section are patiently waiting for something to be done before winter sets in."

November 13 1907 CARBONEAR "An old resident of Irishtown, in the person of Mr. Michael O’Brien died on Sunday last, aged 79 years, and was buried Tuesday in the R.C. Cemetery

Mr. C.T. James, Sub-Collector of H.H. Customs at Channel, paid a short visit here this week, looking up old friends of his native town.

The crew of the shipwrecked vessel that was recently lost on the Treaty Shore, came up by the S.S. Portia to St. John’s, and arrived here Wednesday night.

The anniversary of Gunpowder Plot was duly celebrated by the youngsters on the 5th Nov. The “cheering ray” illustrated many hills around about.

Mr. Morale, of Jersey, who does a large fishery business in the Straits and is therefore well known to some of our people, called to see them before leaving for the Old Country.

The memorial erected to the late Miss Nicholl, has been connected with the water service and electric current, so that thenceforth a fountain of pure water will flow in troughs on either side of its base, while the summit will bear a brilliant arc light. Mr. C. Henderson superintendent the work.

Five venders of hop beer were summoned before Judge Penney on Monday, it being alleged that the compound sold by them, contained more that 2 per cent alcohol. The case was postponed for a week.

A case of slander was heard at the Court House on Thursday before Judge Penney. Both the plaintiff and defendant were of the feminine sex, and during the past season were “sisters” in the same harbor at Labrador. It was while the voyage was being hauled that the peace was disturbed. His Honour upon being satisfied that the slanderer was guilty, a fine of $10 was imposed which was paid.

Ensign Strickland, of the Harbor Grace S.A. Corps., has been transferred here to take the place of Adjutant Pitcher, who goes on furlough for three months.

Mr. Jno. Maddock, partner in the firm of J & J Maddock, arrived from St. Anthony, via St. John’s, Wednesday afternoon.

Duff & Sons barquentine Kenneth Victor, Capt. George Dean, sailed again for Sydney in ballast, to load coal for that firm. Capt. W.J. Kennedy goes to Sydney also on his schooner Luetta.

The fishermen’s committee met Mr. Donald Morison, K.C., Thursday at the Court House, when the grievance as to what price should be regarded as current for Labrador fish was laid before him.

Rorke & Sons schooner Lena, sailed Saturday for Boston, taking a full cargo of cod and salmon. Capt. Peter Cullen goes in command.

Mr. W.S. Bowden, Jeweller, is back from Bell Island, after an absence of four months and resumes his trade here at the old stand, opposite T.C. Badcock’s.

A meeting of the United Towns’ Electric Company was held Wednesday afternoon, to consider a position from lighting the town. As far as we can learn, the funds to foot the bill are to be derived from surplus monies collected in water taxes. A satisfactory agreement has been reached, and the Company will immediately start at the work.

An interesting program consisting of choruses, solos, duets and recitations, was rendered on Friday night at the Methodist school-room by the Women’s Missionary Auxiliary.

Mr. Turner is here from St. John’s this week, surveying land for the proposed extension of Bennett’s Hill, in a direct line to Water St. The proposed plan of running through a middle street has been evidently abandoned, notwithstanding the fact that a survey and estimates have been shelved in the Col. Secretary’s Office, a long ago. The job in hand calls for a very paltry allocation, but is nevertheless, looked upon by the people with divided suspicion; on the one hand as a stale bait to attract votes, and on the other as a little game of self between interested parties, while the benefit to town residents in general, will be next to nothing. Our nominal representative unfortunately, belongs to a class of weaklings, who allows himself to be wholly governed by the whip party, and is abundantly satisfied with the smallest crumbs that fall from the Executive table to his District, unmindful of the fact that the Heads of Departments, who bestow the charity, know little and care less, about what his constituents really require.

CORRESPONDENT, Carbonear, Nov. 11th, ‘07"

November 13 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The shore line train arrived at 10.30 last night. Very few passengers came by her.

The C.C.C. will hold a sociable at Smithville on the 20th November. Members of the brigade will attend in uniform.

Mr. George Skinner, of the Nova Scotia Steel Co.’s staff, Wabana, came to town yesterday, and is staying as the Crosbie.

The schooner Lizzie, Richard Seaward, arrived Monday evening from Fox Harbor, Trinity Bay, with the summer’s catch of codfish taken at Labrador, on board.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers, including; Major and Mrs. Morris, Mrs. E. Larkin, P.F. Curtis, H. Reid, R.B. Simmonds, G.H. Coultas, R. Devana.

Four arrests were made by the Police last night, four drunkenness and one for being drunk, disorderly and fighting. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning.

A light is needed at the junction of Golf Avenue and Mundy Pond Road. The residents of these localities would also be thankful if they could be supplied with water either by tank or wells.

A notice appeared in last night’s Gazette saying the Government have been notified by Earl Elgin, that aliens who shall enter the United States, after an uninterrupted residence of at least one year, immediately proceeding such entrance in Newfoundland, shall be exempt from the Head Tax of four dollars.

The crews of many of the outport schooners in port often go on shore, leaving no person on board in charge of the vessel and its contents. In some cases they even leave the doors of the cabin and forecastle open, thus placing opportunities in the way of any dishonest person who may be loitering around the wharves.

Work is progressing on the foundation of the new C.E. Commercial Academy Springdale St. The site selected is to the North of the Methodist Guards’ Hall, where there is ample room for a playground around the school. When the work of erection begins, it will be pushed ahead until the building is finished. It is the intention of the School Board to have all in readiness for Principal Butler and his staff of assistants to conduct their classes in the new building after next summer's vacation.

The S.S. Cape Breton sails today for Sydney.

The S.S. Bruce is due back to Port aux Basques this morning.

There is now sixty one male prisoners doing time in the penitentiary for various reasons.

A few of the local fishermen were on the grounds yesterday, and did fairly well. One boat got about 7 cwt., the others from 1 cwt upwards.

Passengers who arrived from Placentia by last night’s train, say there is good signs of fish at Cape. St. Mary’s but the weather is too changeable for the small boats to go to the grounds.

Mr. A.E. Foran, who has been in the city the last two weeks, returned to New York by Sunday’s express. His brother Charlie goes with him.

The marriage of Miss Evelyn Boone to Mr. Robert Wright, Jr., takes place tomorrow afternoon, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Springdale St.

Mr. E. Larkin who left here a few weeks ago on a health trip, is at present seriously ill at Boston, and his wife left by last evening’s express to visit him.

Last night was the coldest for the season along the railway. At Port aux Basques it was snowing, and at the Quarry the thermometer registered 12 degrees of frost.

The residents of Gold Avenue, Mundy Pond, Springdale, and Casey Street, are well pleased with the repairs that have been done to these streets, which were torn up by the heavy rain storms a few weeks ago. The side drains have been repaired in many places also.

A few weeks ago, a yacht owned by a West End Blacksmith, sank near Kennedy & Mullaly’s wharf, and after an unsuccessful attempt to refloat her, the owner sold her for 50 cents. Monday, Diver Glynn got her above water, and she is now safely moored at Kennedy & Mullaly’s wharf."

November 13 1907 JOKE OF 1907 "Jeweller — ""You say you want same name engraved on this ring?""

Young Man — ""Yes, I want the words. 'George, to his dearest Alice,' engraved on the inside of the ring.

“Is the young lady your sister?”

“No, she is the young lady to whom I am engaged.”

“Well, if I were you I would not have ‘George, to his dearest Alice' engraved on the ring. If Alice changes her mind, you can’t use the ring again.”

“What would you suggest?”

“I would suggest that the words be ‘George, to his first and only love.’ You see, with that inscription, you can use the ring half a dozen times. I have had experience in such matters myself.”"

November 14 1907 ARRESTED AGAIN Hugh Walsh, who has been arrested for safe keeping for the hundredth time, was brought in again last evening. Walsh, while quite harmless in his normal condition, cannot be trusted when suffering from mental aberration, and on several occasions, the Police were called, prevented him from bringing harm to himself and other members of the family. Some time ago, the unfortunate man chased a woman along the Queen’s Road with an axe, and but for the interference of the Police, would have probably killed her. Walsh who is periodically affected, should be given proper attention, else a serious matter may follow.
November 14 1907 WITH OATS The schooner Monie and Memie, Capt. Fudge, arrived in port yesterday morning after a passage of five days from Souris, P.E.I. She left Souris last Friday. On Monday she harboured at Trepassey, where she remained until Tuesday evening, and reached here yesterday at 10 a.m., having a fair run down the shore. The cargo consists of 2,170 bushels of oats, consigned to George Neil.
November 14 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived at Port aux Basques at 8.20 a.m. yesterday, bringing the following passengers: R.A. Chambers, Miss W. Boone, Miss G. March, Miss L. Burke, Miss A McIsaac, Mrs. H. Cunningham, F. Brazley, Geo. Craig, Capt. C.C. Young, Capt. A Glavine, and 48 in steerage. The express is due at noon.
November 14 1907 ANOTHER SCHOONER A TOTAL WRECK A telegram from Musgrave Harbor, was received yesterday by Mr. T.W. Abbot, of Musgrave Harbor, who is at present in the city, to the effect that the schooner Ethel S., was lost at Doating Cove, a small harbor just to the South of Musgrave. The Ethel S., Capt. Newman Gillingham, was in port two weeks ago and landed her cargo of fish at Crosbie and Co.’s wharf. A freight for the home port Musgrave Harbor, was taken on board. This was landed on arrival at the latter port, and the vessel then started for a round of neighbouring harbors, on the Straight Shore and vicinity, collecting fish to make a second cargo. On Tuesday evening, when on the way back to Musgrave from another harbor, she mis-stayed near the land at Doating Cove, and there not being room to warp around, she went on the rocks, though every effort possible was made by those on board to keep her off. The Captain and crew succeeded in getting on shore in safety. A sea on at the time, soon caused the vessel to become a total wreck. As this shore is one of the most exposed places on the Coast, every part of it being open to the ocean, she will break up in a very short time. At the time of the wreck, the Ethel S. had on board two hundred quintals of fish belonging to different fishermen, who had placed it on board, for shipment to St. John’s. These men will feel the loss of their fish. Capt. Gillingham will also feel greatly the loss of his fine schooner.
November 14 1907 WRONGLY SUSPECTED A short while ago, a complaint was made to the Authorities that a Postal Official on one of the Bay Boats had not been conducting matters right. A Police Officer was sent to investigate, and made a round trip, but could not find nothing that in any way would connect the Officer with the charge made. It is said according to reports, that the story that the Postal man was delinquent, came from another Official, who had not been on friendly terms with the suspect. The matter is now under the consideration of the Authorities and it is likely some trouble will follow.
November 14 1907 LOSS OF THE ORION. APPEAL FOR AID "OUT OF SIXTEEN LOST, ELEVEN WERE FAMILY MEN.

Marystown, November 13th. — A meeting was held here last night for the purpose of raising subscriptions for the widows and orphans of the crew of the schooner Orion, numbering sixteen men. Mr. Avery, Magistrate at Burin, occupied the chair, a committee was formed and will gladly receive any donations for that purpose. (Signed) M.T. Flynn.

Marystown has take the initiative in a movement for the relief of the widows and orphans of the Orion’s crew. Grand Bank mourns the loss of her sons and sympathises deeply with her fellow mourners in Mortier Bay. Burin sorrows with those who sorrow, and throughout the District and the Island, is grief and sympathy.

A vessel staunch and strong in every particular, 6 ½ years old, 65 tons registered, after having weathered the storms and dangers of the year, when returning home disappears, leaving no clue as to the cause of her disappearance.

Aboard her were sixteen men and of them, eleven were men of family. The tragedy is awful enough in itself, but when the agonies of the widows and orphans are considered, the passing of the brave fellows becomes matter of minor moment, for having paid the price of admiralty, they are in the protecting hands of the All-Father.

In His hands too, are the widows and orphans: but the Brotherhood of Man is as much a fundamental doctrine of Christianity as the Fatherhood of God. It is man’s privilege as well as his duty to aid.

St. John’s made a noble response to the appeal for the Trinity Bay suffers. Will she be less generous now? We believe not. According as God has prospered, our citizens will respond. We shall gladly acknowledge, through our columns, the receipt of any subscriptions of any kind, through any source, and see that they reach the proper quarter.

“He gives twice who gives quickly” and if the bitterness of grief and the agony of bereavement can be assuaged in the least by the lessening of the burden caused through the loss of the breadwinners, then let those who have not been called upon to drink the cup, give tangible evidence of their gratitude, by helping the widows and orphans, who have been called to drain it to the dregs.

Read the Telegram from Mr. M T. Flynn, which appears above, and then, of your kindness and gratitude, tender your contributions towards the relief of the sufferings and privations of brokenhearted widows and helpless children. Their grief only kindly Time can assuage, but every dollar will aid in lightening the burden that now presses upon the shoulders of gentle women and on children of tender years."

November 14 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Prospero left at 10 a.m. yesterday, going West, with the following passengers: Messrs W.B. Hanes, O. Cooler, Veitch, P. Cashin, J.F. Roach, G. Butt; Mesdames G Ryan, Myric, Freebairn, Misses F. Morcy, James Vinicombe, Strang, Fowler, Myric, O’Neill; and 62 in steerage. Potria left Baie Verte at 2.30 p.m. yesterday, going West.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is due Bay of Islands. Ethie is due Clarenville tonight. Clyde is due at Lewisporte tonight. Dundee is due at Port Blandford tonight. Virginia Lake is due at Tilt Cove, this morning. Glencoe left Port aux Basques last night. Argyle leaves Placentia today going West."

November 14 1907 FROM TRINITY During yesterday and last night, about twenty schooners arrived from Trinity, all with cargoes of dry fish. Coming across the Bay Tuesday night, it blew a heavy N.W. gale, accompanied with snow, and most of the craft had to double reef. One of the number being deeply laden, ran for Western Bay, and remained there until yesterday morning. The others came along, and reached port between midnight and 2 a.m. yesterday.
November 14 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. Alex Quinn and Miss Mary Wiseman are to be married at the R.C. Cathedral tonight by Fr. Finn.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner L.E. Young, Capt. Bartlett, was at Sydney on Monday and loaded coal there after a short delay.

A rumour is currently about town, that a Roller-rink is shortly to be started here, but confirmation is obtainable.

Mr. Edward Quinn, who was Storekeeper with Messrs. R.D. McRae & Sons at Grady, the past summer, resumed work today with Messrs R Rutherford & Co.

Miss Jessie Gordon, C.E. Schoolteacher at Spaniard’s Bay, returned to her school by Monday’s train, having spend a couple of days with her parents here.

Mr. Joseph Pumphrey of Messrs Rutherford & Co. Grocery Store, who have been laid by with pleuro-pneumonia, is now convalescent, and his many friends will be delighted to see him about again in a few days.

His Lordship Bishop March, left by Monday’s train for North River to attend the opening of a bazaar there last night. The bazaar is in aid of the fund for the new Church, which Rev. Dr. Whalen was in course of erection.

The sale of work which a committee of ladies of St. Paul’s Church intended to hold in St. Paul’s Hall on the 13th and 14th November, will now take place in Coughlan Hall on these nights. A special feature of the last night will be a soup-supper which, no doubt will be well patronized.

Mrs. Wm. Herder on Saturday night, while passing along the sidewalk on Water Street near the lane leading to the Archibald Boot and Shoe Factory, slipped on the uneven ground and severely wrenched one of her ankles. She was assisted to Mr. P.J. Fitzgerald’s shop and soon after, driven home, where she will have to remain quite for three weeks before using the foot.

In the District Court on Monday, a young woman sued her master at the Labrador fishery, for wages due her. Defendant not showing any just reason for with holding the wages, judgement for the amount claimed went to the plaintiff. Mr. Kearney argued well for the plaintiff, and afterwards wrested from the Court the allowance on a brief fee. Another case for the recovery of fishery wages was also heard, and plaintiff obtained judgement for $11 and costs. Mr. Kearney for plaintiff.

To show the eagerness which people show towards visiting the moving picture halls here, a story is told of a poor woman who thought she ought to see the wonderful sights described by the hand-bills, which solicited public patronage. In order to procure money to see both shows the same night, this poor woman went to her flour-barrel, and seeing it contained only a little flour, she emptied it into a coverlet, sold the barrel for 10 cents, and took in the sights.

One day last week, while removing Davis old house on the Southside of Mosquito, a man discovered a T.D. clay pipe, which evidently has a history. The house just taken down, is said to have been built more than a hundred years ago, and as the pipe was found enclosed within the wall plate above the window, it is supposed to have been left there by a workman when the house was being built. The man who found the pipe last week, in spite of the mould encrusting the T.D. and the damp tobacco, applied matches to the latter until he succeeded in obtaining a smoke. How long are T.D. pipes in existence?

Mrs. Stephen Andrews passed peacefully away last night at the age of about 70 years. She leaves a husband, two sons, George, of W.H. Thompson’s Drug Store, and William now living on the West Coast.

The thank-offering meeting of the local branch of the Women’s Foreign Missionary, was held at the Presbyterian Church on Monday night. Rev Dr. Robertson of St. John’s, was in the chair. Mrs. R.S. Munn, Sr., president of the local branch, read the annual report. Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite (Methodist) and Rev. J McNeil, gave addresses. Solos were sung by Misses Louise Thompson and Masie Duff; a duet by Misses Duff and Flora Munn and a recitation given by Miss Cron.

The soiree held by “Diamond Jubilee” Lodge No. 236, S.O.E., in the British Hall on Monday night in honour of the King’s birthday, was a most enjoyable affair. The hall was tastefully decorated with festoons of crepe tissue, flags, and other bunting, and Chinese lanterns. After the regular fortnightly meeting of the lodge was over, a program of songs, addresses and gramophone selections, was rendered, and patriotic enthusiasm manifested itself in the utterance of the various speakers. About fifty members of the Order sat down to a splendid supper provided by Mrs. Myrden, who in her customary manner, exactly suited the palates of those at the tables. The following toasts were gone through: “The King,” proposed by President Ernest Simmonds, and acknowledged by the members singing the National Anthem; “Supreme Grand Lodge,” proposed by Past President W.A. Oke and emphasized by the members singing, ""We are Jolly Good Fellows”; “Sister Lodges” proposed by Bro. W. Harris, and responded to by Bro. Strowbridge; “The Flag” proposed by Past President Ernest Jones, responded “Rule Britannia” and “Absent members”, proposed by President Ernest Simmonds, and notice by the singing of an appropriate song. Songs and gramophone selections alternated until midnight. At 9.30 p.m. fireworks were set off from the street. Altogether, this commemoration of the King’s birthday was highly successful and all the who participated were fully satisfied with the pleasant occasion. The committee in charge of the preparation deserves the thanks of the Lodge for the manner in which the work entrusted to them, was executed. The knowledge of a thing well done, is a compensation in itself. This Lodge is in good financial standing, its funds being greater that in any previous year and its membership increasing, so that this year is likely to be the most successful one since the Lodge started.

Rev. F. Severn arrived from Brooklyn, B.B., by yesterday’s express, and left by this evening’s train for his new mission, Port de Grave.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 12th, ‘07"

November 14 1907 SUPREME COURT "(Yesterday) Present: Chief Justice and Mr. Justice Johnson.

Samuel Manuel vs. Joseph Elliott. — Day set down for the 4th.

Edward F. Harvey vs. George Barbour — This is an action for $1,750.35, for the price and value of a vessel built and delivered by the plaintiff to the defendant, and has since June 19th., and is now, in possession of the defendant, and he has not paid the price agreed to be paid therefor, or any part thereof. Mr. W.R. Howley for plaintiff ; Mr. Morison, K.C. for defendant.

The defendant counterclaim for $246.78 for work and labour done, and materials provided, and money paid for the plaintiff, in respect of said schooner.

W.R. Howley moved for leave to amend statement of claim and reply. Morison K.C., was heard against the motion, and moved for an adjournment and also costs of the day, if amendments are allowed.

It was ordered that the proposed amendments be furnished in writing, and that the defendant have the cost of the day. It was also ordered that the future hearing be adjourned till today at 10 o’clock. The Court adjourned till today at 10 o’clock."

November 14 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The whaler Sabraon shipped three firemen yesterday for the whaling voyage in Southern waters.

The rain storm of last night did not extend far along the line, as West from Whitbourne it was fine and freezing.

The Rifle Club’s annual dinner takes place tonight at Donovan’s, the party going out by special train at 7 o’clock.

Six boats were out on the fishing grounds yesterday, and secured fairly good catches, ranging from two to three hundredweight.

Mr. Peter Cashin who has been at Bowring Bros’ office for the last year, resigned a few days ago, and left for his home at Cape Broyle, by the S.S. Prospero yesterday.

The dance to be given at Smithville is not under the auspices of the C.C.C. but permission has been given some of the senior boys of the corps to attend the dance in uniform

Mr. Phillips, formerly of H.M.S. Brilliant, but now retired from the Navy, has secured a position with the Reid Nfld. Co., as Diver, and at present is at Fair Islands, trying to secure an anchor, which was lost from the S.S. Dundee.

Capr. Stanley Barbour’s schooner Stanley G. Barbour, finished discharging cargo of fish at Bowring’s yesterday, and will begin loading today, taking on board provisions and general merchandise for Newtown B.B.

The schooner Mermaid, Thomas Johnson, arrived yesterday, from Round Harbor, Notre Dame Bay, with a full load of 1.500 quintals of dry fish. After landing her cargo of fish, the Mermaid will load provisions and other goods for S. Blackler, Nipper's Harbor, N.D.B.

Murphy’s schooner L Moore, of Placentia, is now at Goodridge wharf landing seven hundred quintals of fish from St. Shott’s, near Cape Pine. When discharged, she will begin taking on board supplies for the people who shipped the fish, and other residents of St. Shott’s.

A Police Officer was arresting a half drunk disorderly last night, when his companion struck the Officer and ran. The Policeman in persuing his assailant, lost the one he was about to arrest, and both escaped him. As the two are known, they will likely be summoned before the Court.

Several outport men visited the Penitentiary Tuesday and were shown through the institution by Superintendent Parsons. They were agreeably surprised to see that the prison was kept very clean. The broom making department was also visited, and the method of making brooms explained to the visitors.

The schooner Ernest S Young, Mark Sheppard, sailed for Harbor Grace yesterday.

Mr. Tobias W. Abbott of Musgrave Harbor, is at present in town on business.

The schooner Shamrock, George Dicks, sailed yesterday for Hermitage Bay and Ramea.

Miss Mary Buckley who was visiting friends in Boston, will return by today’s express.

To Correspondent: – “Daily News Reader.” Your letter will appear in tomorrow’s paper.

The schooner Empire finished loading yesterday at Bishop & Monroe’s and sails today for Oporto.

The schooner Swan, David Costello, is loading a general cargo for M.F. O’Toole, Conception Harbor.

The schooner Pioneer, John Drake, arrived in port Tuesday night, from Oderin, laden with fish and oil.

Three arrests were made by the Police last night, one drunk, one drunk and disorderly, and one who is demented and was placed in the lockup for safety.

The schooner Lady A, George Arnold, arrived yesterday morning from Alexander Bay B.B., with 400 quintals of fish, 160 hundred weight of birch bark, and 5,000 feet of lumber.

The S.S. Amphitrite, Larder, arrived yesterday morning from Trepassey, having on board a cargo of deals taken from the wrecked Cyril. She is berthed at the wharf of Kennedy, Mullaly & Co.

The Gladys B. Smith, Corcum, arrived yesterday morning from Sydney, with 180 tons of coal to Kennedy, Mullaly & Co., after a passage of 3 days. She would have been here two weeks ago but for the long delay at Sydney awaiting a chance to load.

S.S. Rosalind left New York at 3 p.m. yesterday for this port.

A number of new houses have been erected at the top of Springdale Street on the Mundy Pond Road. The city is slowly spreading out in this direction.

A few days ago at Bell Island, the steamers Mary and Progress were in collision. The whale back deck of the S.S. Mary was much broken; no damage was done the Progress. The collision was accidental.

The following registered at the King Edward yesterday: George Penney, Ramea, P.T. Power, Placentia, T.R. Power, Placentia, Dr. G.N. Murphy, St. John’s; W.G. Donnelly, St. John’s; C.R. Penney, Carbonear.

The schooner Vivian, John Clarke, arrived in port yesterday from Dog Bay, with a cargo of one hundred thousand feet of lumber, to the Horwood Lumber Co. She is discharging at the company’s West End wharf. Capt. Clarke will sail again for Dog Bay when he has finished landing, after which he will take freight to Brigus."

November 14 1907 DEATHS BROWNING — Yesterday morning at 9 o’clock, Elizabeth Blair, widow of the late Gilbert Browning. Funeral on Friday at 3 o’clock p.m.
November 15 1907 BIG PULP PROPOSITION The S.S. Ingraham left Nipper’s Harbor yesterday morning at eight o’clock, coming this way, with Mr. J.J. Murphy, the American Millionaire, and the cruisers who were looking over Murphy and Parrell’s pulp areas on the North East Coast. From messages already received in town, prospects are bright for the establishment of large pulp mills on those properties. The Ingraham will arrive here this morning.
November 15 1907 WEDDING BELLS "WRIGHT - BOONE: Last night, a very pretty wedding took place at the residence of the bride’s parents, 23 Springdale Street, when Miss Evelyn F., daughter of Mr. W.T. Boone, was united in matrimony by the Rev. Charles Hackett to Mr. Robert Wright, Jr., of the well known Water Street firm of Robert Wright & Son. The bride was charmingly attired in cream Brussels net over Liberty satin, and was attended by her cousin, Miss Clarice Samways, and Miss Annie Wright, sister of the groom; the bridesmaids being daintily gowned in cream silk. The groom was supported by Mr. Walter Edgar. After refreshments had been served and congratulations tendered, the happy couple drove to their future residence, 52 Prescott Street, where they will be “At Home” to their friends after November 24th. The bride was the recipient of many handsome presents, testifying to the esteem in which she is held. The bridegroom is the eldest son of Robert Wright Esq., who for many years has occupied a prominent position among the successful business men of Newfoundland. He has already won an honoured place in commercial circles, and promises to maintain and enhance the reputation for energy, enterprise, and business ability, that the firm already enjoys. To the bride and groom we tender best wishes for a long union of uninterrupted happiness.

BURT — MILLEY: Another pleasing ceremony took place at 8 o’clock last night at the Cochrane Street Church, the occasion being the marriage of Mr. H.N. Burt, Manager of Alex Scott’s Dry Goods Store, New Gower Street, to Miss M Milley, daughter of the late Mr. John Milley. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. F.R. Matthews, B.A., in the presence of a large party of friends of the happy couple. Mr. F.W. Pincock acted as best man; Miss Edith Milley was bridesmaid, and little Miss Mary L. Burt filled the position of flower girl. The bride looked charming. She wore cream silk crepe-de-chene with bridle veil and orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of white carnations and ferns. The bridesmaid who is a sister of the bride, wore pale blue silk crepe-de-chene, and the little flower girl was prettily attired in white, carrying a basket of flowers. After the ceremony, the party drove to No. 8 Colonial Street, the residence of the bride, where a reception was held, at which forty guests attended. The presents received by the bride were numerous and costly, among them being a double set of carvers, and two dozen silver knives from the Cochrane Street Sunday School and Epworth League, both the bride and groom being Teachers in the School and members of the League. The News wishes Mr. and Mrs. Burt much happiness in their future life."

November 15 1907 INFANTICIDE An arrest was made by the Police last night, in connection with an alleged case of infanticide and concealment of birth. The body of the infant is now in the morgue. It was discovered in a cistern at the top of the house in which the accused was a servant, and must have been there some days, as decomposition had set in. The odour from the decomposing body caused the lady of the house to make an investigation, which led to its discovery. The matter was then reported to the Police, and Detective Byrne was given the case. The arrest of the unfortunate girl was made a few hours later.
November 15 1907 NAUTICAL The S.S. Siberian will not be due here from Liverpool until next Wednesday. The S.S. Dageid, from Montreal via gulf ports, is due to arrive tomorrow. The S.S. Akmerianna arrived at Liverpool yesterday at 3 a.m. The Halifax City is due from Liverpool today.
November 15 1907 HEALTH Lena Carew of Barnes Road, was discharged from the Fever Hospital yesterday afternoon. There are now in the city, eleven cases of scarlet fever being nursed at home, and twenty-one in the Fever Hospital. Six cases of typhoid fever are now being nursed at home, and seven in St. George’s Hospital. Only one case of diphtheria is under supervision; the patient is being nursed at home. This makes thirty-two cases of scarlet fever, and thirteen of typhoid, and one of diphtheria; in all forty-six cases of infectious diseases, of which twenty-eight are at the Hospital’s, and eighteen at the homes of the patients.
November 15 1907 PERSONAL Amongst the recent birthday honours, the first name is that of Sir Charles Tupper, now the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles Tupper, Bart, G.C.M.G., who has been made a member of the Privy Council. Rev. F.W. Colley, of Carbonear, returned home by Wednesday night’s train.
November 15 1907 WEST COAST NEWS "The schooner Renown, Capt. Paul Young, arrived Monday from Sydney, bringing a cargo of coal to Mr. J. O’Brien.

Several cases of scarlet fever are reported in Baker’s Cove and Cox’s Cove, Middle Arm. Dr. Fisher visited these places Monday, on the Atlantic, and prescribed for the afflicted .

The S.S. Harlaw sailed from here Saturday night taking a full cargo of barrel herring and codfish to Sydney and Halifax. This steamer will only make two more trips here this year.

The American vessel Dora A Lawson, came in Sunday from Bonne Bay. When taking the entrance to Humber Arm she ran aground on Wood’s Island. With the high tide next morning she was successfully floated.

On Bonfire Night, a young lad, Ernest Taylor, living with Section Foreman Sheppard, was demonstrating the occasion, when a charge of gun powder prematurely exploded, badly burning the boy’s face, but he is now improving."

November 15 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "J.C. Foote, West Wabana, registered at the Waverley yesterday.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, is loading freight at George Neal’s wharf for J B Martin, Bell Island.

The schooner Maggie Belle, Eli Dalton, arrived Wednesday, from Smith's Sound, fish laden.

R.E. Chambers, M.E., Manager of the Nova Scotia Steel Company, Wabana, arrived in town yesterday.

The schooner Bonanza, Patrick Whelan, arrived from Indian Arm, Bonavista Bay, Wednesday evening with fish oil and hoops.

The S.S. Amphitrite is discharging a load of deals, saved from the wrecked Cyril, at E.H. & G. Davey’s wharf.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; O.J. Owen, T.P. Miller, Grange, England; R,E. Chambers, New Glasgow.

Munn’s schooner Procyon, Thomas Noseworthy, Master, came off dock yesterday morning. She is now taking in a general cargo for Munn & Co., and will sail for Harbor Grace tomorrow.

The schooner Romeo, James Walters, arrived in port Wednesday evening. Her cargo consists of twenty thousand feet of lumber, from Smith Sound, and a quantity of fish, taken on board at Trinity.

Merry Meeting Road, between the West Eend of St. George’s Field and Moore’s Lane, is badly in need of repairs. Nothing has been done to repair the washouts and holes, made in it by the heavy rains of October.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, arrived from Bell Island last night.

The fishermen of Long Harbor, Placentia Bay, get fair catches of fish any day it is fine enough to visit the fishing grounds.

The schooner St. Patrick, Daniel Bruce, arrived from Long Harbor, B.B. Thursday night, laden with fish , oil , herring and shooks.

The schooner Olive, William Evans, Grand Bank, has finished landing her cargo of 1,200 qtls. of fish , shipped from Lamaline, and will now load freight for Grand Bank.

The health Inspector - General McGowen, was slightly improved yesterday.

The schooner Vernie May, Christian, arrived Wednesday from Bell Island after landing freight for the Dom Iron and Steel Co. She will again take on a freight for same company.

Four arrests were made by the Police last night. One arrest was made under warrant, two was for drunkenness, one of whom was a female, and the fouth for alleged infanticide and concealment of birth.

Mr. J.C. Foote, of West Wabana, arrived in town yesterday on business, for the Nova Scotia Steel Co. Wabana."

November 15 1907 MARRIAGE McLARREN – O’REILLY — At Boston, November 1st., in All Saints Church, Aleck McLarren, to Miss Bride Frances O’Reilly, of St. John’s Nfld.
November 15 1907 DEATHS JACKMAN — At 7 last night of appendicitis, Alice, the beloved child of James and Mary Jackman, aged 2½ years.
November 16 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "The schooner Delta, W.C. Barnes, Master, left for St. John’s on Wednesday morning.

Master Thomas French went to the Postal Telegraph Office here this week to learn the Operating business.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner Fetella, Simeon Wells Master, arrived at Sydney on Wednesday to load coal.

Messrs. Munn & Co.’s brigt. Amy Louise, Capt. Sheppard, arrived from New York Tuesday afternoon with anthracite coal. The passage was a stormy one. The Capt. left for St. John’s by this morning's train.

In the District Court on Wednesday morning, the Manager of the Slip here, endeavoured to obtain payment for the dockage of a certain vessel. The Court could not hold with the plaintiff and dismissed the case.

The schooner Quickstep, J.J. Keefe, Master, arrived from the Labrador via Trinity Tuesday night. This schooner is generally the last fishing vessel from this port to arrive from the Labrador, and she again brought the key this year.

Mr. George Parsons, Manager of the Nicklodian, is now staying at Gordon Lodge. Messrs Thorburn, McNab and John Henderson, who arrived by Tuesday night’s train and Mr. Trites, who came by Wednesday afternoon train also put up at the Gordon.

Now that another house has been placarded for scareletina, (scarlet fever) it would be well if the Board of Health would have the old Military Barracks fitted up as a lazaretto, so that in cases of the disease spreading, the wage-earners of the infected families may be at liberty to seek employment and not be a burden upon the Relieving Office.

The S.S. Virginia Lake en route to Labrador, arrived from St. John’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, and sailed again at 9 a.m. It took this steamer 12 hours to come from St. John’s, and this is not surprising, if the reports are correct. The Government is to be congratulated upon having such a suitable steamer upon the Labrador service.

Although it has been said that it was whispered into the ear of somebody, that a street light would be placed at the junction of Military Road and Garland Street, it may be relied upon, no electric will be placed there in the near future, even though the Telegram Correspondent may wish it, in his own or the public interest, unless he can prevail upon the Government to stand the whole expense of putting it there. It would require the erection of at least a half dozen poles and the Company is not likely to go for that expense for the sake of only one light. The Correspondent's allusion to Harbor Grace Island light is irrelevant to the question; as the present writer does not remember ever referring to the proposed light for the benefit of the Telegram Correspondent or anyone else.

Mrs. (Rev.) Severn and child, who were on a visit to St. John’s, were expected by this afternoon’s train. It is likely they will leave for their new home at Port de Grave during this week.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Stephen Andrews took place Wednesday afternoon, when a large number of citizens followed the remains to their resting place in the C. of E. Cemetery.

Mr. W.H. Kennedy who travels for the Thomas Smyth Co., of St. John’s, recently purchased a horse which he will use in visiting different places in this Bay. Mr. Kennedy is very energetic and it looks as if he means to hustle business.

A Missionary meeting will be held at the C. of E. Schoolroom, South Side, on Tuesday night next, with visiting speakers being Revs. W C. White, of Heart’s Content and F. Severn of Port de Grave. On Wednesday night the same deputation will address a meeting of Christ Church.

The sale of work in connection with St. Paul’s Church which is being held in Coughlan Hall, was well patronized on Wednesday night. The abundant supply of useful and ornamental goods, and the refreshment tables, literally groaned under the weight of dainty dishes, which attracted quite a large lot of patrons and gave the attendants a busy time. The proceeds of the night amounted to $267., a larger sum than was taken on the first night of the sale last year. Another good sale is expected tonight when a soup-supper will be special attraction.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 14th, ‘07"

November 16 1907 BRIGUS NEWS "Miss Jennie Spracklin arrived from New Harbor, T.B., by Saturday evening’ express.

Bearns’ property opposite Smith’s Corner, has been sold to Mr. Thomas Roberts. If the Government bought the lower part of it, and ran a road through to connect with the Riverhead Road, it would be a great convenience.

Miss Mary Rorke of Carbonear was in town last Sunday.

The schooners Helen, John McRae, and Canopus, are overdue from Sydney with coal cargoes.

Business this fall has been the dullest for many years.

The schooner Charlotte, W. Clark, sailed on Monday for Trinity Bay, where she will get a thorough repair. The Puritan is also there and will be given new deck and topsails.

The Hue Mattress Factory will be brought to Brigus and erected near the Railway Station.

Rev. J.W. Bartlett arrived from Grand Bank last Monday.

Miss Nillie Bowden of St. John’s is spending a holiday with Mrs. F.H. Hue.

The ball in the Cabot Hotel last week was the best on record. Arch Smith and Will Bartlett the two promoters, are to be congratulated.

The schooner Pilot arrived from St. John’s on Tuesday, with provisions for Hiscock firm.

Smith’s Island Store was auctioned the first part of the week. The highest offer was considered too low, and the sale was called off.

Brigus Nov.14th. "

November 16 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Cacouna left Montreal Thursday for this port. S.S. Almeriana arrived at Liverpool at 3 p.m. Thursday. S.S. Dagied is due here today from Montreal and Gulf ports.
November 16 1907 PERSONAL Mr. W.F. O’Reilly, Magistrate of Placentia, is in town. Inspector General McGown was slightly improved again yesterday. There passed away of heart disease on Monday the 17th Nov., at Sydney C.B., James Burns, Chemist and Druggist. The deceased was indisposed but a day or two and his death came as a surprise to all who knew him. One of nature’s noblemen, universally beloved and esteemed, not only in Sydney but in all the country around about. He leaves a blank difficult to fill. Mr. Burns stood high in the Masonic order. Mrs. Sidney Woods is a sister and Dr. W.V. Burns, late of this city, a brother of the deceased.
November 16 1907 WEATHER REPORT The weather along the line yesterday, was the worst experienced the season. There was but little change last night, the latest reports received being: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 20 above. Bay of Islands, calm, dull, snowing, 30 above. Quarry, N.W., light, snowing, 17 above. Bishop’s Falls W., light, dull, 21 above. Clarenville, calm, fine. 30 above. Whitbourn, W., light, dull, 38 above.
November 16 1907 NEW WATER WORKS The construction work on the new water service is rapidly progressing, and 5,600 feet have been done to date. The old pipes, which were put down last year, have been taken up, and replaced with new ones, which have been tested under a most severe pressure and will give satisfaction. Engineer Ryan and staff hope to have the line completed this season, and a full supply of water will be given to the higher levels.
November 16 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Blackhead Road is in a terrible condition at present, and needs repairs forthwith.

J.T. Murphy, Halifax, and W.F. O’Reilly, Placentia, registered at the Crosbie yesterday.

The B.I.S. will hold its regular quarterly meeting tomorrow immediately after Mass.

In the letter published yesterday from Bay of Islands, for J.A. Bartlett read J.A. Barrett.

The Cochrane House has been purchased by M.W.V. Drayton, and will be run by him in future.

The local fishermen were outside yesterday and secured good catches. The fish sold at remunerative prices in the Coves.

The people of Holyrood are making arrangements for a sociable to be held in the Star Hall there next week.

The Reid Company is now building ten freight cars at their work shop at the Dock. Two have been completed, and the others will be constructed during the winter.

The schooner Springfield, Styles, arrived in port yesterday afternoon from Fox Harbor, Random, after a quick run of nine hours, bringing a varied cargo of 250 quintals of fish, 2 turns of oil, 23 thousand feet of Cooper’s lumber, 3 cows, 7 sheep and some poultry.

W. J. Styles schooner, Isabel Alice, arrived yesterday afternoon, from Fox Harbor, Random, having made the run in about nine hours, which is a very quick time, for such a distance. The Isabel Alice had on board 300 quintals fish, 2 turns of oil, 17 thousand feet of Cooper’s lumber, 1 cow and 5 sheep.

At nine last night, a young woman walking along Water Street was suddenly seized with a fit of weakness, and fell to the sidewalk opposite the door of Parsons Photograph Studio. She was lifted up by persons who were passing, and brought into the hallway of the building, where she recovered after a time. When she had sufficiently revived, she was conveyed to her home in a cab.

The case of the King versus Augustus Sweeney for manslaughter, has been postponed until December.

There will be a welcome meeting at No.2 Barracks, Livingstone St., tomorrow, to Adj. Barr, the new Chancellor. It will be led by Lieut. Col Rees. All will be welcome.

The Reid Co. will within a few days, instal new signals along the railway. The signals will have green and red lenses and will be so worked as to save considerable delay to trains. When the train is required to stop at a station for orders, the red is shown, and when it can pass, the green is exhibited. At night these will be lighted, and the Engineer and Conductor will be able to ascertain if the road is clear without delay.

The schooner Minnie, John Miller, arrived in port yesterday from New Bonaventure, Trinity Bay, after a quick run of nine hours, laden with fishery products.

The schooner Mauna Lea, Davis, Greenspond, has finished landing a cargo of fish from Cape Charles, Labrador. She is now at Bennett’s wharf, loading provisions and general merchandise for F. Moore, St. Anthony.

Mr. George Neal, the enterprising Produce Merchant, is enlarging his office, rendered necessary by the increased work resulting from the extension made in his business. His wharf, stores, offices alike, are busy centres, and growing busier every week.

Schooners arriving in port yesterday reported that it snowed very hard along the North side of Trinity Bay Thursday night, from ten till after midnight. While the snow was falling here, early yesterday morning, the weather was clear and fine in that section.

The shore train arrived at 9.45 last night bringing about 30 passengers.

The S.S. Sobraon, is now at the dock pier being made ready for her whaling voyage.

The whalers Puma, and Lynx, S.S. Stord, and S. S. Petral, are now on Dry Dock being overhauled. The former two are being made ready for their cruise South.

Brakeman Charles Graham, who had his hand badly injured a few days ago, and is being treated in Hospital, was much improved yesterday. It will be some time however, before he will be able to resume work.

Constable Wells arrived by train from Carbonear yesterday, having in charge a prisoner named Henry Deer, of Flat Islands, who was sentenced to four months by Judge Penney at Carbonear, for assaulting a relative."

November 18 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "W.G.R. Hinds, the man who is to open a five cent show in the T. A. Hall, will arrive by today’s express.

Over ninety miners are returning from the Sydney’s by today’s express. They are returning to spend the winter with friends.

Sunday’s express brought in a large number of passengers including: W.J. Scott, M. Martin, J Manuel, H.P. Cornick, W.H. Greene, P. Martin, R. Simms.

Saturday afternoon, Constable Nugent was called to the Railway Station to arrest an outport man who was creating a disturbance. The man was under the influence of liquor.

The P.E. Island schooner Helen Stewart, is now due to George Neal with 12,000 bushels of oats and other products. She harbored at Trepassey yesterday out of the storm.

Whale oil increased in value in the foreign market the past few weeks and is considerably higher that the price given last year, and in consequence, some of the whaling concerns will share good profit.

The Reid Company will have their snow plows thoroughly polished with graphite before they will be placed in service, which will make them more useful in snow fighting; the snow not sticking to the plow as it otherwise would.

The Ingraham returned from Hawke’s Bay Saturday, with J.J Murphy and a party of American capitalists who have been inspecting timber areas. The visitors were favourably impressed with the properties, and it is expected that a sale will be made.

Mr. H.P. Cornick, formerly of the Timber Estates, arrived from Lewisporte Saturday on a visit to friends. He leaves again tomorrow for Millertown, where he has accepted a position with the Harmsworths at Millertown, where the latter company will begin mining operations at an early date. Mr. Cornick is accompanied by his child.

A lane known as Rocky Lane, leads from the West part of Merry Meeting Road to Newtown Road. This lane, though a public thoroughfare, has become a dumping ground for all kinds of refuse, ashes, etc., thrown from the sanitary cars into the lane, while all the animals, such as dogs and cats, etc., that perish in the central part of the city and on the higher levels, are given open air graves there. It is also stated that the residents of Merry Meeting Road, West past Summer Street and McNeilly Street, who have not yet been honoured with nightly visits from the city patrol cars, made this lane a depositary of sanitary refuse. Its condition can be more easily imagined than described, and it is a standing menace to the health of the people who lived near it.

Mr. McGrath’s new paper will, we understand, be issued tomorrow.

The Christmas edition of the Free Press will be issued on December 17th.

A handsome mural tablet has been erected in Gower Street Church, to the memory of the late Rev. Dr. Milligan.

The schooners that went ashore at Twillingate in the September storm, are now practically all removed from the rocks. A number of them have been repaired, some at big expense, and will be fit for the trade next summer.

Hard frost last night. Winter is here!

At Greenspond and vicinity, some catches of small herring were taken last week.

Over $14,700 has already been subscribed toward the removal of the debt on Gower Street Church - another $6,000 and the Trustees will be able to sing the “Nunc Dimittis.”

A young woman named Penny was brought in by Constable Benson from Carbonear, Saturday last, and taken to the Lunatic Asylum for treatment. She was somewhat violent on the way over.

The weather up country yesterday, was fine West from Exploits. East from that point, the conditions were about the same as in the city. Last night’s report is: Port aux Basques, calm, fine, 38 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., strong. Snowing, 42 above. Quarry, N.W., light, showery, 20 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W., light, dull, 28 above. Clarenville, calm, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, calm, fine, 35 above.

The whaler Port Saunders, operating at Hawke’s Bay, has only landed 30 whales to date. The shareholders are not likely to receive any big profits from this turnover.

An important case having reference to timber areas, will come before the Supreme Court for hearing tomorrow. Several witnesses who will give testimony at the trial, arrived in town from Bootwoodville, by Saturday’s express.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: M Beaton, J Haynes, M. Sullivan, A.E. Foran, C Foran, Miss G. Eldon, Miss S.A. Day, R. Walsh, Mrs. A Johnstone, Miss Daley, M. Thistel, Mrs. Saxton, Miss M. Delaney, W. Tulk, R. Hill, H. Conwan, T. Curran, W.H. Horwood, J.S. Taylor, J.W. Owens.

Acknowledgement. — We have received the following amounts toward the relief of the families of the crew of the Irion, and other storm suffers, if any not yet provided for: Isaac C. Morris $5.00. Rev. C. Hacket $3.00. Daily News $5.00. J. Alex Robinson $5.00. Capt. J.R. Moss $5.00. ------- $23.00."

November 19 1907 PORTIA BACK FROM NORTHWARD The S.S. Portia, Capt. A. Kean, arrived in port at 7.30 last night, from Northern ports. She left here the 8th Nov. and called at every port North to Griquet. Fine weather was experienced almost the whole trip though it was somewhat cold. From Nipper’s Harbor, North, some ice had made near land, but is of insignificant thickness. The Coast, coming South, had a very wintry appearance, all the hills and headlands being covered with snow. The Portia brought a small quantity of freight and the following passengers; Messrs. Bussey, Simms, Maddcock, McCormack, Neah, Hear, Huelin, Foots, House, Budgell, Snow (2), Herbert, Quirk, Loveridge, Saunders, Winsor, Bishop, Brown, Snelgrove, Maguire, Fowlow (3). Collis, Lockyer, Mesdames Howlett, Kean (2), Barbour, Snelgrove, Green, O’Neill, Matthews, Turner, Barter, Misses Williams, McCormack, Winsor, Doyle, Bishop, Hanan, Piercy, Snelgrove (6), Pack, Lanham, Matthews, Froud, Blunden, and 90 in steerage.
November 19 1907 S.S. DAGEID IN PORT At noon yesterday, the S.S. Dageid, Steenson, arrive from Montreal via Gulf ports, after a passage of fourteen days, with a general cargo to Shea & Co. The ports called at are Charlottetown and Summerside, P.E.I., and North Sydney. The run from Sydney was made in a little over two days. All the way from Montreal to St. John’s, stormy weather was met with. One hundred and thirty sheep were taken on board at Prince Edward Island, but two of them perished in transit, and many others more or less injured, owing to the rolling of the ship.
November 19 1907 MAN MISSING FROM MADDOX COVE Patrick Murphy of Maddox Cove, has been missing since Saturday night, and his friends are fearful that he is not alive. Murphy was a Seaman on the Diana, and only returned to his post Saturday morning. In the afternoon he left Maddox Cove, taking along with him some purchases, and friends in St. john’s thought he had reached home safely. Mrs. Murphy, hearing that the Diana arrived Saturday, and her husband not turning up, left Maddox Cove yesterday morning for here, to learn the cause of his absence. About a mile from her home, she picked up two parcels which she brought to town. She immediately on reaching here, visited her sister-in-law to enquire for her husband, and in the meantime showed the parcels she had picked up. Her sister-in-law was horror-stricken, as they were none other than two she had tied up for the missing man Saturday afternoon. The finding of the parcels so near his home, makes it plainly evident that Murphy strayed away from the road sometime Saturday night. The Police were informed of the occurrence and Constable Lawlor and Tobin were sent to look for him. A number of men from Petty Harbor and Maddox Cove are also engaged in the search, but up to late last night, they were unsuccessful.
November 19 1907 A SAD CASE By the S.S. Portia, Phene Ellesworth, a blind orphan, arrived from Carmanville to enter Hospital. The girl is only eight years old, and is a daughter of one of the unfortunate men who were smothered in the woods at Carmanville last spring. Today the little one will go in Hospital and have an operation performed on her eyes. After the operation the girl will be sent to the Halifax School for the Blind.
November 19 1907 COLUMBIA SAFE The schooner Columbia, Carrol, which went ashore on Northern Labrador, and for the safety of which friends of those on board were getting anxious, was seen at Seldom-Come-By by the S.S. Portia. Capt. Carrol was on board the Portia and reported all his crew well. The Columbia was harbored at Englee when the Portia was going South.
November 19 1907 PERSONAL Capt. E. Bishop of Wesleyville arrived in the city last night. Mr. William Duff arrived from Carbonear yesterday on business. Mr. H. Frazer of the R.N. Co., who was up country photographing, returned by yesterday’s express. Mr. E. Hearn, Manager of I Perlin’s stores, Tilt Cove, arrived in the city by the S.S. Portia, on a visit. Mr. J. McCormack of Coachman’s Cove, is at present in the city on business, having arrived by the Portia. Mr. Robertson, of the Bowser Oil Tank Co., leaves by this evening’s train on a business trip over the line. Capt. Jesse Winsor arrived from Westeyville by the Portia, last night and will remain a few days on business. Mr. Stephen Loveridge, representing the firm of William Ashbourne of Twillingate, is now in the city make some heavy purchases for that business. He will be returning home by the Portia on Thursday. Mrs. Samuel J Brookman, mother of Dr. Brookman, formerly of Bay of Islands and Greenspond, died at Sydney on Wednesday night in her 59th year. Mrs. John Bartlett and Mrs. Dr. Kendall are sisters, and Mr. H.C. Burchell, formerly Government Engineer, is a brother of the deceased lady. The cause of death was apolexy. The funeral took place on Saturday.
November 19 1907 ORION DISASTER "Today we are in a position to report considerable progress, as will be seen from the accompanying letter from Mr. Davidson. He has handed in a cheque covering the subscription from some firms which he represents in the Island.

St. John’s Nov. 18, 1907.

Dear Sir.—

Enclosed please find a cheque which I have to ask you to deposit to the credit of the “Orion” and general relief fund, pending the distribution of same to the widows and orphans who have suffered the loss of their loved ones. We cannot make up their loss but we can try by our acts of sympathy.

The cheque amounts to $143.30, particulars of which are enclosed.

Yours very truly, (Signed) W.H. DAVIDSON.

In addition to the foregoing, we have pleasure in acknowledging further subscriptions. One for $10.00 from “The North River Catholic Bazaar Committee, per Rev. Dr. Whalen,” suggests a method of increasing the funds which is well worth consideration. The success that is achieved by bazaar is alway due in a measure to outside help and it is a pleasure in turn to help others, especially when the cause is so deserving a one. This is the season for Bazaars, Sales of Work etc., and small donations from each would prove most helpful, and at the same time not place any extra burden upon the promoters.

The list stands as follows: To amount acknowledged, $23.00. Ernest W. Taylor, General Freight Agent R.N. Co. $5.00. G.W. Goodwin & Sons, Ivy Soap Works, Manchester, England, £10, - $48.66. Trummers & Co., Sea Dog Matches, London, £10 - $48.66. Aut Jurgen’s Margarine Works, Oss, Holland, £5.5 - 25.44. Kit Coffee Limited, Glasgow ,Scotland £2.2 - $10.22. Eugene Goulmy & Baar, Amsterdam Holland, £2.2 - $10.22. North River Catholic Bazaar Committee per Rev. Dr. Whalen, $10.00. Success, $1.00. Total - $182.20.

We trust this sum may be considerably augmented and that the Outports will be largely represented on the list."

November 19 1907 DIED SUDDENLY BODY ARRIVES The body of W. Bishop, late
November 19 1907 SLIDING ACCIDENT The 8 year old son of Stanley Abbott, Springdale Street, met with a painful accident last evening while sliding. Young Abbott was coming down the incline at good speed and collided with another slide, owned by a boy named Roberts. The crash was very heavy and Abbott was thrown off into the drain. He was picked up in an unconscious condition and brought to his home, where the Dr. was called. It was found that the boy’s leg was badly fractured and he also had a deep cut in his forehead, which required five stitches to close it.
November 19 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "The little steamer Nereus belonging to Bell Island, was taken on the slip here this afternoon.

Mr. Hillyou arrived in town Friday night, and put up at Gordon Lodge. He left again this morning.

On Monday Next, Miss Bride Lee will began an engagement as singer with the Nickelodin at the Academy Hall.

Mr. John Pumphrey, who was ill for a couple of weeks, has been about these two days and will return to his post in Messrs R. Rutherford & Co.’s Grocery on Monday.

The S.S. Euphrates arrived from St. John’s this morning with a quantity of staves for Messrs Murray & Crawford. She takes back some cod oil and a number of fish drums.

Mrs. Severn, child and maid, for Port de Grave, and Mr. G.H. Badcock for St. John’s, went out by this morning’s train. Mr. Badcock and wife are expected to return tonight.

Messrs. Munn & Co. were apprised by cable on Friday, that their schooner Nellie Louise, Capt. Mark Burke, had arrived at Pernambuco on Thursday, after a quick passage of 31 days.

The anthracite coal brought by the brigt Amy Louise, is meeting with a ready sale, and the ship is expected to be discharged by next Tuesday, after which she will go to Sydney for coal.

Rev. A.M. McLeod, under the direction of the Halifax Presbytery, will supply at the Presbyterian Church here about the end of the present month, when Rev. J. McNeil will take his departure.

In the District Court, two sharemen at the Labrador fishery, applied for the recovery of money due them from a planter. Defendant’s son who was in Court, admitted his father’s liability, so judgement went to plaintiffs for the amount due them with costs.

Trade was brisk at some of the stores on Water Street today; but notwithstanding an occasional busy day, the amount of trade done here this fall, up to the present, does not approach that done by most of the shops up to the same time last year.

The public waiting room of the Post Office has recently been done up, the walls having been stained with an oak pattern and varnished. The room now looks tidy and will no doubt present a respectable appearance until a more suitable office building in placed in the proposed Public Building, which will certainly adorn the town, if the proper course is taken by our citizens.

The receipts at the sale of work at Couglan Hall on Thursday night amounted to $114. This sum with some small amounts which came in the next day, and the proceeds of Wednesday night’s sale, aggregated $385, an amount only $4 less than that taken at last years sale which ran three nights. Quite a lot of superior goods, which could not be sold at a low figure, were not disposed of, and will be kept for another sale at some future date.

The President of “Diamond Jubilee” Lodge, S.O.E., are in receipt of a copper shield forwarded by the Supreme Grand Lodge at Toronto. The shield commemorates the death of Nelson, Oct, 21st 1805, and will be kept by the lodge as a souvenir, in memory of the Battle of Trafalgar and the death of “the greatest sailor since the world began.” Upon the shield is a print of Nelson’s Flagship, Victory, as she was in 1805, under which is an inscription as follows: “England experts that every man will do his duty.” Death to Nelson Oct 21st , 1805, Centenary Memento Oct. 21st 1905, containing copper from H.M.S. Victory. From the Lords of the Admiralty to the British and Foreign Sailors Society, E.R. VII. The shield will be suitably mounted and put in a conspicuous place in the lodge room, so that all who visit the room may be reminded of that memorable occasion, when liberty and rest were secured to the millions of the British race by the achievement of a national hero. The president has also a number of watch chains of the same design for distribution among the members of the lodge. The lodge hopes to secure a bust of Nelson done in the same metal and mounted upon “Victory” oak.

Mr. Thomas Snow, in an interview with your Correspondent, complained strongly of the treatment accorded him by the Authorities here, in connection with the sad occasion which eventuated in himself having to convey his wife to the Insane Asylum at St. John’s. Mr. Snow wishes to have his case brought to Public notice and urged the writer to lay bare the facts. He claims to be a poor man who would be unable to do what has been done for his wife only for the assistance given by friends in sympathy. He states that he asked Judge Seymour for assistance to take his wife to St. John’s. This the Judge refused to do as the Magistrate suggested that Mr. Snow see the Relieving Officer.

The Relieving Officer flatly refused to give aid, and the Local Member for the District was applied to, but no assistance whatever was obtained by the distressed man. Not even a Policeman to take charge of the unfortunate woman, was allowed. The husband had a most trying time on the train and says his experience was a cruel one. At Brigus Junction, a Policeman boarded the train and suggested that the patient’s hands be tied with a rope, but this the husband would not permit.

After a most trying journey, which called for constant vigilance on the part of the husband, the wife was taken to her destination. At St. John’s, all the Police assistance necessary was easily and readily obtained, but here, no help whatever could be got from the Authorities. Even the Doctor who filled out the required form for admission to the Asylum, charged a fee of $5, which under the processing circumstances, the husband promised to pay.

Such is the story told by Mr. Snow which, if it has not another side, indicates that much unnecessary trial was placed upon a poor man, who it seems did not posses the knowledge how to make his claim known, in order obtain assistance, which is due to every citizen no matter what his station in life may be.

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 16th, ‘07"

November 19 1907 BELL ISLAND NEWS "FROM PIT TO PIER:

Quite a number of steamers have been loaded with ore and sailed again during the past week.

Rev. Fr. McGrath is organizing a concert under the management of the Misses Donnelly, which is to take place at a near date. There is good vocal talent amongst the principals of the program and a successful all round result is anticipated.

It is understood that one of the moving picture shows have taken St. Joseph’s Hall and will arrive here soon to give a short season of exhibitions. We bespeak their success.

The weather was very cold last night, the thermometer showing several degrees of frost.

Workmen are still arriving and being employed by the two companies. Business is being rushed ahead smartly, night and day, and preparations for the winter will soon be completed.

Friday and Saturday next, will be busy days on the Island, being Chamber’s and Whitney’s pay days respectively, when some $70,000 will be disbursed

The Road Commission here have been at work, and they have actually placed ashes over the public road, after allowing it to be knee deep in mud and whole fall. Now however, OH Generous boom! —they have actually fixed up about an eight of a mile of it.

There has been added to the inhabitants of Bell Island, a real live Baker, who proved a great convenience on the Island. It is gratifying to see the familiar bread car on its rounds every morning.

Everything in Police and Customs quarter have come to a dead calm and happiness quiet and content permeates the land.

The Daily News is now being eagerly look for every evening in this part of the Island, and “From Pit to Pier” is read with interest by nearly all the inhabitants. It is one little column in the whole Island devoted to their interest, and the only means by which, so far, their sentiments, favourable and otherwise, can be made public. Now that the elections are within a year of us, your paper will soon be a boon to your subscribers during the coming winter months.

Another grand social event was given at St. Joseph’s Hall last night , Nov. 12th. A return soiree was given the ladies of Bell Island by the gentlemen of Wabana, at which the “Exiles” attended in goodly numbers. Some 80 persons participated, and dancing to lively music was kept up till 3.30 a.m. The ladies were richly attired in gay costumes, whilst the gentlemen appeared “well fixed” for the occasion. Our local Baker catered, and everything was done so well by the gentlemen of the committee, that not the slightest hitch occurred during the whole program, which consisted of some 24 dances, songs and luncheon. A beautiful new 3 step or mazurka, the grateful motion of which would delight a lover of the Terpsichorean, was danced by some eight or ten couples with Mr. McDonald leading. Both he and his lady partner did full justice to this beautiful dance. Prof. Kneeland furnished the music for this special event which is a beautiful soft air played in slow time. The latter played and danced together. A very nice hornpipe was danced by Mr. P. O’Brien. Mr. J Burke was Floor Manager, and was indefatigable in his efforts to please all, which he did to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. True democratic courtesy and good will prevailed throughout. At the request of Mr. Burke, Mr. W.J. English announced notably Mr. D. Jackman, with “Hauled Him Back Again.” Mr. P Doyle with “My Irish Mollie” but the crowning event of all was Mr. F. Jardine’s “Adieu Marie” which received echoing applause. Later, a very nice quartette was rendered – “The Old Oaken Bucket” – with Mr. McDonald in the treble. It was a pity the Superintendent of Construction, Mr. Dan McKinnon could not be present, as business called him away. Foreman Dan in an all round good fellow not only at amusement, but at work - the men under his control simply love him, so genial and cheery is his disposition, and all work done under his supervision has generally met with full approbation. The soiree broke up, and after “They are jolly good fellows” had been sung, all returned to their homes feeling that they had spent one of the most enjoyable evenings for a long, long time.

CORRESPONDENT. Bell Island, Nov 12th."

November 19 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Glencoe arrived at Port aux Basques at 9 p.m. yesterday. Clyde left Nipper’s Harbor at 4 p.m. yesterday going North. Dundee left Port Blandford at 4 p.m. yesterday. Argyle left Placentia at 6.30 p.m. yesterday on the Red Island route. Ethie left Clarenville at 12.30 p.m. yesterday.
November 19 1907 NAUTICAL S S. Corean arrived at Glasgow Sunday morning. S.S. Adventure will leave Sydney tomorrow for Harbor Grace. S.S. Regulus is now loading hard coal at New York for St. John’s. Schooner Leah, Whidden, is loading drum fish at Bowring Bros. for Brazil. Schooner Roanoke, Capt. H. Petite, is loading fish for Halifax at Smith Co.’s wharf. Benson’s schooner, St. Elmo, will leave tomorrow for Morton’s Harbor to load fish for St. John’s. Barqt. Galatea, Connors, in ballast to Baird, Gordon & Co., arrived from Oporto yesterday after a passage of 25 days. Schooner Margaret Murray, Williams, is loading at Bowring Bros. for Oporto. She sails this afternoon. Barqt. Golden Hind, Hearld, sailed for Pernambuco yesterday with fish in packages from Bishop & Monroe. S.S. Ulunda arrived at 5 yesterday morning two and one half days from Halifax, and will sail for Liverpool tomorrow. Schooner Water Sprite, Edward Kean, arrived Saturday night, from Brookfield, Bonavista Bay, with a cargo of 900 quintals of fish. S.S. Kenora Hayton, 18 days from Glasgow to Montreal, arrived in port yesterday, short of coal. Bowring Bros. are her agent.
November 19 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Rosalind had not arrived up to press time.

There are no new cases of infectious diseases reported at the Health Office since last issue.

There were three arrests made last night, a drunk, a disorderly, and drunk and disorderly. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning.

The Rev. Mr. Gericke, the Moravian Missionary, was entertained at Government House yesterday by their Excellencies Sir William MacGregor and Lady MacGregor

A young man named Snow of Pilley’s Island, arrived by the Portia last night to enter Hospital. He was looked after by his father on the passage.

Yesterday was the busiest along Water Street for some weeks, the shop hands having all the work they could attend to. It was also a busy day along the waterfront, there being thousands of quintals of fish landed.

It was reported about town last night, that a young man living on a suburban road, has committed suicide by severing the arteries of his arm with a razor. The News enquired from the Police but they knew nothing of such an occurrence.

Passengers who arrived by last night’s express, reported herring very plentiful in the Arms at Bay of Islands and some good hauls are being made daily. Several schooners with frozen and salted cargoes respectively, will be ready to sail for markets this week.

Two seamen from the S.S. Kenora amused themselves on Water Street last night, and soon had a large crowd following them. Constables Coady and Hann objected to the proceedings and arrested the seamen, this morning they will answer for their conduct before the Magistrate.

Off Cape St. Francis last night, when the Portia was passing, a large ship brilliantly lighted could be seen a short distance off. Suddenly all lights went out and did not show again, at least up to the time the Portia entered the harbor. The steamer was evidently the one that passed the narrows at 8 o’clock and the disappearance of the lights was no doubt due to an accident to the ship’s dynamo.

The weather along the line yesterday was the coldest for the season, there bing 25 degrees of frost registered at the Quarry. Last night is was also cold at the Quarry, the reports being; Port aux Basques, S.W. light, fine, 38 above. Bay of Islands, calm, fine, 40 above. Quarry, N.E., light, fine, 10 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 23 above. Clarenville, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, N.W., light, fine, 30 above.

A large steamer passed the narrows last night at 8 going South, evidently an ore boat from Bell Island.

All the hotels in the city are now filled. At one of them last night, several who sought admission, had to be refused, not a single room being vacant.

Several schooners coming into port last night were becalmed in the narrows from 8 o’clock until 11. Two of them had to drop their anchors to prevent the tide taking them on the rocks.

The “Evening Chronicle” will make its bow to the public tomorrow afternoon. As will be observed by reference to our advertising columns, Mr. McGrath requests that all advertisements for the first issue be sent in not late than noon today.

There is a good sign of herring about White Bay and fair hauls are being made daily.

Miss Maher, of Petty Harbor, who is on a visit to friends in the city, met with a very painful accident, Saturday morning. In going down Bannerman Street she slipped on the ice and fell, breaking one of her arms below the elbow. Dr. Campbell was called to attend the injured and on examination, he found it to be a single fracture of one of the bones between the elbow and the wrist.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday and last night: W.B. Ford, Wabana; D.A. Ryan, Trinity; Arthur Terroux, Montreal; George J Baker, Boston; C.A. Norman, Michigan; W.J. Murphy, Boston; C.A. Jerret, Brigus; Wm. Duff, Carbonear; W.M. Belfoor, Botwoodville, H.J. Hannon, Botwoodville, E.A. Whiteman, Botwoodville, Jesse Winsor, Wesleyville. C LeDrew, Botwoodville, John Connors, Botwoodville, E. Bishop, Wesleyville, B. Good Vancouver, B.C., Mrs. B. Goose, Vancouver, B.C. M.W. Taylor, James Greening.

At present, the Police have a number of Privates and Sergeants layed off with illness. The only Sergeant doing duty at present is Sergeant Peet.

The express arrived at 7 last evening, bringing; Sir R. Harvey, J.W. Grant, H. Frazer, A Whitemen, D.A. Ryan, C. Drew, J. Noseworthy, H.C. Curtis and about 40 others, mostly pogie fishermen, returning from New England, to spend the winter at home.

At 7.35 yesterday morning, an alarm from box 34 brought the Central and West End firemen to the residence of Mr. Kielly, Water Street West. The blaze was only a slight one, the wood casing around the fire place having caught fire, owing to a defect in the chimney. It was put out with a few buckets of water and the services of the brigade were not needed. Another alarm was sent in at 11.57, from box 26 but the Firemen did not reach the scene. The wires had become crossed and the alarm did not ring, so as to indicate the right box. The blaze this time, was at the house of Mr. Coffin, Butcher, New Gower Street, where a pan of fat had caught fire. No damage was done, and it was put out in a few minutes. The crossed wires were adjusted later."

November 20 1907 ORION DISASTER In last night’s issue of the Evening Telegram, appears a list of the subscriptions received by Messrs Gear and Davey, towards the Orion Relief Fund. The amount collected by them, so far is $1,040.50 and no doubt further sums will be added. Considering the large demands upon the public of St. John’s, this generous response is most gratifying; and we congratulate the Members for the District upon the success which has thus crowned their efforts. The sum realized, augmented by subscriptions received from other sources, will do much to alleviate suffering in the stricken homes.
November 20 1907 BODY FOUND NEAR HOME The body of the missing man Murphy, was found yesterday forenoon, by Constables Tobin and Lawlor. The Police searched both sides of the road from the place where the parcels were picked, and after continuing for about three quarters of a mile, found the corpse about 40 feet from the side of the road, in a thicket of alders. The body was on its side, and was partly frozen. The face was somewhat marked; the theory advanced, being that the marks were caused from falling. Neither along the road nor about the deceased’s clothing, was any liquor or liquor bottles found, and the report that he had been inebriated. The unfortunate man did not live at Maddox Cove, but was on his way there to see his wife, who was spending a few weeks with her brother. Where the body was found was about three hundred yards from where his wife was staying. How he wandered into the woods will remain a mystery. In the afternoon, the remains was taken to the morgue, and a post mortem examination was made by Dr. Rendell, who pronounced death due to exposure. Last night the body was coffined and taken to his late home. Murphy’s death has created great sorrow among his friends and it is particularly sad, considering that he had only returned from a Northern sea voyage, and was going home to see his wife. General and sincere sympathy is expressed for the family of deceased, in which the News joins.
November 20 1907 LEFT HOME AND CAUSED TROUBLE Monday morning, a young man named Bowe, of the Goulds Road, came to town to dispose of the day’s milk supply, and as per usual, he was expected to return at the customary hour. Monday night, the horse returned, but without the owner, and Bowe’s family became anxious. Yesterday morning, he not having turned up, the matter was reported in town, and a general search was organized by friends. The search was unsuccessful however, and those engaged at it could learn nothing as to where the missing man was. The News however, learned last night that Bowe joined the train at Waterford Bridge, Monday night. Leaving his horse go home, he bought a ticket for North Sydney, and was carried as far as Port aux Basques, where he will likely join the S.S. Bruce for the coal fields. It is alleged that Bowe did not leave exactly on a health trip, and this morning the authorities at Port aux Basques will be cabled to arrest and send him back.
November 20 1907 REGULUS STRIKES A SNAG "(Exclusive to Daily News)

New York, Nov. 19th — The steamer Regulus, from Lewisporte for New York, lumber laden, is ashore twenty miles east of Fire Island. There is not much sea running and the steamer is in no immediate danger. The crew are aboard and throwing the cargo overboard in the attempt to float her. Tugs have gone to her relief. Harvey and Co. of St. John’s, are the owners."

November 20 1907 INJURED AT TICKLE HARBOR Cornelius Sullivan, of Harbor Main, met with a serious accident yesterday afternoon, while engaged at railway fencing work at Tickle Harbor. Sullivan was close beside another workman, who was driving a nail which broke off when struck, and hit Sullivan in the jaw, the point entering his eye. He was knocked unconscious and a copious stream of blood flowed from the wound. After a few moments however, he revived, but unable to see, and it is believed he has lost his sight. The matter was reported to the Reid Co., and the injured man was brought in by last night’s train for medical treatment. Mr. Sullivan is a hard working man, about 60 years old, and the last summer, was Master of a schooner at Labrador, securing a good voyage of fish.
November 20 1907 FINED FOR BREACH OF GAME LAW Capt. McClaire, an English sportsman, was before Magistrate March at Bay of Islands yesterday, charged with violating the Game Laws, which being proven, he was fined $150. The fine was paid. It will be remembered, some time ago the News called attention to this matter, having been informed that McClaire killed a caribou on the 19th Nov. The happening was then taken notice of by the Authorities, and Sergt. Sheppard, who is a special Game Warden, was instructed to look after the Captain. The Sergeant secured sufficient evidence, and had the offender brought to justice with the above result.
November 20 1907 BOY ARRESTED FOR LARCENY Last night, two Policemen doing duty in the West End, captured two boys in the act of stealing. The Officers were on their way to the Railway Station, and near the archway to the R.N. Co.’s freight sheds, saw the lads emerging from McCarthy’s Junk Store with a bag. Being questioned by the Police they acknowledged that they had entered the place and taken some articles of different value. Both who are old offenders, were taken to the Police Station and will be arraigned before the Magistrate today.
November 20 1907 ROSALIND ARRIVES The S.S. Rosiland, Clarke, arrived in port from Halifax and New York at 5 a.m. yesterday. She made a fine run from New York to Halifax and from the latter port met fine weather to here. She brought a full cargo, several packages of freight, and the following passengers: Miss T. Simpson, Miss A Worrall, Miss M. Smith, and 82 steerage, from New York; Messrs J Moore, G.A. Humphries, R.C. and Mrs. Mason, H.C. Robinson, J.H. Monrce, C.H. Bell, and 1 in steerage from Halifax.
November 20 1907 A MORAVIAN MISSIONARY Yesterday, we had the pleasure of meeting the Rev. Mr. Gericke, who after eleven years continuous service at the Moravian settlement on Labrador, is now proceeding to the Moravian headquarters at Herrnhaut, Saxony, with the intention of working in the Home Mission field. Mr. Gericke came out eleven years ago on the last trip of the old sailing vessel, Harmony, going direct from London to Macovic, (Makkovik) the journey occupying 45 days. This is his first visit to St. John’s. His father and maternal grandfather were also Moravian Missionaries, and he and his mother were both born in Greenland. During the Governor’s visit he missed seeing him, as he was at Ramah, where His Excellency was unable to call. On Monday with Mrs. Gericke, he dined at Government House, so that now Sir William has a personal acquaintance with all the Missionaries who have been labouring on that Coast during recent years. Mr. and Mrs. Gericke with their three children, and one belonging to a brother Missionary, leave by the Ulunda today.
November 20 1907 THE LATE FRANK CURTIS Many there are in St. John’s who will learn with deep regret of the death of Mr. Frank Curtis of Salmonier, youngest son of the late Garrett Curtis, who was one of our old settlers and shipbuilders of that place. The former was one of the active intelligent spirits of that section, entrusted with the performance of much confidential Government work such as surveying the public lands, revising the census and electoral lists, etc. He was one of the noted shots and guides of the Avalon Peninsula; the friend of the officers of the Royal Newfoundland Companies, who with invited comrades from the garrison at Halifax, made Salmonier their headquarters in the shooting season, with their relays of splendidly trained Englished pointers and setters; but not the best shot amongst them, as he candidly admitted, could equal the sure and brilliant style in which Mr. Curtis brought down his birds, right and left. Subsequently he took service with his friend, the late Smith McKay, in the latter’s great development of the Tilt Cove Copper Mine. All have gone to the brighter land, we trust; bright, genial, generous souls, and the world is darken for their departure. Mr. Curtis married, at Tilt Cove, Miss Hoskins, daughter of the Mining Captain there, who, with three intelligent sons and two daughters, survive him.
November 20 1907 CARBONEAR "Messrs E. Penney & Son’s schooner Ethel Grace, Herbert Pike, Master, arrived from St. John’s Wednesday night, bringing a full load of provisions, coal, groceries, etc. That firm intends opening a general store on their premises to the East of Tucker & Cameron’s.

Miss M Udell left Wednesday afternoon for Montreal, via St. John’s, to undergo surgical operation there for an affection of the throat. Her brother, Mr. William Udell accompanies her.

Two of Messrs Rorke & Sons schooners arrived Tuesday from Trinity and Bonavista Bays respectively laden with wharf sticks, firewood, etc.

A new desk of handsome design was placed in the Court Room on Wednesday. In appearance, it is a vast improvement on it predecessor. The work is from the skilful hand of Mr. George Colbourne, Foreman at J.P. Guy’s Furniture Factory.

Capt Handcock of the Mary Parker, one of Ryan & Co.’s schooners, arrived here Saturday with the belongings of the ill fated Mikado’s freighter. The Mikado was commanded by skipper Richard Murphy of this place, and ran ashore coming home, in Stag Harbor Run.

At dance at St. Patrick’s Hall on Thursday night attracted great numbers. The clock indicated 3.45 a.m. before the floor manager realized that there was an end to all things. Messrs Hamilton and Sweeney furnished music for the occasion.

Messrs J and J Maddock’s trader Onward, Jno. Pike Master, arrived Saturday, bringing a full load of fish, oil, etc, for the firm.

A youthful fishermen of 24 summers, hailing from the “marsh” and a fair resident of “Dear old South Side Hills” launched out in the matrimonial sea Thursday last. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. T.B. Darby, B.A. in the Methodist Church South Side, and witnessed by many.

Capt. Josiah Penney’s two schooners arrived from Red Bay this week. These are the last vessels to arrive from the prosecution of the season’s voyage.

Mrs. (Rev.) Chass Hackett returned to her home in the city on Saturday.

Constable Wells was dispatched Friday morning with one Henry Deer, who was convicted the day previous by Judge Penney, in a lawsuit for assault against his nephew, in which he was the aggressor. The prisoner was incited by an imaginary claim on a piece of land to which he had no clear title. It is said that this small strip of innocent soil at Flat Rock has been an incessant bone of contention between the contracting parties for years.

The annual Missionary meeting of St. James’ Church took place at 7.30 p.m. Thursday evening. As on former occasions, a large and attentive congregation attended. Revs C. Carpenter, Harbor Grace; F. Severn Island Cove and F.W. Colley, were present, also Mr. Norman of Coley’s Point. Earnest addresses on Missionary themes were delivered.

A young woman by the name of Julia A Penney, who has shown signs of mental derangement of late, was taken in charge by the authorities, and on Saturday, Constable Benson was ordered to take the unfortunate woman to the Lunatic Asylum. She is a grand-daughter of an old lady locally known as “Aunt” Susan Penney.

Owing to a slight mishap at the Power House, Mr. Cooper was obliged to shut off the electric current from 7 to 7.15 p.m. Thursday evening. To the business places, which were not prepared for such an emergency, the inconvenience was considerable.

Several transfers have been taken place recently in real estate. The residence and lands formerly occupied by the late Capt. R. Pike’s family have changed hands, and are now the property of Mr. Herbert Taylor of J and J Maddock’s firm; while two building lots, immediately situated to the rear of the Post Office, have been bought out from Miss Stapleton. One of the lots is already being excavated by the purchaser with a view to building.

Mr. George Winsor, accompanied with a crew of sailors, went out by Thursday express, en route to Gloucester to bring down a schooner recently purchased by Messrs Duff and Sons Ltd.

The law suite in which several hop beer sellers are involved, is further postponed until the Supreme Court sits here.

CORRESPONDENT, Carbonear, Nov. 18th, ‘07."

November 20 1907 HEALTH NOTES A house on Cochrane Street will be released from quarantine and disinfected today. There was only one case of scarlet fever at this house; the patient, a little girl, was reported yesterday fully recovered. No new cases were reported yesterday at the Health Office. Since last Friday, not a single new case of either scarlet or typhoid fever has developed in the city, and it looks as if these diseases are under control at last.
November 20 1907 NOT THIS YEAR The statement of one of the evening contemporaries, that Dr. Stewart is expecting the warship Brilliant to call at St. Anthony and convey him to Labrador, to take the necessary steps to combat the spread of disease amongst the Esquimaux, is well founded, but so far as we can ascertain, somewhat premature. Drs. Grenfell and Hutton have both voiced the need for such a service to be instituted, and we learn that arrangements were in progress with this object in view. They have however, not measured, and the Brilliant will scarcely visit the Labrador again this year. Apart from this, those in authority know nothing about Dr. Stewart’s contemplated sojourn on the Labrador Coast.
November 20 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Portia sales tomorrow at 10 a.m. for the Northward. Prospero left Bonne Bay at 8.20 a.m. yesterday.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Glencoe leaves Port aux Basques this morning. Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Clyde left Nipper’s Harbor at 1 p.m. yesterday, inward. Dundee left Bonavista at noon yesterday. Ethie left Carbonear at 4 p.m yesterday. Argyle left Sound Island at 3.25 p.m. yesterday, inward. Bruce is due Port aux Basques this morning."

November 20 1907 PERSONAL Col H.B. Robinson arrived by the Rosalind on a business trip. Mr. E.C. Brown, of King’s Cove, is at present in the city on business. Dr, McCollough, Magistrate of Oderin, leaves for there this morning to take up duties. Dr. and Mrs. Ames who were visiting the city yesterday, returned to Broad Cove by the evening’s express. Mr. and Mrs. E. Pike of Port aux Basques, who were visiting their daughter, Mrs. A Pretty, left for home last evening. Miss Peet, daughter of Sergt. Peet, who has been spending a vacation at Montreal with friends, will arrive tonight by the Bonavista. Constable William March returned from Placentia Bay Saturday night, where he was on fishery protection service, and yesterday resumed city duty. Mr. R.C. Mason, of New York, accompanied by Mrs Mason, arrived by the Rosalind yesterday, and are staying at the Balsam. About four months ago, Mr. Mason was here and bonded several timber claims, and is very much interested in the recent proposition for the establishment of a pulp concern at Hawke’s Bay. Mr. and Mrs. Mason will remain in the city for a few days.
November 20 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Sergt. Sparrow is at present confined to his room suffering from a cold. Sergt. Noseworthy is also ill.

The St. Thomas’s Organ Fund Committee will meet in Canon Wood Hall tomorrow at 4 p.m. to transact important business.

The express last evening, took out; A and Mrs. Pike, H. Donnelly, Dr. and Mrs. Ames, P Griffin, and about 80 pogie fishermen.

The three masted schooner Mildred, recently built for Job Bros & Co., at Lunenburg, left for here, Monday. She is commanded by Captain Keeping.

About twenty workmen crossed from Bell Island yesterday and came to town. They had been working there since last spring, and are returning home with well filled purses.

About 100 Conception and Trinity Bay men joined the outgoing express last evening, at Brigus Junction. Most of them did poorly at the fishery this season, and are going to Sydney to work in the mines during the winter.

Yesterday afternoon, a wall on Water Street, opposite Cash’s, caved in, the pavement falling into the sewer. During the afternoon, the atmosphere was very unpleasant in the vicinity, and immediate repairs should be made.

At 2 a.m. yesterday, Sergt. Peet, while doing duty on Water Street, found a Witless Bay man in Sclater’s doorway, who was quietly removing his clothing, mistaking the place for a bedroom. The Officer took him to the Station for safe keeping.

About 80 pogie fishermen arrived by the Rosalind yesterday. Most of them are Conception Bay men, and left for their homes by the afternoon express.

Mr. J. Syme reported to Supt. Sullivan yesterday, that his office window had been broken Monday night, and he suspected robbery was attempted. Detective Byrne went to investigate and learned that it was broken by an inebriate, who will be summoned.

Mr. Lawrence Glasco, Butcher, died at his home yesterday morning, after an illness of two days. Deceased was the oldest son of the late John Glasco who carried on butchering business in the West End for half a century. Deceased leaves a widow and six children.

Messages were received in town yesterday from Marystown, saying that the schooner Golden Rod, Capt. Robert Lundrigan, arrived from Burin Monday night, and reported having lost George Bride, one of the crew. He was struck by the main boom when the vessel was coming out of Sydney, and knocked overboard. The body was not recovered.

The weather along the line yesterday was similar to that experienced in the city. Last night it was also mild, the latest reports being: Port aux Basques, calm, fine, 43 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light fine, 36 above. Quarry, S.W., light, dull, 32 above. Bishop’s Falls, calm, snowing, 30 above. Clarenville, calm, dull, 38 above. Whitbourne, calm, dull, 30 above.

At Old Perlican, Capt. A Barret will build a forty ton schooner during the winter, to replace the schooner S.E. Parker, lost last spring. The frame will come from the West side of Trinity Bay, and the planking and decking has been ordered from Clarke’s mill at Springdale, N.D.B. The service of Mr. Amos Piercy, a builder of first class reputation, has been secured to build the schooner. Capt. Barret is a most successful fish killer, and will use his new schooner at the Labrador fishery.

At noon yesterday Mr, J. M. Dooley of the Waverly Hotel, while going to Pleasantville, discovered a horse perishing at the rear of the old Gun Club House. The animal was unable to rise and it was evident that the poor beast had been nearly starved, as its bones were almost protuding through his skin, and both its fore legs were badly cut. Mr. Dooley phoned Inspector Sullivan on the matter from Pleasantville, and an officer was sent down to investigate. From marks in the ground, it could be seen that the human owner of the poor animal had used another horse to drag it to where it was found, thinking no doubt that the building would prevent the horse being seen, and that it would soon perish. The horse is black with a white face. Detective Byrne was detailed to look up the owner, who will likely get into trouble through his ill human act.

The Supreme Court on Circuit opens at Brigus on Friday next; at Harbor Grace on Monday, and Carbonear on the following Friday.

“Main Hatch,” writing from Carbonear, says, “In my recent letter I forgot to say that no blame attaches to Capt. Batten, in the S.S. Walrus, with regards to water. The ship was jammed. He did his work well and it is surprising how he brought her out of such difficulties. All credit is due him.

Capt. McClaire, who has been fined for a violation of the Game Laws, will have another case to deal with before he leaves for home. One of his guides is now claiming $40 back money which the Capt. forgot to pay him, because he (guide) objected to his violation of the laws.

Capt. Thomas Pye, of Brooklyn, B.B., left in his schooner Curfew for home yesterday, laden with winter supplies for himself and neighbours. His daughter, Miss Annie Pye, came to the city at the same time by steamer two weeks ago, to help make the season’s purchases and visit friends. Of these she has a host, for Miss Annie has spent some six years in the Old Bay State, and her bright happy and dignified manner makes her a welcome guest with all. She returns home on Thursday’s train.

Three arrests were made last night two for larceny, and one for being incapable. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning.

The floating whale factory Sobraon, and the whalers Lynx, and Puma, leave this morning on their cruise South. The Sobrson carries a large supply of coal, and to avoid delay on the trip the whalers will be coaled at sea.

There is quite a lot of fish yet to come in from outports. Capt. Jesse Winsor of Wesleyville, has fully 1,700 quintals to send along, and many other Northern skippers have greater or less quantities to be shipped here within the next few weeks."

November 20 1907 DEATHS GLASCO — On the 19th November of pleuro-pneumonia, Lawrence Glasco aged 42 years, leaving a wife and 6 small children to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Thursday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence No.6 Gilmore Street. Friends and acquaintances please accept this the only intimation. – R.I.P.
November 20 1907 FUNERAL NOTICE MURPHY — The funeral of the late Patrick Murphy will take place this afternoon at 2.30 o’clock from his late residence, Livingstone Street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this the only intimation.
November 1 1907 ROUGH WEATHER IN STRAITS The S.S. Home returned to Bay of Islands at 6 p.m. yesterday, from Battle Harbor and Straits ports. Since leaving to go North she has experienced terrible weather — the worst for the season. There has been a continuation of storms, accompanied by snow, and the ship was forced to harbor several times. On the return trip, the weather was not much better, and harbor had to be made each night. The home brought a large quantity of freight and a number of passengers. The work for the season is now practically over in the straits, and snow and frost has been felt already.
November 1 1907 A DESERVING CASE A most deserving case for the charitably disposed was brought under the notice of Inspector William O’Brien, of the Heath Department, a few days ago, being that of a woman with five orphan children, residing on Cabot Street, and with no visible means of support. Four of the children are at present in the Fever Hospital with scarlet fever. There was practically no food or clothing in the house. Wednesday, Inspector waited upon Mrs. D.J. Greene, the President of the Ladies St. Vincent de Paul Society, and informed her of the facts, and that lady shortly afterwards sent around a supply of new clothing etc. The Men’s St. Vincent de Paul Society will send the usual supply of coal to the house. Dr. Brehm has also interested himself in the woman’s behalf, and will procure further supply of necessary articles.
November 1 1907 GOVERNOR BACK His Excellency Sir William MacGreger and Mr. W.D. Reid, who had been caribou shooting up country the last week, returned to town yesterday in the private car Terra Nova. Since leaving here the weather has not been a bit too fine, but nevertheless the party had an enjoyable outing, and got good sport. Unfortunately however, the heads secured were not as would be desired, it being impossible to hunt because of weather conditions. A number of ptarmigan were shot by the party, but they were not plentiful. Sir William and Mr. Reid look quite well after their trip.
November 1 1907 DAMAGE DOME AT GRAND FALLS From passengers, who arrived by last evening’s express, we learn that the rain of Wednesday and Thursday last, raised the Exploits River over two feet, and on Thursday night, two sections, each of about 30 ft., on the cofferdam, broke from its foundation and was swept with terrific force against the Forebay Flood Gates. This let the water in along the whole length of the upriver side of the dam, on the North side of the river, about 500 feet in length, and flooded the Forebay, the course of the river being diverted from the main opening in the dam, and rushing with great force down the incline at the upper end of the Penstock line of excavation. The only damage done, was the floating out of place of about 100 feet of crib work which was being constructed along the front of the concrete dam, as an apron, to serve as a protector from heavy ice rafting. The cofferdam is only a temporary structure to turn off the water during the building of the concrete dam. It is built of logs and ballasted with rock and plank on the up river side. A serious fatality was averted by its going at night, as thirty men were working on the river bed between the cofferdam and the completed concrete dam, and had it broke away while they were thus engaged, there is no doubt but some of them would have been killed and drowned, as the violence of the inrush of water would sweep the men through the forebay gates and down the rapids, where no earthly power could save them, and there was also great danger of their being crushed against the dam, and nipped under the debris of the broken cofferdam. It will not retard the work very seriously, and the cost of replacing the cofferdam and apron crib work will not be very heavy. The river is now higher than at anytime since last spring.
November 1 1907 HEALTH NOTES The house of James Deady, No. 35 LeMarchant Road, where one of the inmates had been suffering from scarlet fever for some time, underwent disinfection yesterday, and will be released from quarantine today. George Whiteway, 2 ½ year old, at 40 Duckworth St., developed scarlet fever yesterday and was removed to the Fever Hospital. The house was also disinfected yesterday, and will be released from quarantine today.
November 1 1907 BOY INJURED AT GOOSE BAY Wednesday last, a 12 year old boy named Reader, while playing with other school children near his home, in Goose Bay, tripped on a stone, and falling, broke his right leg below the knee. The boy suffered intense pain for several hours. Dr. Fred Pilot was called and set the broken limb, at night. The little fellow is a bright intelligent lad, and the Doctor hopes to have him around again within a short time.
November 1 1907 RESCUED IN MID OCEAN London — Oct.26th — The crew of five on the Labrador Anna of Labrador, bound for Gibraltar with dry fish, was rescued in mid ocean by the Dominion liner Ottoman.
November 1 1907 BELL ISLAND, FROM PIT TO PIER "Belle Island, Oct. 29 — A slight change has occurred in the weather here – quite marvellous in itself – but beyond that, nothing of any public importance has happened during the past week. There were quite a number of steamers however, arrived to both companies, principally coal and log laden, and departed hence, freighted with ore.

On Sunday last, Rev. Fr. McGrath celebrated Mass in the little school chapel at Wabana. This is a rare occurrence, as the Church is situated near the town proper, a distance of nearly two miles from the mining settlement. A large congregation assembled. The Rev. Gentleman gave a short discourse on the dedication of the month of November to the Rosary and the Souls in Purgatory, which was listened to with rapt attention. The Church will be shortly taken up.

Messrs. Whiteway and Dowden have both left the Island to pursue their different avocations, the former in St. John’s, and the latter in Carbonear. They were two well known figures in the settlement and much esteemed by all, and general regret was felt at their departure. It is probable that Mr. Bowden will return at New Year, and resume his business of watchmaking on the Island.

The Technical School of Engineering will likely be opened for tuition about the first of November. Everything is nearly ready, and the gentlemen promoters deserve every praise for the indefatigable exertions put forward by them, to promote this laudable undertaking.

On Sunday evening last, your correspondent attend an invitation to what is known as the Front of the Island. The “track” route was taken as the shorter. A beautiful Aurora scene was visible on the return, more brilliant perhaps, than I had ever seen before. It was an unique feature of the walk to see all pedestrians – men and women – moving in and out, each provided with a lantern, which lit up the surrounding darkness, much more than one would imagine.

A large number of labourers arrived here the beginning of this week, and were immediately put to work; they came from the surrounding settlements, from all appearance, work is to be had on this Island for any who wish to find employment for the winter months.

The working men of Wabana are thankful to the News for voicing through your correspondent, their sentiments in regards to certain existant evils hitherto rampant here. Head Constable Dawe has since taken a more moderate turn in his dealings with the public. True it is, the Head Constable’s presence here has done a large amount of good; but when he attempts to “bluff” the people, and is over zealous, it becomes necessary to resort to public print to “call down” such unwarrantable actions. As I said before, the “Head” is capable of promoting a large amount of good, and it is to be hoped that the criticism of this previous action will result beneficially to al concerned.

Owing to the weather of the past two months, many potato gardens and hay fields have not yet been touched, and are now not likely to be, the winter being so near at hand.

No accident worthy of mention has occurred, and the health of the Island is excellent. There is no one large, as far as I can learn, sick from any cause.

Mr. T. McGrath goes to the city, permanently, next week.

CORRESPONDENT."

November 1 1907 DR. DOBSON DEAD The Rev. Dr. Dobson, one of the best known of Canadian Ministers, died at Charlottetown, P.E.I., on Sunday, at the age of 61. He had an attack of typhoid fever some months ago, but revived; and perhaps too soon, resumed his duties. Recently, pneumonia supervened, with fatal results. Last year, Dr. Dobson was President of the New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island Conference. He has filed the most prominent pulpits in the Methodism of the Maritime Provinces, his preaching ability being of an exceptionally high order. Many in St. John’s know Dr. Dobson personally, whilst his name is a household word in many a Methodist home.
November 1 1907 HOME REPORT The S.S. Home returned to port early Thursday morning, bringing a large inward freight and a great many passengers. But for the storm on the 21st and 22nd., her trip would have been one of the quickest for the season. She lay up for nearly two days at Hawk’s Bay, unable to do anything while the storm lasted. Nearly all the Newfoundland fishermen have left the Labrador Coast, and the Labrador men will have to face a long winter, as after the Home’s trip are over, they do not hear from Newfoundland again till April. Baine Johnstone & Co. third steamer load of Labrador fish left Battle Harbor on the 15th. Mr. J.T. Croucher, Agent for the firm, left for St. John’s by last Virginia Lake. It rumoured that the Marconi Wireless System would be in operation between Battle Hr. and Fogo, the coming winter. This would be a great boom; but we fear the report is only a rumour. The whale factory at Hawke’s Bay has been closed for the season and the employees will be returning home. The home sailed from here again, Friday night. She took onboard, from Fisher’s Mill, Corner Brook, 13,500 feet of lumber and 6,000 shingles for Blanc Sablon, and West St. Modest. — Western Star.
November 1 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Kite sails for Gilliesport this morning. S.S. Almerianan left Halifax at 11 a.m. yesterday for this port. S.S. Silvia left New York on Wednesday for St. John’s, via Halifax. S.S. Adventure left New York Wednesday morning for North Sydney to load coal for here. Schooner Pointer arrived from Battle Harbor yesterday with fish to Baine Johnston & Co. S.S. Pors is due today from Sydney with a cargo of coal for Morey & Co. Schooner Piyho will finish loading tomorrow, and will sail for Liverpool, Monday next. Walrus was at Catalina yesterday, and landed several Bonavista crews, returned from the Labrador. S.S. Rosalind, Clarke, sails for Halifax and New York at noon today, taking thirteen additional steerage passengers.
November 1 1907 WESTERN NOTES "(From the Western Star)

The Francis Willard, Capt. Hall arrived Saturday from Bay St. George for herring cargoes.

For being drunk and disturbing the peace, two young men were fined $5 and cost on Thursday.

The marriage of Mr. Elias Basha and Miss Maggie Gallant takes place at the Roman Catholic Chapel this afternoon. A reception will be held at 6 o’clock at the residence of the groom’s parents.

Large shipments of merchandise have been arriving of late; and nearly every freight train brings from one to four carloads of goods, which proves the healthy condition to trade in this place.

The S.S. Atlantic, Capt. D. Zinck, arrived Monday afternoon from Lunenburg, via Sydney. This steamer will be used by the Atlantic Fisheries Co., in connection with herring fisheries in the Bay.

The Roman Catholics of Port au Port are building a Parish Hall. The first story will be used as a school, and the second one will be the amusement room. Such a building has been long needed in that place.

The schooner Conqueror, Capt. William Wheeler, from Halifax, arrived at Bonne Bay on the night of 22 nd. Oct. When at Bay St. George, she met the storm of the 21st., which was the worst October storm ever encountered by anyone on board.

During the past week, caribou have been reported very plentiful in various section of the country. Every day, hundreds of them have been seen crossing the railway track, everywhere between Grand Lake and Bishop’s Falls, and hunters are meeting with fairly good success.

About five tons of iron ore have been brought out from Steel Mountain, nine miles from St. George’s, and will be shipped to Sydney, shortly. The D.I. & S. Co. have taken an option on the property for one year. If the samples are satisfactory, there will be a mining boom there next spring.

Mr. Charles Janes, of Benoit’s Cove, had the misfortune to loose a herring net in the storm of the 22nd. It was supposed by three bouys, painted red at both ends, and had a name “JAMES” marked thereon. The owner is a poor man, and the person picking up the net would confer a great favour, by returning it to the owner.

The storm of last week was felt very severely here, and caused destruction to some floating property. A number of small fishing boats were driven ashore and wrecked. Rev. Mr. Petley’s gasoline launch sunk near Angwins Wharf, and Murray’s schooner the Brothers, dragged her anchors and went ashore, causing considerable damage to the hull.

The 19 ton schooner, Eliza Mary, owned by Baird Gordon & Co., St. John’s, with part cargo lobsters, fish etc., bound to Bay of Islands, was lost at Bear Cove during the storm of the 18th October. She was anchored at Fox Island River when the gale came on, and parting her chains, drove ashore. The little craft soon became a total wreck on the rocks, and we learn, very little of her cargo was salved.

The steamer yacht Zera, with a party of American capitalists on board, is now on the way to Hawk’s Bay. The Americans are largely interested in the manufacture of pulp and paper, and have gone North to look over the timber areas owned by Noseworthy and others, and also to examine the water power of the rivers in that vicinity. If conditions are favourable, another industry as that at Grand Falls, will be started next spring at Hawk’s Bay.

The American vessel Senator, Gardner, went adrift in the storm of the 22nd and fell in across the head of O’Brien’s wharf, where she pounded heavily for some time, and when the tide ran out, the vessel was striking the bottom. The Greshman was requested to render assistance, which was long delayed; and in the height of the storm, the Fiona went to the rescue and towed the vessel out of danger, but not before parting one or two lines. Capt. English was highly recommended for his timely assistance.

The S.S. Active, Capt. Edward Seeley, from Halifax, touched at Lark Harbor Thursday, and came in here during the night. She left next morning for Bonne Bay, and returned again yesterday. This vessel has been chartered by the Gordon-Pew Fisheries Company, of Gloucester, and will be used in this Bay during the present herring fishery, towing boats and vessels belonging to the firm. There are quite a number of vessels belonging to the firm here, and the Active will be very serviceable to them.

HERRING FISHERY. Nearly all our fishermen are now in readiness, and are prosecuting the herring industry. The vessels have mostly gone to Wood’s Island and Middle Arm, and there the chief interest is now centered. Large schools of herring were seen in that vicinity last week, and some of the nets had good catches, the highest being ten barrels in one day. Several good fares were taken in Humber Arm, but this week there has not been much doing. The schooner Minnie M. Cook, chartered by Mr. McLean, Wood’s Island, has over 700 barrels, and expects to load this week. Her cargo goes to Boston. On Friday there was an abundance of herring in Lark Harbor, but most of the fishermen had gone fishing in the Arms. There has been fairly good fishing at Bonne Bay of late. Two American vessels – Bohemia and D H Lawson — are there fishing. The Atlantic Fisheries Co. have four vessels and a steamer here, well fitted with appliances for the fishery, and are hopeful of securing more cargoes than they did last year. Their Agent, Mr. Acker, is a hustling man, and he is ably assisted by Capt. D. Zinck, in whom the same characteristics predominate.

The American firms are all represented by good men, men who have a practical knowledge of the herring fishery, and in whom their owners can safely place implicit confidence. The Scotch firm at Drake’s Cove, has engaged some Bay St. George men, and the factory will be ready this week. All that is needed now is an abundance of herring to strike into the Arms and inside reaches, then the fishermen would soon get busy. The following American vessels arrived since last we went to press; Clintonia, Capt. Ralph Webber on Wednesday; A.M. Nickerson, Capt. A. Hudder, Thursday night, Avalon, Capt. T. Bohlin, Friday night; W. E. Morrisey, Capt. F. Upshell, and Rob Roy, Capt. Larkin, arrived Sunday. – Western Star."

November 1 1907 S.S. STRATHCONA The little steamer Strathcona, Capt. Bartlett, of the Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen, with Dr. Grenfell, C.M.G., on board, arrived in port from Labrador Coast at 12.00 p.m. yesterday. The Strathcona has been engaged all the past season in the usual mission work among the fishermen and settlers on the Labrador. Dr. Granfell leaves for the United States next week, on business in connection with the mission. While in the city, he is the guest of His Excellency the Governor.
November 1 1907 WASHED OVERBOARD The schooner Wild Rover, Capt. Osmond, reached Bonne Bay Tuesday, 22nd October, with flag half mast, having lost one of her crew, in the storm of Monday night. The schooner was returning home from the fishery having a cargo of dry codfish on board, cured at Brig Bay, which port was left Monday morning. The craft had passed Port Saunders when the wind freshened, and towards evening, it was blowing with hurricane force. Sails were lowered, and the craft was scudding under bare poles. It was impossible to make a harbor, as there is none between Port Saunders and Bonne Bay. A blinding snow storm raged at the time. Seas were mountainous, and one huge wave swept over the taft rail and carried away the wheel, and everything movable on deck. Young Osmond, who was steering at the time, was washed overboard and never seen afterwards. – Western Star. (This is the schooner referred to in Monday Morning’s News)
November 1 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: S.S. Prospero arrived at Placentia at 4.15 p.m. yesterday, going West. S.S. Portia is still North of Baie Verte.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home arrived at Bay of Islands at 6 p.m. yesterday. Ethie leaves Clarenville this morning. Dundee leaves Port Blandford this morning. Clyde leaves Lewisporte this morning. Argyle left Marystown at 4.50 p.m. yesterday, going West. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Glencoe left Hermitage Cove at 3.30 p.m. yesterday, coming East."

November 1 1907 PERSONAL Dr. Fred Pilot arrived in the city last evening on a short visit. Mr. J.W. Noel, of the Crown Lands Department, arrived in town by last evening’s express. Mr. A. Pretty and Mrs. Pretty, who were visiting on the West Coast. returned by yesterday’s express. Mr. Frank Rendell, who was at Deer Lake on business, returned by yesterday’s express. Mr. E. Perez. who was sailing out of Boston as Engineer on a large steamer the last two years, arrived by yesterday’s express, on a visit to friends. Amongst those on the platform of the Third Normal Institute of Eastern Nova Scotia on Oct. 23rd, we are please observe the mane of Mr. Vincent Burke, Superintendent of Catholic Schools. Mayor McDonald presided, and representative educational leaders were present. The Rev. Dr. Workman, who by a vote of 10 to 17 members of a committee of 30, was called upon to resign the chair of Old Testament Exegeisi in the Wesleyan Theological College, Montreal, on the grounds of “heterodoxy”, pronounces the charge made against him foundationless, and announces his intention to remain a member of the Methodist Church. The students of the college are protesting vigorously the action of the Governor. It is the old story, “Orthodoxy is my doxy, every one else’s doxy is heterodoxy.”
November 1 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Magistrate Murray, Harbor Main, will be called upon today to renew the licences of the Liquor Dealers in the District. It is said that those holding them will again be given permission to sell.

An outport man named Davis, was assaulted on Queen St. last night, by two inebriated hooligans. Davis was given the names of his assailants, and he will have them summoned today.

The S.S. Ingraham left for Bay of Islands yesterday, to meet Mr. J.J. Murphy and a party of Americans, who are going to Hawke’s Bay to inspect some timber claims there.

The express arrived at 4.15 p.m. yesterday, bringing; His Excellency the Governor, W.D. Reid, W.J. Long, Frank Rendell, W. Noel, Dr. F. Pilot, A. Pretty. Mr. Pretty, J. Thomas, Miss White, and about 20 other passengers.

The T.A. Athletic Association held a dance and cauld cannon supper in the armoury of their hall last night, which was attended by about 50 couples. The catering was up to date and an enjoyable time was held.

The weather up North the last ten days, has been worse than for any time the season. Potato and turnip crops that were in the ground, have been ruined in consequence, while several fields of hay were also destroyed.

The Boston Scotsman rises to remark as follows: “This is the material with which we Americans licked the British. The Captain commanding the three last victorious yachts, is a product of the Clyde, Scotland, the entire crew are Scandinavians, and the builder of the defenders a German. If Peary ever discovers the North Pole he will be the only American on the ship, as his entire crew are natives of Newfoundland.”

Capt. W. Bartlett, Brigus, is at present in the city.

The November sitting of the Supreme Court opens today.

Mr. M.F. O’Toole, of Conception Harbor, is in town, and staying at the Crosbie.

Mr. H.H. Archibald, of Harbor Grace, arrived in town last night on business, and is staying at the Crosbie.

The schooner Ionia, Earle, Master, 24 days from Operto, in ballast to Bishop & Monroe, arrived in port yesterday afternoon.

Messrs W.C. Job and E.F. Harvey left for the Quarry by yesterday’s express to spend a few days caribou shooting.

About 20 outport schooners arrived in port between five and seven o’clock last evening. They were mostly from the Northward.

There were five arrests by the Police yesterday; three drunks, one drunk and disorderly, and one drunk and conveyed to the Station in a cab.

Miss Beatrice Baxter, who has been visiting here for the past three months, left by last evening’s express for New York. Mr. John Baxter accompanied her on a visit to his parents.

In reference to the ad. in yesterday’s News, in reference to a sum of money being picked up in the Long Room, we would say that the money was not in a purse as stated.

There is considerable snow along the West Coast, though not sufficiently deep to impede train traffic. Thursday night, it snowed, West from Terra Nova, and the weather was intensely cold.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday: H.P. Morgan, London; M.F. O’Toole, Conception Harbor, Thomas Moore, Bay de Verde; William Butt, H.H. Archibald, Harbor Grace.

A young woman named Sutton was run down by a passing horse and dray on New Gower St., last evening. She was not seriously injured, but received a bad fright. Mr. J. Doyle assisted her to her home.

It was exceptionally fine along the railway yesterday. It was also fine last night. The latest reports are: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Bay of Islands, N.E., light, dull, 38 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 21 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W., light, fine 20 above. Clarenville, N.E., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourn, N.E., light, fine, 40 above.

St. Andrew’s Choir meets for practice this evening at 8.15. A full attendance is requested

A Mrs. Adams of Shoal Harbor, was brought in by yesterday’s express, suffering from mental aberration, and was taken to the Asylum. The demented woman was in charge of her husband.

When the express that arrived yesterday was going West, some hundreds of caribou were crossing the track between Quarry and Howley. Train hands say they never saw them so plentiful or so many stags.

It was the coldest for the season along the line last night. At Quarry, the temperature registered 15 degrees of frost at midnight.

The schooner Mary M., Thomas Mullowney, arrived yesterday evening from Indian Arm, Bonavista Bay, laden with fish, oil, hoops and barrels."

November 2 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Messrs. Munn & Co.’s brig., Amy Louise, Capt. Sheppard, left New York on Wednesday, anthracite coal laden for this port.

Constable Grouchy who has been stationed here, arrived by Thursday night’s train and is now settling himself before going on duty.

Five fishermen left for Broad Cove by Wednesday morning’s train, and Mr. E. Parsons went to St. John’s by that evening’s train.

Mr. John Davis, Principal of the Methodist Superior School here, has been engaged to visit Bay Roberts weekly, to give instruction in singing to the C. of E. choir of that town.

The attendance at the Royal Moving Pictures at St. Paul’s Hall Tuesday night, was large, the building being packed during the greater part of the night. Much favourable comment on the entertainment was heard the next day.

A liquor case was before the Court on Wednesday and was partly heard. A witness, being unable to be present through illness, the Police asked for a postponement, and the case was adjourned sine die.

Mr. D. Scott, Superintendent of the Postal Telegraph, went to Upper Island Cove on Wednesday and opened telegraphic communication with the office here. It is not yet known when then the office will be opened for business.

The funeral of the late Thomas Walsh took place Wednesday afternoon and was largely attended. Deceased having been a member of the British Society, that body escorted the remains of their late brother member to their resting place in the C. of E. Cemetery.

The inner private office at the railway station here, has lately been wainscotted with hard pine, and now looks well, as the result of the good work done by Mr. A. Bridle, an employee of the Reid Nfld. Co. Extensive repairs to the platform of the station, are now in progress under the foremanship of the same party.

The season for dogs to roam in quest of plunder seems to have come round again, and reports of their depredations are heard almost daily now. From the Southside, tales of mischief by dogs, are told, cattle, sheep and poultry being the victims of their prowlings. A goat was killed by dogs on Water Street, one night this week.

The Royal Moving Pictures, at St. Paul’s Hall last night, had another full house.

Messrs. Munn & Co.’s schooner Estella, Silas Wells, Master, sailed for Sydney this morning, to load coal.

Posters are out today giving notice that the Nickelodeon expects to open to the public at the Academy Hall, next Saturday.

Miss Nellie Power, engaged at A.J. Harvey & Co.’s St. John’s, is now here spending a two weeks’ vacation with her friend, Miss Ellen Lahey

Mr. John Noseworthy while going home last night, was attacked by a vicious dog, which bit him severely about the knee. Today he made a complaint at the Court and the dog will be destroyed.

Mr. John Ash, formerly Watchman at the Harbor Grace Boot & Shore Factory, after an illness of about a fortnight, died this morning, aged about 65 years. Deceased was a member of the Orange Society. The funeral takes place tomorrow afternoon.

Four goats belonging to a poor woman living at the South Side of Riverhead, were killed this week by dogs. This woman has had five goats killed by these ravenous animals, and she feels the loss of her goats keenly. Dogs and goats are sometime a nuisance, and the only cure seems to be a persistent application of the Police remedy.

Are we really to have a marine slip built in this harbor, after all the rumours to that effect have seemed to pass away without a confirmation of its consummation being made? The latest rumour bearing upon the subject, is that within a reasonable time, plans for the building of a floating dock, capable of taking up a vessel of 200 tons, are about to be initiated, and that a capable man from this town, will likely be sent to Halifax, to select a plan suited to the requirements of our trade, and engage a practical builder of such docks to come here and construct one. Most people agree that a marine slip is very necessary here and that investors of capital need not fear for the safety of money put into such a venture. All will welcome the announcement that a new floating dock for Harbor Grace is to become a reality.

It is understood that the street light at Caplin Cove is to be removed to a post near Hall’s Lane. Before an alteration is made, it is to be hoped due consideration will be given to public interests. If those connected with the lighting of the town cannot see their way clear to add another light further East, they should be sure that by placing the light at Hall’s lane, a greater number will be benefited to the removing than by allowing it to remain where it is. Personally, the writer favours the removal further East. but he is not sure this would best serve the public. Lights at intervals, as far as the electric light poles run, are veery desirable, but if these cannot be obtained, a suggestion is here made that the Road Board rail all dangerous portions of the embankment, and so obviate risks of falling over the bank. This matter of railing the embankment has many times been agitated for, and it was understood that the Road Board contemplated doing the work this fall, but the season is getting advanced, and if the work is to be done this year, it is time a commencement were made. CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Oct. 31st. ‘07"

November 2 1907 NEWS "The S.S. Kite hauled alongside the S.S. Cocouna yesterday, to take aboard some pressed hay for the Gillisport Lumber Co., which will be used by the company’s horses during the winter. It is likely she will sail for there today. About 30 men leave from here, who have been engaged for a term of nine months, at $26 a month and found.

It is said that Dr. W.H. Parsons, now practicing at Bonne Bay, will leave shortly to practice at Harbor Grace, his native town.

A number of Salvation Army Officers, who were in the city attending Congress meetings, left for home by last evening’s express.

There has been a good sign of herring at Humber Arm this week, and good hauls were taken. At Wood’s Island good work was also done, and also at Lark Harbor.

A number of out harbor schooners left for home ports yesterday. During the afternoon, there were several arrivals, many of them anchoring in the stream for the night, and will haul in to the wharfs today.

Only a few boats went on the fishing grounds yesterday. After being out a short time, they had to leave and come in, the sea being very rough. Fish was found plentiful and had the water been smother, good fares would have been secured.

The schooner Minnie J. Hickman, Robert Young, arrived in port yesterday from Campbellton, with a cargo of about 150 thousand feet of lumber, to the Horwood Lumber Co. She is discharging at the Company’s East End wharf."

November 2 1907 OBITUARY This morning we record the death of Mr. John Skiffington, one of the oldest residents of Quidi Vidi and St. John’s East. For some time he has been seriously ill, and death was not unexpected by his family. Deceased, who had reached his 80th year, was very prominent in the fisheries of St. John’s for many years. In the sealing fishery he was a practical man in the fifties, and held various prominent positions with Captain Graham. For more than 14 years he was watching for the East End of the city, and was honest and trustworthy. Mr. Skiffington raised a large family, and those living today are: Richard, George, Patrick, James and John in Boston; Edward in St. John’s, and one daughter. To the bereaved family, the News extends sympathy.
November 2 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived in Port Aux Basques at 8.30 a.m. yesterday, with the following passengers; Mrs. N.J. Payne, Mrs. J. Strickland, Miss J Luther, J.J. and Mrs. Murphy, V.P. Burke, C.W. and Mrs. Rowlings, A. Moulton, R.F. Mercer, J.T. Joyce, J.R. Davis, R.J. Patrick, H Palsmore, J.A. Howland, W.H. Horwood, W.L. Hunter, J.R. Prince, J. Reid, J.W. O’Brien, W.J. Broker, R.S. Elliott, C.D. Blanchard, Capt. C. Cross, W.T. Davis, P.H. Reid, J.G. Augnow in saloon, and 43 second class. The express is due at 2.30.
November 2 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home left Bay of Islands yesterday, going North. Ethie left Clarenville yesterday. Dundee left Port Blandford yesterday a.m. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Argyle left Burin last evening, going West. Glencoe is due at Placentia this morning. Clyde left Lewisporte yesterday, on time.

Bowrings: S.S. Prospero left Lamaline at 11.27 a.m. yesterday, going West. S.S. Portia is North of Baie Verte."

November 2 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Florence will leave London for St. John’s direct, about December 1st.

Mr. V.P. Burke, R.C. School Inspector, who has been in Canada on a visit, returns by today’s express.

Mr. Frank Leicester left by today’s train for Harbor Grace, where he will sing at the Royal Theatre during next week.

The schooner Ellen, Pittman, arrived yesterday from Smith’s Sound, T.B., with 23,000 brick for H.J. Stabb & Co.

Two schooners, the Drummer’s Tax and Minnie Stone, arrived yesterday from the Trinity Bay Brick Yards, with full cargoes to the Horwood Lumber Co.

About half dozen boats were on the local fishing grounds, yesterday. They secured from one cwt. to three cwt. each, but the water being rough, they returned to port early.

The schooner Northern Light, Simmonds, with lumber and Coopers’ material, arrived in port yesterday, and is discharging at the Empire Lumber Company’s wharf.

At the 7 and 8 a.m. celebrations of the Holy Communication in the C.E. Cathedral tomorrow, intercession will be made for God’s blessing upon the work of the Men’s Bible Class.

Thursday last, a violent snow storm raged at Seldom Come By, with wind from North-East. The schooners anchored there had their decks covered with the snow to a depth of several inches.

Mr. J. Murphy, accompanied by Messrs S.R. Davis, R.H. Reid, W.L. Davis, R.S. Elliott, W.L. Bowker and J.W. O’Brien, a party of American capitalists, arrived at Bay of Islands by train yesterday, and will proceed to Hawke’s Bay in the D.P. Ingraham, to examine some timber properties, which the Americans contemplate taking over.

The weather along the line yesterday and last night was as fine as could be expected. Last night the following reports were received: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light, fine, 28 above. Quarry, calm, fine, 20 above. Bishop’s Falls, N, light, fine, 30 above. Clarenville, W., light, fine, 33 above. Whitebourne, calm, fine, 38 above.

The S.S. Ulunda, Chambers, arrived from Liverpool at daylight this morning.

The schooner Maggie E.Z., A Roberts, arrived from Herring neck yesterday, with a load of fish and oil.

The Ingraham is due to arrive at Bay of Islands this morning, and will take the party now there to Hawke’s Bay, to look over the property of J.J. Murphy and others.

The price of Labrador Fish has now dropped to $3.50 per quintal, and outport dealers now in town, yesterday could not obtain a higher price.

The inquiry into the death of William Bailey will be continued before Judge Conroy this afternoon, when Mr. J.W. Morris, Supt. Elect. Dept., R.N. Co., will probably be examined as to the working of the plant.

The whaler Puma, Capt. Christoplersen, arrived in port from Balana yesterday morning, after a good season’s work, she having secured eighty-three whales to date. The Puma is owned by the Newfoundland Steam Whaling Co., and will now refit for a cruise with the floating manufacturing station Sabraoh, due to arrive in a few days.

Drunkenness was very prevalent in the city yesterday and no less than six arrests were made by the Police before five o’clock. Three of these were simple drunks, two drunks and disorderly, and one drunk while in charge of a horse. Last night the streets were much quiter, and there were no arrests up to 11.30 p.m.

A case of scarlet fever was yesterday reported to the Health Authorities from 57 Plymouth Road, the patient being a seven year old boy. He was taken to the Fever Hospital, and the house will undergo disinfection today, and probably be released from quarantine tomorrow."

November 2 1907 DEATHS SKIFFINGTON — Last evening after a long illness, John Skiffington, aged 80 years, leaving a wife, six sons and one daughter. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence, Quidi Vidi. Friends please attend without further notice.
November 4 1907 SATURDAY’S ACCIDENT At 4.15 Saturday afternoon, Frank Parks, a Fireman of the S.S. Argyle, had a narrow escape from being killed. He was sitting on the hand railing at the head of the stairway on the second flat of the Reid Company’s Office, and being suddenly attracted, he lost his balance and was precipitated to the floor below, a distance of about 18 feet. Before striking the floor, his head came in contact with a radiator, and was laid open from the forehead to behind the left ear, in a triangular shape. His face was also badly cut, and one of his legs was broken in two places. The Station was almost filled with people, awaiting the arrival of the express at the time, and several witnessed Park's fall. He was picked up in an unconscious condition, with blood flowing copiously from the wounds, while the fluid was also oozing from his mouth and ears. Constables Tobin and Savage procured a cab and had the injured man driven to the Police Station, where Dr. Randell attended, and after giving stimulants, ordered him to Hospital, where he was later taken in the Ambulance. The broken limb was set and further attendance given him at the Hospital, and last night the man was doing well. No serious result is anticipated.
November 4 1907 YOUNG MAN DIES IN WOODS Mr. Albert Jure, of Botwoodville, his two sons, and a young man named Nathaniel Hart, who were trapping at the head waters of the Exploits, came out to Badger Saturday evening, with the melancholy news of the death by drowning, of George, youngest son of Albert Jure. How the young man got drowned remains partly shrouded in mystery. It is supposed that being in an exhausted state, he fell into the river and was too weak to get out. It transpires that during the snow storm that prevailed on the 21st October, the poor fellow got astray from his companion, Hart, and being without food or means of making a fire, became faint from cold, want, and the heavy travelling. Heart found him on Wednesday, 23rd, by following his tracks in the snow. About one mile from where he found the body, he picked up the discarded gun. Little further on he found where he rested, till finally coming to the bank of the Victoria, he found the body of the unfortunate man floating in a still pool, or eddy of the stream. He took the body out, and then went in search of the father and brother. These he came across at their camp on the Exploits, over twenty miles from where he found the body. Together they went, taking the planks of an old boat with them. Of these boards they formed a sort of rude coffin, in which they tenderly placed the remains. Leaving the coffin, they at once proceeded to Badger, and from thence sent the sad news to the mother of the poor fellow. When the marshes and ponds will have frozen over, it is intended to bring out the remains for interment. George Jure was a young man of but 24 years, and was well liked by all who knew him.
November 4 1907 CARL E. RICHARD The schooner Carl E. Richard, Capt. Hilton, entered port at 3 p.m. yesterday from Port Mulgrave, to J & W Pitts. She left that port on Thursday morning and had splendid weather during the whole passage. She brought 95 head of cattle; 19 sheep, and 25 cases eggs.
November 4 1907 WALRUS ARRIVES FROM LABRADOR The S.S. Walrus, Capt. Batten, arrived from Labrador, Saturday 1st., via Carbonear. The Walrus left Battle Harbor, the 28th October, and called at Seldon Come By, Bonavista, Catalina and Carbonear, where she landed crews that were bought down by her in the spring. Tuesday, Oct,. 22nd., while at Battle Harbor, a heavy storm of wind, accompanied with snow, was experienced. The Walrus had a narrow escape from going ashore. About 4 a.m. the ring to which the ship had a line made fast to, gave out on shore, and steam had to be got up to prevent her from drifting on the rocks. The assistance of the land men was also needed to get another line made fast, otherwise matters would have been serious. The Walrus was somewhat damaged, her bow chocks being broken, and hauser pipe split. The gale was the season, and Capt. Batten and crew had a rather difficult jog to save the vessel from destruction.
November 4 1907 BRUCK PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived at Port aux Basques at 11.30 a.m. yesterday, having been delayed at North Sydney by the late arrival of the I.C.R. express. She brought the following passengers: Mrs. J. Mitchell, Miss C Lambert, Mrs. E.S. Wood, Miss M. Hillyard, C and Mrs. Bellamy, Mrs. J.C. Dunning, J.H. Mundoff, D.C. Sheppard, E.W. Spalding, Mrs. J.X. Cameron, Rev. W.J. Thistle. The express is due at 4 this afternoon.
November 4 1907 MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY The inquiry into the death of William Bailey was continued before Judge Conroy Saturday afternoon, Counsel engaged in the case also being present. The only witness examined was Mr. J.W. Morris, Supt. Elect. Dept., Reid-Nfld Co., who gave expert testimony as to the working of the system. Further hearing was adjourned until today, when several witnesses, who have been previously examined, will be recalled to have their evidence read over to them for correction. The inquiry will probably be finished today.
November 4 1907 TECHNICAL SCHOOL AT BELL ISLAND The Technical School about to be started at Bell Island Mines, will be in charge of Mr. J McDougall, Civil Engineer, brother of Manager McDougall, and Mr. Kneeland, Master Mechanic, both members of the Dominion Iron and Steel Co.’s staff at Wabana. This school will be conducted free of charge to the pupils, the company standing all incidental expenses, and will be open to all employees of the Mechanical Department. It has not yet been decided if a new building will be erected for the purpose, or the R.C. School at the Mines, hired for the accommodation of the classes.
November 4 1907 REV. JABEZ MOORE Honours are continuing to fall to the lot of the Rev. Jabez Moore, formerly of Carbonear, and more recently Presiding Elder of the Minot District of the North Dakota Conference. In the middle of October, Mr. Moore was elected as the head of the Delegation to General Conference, by the largest majority ever given to a delegate. Possibly he is the first Newfoundlander to be elected to this honourable position. The Conference commences at Baltimore next May, and will be in session for at least one month. Rev. Mr. Moore has also been appointed Presiding Elder of Grand Forks District, instead of Minot. He had served in Minot for five years, and had another year before his term expired, but at the request of Pastors of Grand Forks District, he was transferred there, and now commences a six year term. Mr. Moore intends to purchase a house in Grand Forks where he will in future reside. We congratulate this successful son of Nfld. upon the continuous promotion he is receiving in the Church of his choice, and hope 'ere long to greet him with the title of Episcopus.
November 4 1907 ULUNDA ARRIVES The S.S. Ulunda, Capt. Chambers, arrived in port, from Liverpool at 1 p.m. yesterday, after a tedious passage of 12 days. Strong gales with heavy seas were experienced during the run. She brought 585 tons cargo, a large mail, and the following passengers for this port: Mr. George Eldon, Mrs. Eldon and Olaf Janssen. The Almeriana being at Pitts wharf, the Ulunda anchored in the stream on arrival.
November 4 1907 ALMERIANA IN PORT S.S. Almerianan, Capt. Hanks, reached port from Halifax at 1.30 p.m. Saturday. She left that port at 11 a.m. on Wednesday and had beautiful weather during the entire passage. The Almeriana brought nearly 600 tons cargo for this port, including 1200 brls apples. She will move into the stream today to allow the Ulunda to discharge, and will sail for Liverpool on Thursday, having a full cargo leaving this port.
November 4 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Prospero left Harbor Breton at 7.30 a.m. Saturday, going West. There was no report from the Portia up to last night.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Ethie, leaves Clarenville this morning. Clyde leaves Lewisporte, this morning. Argyle leaves Placentia this morning, on the Red Island route. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Glencoe left Placentia at 7.25 p.m. Saturday, going West. Dundee leaves Port Blandford, this morning."

November 4 1907 WHALER LYNX HERE The whaler Lynx, Capt. Amundsen, arrived from Beaverton, N.D.B., at 7 o’clock yesterday morning. The Lynx is owned by the Newfoundland Steam Whaling Company, and has secured 73 whales for her season’s work. Of these 42 have been killed in Notre Dame Bay, and the balance, while operating from the factory at Chaleur Bay. The Lynx will refit here and in company with the Puma, will go on a cruse with the floating factory, Sabraon, which is now due here.
November 4 1907 ACCIDENT TO BIG LINER OFF NEWFOUNDLAND London, Oct. 28th. — A wireless message has been received from Capt. Pollack, of the North German Lloyds steamer Kaiser Wilhelm, De Grosse, saying all were well on board and that they expect to reach Plymouth Tuesday evening. The Kaiser left New York on October 22nd., and should have reached Plymouth this morning. She was detained, however, by the breaking of her rudder on October 25th off Newfoundland. Since the accident she has been steered with her propellers.
November 4 1907 PERSONAL Dr. Fitzgerald, who was in the city last week on business, returned to St. Jacques by the S.S. Glencoe. Mr. W.H. Kennedy, Travelling Agent for the Thomas Smyth Co., left for the Northward yesterday on business. Mr. Angus Walker left for Bishop’s Falls by yesterday express, to superintend some masonry construction work. Mr. C.F. Bishop, who was in town last week on business, returned to Burin Saturday, by the S.S. Glencoe. Mr. H.D. Reid, left in car Terra Nova yesterday, for Grand Falls. Before returning he will spend a few days caribou shooting. The Premier’s brother, Rev. Geo. J. Bond, B.A., left last week for the Orient, with the object of writing up China, Japan, Tibet, Korea, etc. He was accompanied by the Rev. Mr. Westaway, Missionary to China and Mrs. Westaway.
November 4 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Another foreigner is endeavouring to secure the T.A. Hall, with the object of running a moving picture show there.

Mr. T.J. Freeman returned from Bay D’Espoir Saturday, where he had been on business for the past week.

The Glencoe took the following outward passengers from Placentia, Saturday: Dr. Fitzgerald, C.F. Bishop, H.P. Burden, Capt. Acsopp, H. Hue, J.F. Miller, Adj. Browne, Capt. Tulk, Capt. Cheeseman, Miss Inkpen, Miss Mulcahey, J. Mercer, Miss Ash, Lieut. Whitten, Sister M. Antoni, Sister M. Pius, J McShave, in saloon, and 8 in steerage.

The weather up country, was fine and warm yesterday; last night it was also fine: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 40 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light, fine, 34 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 37 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, dull, 45 above. Clarenville, W., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, S.W., light, fine, 38 above.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: H.D. Reid, F. Donnelly, J.W.N. Johnstone, Miss Sinnott, Mrs. R. MCDonald, A. Walker, R. Scott, W.H. Kenedy, H. Fraser, J. Budgen, J.B. Petipas, S. Carpenter, S. Parsons, J. Kelly, Miss Haynes, Miss E. O’Leary, Miss E. Domminy, Miss B Pardy, A. Miller, R. McDougall, N Campbell.

Mr. C.F. Taylor arrived from Baie Verte by yesterday’s express

The house at 59 Plymouth Road was disinfected, on Saturday, and released from quarantine yesterday.

The S.S. Aggie leaves Lewisporte this morning with some lumber men, who are going to cruise several properties in Hall’s Bay

Fred Roe and Mary Burke were discharged from the Fever Hospital on Saturday, having completely recovered from the disease.

A case of scarlet fever was reported to the Health Authorities from 44 Alexander St. on Saturday. The patient is being nursed at home.

The supper given by the officers of H.M.S. Brilliant at the Roller Rink Saturday night, was attended by about 120 ladies and gentlemen, and proved a very enjoyable affair.

The work of salving the lumber cargo of the wrecked Micmac, still continues and up to Saturday last about 1,000,000 feet had been landed. The ship is now broken off, but there is but little danger of her going to pieces for some time.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; J.W. Janes, Hant’s Harbor; R.F. Mercer, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Jessie Lentle, Providence; W.L. Hunter, New Glasgow; H.A. Thomas, Grand Falls.

Saturday evening, the schooner Laura May, Jas. Haden, and Capt. Michael Hann’s schooner, arrived from Petit Forte, after a good run of 24 hours. Although a strict lookout was kept for floating deals from the wrecked Micmac at Broad Cove, the Laura May struck one in Placentia Bay, but fortunately not hard enough to cause damage.

The Police had their hands full Saturday night, trying to keep order among the crowds on the streets, and drunkenness was much in evidence, no fewer than eleven arrests being made. Five of these were simple drunks, four drunk and disorderly, and two drunk and fighting. The five drunks were released yesterday morning, the others will appear before the Magistrate this morning. A Portugal Cove man arrested on Saturday by Constable Stapleton for indecent exposure, was released upon depositing $5 to appear this morning. Another drunk was arrested yesterday afternoon, and will have to answer for his conduct this morning.

The schooner Idalia, N. Mercer, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co. for C & A Dawe, Bay Roberts.

The Council should have Job’s Cove attended to. The drain is choked and a heap of mud is found opposite the gateway leading to the wharves.

The boats out fishing on Saturday found fish plentiful and secured good fares. Many of the fishermen have given up the work for the season. Only about half dozen still continue to go out and some of these will leave it off after this week.

The case of the shareholders against the Yarmouth Bank Directors, has resulted in a decision in favour of the Directors. Mr. A.B. Morine, K.C., and Hector McInnes, K.C., represented the shareholders, whilst Mr. Armstrong, K.C. and Mr. H.A. Lovitt, K.C. represented the Directors.

A number of schooners that arrived in port on Friday, berthed at the various wharves on Saturday and began discharging their cargoes of fish. Some of the wharves and docks are so crowded that many later arrivals had to anchor in the stream to await a chance to haul in, when those now at the wharves have finished discharging.

Mr. McDonald, wife of Magistrate McDonald, of Bay St. George, left for home by last evening’s express. Mrs. McDonald was at Torbay a few days, and placed her daughter at school in the Torbay Presentation Convent. Mr. J. McDonald, a teacher in the Torbay Superior School, is a son of Magistrate and Mrs. McDonald.

The schooner Veronica, John Downey, arrived in port Saturday morning fish laden, from Scilly Cove, T.B. The Veronica left New Perlican early Friday morning and went to Scilly Cove where she took on board a load of fish, and left there about dark Friday evening, arriving in port at 4 o’clock Saturday morning. This shows, that with fine weather and favourable winds, work that otherwise may take weeks to accomplish can be done in a couple of days. A Trepassey schooner, that arrived in port early last week, was five weeks in completing her load and getting to port, owing to unfavourable weather and adverse winds.

The funeral of the late Daniel Murphy, late of R.N.R took place yesterday. A squad of Reservists in charge of Mr. Blackmore attended, and hauled the remains in a gun carriage, the coffin being covered with the Union Jack. The C.C.C. Band, deceased being an ex-member of the Corps, was also present and played the Dead March when the body was taken from the house, entering the Cathedral yard and near the cemetery. At the Cathedral, the prayers of the dead were recited by Rev. Fr. Fyme. After the funeral the C.C.C. Band accompanied the Reservists to the ship, playing music along the line of march."

November 5 1907 FISHERMEN MEET AT CONCEPTION HR. On Saturday night, a mass meeting of fishermen from different parts of Conception Bay was held in the Academy Hall, at Conception Harbor, for the purpose of discussing the desirability of forming a union, which would look after the interest of the fishermen. Mr. M.F. O’Toole was appointed Chairman, and briefly explained the object of the gathering. Mayor Gibbs was also present, and addressed the meeting. Much interest was shown, and considerable discussion on the subject took place; and it was decided to form a United Fishermen’s Union. This union will have an Agent in the foreign market during the fishing season, who will keep them informed of the state of the market, and look after their interest generally. Mr. Gibbs is at present interviewing the different Merchants in Conception Bay, endeavouring to arrange a settlement re the price for the present season. Should this fail, a test case will be taken in the Supreme Court against one of the Shipping Merchants. We undrestand fishermen of Trinity and Bonavista Bays have signified their intention of joining in the movement. Mr. E. Kennedy, the leading Merchant in the District, interviewed by Mr. Gibbs, did not seem to be antagonistic to the movement, and stated his willingness to pay as high a price as any other Merchant, if the state of the market would warrant the price. Another meeting will be held in about a week’s time.
November 5 1907 WATERSIDE THIEVES AT WORK Saturday night, during the absence of the Captain and crew of the schooner Rosaline, at Ayre & Sons’ wharf, the cabin was broken into and the amount of $147 stolen. Beside this sum, there were three other envelopes, containing from $300 downwards, the entire amount at hand being $652. When Capt. Bishop was leaving the schooner, he made the companionway secure and left the money in a trunk. Returning, he found the cabin door broken and the above noted amount stolen. The money belonged to a freighter, whom Capt. Bishop brought fish to town for, and the loss to him will be serious. The matter was reported to the Police yesterday, but there is very little clues to work upon. It is evident that the person or persons who committed the theft were unaware of the large amount of money lying around, else it would have also disappeared. Up to last midnight there was no arrest made.
November 5 1907 HAD TO SKIP OR BE ARRESTED Some two weeks ago an atrocious act was committed in a Northern outport, by a prominent resident, the culprit being caught in the act by some fishermen of the harbor. He has been suspected of frequent similar offences, and it was decided to watch him. The matter was reported to the authorities, and Constable Bishop was sent to arrest the delinquent. The latter however, suspected this action and forthwith made himself scarce, coming to St. John’s, where he was met by his sister, it is said, who gave him funds, and he took passage by the express, and at present is in Canada.
November 5 1907 THE ORION’S MISSING CREW "All hopes for the safety of the schooner Orion, which left Battle Harbor, October 5th, for Grand Bank, are now abandoned, and it is believed that she went down in the storm that followed, the night after she left Battle Harbor. Some wreckage has been picked up at Gragamelle, with a dory marked ”Orion”, and it is supposed she struck near Twin Islands while coming up the Straits. The fact of a dory being found at Gragamelle, does away with the theory that the missing vessel may be fishing, or storm bound on the North East Coast. Following we give names and residential places of the crew: Edward Bungay, Captain, married, Grand Bank. Charles Piercy, Mate, married, Grand Bank. Joseph Piercy, Cook, married, Fortune. George Spencer, John Spencer, brother, both married, Mortier Bay. Thomas Ralph, married, Mortier Bay. John Hanrahan, married, Mortier Bay. William Dialee, married. Mortier Bay. Michael Farrell, married, Mortier Bay. Samuel Murley, married, Mortier Bay. William Hodder, single, Mortier Bay. Michael Power, married, Mortier Bay. Michael Kelley, single, Mortier Bay. William Price, single, Brunnette Island. Michael Ducey, single, Mortier Bay. Richard Dunford, single, Grand Bank."
November 5 1907 A FALSE ALARM CALLOUS REPORT It was reported about the city last evening, that a serious accident had taken place on the railway, and that a special train with three Doctors and a Clergyman, had left for the scene. The story was given credence, and people about the Station were anxiously awaiting the arrival of trains to get information as to who the injured ones were. Persons expecting friends were particularly anxious, and though informed that no accident had occurred, were inclined to be doubtful. The story originated owing to a special train leaving at noon with Dr. Keegan on board, for Fox Harbor, and as in many instances, irresponsible persons set the report going that there was an accident on the road. The canard caused such uneasiness, and those responsible for it should feel well ashamed — if they have any shame.
November 5 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Ulunda, Chambers, sails for Halifax, tomorrow night. S.S. Corean left Philadelphia at 9 a.m. Sunday for this port. S.S. Almerianan, Hanks, sails tonight for Liverpool, taking full cargo, fish, oil, etc. S.S. Rosalind arrived Halifax at 5 a.m. yesterday, and sailed again, last night for New York. S.S. Regulus arrived at Botwoodville on Saturday, having been detained by fog. She loads lumber for New York. S.S. Adventure arrived at North Sydney, from New York, at 7 p.m. Saturday, and will leave for St. John’s on Wednesday, bringing a cargo of coal. Schooner Carl E. Richard, Hilton, sails tomorrow morning, for Port Mulgrave, in ballast. She will not return here this year, but will go to South America for hardwood.
November 5 1907 ALONG THE LINE The 6 p.m. train yesterday, took out only a few passengers, mostly second class. The express arrived at 7.50 bringing: Rev. Dr. A. Howley, Mrs Cameron, H. Duder, J. Brocklehurst, W. Knox, Mrs. W. Winsor, Mrs. (Sergt) Sheppard, P.F. Brown, R. Dawson and about 20 second class. The shore train arrived at 9.35 last night. About 50 passengers came, among them being: J. Pike, F. Jerrett, J.W. Hiscock, P. Dumphy, J Davis.
November 5 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Dr. Ames of Broad Cove, was in town today.

Next Monday, Nov. 14th., is the anniversary of the consecration of His Lordship Bishop March.

Mr. C. Yetman, Agent here for the C.L. March Co., Ltd., intends going to St. Mary’s and vicinity next week on a business trip.

Messrs. Munn & Co.’s, steamer Louise, arrived this evening from Carbonear, where she recently landed fish brought from Venison Island, Labrador, to Messrs John Rorke & Son.

The Nickelodian at the Academy Hall opened for the first time this afternoon. Miss Mary Hanrahan as pianist, Miss A Hayse, singer. The pictures shown are said to be exceptionally good.

A Missionary meeting in connection with the Church of England, will be held here on the night of the 18th. November. Revs. W.C. White of Heart’s Content and Edgar Jones, Rector of Bay Roberts, will be the chief speakers.

Misses Maggie Ryan, of Riverhead, Annie Fleming and Mary Casey, School Teachers in the parish of North River, took occasion of Friday being a holy day, to spend a short time with friends, and arrived here by Thursday night’s train. They return on Monday morning

The schooner Pointer arrived this morning from St. John’s, with 100 tons coal to Messrs. R. Rutherford & Co. This small quantity will relieve for the present, the need of coal so generally felt in this town for some little time.

Mr. Kenneth Smith, a former resident of this town, has opened a shop on Water Street opposite Mr. Joseph Ross’s grocery store. His father, Mr. Michael Smith, carried on business here three or four years ago.

Mr. Leicester, singer for the Royal Moving Picture Co., arrived by last night’s train and put up at Cochrane House. Mr. Thomas Freeman of this town, will next week begin an engagement with the Company, as Mechanical Operator of the motion apparatus.

Business at the stores on Water Street this week, has been brisker than for some time, although the volume of trade done was not up to the expectations of the proprietors, but an improvement is expected during this month.

The Superintendent of the Water Company would prevent a cause for complaint if he would have the water fountain on LeMarchant St. boxed in; for if this is not done before winter, the high winds will blow the water about, so that the street near this tank will be a very slippery spot.

His Lordship Bishop March returned from his episcopal visit to Trinity Bay.

Mr. R.A. Squires, wife and child, arrived from St. John’s by last night’s train, and are staying at his father’s, Mr. Alex Squires, until Monday evening, when they return to the city.

A very interesting ceremony will take place on Wednesday afternoon at the residence of Mr. John Stapleton, when his daughter Annie will be united in marriage to Mr. Joseph Moriarty of this town. Congratulations offered.

At the Court today, a drunk and disorderly was asked to contribute $2.00 to the Court Treasury, which he did; and two drunks were requested to defray the cost of the process which required their attendance. In the District Court, two civil cases, one of which had been settled out of Court, were called. The other case was disposed of by defendant having to pay plaintiff the amount claimed by him.

The Harbor Grace Correspondent of the Telegram wishes to have that part of Military Road between Stratton’s Hill and Garland Street put in good condition. He urges the Chairman of the Road Board not to loose his good name for the sake of 50 or 60 yards of bad road. The Chairman in an obliging sort of man, and will no doubt, do all he can to meet the wishes of the Correspondent, but as he has spent a good deal of money to advantage this summer, he must find it difficult to have all roads in perfect order. If the Government would send along more money, the Chairman will, doubtless accommodate the Correspondent. The government should not neglect its friends.

The ladies of St. Paul’s congregation intend holding a sale of work at St. Paul’s Hall on 13th and 14th November, the proceeds from which will go towards placing a new front to the organ and putting new windows in the old part of the Church, the present windows being there for 70 years. Any contribution of candy, plain or fancy work, or any donations that friends may wish to offer, will be most thankfully received by the ladies committee.

A case brought forward by the Constable of Bay Roberts, at the instance of Inspector General McCowen, was heard at that town before Judge Seymour on Thursday. From the evidence submitted, it appears that three of the crew of the schooner Mabel B., fishing at Labrador, went ashore at Freetone Island, and coming up on a shack, entered it, and finding three trunks therein, containing goods usually sold by pedlars, broke open two of the trunks and took some of the goods to their vessel. The Captain ordered the men to take the goods back to the shack, but instead of doing so, when they went ashore again, they burned the goods. Defendants pleaded guilty and two were find $10.00 or one month each, the other $5.00 or 14 days. Mr. Kearney for defendants.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 2nd, ‘07"

November 5 1907 PERSONAL "Mr. F.A. Jerrett came in from Brigus by last night’s train.

Mr. A.R. Martin, of the Anglo staff at Heart’s Content, is now in town.

Mr. Peter Matthews, of New Perlican, is at present in the city, on business.

Rev. Dr. A. Howley, P.P., Salmonier, arrived in town by last night’s train.

Mr. J.W. Hiscock came in from Brigus by last night’s train, and is staying at the Crosbie.

Capt. J. Ryan, of Spaniard’s Bay is at present in the city, settling up his summer’s business.

Mr. P. Dunphy, Red Island, came to the city last night, and will remain a few days, on business.

Mr. M.P. Cashin, M.H.A. came in from Cape Broyle, yesterday on business, and is staying at the Crosbie.

Mrs. (Capt.) W. Winsor Sr., of Wesleyville, arrived in town by yesterday’s express, to visit her mother, Mrs. Whiteway, who at present is seriously ill.

The Rev. Ambrose Haygate, who previous to the fire of 1892, was senior curate of the Church of England in this city, has been appointed by the Bishop of Chester to be Rural Dean of Congleton.

English papers to hand by yesterday’s mail, contain the information that Mr. Frederick C. Bowring, cousin of Sir William Bowring, and brother of Hon. E.R. Bowring, has been selected as Liberal Candidate for the Castle Street Ward, Liverpool. Sir William Bowring, who is a strong supporter of the Campbell Bannerman Government, has for some years been leader of the Liberal party in the Liverpool City Council."

November 5 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The schooner Gladys B. Smith is now due from Sydney, with a load of coal.

The brigt. Bella Rosa is now due here from Oporto to A Goodyear & Sons.

The schooner Muriel is now due with a cargo of cattle and provisions, from P.E. Island.

The schooner Procyn, of Harbor Grace, is now in the stream, awaiting a chance to go on dock for repairs.

There was no sign of the S.S. Silvia up to press hour, she evidently being unable to make port, owing to fog.

None of the local fishermen ventured on the grounds yesterday, owing to the heavy wind; several however, went out last night.

A number of salmon were offered in the market yesterday. They weighted from ten up to fifteen pounds, and were taken in nets on the Southern Shore.

There are more outport schooners in port at present, than at any time for several years, and with fine weather, a large volume of business will be transacted along the water front.

There is a scarcity of coal in the city at present. The S.S. Adventure is now loading at Sydney, and several vessels are on the way here with cargoes, so the present situation will be relieved during the week.

The steamer Briaredene, Capt. Crowe, arrived at Halifax from Gillesport, Labrador, Thursday last, with 34 time-expired lumber men. A similar number left here in the S.S. Kite, to replace them, and will remain at Gillesport until July next.

Passengers who arrived by last evening’s express, say that there is a good sign of herring in the arms at Bay of Islands, and a few good hauls were made the latter part of the week. It is expected that some of the vessels will be ready for market during this week .

It would be wise for outport men to be careful about their cash in future, and see that it is properly put away, and the entrance to their schooners secured before coming ashore. If not, there is a possibility of some of them having Saturday night’s theft on the schooner Rosaline duplicated.

The weather along the line, yesterday morning, was stormy, there being a heavy S.W. gale, with rain. Last night it moderated, the latest reports being: Port aux Basques, S.E., light, foggy, 38 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light, dull, 50 above. Bishop’s Falls, S.E., light, dull, 48 above. Clarenville, S.W., light, raining. Whitbourne, S.W. light, fine, 38 above.

There were no cases of scarlet fever developed yesterday.

There were three arrests by the Police yesterday, one drunk, and two drunk and disorderly.

The schooner Atlanta, Mark Jones, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co’s wharf for H J. Earle, Fogo.

The Magisterial inquiry into the death of Wm Bailey was further adjourned yesterday afternoon, no business being done.

The residence of James Kearsey, Pennywell, will undergo disinfection today, and be released from quarantine tomorrow.

A patient undergoing treatment at the General Hospital, developed scarlet fever on Saturday, and was removed to the Fever Hospital Saturday night.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; M.P. Cashin, Cape Broyle; G.H. Burdaff, Boston; E.W. Spalding, Lincoln, C.V.A. Peel, Oxford, Eng., J.W. Hiscock, Brigus.

On Saturday last at Caplin Bay, Samuel Carter, of Witless Bay, secured a dory load of fish on fresh caplin bait. Caplin to be taken at this late season, is unprecedented in that District.

Mrs. Sergeant Sheppard, who returned from Howley by last evening’s express, where she was visiting her husband, spent an enjoyable time while up country. She visited the hunting grounds and succeeded in killing three caribou, one having an excellent set of antlers.

Surveyor Duder, J Brocklehurst and W Knox, who have been in the woods at Dog Bay and Gander Bay since June last, returned by yesterday’s express. Two others of Bay Roberts, who were with the party, detrained at Brigus Junction.

Mrs. Margaret Murphy died at her home, Hill Farm, Kilbride Road, yesterday, after an illness of only a few hours. Deceased was only in her 22nd year, and was a daughter of the late Patrick and Mary Feehan. She was only married about a year ago, and general sympathy is expressed her husband.

The schooner Grace, Roberts, of Twillingate, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co., for Herring Neck and Twillingate.

The S.S. Mary arrived from Bell island at 2.30 p.m. yesterday, and is loading freight for J.B. Martin, Bell Island, at George Neal’s wharf.

The schooner Janie Belle, James Handcock, Master, arrived in port Saturday night from Portland B.B. , laden with fish, oil, potatoes, billets, 2 cows and 8 sheep.

At the Empire Wood Working Co.’s, wharf, the schooner Renown, John Jones, Little Bay Islands, is discharging lumber from George Clarke’s mill, Hall’s Bay and the schooner Florence, William Brown, Bay Roberts, is also discharging lumber, from Gander Bay.

There were 105 steerage passengers arrived by the last Bruce. They were mostly miners from the Sydneys returning to their homes in Trinity and Green Bay.

Colonel Rees of the Salvation Army, has received a consignment of potatoes, carrots, and beets, sent as a gift to the Rescue Home in St. John’s. He owes these things to the generosity of Harry J. Crowe, Esq. of Botwoodville; they are from his farm, opened at Farmdale, Rushy Pond, and the Colonel testified that their superior quality gives substantial proof of the great capabilities of that part of the interior of the Colony to produce root crops. We understand that His Excellency the Governor visited this farm recently, and is of the opinion that much can be made of the land for agricultural purpose.

Mr. Stephen Hefferin, of Petit Forte, P.B., and Miss Lucy Squires of this city, were united in marriage at Petit Forte Saturday evening. The nuptial knot was tied by the Rev. W.P. Dountney, of St. Kyran’s, and the happy event was made the occasion of much rejoicing by the numerous friends of the young couple, who are well liked and very popular members of the community. After the wedding supper had been partaken of, dancing was indulged in by the younger folk, until the early hours of the morning.

The schooner Laura May, James Hayden, of Petit Forte, P.B arrived in port Saturday evening, after a quick run of 25 hours with a load of 500 qtls. dry fish. Friday night, while crossing Placentia Bay, a deal got across her stern, and one of the crew while endeavouring to clear it, came near being drowned. He was somewhat hurt about the head and lost one of his boots while in the water. The schooner Mary J., Patrick Hayden, also from Petit Forte, arrived early Sunday morning, after a remarkably quick run of 20 hours, fish laden."

November 6 1907 CARBONEAR NEWS "A number of young men and women went out by Friday’s express to winter in the land of Uncle Sam.

Duff & Sons’ schooner Pet, Hobbs, Master, arrived from Merchantman’s Harbor, Friday.

Rorke & Sons’ schooner Jessie, Jos. Hogan, sailed on the 30th for Bonavista Bay to load firewood, stakes, rails, etc., for that firm.

A company of young folk celebrated All Hallowe’en by holding a “snap apple” party in the rooms over the offices of the Electrical Co. Miss Williams, daughter of the Company Manager, presided as Chief Hostess, whilst others of the fair sex lent their assistance to make the affair a success.

November 1st being the Feast of All Saints, the usual holiday was duly honoured in the R.C. Church, and Masses were held same as on Sunday.

The S.S. Diana, Batten, arrived in port at 7 a.m. Thursday night, freighters were busy all day Friday, getting ashore their belongings. The congested state of things that existed on board this steamer in the spring was very much relieved on the homeward voyage, owing to several crews coming by sailing vessels.

The new wing, in course of erection on the Methodist Church of Freshwater, is now nearing completion, thanks to the united efforts of Pastor and people of that prosperous little settlement.

Capt. Jos. Westcott of the brigantine Beatrice, left Spain for this port on the 1st November. Estimating the run out by the jovial Captain’s past record, we may expect his appearance about the last of the month.

As a result of the meeting of fishermen, held at the Court house on Monday night last, we learn a prominent lawyer of the city has been retained by the committee to plead their grievance in the Autumn sitting of the Supreme Court, which will be held on the 20th November.

An excessive indulgence in the drinking of hop beer by our youth, has been quite noticeable for the past few months. The abuse has become so rampant hat the authorities have felt themselves justified in stepping in to ascertain just what the so called “hop beer” compound consists of. Samples of the stuff have been procured from six or eight venders for the purpose of undergoing analysis at the city. The iniquitous C.O.D. system still continues its barefaced evasion to the spirit of the law pertaining to the Temperance Act in local option towns.

Mr. W.H. Soper and crew arrived from Labrador Saturday, in his new schooner, the Manaloy, Rumson, Master.

The stagnated condition of trade prevailing of late by inclement weather, was somewhat revived during the past few days of sunshine.

The Horwood Lumber Co.’s Foreman, Mr. Roberts, is now able to reurn to work again after a short period of sickness.

Mr. Eben Taylor, of Duff & Sons, Ltd., and Miss Maria Young, of Heart’s Content, were united in Hymen’s bonds on the 30th October, by Rev. W.C., White. After the ceremony was performed, the guests repaired to the house of the bride’s father, and there sumptuously dined. At 7.30 p.m., the happy company wended their way to the Orange Hall, which had been hired for the occasion, and there kept up festivities until early morn. Very many choice presents were received by the bride. The duties of best man were admirably filed by Mr. Walter Taylor, brother of the groom, while the honour of bridesmaids were accorded to Miss Elsie Young and Miss Bessie Taylor. The groom’s presents to these were a gold stick-pin and gold bracelet respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Tayor said good bye to their friends of the cable city at p.m. the following day, and drove to their home at Carbonear, where all wish them a pleasant voyage over the matrimonial sea.

CORRESPONDENT."

November 6 1907 HERRING AT WOOD’S ISLAND "Editor Daily News:

Dear sir, — I notice a remark on the herring fishery in Wednesday’s edition of the Star, where it is stated that one of Mr. M.L. McLean’s vessels at Wood’s Island has 700 barrels of herring on board. This is an exageration. The plain fact of the matter is, she has not half that quantity. The Star should learn not to jump at conclusions, which only tends to deceive the public. The truth is, there is very little herring outside anywhere, and many think this may be the beginning of the end.

Yours truly, FISHERMAN, Wood’s Island, Oct. 30, 1907."

November 6 1907 PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY His Excellency the Governor in Council, has been pleased to appoint Mr. Hugh W. Simmons, (Colinet) to be a Surveyor of Lumber; Mr. Wm. Tulk (Burgoyne’s Cove, T.B. ) to be an additional member of the Church of England Board of Education for Smith’s Sound; Mr. Alfred Pittman, (Sopp’s Island), to be an additional member for the Road Board for North Side of White Bay, District of St. Barbe; Messrs, John Joy and Samuel Turley, to be members of the Road Board for Saint Patrick’s, District of Twillingate, in place of Messrs Henry Gillard and Michael Bouzan, left the locality; Mr. Francis Bowers, to be a member of the Road Board for Indian Burying Place, District of Twillingate, in place of Mr. George White, resigned; Messrs Simeon Osmond, Andrew Kelly, Peter Sullivan, James Beresford and Peter Cashin to be a Road Board for Mint Brook and Gambo, District of Bonavista; Henry Elliott, Esq., to be an additional member of the Road Board for Harbor Breton, District of Fortune Bay; Messrs Hugh Gillis, Julien Bruce, Paul Hall, Dugald Gillis and Ben Harvey, to be a Road Board for Gravels to Abarham’s Cove including Boswarlas, District of St. George; Messrs. Charles Duffy, Stephen Weller, James Carter and Joseph M Benoit, to be a Road Board of Abraham’s Cove to Cape St. George, District of St. George. Secretary’s Office, Nov. 5th, 1907.
November 6 1907 KILLED AT BOSTON By Monday’s express, a letter was received in town by Mr. Michael Brown, saying that his nephew Philip Brown had been killed in Boston on the 21st October, while jumping from a street car. He was on his way to Chelsea, but took the wrong car, and discovering his mistake, jumped. He was picked up in an unconscious condition and taken to the City Hospital, where he expired three hours later, without regaining his senses. Deceased was a former resident of the district of Bonavista.
November 6 1907 COASTAL STEAMER "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Argyle left Placentia at 4 a.m. yesterday, on the Red Island route. Dundee is due at Port Blandford tonight. Ethie left Carbonear at 3.30 last evening. Clyde left Lewisporte, yesterday morning, going North. Glencoe leaves Port aux Basques, this morning.

Bowrings: Portia left King’s Cove at 1.10 p.m. yesterday, and is due here at 6 a.m. Prospero left Birchy Cove at 11.30 p.m. Monday, for Sydney, and was due to arrive there last night."

November 6 1907 PERSONAL Mr. M. Drover went out to Green’s Harbor, T.B., by last night’s train. Mr. J. McRae arrived from Harbor Grace by last night’s train, and it at the Crosbie. The Revs. J.J. Durrant, of Botwoodville, and Solomon Hann, of Garnish, have been spending a few days in the city. Mr. R.S. Munn, of Harbor Grace, came over by the Louise yesterday on business, and is staying at the Crosbie. Messrs. A. Gowans and W.A. Mathieson, of the Ourown Woolen Mills, Hueville, came in by last night’s train on business. We regret to learn that Mr. Walter S. March’s illness continues critical, and is causing grave anxiety to his friends. Mrs. Hackett, wife of the Rev. Charles Hackett, of George St. circuit, left on Monday on a visit to her mother, Mrs. E.P. Gould at Carbonear. T Kyffin Freeman, Esq., the London Correspondent of the Free Press, has been honoured for a second time by election as Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Baptist Total Abstinence Association of England. Harvey Graham, Assistant General Manager and Director of the Nova Scotia Steel Company, died at New Glasgow last Thursday, after a year’s illness. He was 59 years of age, and one of the most prominent and honoured of Nova Scotia’s sons. Mrs. Fraser, wife of the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, is a daughter. Three other children survive Mr. Graham who twice married, but died a widower.
November 6 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Pors sailed for Sydney yesterday a.m. S.S. Cape Breton, is now due from Montreal, direct. S.S. Almeriana, Hanks, sailed last night for Liverpool. Schooner Dictator, is now loading at Crosbie & Co.’s for Oporto. S.S. Ulunda, Chambers, sails for Halifax on Thursday morning. S.S. Silvia, Farrell, sails for Halifax and New York on Friday. Brigt. Clementine, Tucker, left Harbor Breton, Saturday last for Oporto. Schooner Olive, Fitzgerald, left Santa Paulo, Oct.15th., for this port, and should now be nearing the Coast. Barqt. Ich Dien, Kennedy, sailed yesterday afternoon, from Pernambuco, taking 4,051 qtls. fish from Crosbie & Co. and G.M. Barr.
November 6 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The adjourned inquiry into the death of William Bailey was continued before Judge Conroy yesterday afternoon, when several witnesses who had previously been examined, had their evidence read over to them for correction, preparatory to signing the copies.

S.S. Carthaginian, is due from Liverpool today.

St. Vincent de Paul holds a special meeting tonight.

About thirty schooners arrived in port yesterday, fish laden, and about the same number left for home ports, laden with supplies.

Water side thieves are still operating, and within the last 48 hours several schooners have been visited and clothing, etc., stolen.

There is one case of typhoid fever and a case of scarlet fever at Spaniard’s Bay. Neither is serious and medical treatment is being given both.

Mr. T. Coady, who was at Philadelphia, studying Dentistry is now on his way home for medical treatment, having contracted muscular rheumatism.

The thief who stole the $147 from the schooner Rosaline, at Ayr & Sons’ wharf, is still at large, and owing to the meagre information given, the Police have but poor hopes of capturing him.

Mr. Thomas Clarke, a well known fisherman of Petty Harbor, died at his home suddenly, Sunday last. He was in his 64th year and enjoyed good health up to half an hour before death.

A fisherman boarding a schooner at Baird, Gordon’s wharf last night, got overboard, and had a narrow escape from drowning. He was under the influence at the time, but the cold bath sobered him up.

Fish was fairly plentiful at Red Island and vicinity last week, and good work was done with trawls. If the weather is fine, the fishermen will continue their avocation for another couple of weeks.

A few of the local fishermen were on the grounds yesterday, and were fairly successful. Fish is plentiful, but owing to the unsettled state of the weather, it is dangerous for the boats to remain any length of time on the grounds.

At present there is an abundance of labour in the city particularly along the water front. Besides fish handling, there are a number of steamers in port, and those desiring work can easily find employment. These conditions however are not expected to last long.

Residents of the locality near Cavendish Square and Forest Road, complain of the hotel foundations at ForT William, which is a favourite resort for persons of ill-repute, and is also used for other than ordinary purposes. The Council should take steps to remedy the matter.

A Southern Shore man was set upon at the foot of Queen’s Street last night, by a gang of hooligans, and badly treated. The interference of some citizens got the fisherman clear of the ruffians. This section of the city is infested with scamps, though strict Police attention is given nightly.

A fisherman of the schooner Lucy Ann reported to the Police yesterday, that during his absence from the schooner, some unwelcome visitor came on board, and went off with a coat and vest that was hanging up in the cabin. It is a good thing the schooners are well fastened to the wharves or they might also be taken away.

The S.S. Bruce is due at Port aux Basques this morning.

There were only two arrests by the Police last night, both being drunk.

The T.A. Club will meet tonight at 9 o’clock on important business. A full attendance is requested.

Some other shipments of ptarmingan were received in town yesterday, but the price is still 90 cents a brace.

Dr. Keegan, who went out by special train Monday to attend M.M. Davis, of Fox Harbor, returned by last night’s train.

Yesterday was Guy Fawkes’ Day, and was duly celebrated. At the North Battery, several bonfires blazed, and muskets was fired during the night.

The shore train arrived at 11 last night, bringing: A. Gowans, R. Mathieson , Dr. Keegan, J. Davis and about 30 others passengers.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday: Mrs. F.J. Dunn, Harbor Grace; F.J. Haley, Bradford, Eng.; R.S. Munn, Harbor Grace; A Gowans, W.A. Mathieson, Hueville; J McRae, Harbor Grace, John Young, Sydney.

Yesterday was one of the busiest days along the water front for some months. Some thousands of quintals of fish were landed from schooners, and also many thousands were out drying.

It is estimated that there are about 125,000 quintals of fish afloat in the harbor among the many schooners. This is the largest quantity of fish to be in port at one time, at this date for many years.

There were three Furness line steamers in port together last night, the Almeriana, from Halifax, Ulunda from Liverpool, and Shenandoah from London. The Almeriana sailed for Liverpool last night. The Ulunda sails for Halifax tomorrow and the Shenandoah remains in the stream until the latter is finished discharging.

Parties arriving from Harbor Main district last night say that three liquor licences have been renewed in the district, and that the other applications are still under consideration. From other sources however, we learn that no licences have yet been renewed.

The brigt. Bella Rosa, 27 days from Oporto, reached port yesterday evening. She has a cargo of salt, corkwood, etc., consigned to A Goodridge & Sons. The passage over was fairly fine until the Newfoundland Coast was reached. Monday night the vessel was in the thick of a S W. storm, but came through without damage.

The weather up country yesterday, was the finest for some days, the temperature averaging about 50 above. Last night it was a little colder, the following being the latest reports: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 35 above. Bay of Islands, Calm, fine, 33 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W.,light, fine, 30 above. Clarenville, W., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, N.W., light, fine, 30 above.

There were no cases of scarlet fever reported since last issue.

Inspector O’Brien was at Torbay, inspecting milk farms and dairies.

At present there are three schooners bearing the one name – “Madonna” – at Baine Johnston’s wharf.

The schooner Pilot, owned by William Hiscock, arrived from Brigus yesterday, laden with oil, fish, etc. After discharging she will load supplies for J.W. Hiscock, Brigus.

The work of erecting new stables for the Reid-Nfld Co. began on Monday. The stables will be situated opposite the machine shops near the trestle.

There are four steamers now on the dry dock, namely S.S. Strod, the wrecking tug Petrel, and the whalers Puma and Lynx. These will all receive a through overhauling and painting.

The schooner Annie C. Hall, Archibald Elliott, of Change Islands, is discharging 500 qtls. of fish at Bishop & Monroe’s. She has also on board, 5m lumber from Dog Bay, which will be discharged at the Horwood Lumber co.’s wharf.

The S.S. Louise, owned by Messrs Munn & Co. of Harbor Grace, arrived in port from that place at noon yesterday, with a cargo of fish, oil, etc. Mr. R.S. Munn came over by her on business.

A girl named Dantels, working at Wood’s Aerated Water Works, Hamilton Street, had her hand badly lacerated yesterday afternoon, by the busting of a lemonade bottle. The girl became unconscious from the loss of blood and fright, and had to be driven home, where she was immediately attended.

A meeting of the local committee of the R.M.D.S.F. will take place at Government House, on Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. His Excellency the Governor and Dr. Grenfell will be present. Dr. Grenfell expects to leave for New York in a few days.

By Thursday’s train, here is expected the Rev. T. H. Billings, M.A., of Montreal, one of the Associate Secretaries of the Student Department of the Y.M.C.A. The purpose of his visit is to interview the principles of the colleges and the students in the Y.M.C.A. movement. Mr. Billings was one of the Canadian delegates to the recent student Volunteer Conventions in Japan, and has promised to speak at the Missionary meeting at George Street Church on Sunday night next, when he will report on that gathering, and its influence on the Japanese."

November 7 1907 WHY COAL IS SCARCE The cause of the shortage of coal in the city at present, is due to the inability of the Companies at Sydney to load steamers or vessels for this port. There are a number of charted steamers fo the Company being loaded daily, and rushed up the St. Lawrence, where orders have to be filled before navigation closes. While these boats are at Sydney they are given the preference, and a local concern is now two weeks waiting to get a steamer loaded. The Adventure is expected to leave there today for this port, with a full cargo.
November 7 1907 NEW CURATE FOR ST. THOMAS’ By the Carthaginian from Liverpool yesterday, arrived Mr. E.L. Birchby, who has been appointed to St. Thomas’s Parish, as Junior Curate. Mr. Birchby received his clerical training at St. Paul’s Missionary College in Burgh, Lincolnshire. Mr. Brodie, a new Curate for Heart’s Content, also arrived. Both of these gentlemen will be ordained by His Lordship the Bishop of Newfoundland, at the Ordination Service to be held at Heart’s Content on Sunday next, at 11 a.m.
November 7 1907 CAPE BRETON ARRIVES The S.S. Cape Breton, Capt. Reid, reached port from Montreal direct, shortly before eleven o’clock last night, after a fine passage of four and one half days. She brought a full general cargo under hatches and a quantity on deck, and one passenger. The ship berthed in the stream last night, and pulls into Harvey & Co.’s premises this morning to discharge.
November 7 1907 PORTIA BACK FROM NORTHWARD The S.S. Portia, Capt. Kean, arrived back from the Northward at 5.45 a.m. yesterday. The weather experienced on the run North was fairly fine. Coming South between Conche and Englee, a heavy gale was met, and at the later place, it was blowing so hard that no freight could be taken on board. For the remainder of the passage, fine weather was had. An ususally large number of passengers were carried on this trip, nearly three hundred being landed at this port alone. The Portia brought a full cargo including a quantity on deck, and as passengers: Segt. Cox, Messrs Ryan, Crocker, Fowler, Hiscock, Cher, Curlew, Colonel, Sawyer, Penny (2), Brewer, Moore, Fillier, Hancock, Duggan, Wasfield (2), Lind, Glavina (2), Lodge, Gardner (2), Malcolm, M. Crawford, Coffin, Hodge, O’Neil, Rowe, Jeffre, Parsons (2), Robins, Hann, House, James, McKnight, Abbott, (2), Rowsell, Rev. Athinson, W. Ryan, Crocker, Fowlow, Hiscock, Coombs, Day, Avery, March, Mesdames, Guy, Lockyer, Feehan, Hiscock, Buney, Coombs, Misses Bishop, Noble, Roberts, Brown, Templeton, Jones, Hiscock, Hopburg, Avery and 225 in steerage.
November 7 1907 CARTHAGINIAN IN PORT The S.S. Carthaginian, Capt. Williams, arrived in port from Liverpool at 5 p.m. yesterday. She left port on Wednesday last, and experienced fair weather for the entire run. The ship brought a full cargo, including 700 tons to this port, 9 bags and 3 baskets mail matter, and as passengers: Messrs Ralph Bishop, E.L. Birchby, Brodie, Rev. E.J.R. Nichols, Madames F.W. Ayre, Baird, R.K. Bishop, W.H. Crowdy, E. Matassarin, and infant, A. Nichols, F. Nichols, Messes Crowdy, M. Matassarin, B. Poole, E. Ray, Master J Matassasrin, and 3 in second class cabin. In transit for Halifax are 3 in saloon, 18 second cabin and 199 steerage.
November 7 1907 A NARROW ESCAPE THE SCHOONER Mary, Maurice Wiffin, arrived in Port Tuesday night from Fox Harbor, Placentia Bay. After leaving Trepassey Tuesday morning, where she had been harboured the night before, a heavy breeze of North West wind began to blow and soon the sea was white with foam. The schooner was kept as near as possible to the Western shore of Trepassey Bay, and when off Cape Pine, a sea that swept over, washed one of the crew, John Foley, over the taff-rail. He chanced to catch a rope, when the sea swept him off his legs, and luckily for him, the end of it was fastened on board. To this he clung until the other members of the crew pulled him in over the rail. His escape from a watery grave was a narrow one, but after changing his wet clothing, he felt nothing the worst for his adventure, and helped to work the schooner into port.
November 7 1907 BODY FOUND The body of the missing man Chafe, was found at Petty Harbor yesterday afternoon, by some berry pickers, quite near his home. Chafe left to go berry picking the morning of Thursday, Oct. 10th, and though an almost continued search was kept up, it took exactly four week before his remains were found. The body was in a bad state of decomposition and was found at the foot of the main river, and it is believed the old man met his death by drowning.
November 7 1907 CRIMINAL ACT George Cole of Colliers, C.B. was before Magistrate O’Donnell at Bell Island Monday last, charged with un-gripping ore cars from the cable, Sunday night. The charge, a very serious one, was proven and he was sentenced to 30 days hard labour. The Magistrate severely reprimanded him for his act, as had the cars started running, it is possible that serious damage or perhaps loss of life would have occurred.
November 7 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived in Port aux Basques at 9.35 a.m. yesterday with the following passengers: Lieut, D. King, S.A., Mrs. C. Major, Mrs. J Udell, Adjt., and Mrs. Barr and child, W.W. Dillon, T. Lesellier, Master Reid, W.S Bates, Rev. T.H. Billing, W.T. Moulton, C. Le Moine, F.C. Patten, in saloon, and 56 in steerage. The express is due at 2 o’clock.
November 7 1907 FISHERMEN AND CULLERS A number of fishermen, now discharging their’s catches, complain of what they call “too strict a cull” and on almost every wharf there is more or less trouble between the fish owners and cullers. Skipper Dunphy of Red Island, P.B., had a dispute with his culler yesterday, and refused to continue landing without a new man being put on. The trouble was over the difference between “large” and “small” fish. Mr. D. claimed that the culler was throwing out “large” for “small” and backed up his argument by taking his fish off the board.
November 7 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is due at Tilt Cove. Ethie arrived at Clarenville at 7.15 p.m. yesterday. Dundee arrived at Port Blandford at 8 p.m. yesterday. Clyde left Springdale at 3 a.m. yesterday, going North. Glencoe left La Poile at 4 p.m. yesterday coming East. Argyle leaves Placentia this morning, going West.

Bowrings: Portia sails North at 10 a.m. tomorrow. Prospero left Rose Blanche at 2.55 p.m. yesterday, coming East."

November 7 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. Joseph Pumphrey of Messrs R. Rutherford & Co.’s employ, has been laid by several days with a heavy cold. His re-appearance at the shop is looked for within a few days.

Re. Dr. Robertson of St. John’s occupied the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church here on Sunday, Rev. Joseph McNeil having gone to the city during the past week.

The street light on Harvey St., at the foot of Garland Street, has been out for several nights, and up to Monday evening was not replaced. The sooner a new bulb is furnished at the place indicated, the better will the public appreciate the service of those responsible for keeping the lights in order.

Mr. H.H. Parsons arrived from Flowers Cove, where he had been all the summer, by Saturday night’s express. Rev. Dr. Robertson, Lawyer C. Hutching, Mr. Fred Horwood and Mrs. Allan Parsons and daughter, also came from St. John’s that night. The lady and her daughter are staying a few days at Gordon Lodge.

Mrs. Noseworthy, relict of the late Charles Noseworthy, died at Bryant’s Cove on Saturday, at the age of 69 years. Some weeks ago the deceased lady was operated upon for appendicitis, when it was seen gangrene had complicated the trouble. She leaves one son, Mr. Selby Noseworthy, C of E. Schoolmaster and Lay-reader at Bryant’s Cove, to mourn the loss of an affectionate parent. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon.

Master Alex Parsons, son of Mr. E. Parsons, Cabinet Maker, while attempting to board the yacht of Mr. G. Parsons on Sunday afternoon, stepped upon the gunwale of a small boat, and his weight capsizing the tiny craft, he fell into the water near the wharf formerly known as Paterson’s. Two young men whose names are withheld, hastened to the rescue, and being unable to take the lad into their boat because of its smallness, they towed him to the wharf where he was landed in safety. Alex was in the water five minutes.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooners Estella and L. E. Young were at Trepassey yesterday bound to Sydney for coal.

Munn’s steamer Louise left for St. John’s this morning taking a quantity of cod oil. Mr. R.S. Munn went passenger.

His Lordship Bishop March entertained some visiting Clergy and other guests, at dinner on Monday evening at the episcopal residence, it being the anniversary of his consecration.

Mr. Robert French, of Charles, of Courage’s Beach, after an illness of several months, died this morning on his 68th birthday. He leaves a widow, three sons, Mark, Charles now in the Yukon Country; Joshua and one daughter, Mrs. James Martin in Montreal, to mourn the loss of an esteemed husband and affectionate father. The funeral takes place tomorrow afternoon.

The hearing of a postponed liquor case was resumed at the Court this morning. The witness, whose illness delayed the case, testified that no liquor was called for and bought, but that some brought by one of the witnesses was drunk upon the premises. The case was dismissed. Mr. Kearney for the defence. In the District Court, Dr. Strapp had the Reliving Officer present, for refusing to pay bills contracted by him as Poor Commissioner. Mr. Squires pleaded not liable, and after the matter had been trashed out in Court by the principle, the case was dismissed, the Dr. being assured by the Court that payment would be made.

“Hello Quills “ Where have you been lately? I have not seen anything of you for some time.”

“Oh my movements are so uncertain because of my peculiar vocation, that my appearance in town is not always regular. Have you anything of interest to communicate. Pills?”

“Well,"" replied the person questioned, “Things are becoming so advanced in this ancient town of ours, that we hardly know whether life will be worth living, if we should relapse into our former mode of existence. What, with moving picture exhibition and agricultural shows, one hardly knows if the seven years of plenty, recorded in Egyptian History, is not being repeated in Harbor Grace. If so we may look for the seven years of famine.”

“Moving picture exhibitions and agricultural shows!"" exclaimed Quills, “You mystify me.”

""Have you not read the daily paper lately?"" questioned Pills. “These give glowing accounts of the wonders to be seen nightly at the various halls. You should go and see them before you leave us.

”Yes, yes” assented Quills, “But I think I am more interested in the agricultural show. You have an agricultural society here, have you not?”

“I should say we have,” said Pills, waxing eloquent on the subject, ""And an enterprising and energetic body it is. Let me tell you of the show. Thanks to the untiring zeal of the society, an organization was permanently founded and arrangements made to hold an agricultural show here this fall. Circulars were sent out enumerating the classes of products for which prizes would be given. It is said the Government gave $300 towards the holding of the show. Now let me point out what results have arisen from the project. Had you been here during the past fortnight, you would have gone six nights out of the week to one of our halls where the exhibits were exposed, and you must have been awed by the display. There you would have seen turnips of different kinds, many of which weighed 22 pounds, cabbage, the variety of which cannot be enumerated, as large as a soup boiler, weighing from 16 to 30 pounds; parsnip, carrots, beet, cucumber, apples, etc., which it would be impossible to dilate upon, the largest ever grown in the country; pigs, of Berkshire breed, black as your coat, sleek and plump, climatized by being bred and reared in the country, and sheep and cattle of different kinds, which deafened the ear with their melodious noises. A brass band was nightly in attendance and kept time with the subdued effect of the lowing of the cattle. Ice cream was served in abundance free of charge to all patrons. An entrance fee of 5 cents was charged, and so well attended was the show, that all expenses were met by the admission collections. Not one cent of the Government grant of $300 has been touched. Talk about moving pictures concerns! They are not in it with agricultural shows.”

“You surprise me much,” exclaimed Quills. “What a wonderful show I have missed! Let know when it re opens; I’ll be there.”

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 5th, 07 "

November 7 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Siberian arrived at Glasgow yesterday afternoon.

The S.S. Carthaginian sails for Halifax and Philadelphia tonight.

Our thanks are due Mr. A. Munro, Chief Steward S.S. Carthaginian, for late English papers.

The Virginia Lake is now ten days North of Tilt Cove, and evidently meeting bad weather on the Labrador Coast.

Inspector General McCowan arrived by the Portia, seriously ill, and yesterday was attended by Drs. Randell and Scully.

Mrs. Guy of Twillingate, arrive by the Portia yesterday to enter the Hospital. She is suffering from an internal trouble.

Mr. H.D. Reid and party left Grand Falls for Patrick’s March last night, and will spend a few days shooting at the latter place.

Sergt. Cox, who was down to Englee and La Scie, to bring up witness in connection with a battery case to be tried in the Supreme Court shortly, returned by the Portia yesterday.

Hon. E.R. Bowring and J Harvey, and Messrs J.A. Paddon and W.C. Job, who were caribou shooting at Howley, will arrive by today’s express. They all secured good heads, and enjoyed the trip splendidly.

The body of Mrs. Gardner, of Groais Islands, arrived by the Portia from Change Islands, for interment here. The deceased lady was on a visit to the latter place and while there was taken ill, death resulting from an abscess on the brain. Undertaker Martin took charge of the remains upon arrival.

Yesterday morning it snowed at Port aux Basques for about an hour, but the remainder of the day was fine all along the road. Last night’s reports were: Port aux Basques, calm, fine, 40 above. Bay of Islands, N.E., light, dull, 30 above. Quarry, N.W., light, dull, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 29 above. Clarenville, calm, fine, 40 above. Whitbourne, S.W.,light, fine, 40 above.

Mr. Ernest Lind arrived from Little Bay by the Portia, to enter Hospital for treatment. Last winter Mr. Lind was at Three Arms on a visit, and one day, while walking down to one of the stages, his foot went through between the longers, and he wrenched his leg considerably. He did not give the matter much attention at the time, but recently, the limb became very painful, and he cannot now put it to the ground, necessitating his coming on here for careful treatment.

S.S. Mary sailed yesterday morning for Bell Island.

The schooner Iona, Herald, is discharging sand from Oporto, at Kennedy & Mullaly’s wharf.

The schooner Mary, Maurice Wiffin, arrived Tuesday night from Fox Harbor P.B., with fish, oil, herring and salmon.

The schooner Orange Blossom, Elias Brown, arrived Tuesday night from Musgravetown, B.B., laden with fish, oil, potatoes and cattle.

The schooner Jubilee, John Stephenson Master, of Fox Harbor, arrived in port yesterday morning, having on board a load of 500 qtls. of dry fish.

Robert Hiscock, of Flat Island, B.B, is discharging his summer’s catch of 500 qtls. fish from his schooner Island Bird, at Goodridge's wharf.

The schooner Energy, William Small, is loading supplies at Tessier’s wharf for J.B. Osmond, Moreton’s Harbor; Thomas French, and R. Boyd, Tizzard’s Harbor.

The Municipal Council will meet at 7.30 tonight instead of Friday night, and employees will be paid tomorrow instead of Saturday, which is the King’s birthday.

An insane man from Clark’s Beach, was brought to town last night, in charge of Constable Bishop, and taken to the Asylum. The unfortunate man is suffering from religious mania.

Mr. J.J. Mullaly left for Sydney by the S.S. Pros to engage some cargoes of coal; for the firm of Kennedy, Mullaly & Co. before returning, he will visit his uncle at Halifax.

The schooner Puma, Charles Butt, from Brown’s Arm, Green Bay, arrived yesterday with forty thousand feet of lumber to Horwood Lumber Co.

The shore train arrived at 9.45 last night bringing; Capt. T. Bonia, Mrs. W. Wills, Mrs. Dawe, Mrs. A Parsons, Miss Parsons, J. Murphy, Constable Bishop and about 40 others.

During the season past, the fishermen at La Manche secured about 2,000 qtls. fish but to date only 800 qtls have been shipped here. The backward weather prevented it being cured, and now it is almost impossible to get the remainder freighted to St. John’s.

Mr. Donald Morison, K.C., left by last evening’s train for Carbonear, where he has gone at the request of the fishermen, who have retained him to safeguard their interests in the differences which exist between buyer and seller over the price of fish.

Mr. Stevens of Logy Bay, asks us to correct some mistakes which crept into a report of the fire at his house on Oct. 19th. He was not left the house and the furniture had not been removed. As a matter of fact the fire was, he informs us, caused by the upsetting of a lamp which he himself was carrying. His family had come to the city as is their custom, during the fall and winter months, but his cattle and the gathering of the crops necessitated his continuous presence there."

November 8 1907 HOW OSMOND WAS DROWNED During the past season, Capt. Benj. Osmond, with four of his sons, on board their little schooner Young Builder (23 tons), made their annual fishing voyage up the straits of Belle Isle. On the 26th of August they returned to Brig Bay where they landed and dried their voyage of cod, which they reloaded on their schooner and sailed for home (Bonne Bay) on the morning of the 21st October. The wind was E.N.E. which was favourable, and the weather, promising for a quick run home. At 10 p.m. Capt. Osmond judged himself to be off Pond's River. The wind had hauled to the N.E., and increased to a gale with snow, so he shortened sail and ran the little vessel under two-reefed foresail until midnight, by which time the sea was in mountains and the wind blew a hurricane. So they then took in sail and ran their little craft under bare poles. At 3.20 a. m. , with the storm at its height, an unlucky sea broke with such tremendous force on the stern of the Young Builder, that those on board did not know but that their craft was going down stern foremost. When she had freed herself of water, the Wheelman was gone, the wheel was carried away, the cabin doors smashed, the slides gone, and the cabin full of water. At 7 a.m. on the 22nd., the storm began to abate, and four hours later the Young Builder, battered and storm tossed, entered her port with her flag at half mast. The missing Wheelman was Arthur Osmond, 25 years of age, unmarried, and a member of one of the best families in Bonne Bay. Young Osmond was a quite, unassuming young man, steady and well thought of in the community where he was born and bred, and his tragic death will be long remembered in Bonne Bay. — Western Star.
November 8 1907 “HOME’S” REPORT The steamer Home, returned Thursday evening from Battle Harbor and intermediate ports of call. Blustery weather and dark nights somewhat detained the ship. She reported the storm of October 21st to have been severely felt along the Norther parts of the Coast. A schooner belonging to Williams, Current Island, was upset at her moorings, so fiercely did the wind blow. At Brig Bay, a schooner owned by Jackman and Sheppard was driven ashore, so also was Coomb's craft at Ferrole. Both of them considerably damaged, but their owners hope to be able to repair them for the coming winter. Numerous small boats were wrecked and stages and wharves in several of the harbors were completely demolished. The Home had great difficulty in taking out 13,500 feet of lumber and 6,000 shingles in the Straits ports, as it all had to be rafted alongside the ship. Operations have been resumed at Hawk’s Bay Whale Factory, and eleven fish were captured there lately. The steamer’s inward cargo consisted chiefly of whale oil and guano. — Western Star.
November 8 1907 THE LIMIT Yesterday, a city tradesman, who is more fond of liquor than work, played a contemptable trick on his better half. The latter who was ill, sent the husband to make a few purchases at a grocery store — where the family gets a week’s credit — and procuring them, went aboard an outport schooner and sold them at about half price, while an anxious wife and child were waiting at home for breakfast. The husband returned about noon, in an inebriated condition, and then attempted to clean out the house furnishings. This morning, application will be made to get him on the”Black List” — which is not likely to improve him.
November 8 1907 DESTROYED BY FIRE The Postal Telegraph Office at Stephenville Crossing was totally destroyed by fire Wednesday night. The fire was first discovered about 2 a.m., by Messrs V Gallant and J Keefe, who were awakened by the roar of the flames. They hurriedly alarmed the settlement, and in a short while, all the people were at the scene; but the fire had gained such headway that it was impossible to extinguish it. Close by were the railway freight shed and station, surrounding these were the dwellings and stores. The people fought the flames in earnest, and it is a wonder that they kept other buildings from being destroyed. The railway platform was considerably burnt and the freight shed slightly scorched, but no further damage was done. The origin of the fire is unknown, but it was no doubt due to carelessness on the part of someone. Preparations are being made for the erection of a new building, but in the meantime, Postal and telegraphic work will be conducted in the McKay Hotel. — Western Star.
November 8 1907 NAUTICAL "S.S. Corean is due to arrive from Philadelphia today.

S.S. Halifax City left Liverpool for here at 4 p.m. on Tuesday

S.S. Ulunda, Capt. Chambers, sailed for Halifax at 3 p.m. yesterday, taking six passengers in steerage.

Schooner Davis Morris, Morris, Master, arrived at North Sydney yesterday, and will load coal for C & A. Dawe, Bay Roberts

S.S. Carthaginian, Capt. Williams, sails at noon today taking as passengers; Miss Cowan in saloon, and two intermediate for Halifax.

S.S. Shenandoah berthed at Pitts’ premises yesterday afternoon to discharge. She had to go outside the heads to turn. She sails for Halifax today.

Baine Johnson & Co.’s steamer Euphrates, went to Heart’s Content on Wednesday to tow down the Lake Simcoe, which brought a cargo of coal there from North Sydney. They had not arrived here up to an early hour this morning.

S.S. Silvia, Capt. Farrel, sails this afternoon for Halifax and New York, taking full cargo and the following passengers; Messrs. Charles Liddy, W.A. Thorburn, Misses Ida Drover, Annie Rabbitts, E.L. Thorburn and eight in steerage."

November 8 1907 WESTERN NOTES "(From the Western Star)

The Toratta, Capt. S. Shaw, arrived Saturday from Bay St. George, and will take a cargo of herring from here.

The Willis C. Hudson, Capt. George Hudson, of St. George’s is now in Middle Arm, procuring a cargo of herring.

The Athlone, Capt. W. Bennett, of St. George’s sailed from there Monday, to come to Bay of Islands for a cargo of herring.

The B.G. Anderson, Capt. Wm. Morris, sailed from St. George’s yesterday, taking a cargo of barrelled herring and dry codfish to Halifax.

Mr. W.A. Gabier has resigned from the Post Office and Telegraph Office at Lark Harbor. His place is being occupied by Willis Parsons, who went there by the Home.

The S.S. Louisburg, Capt. Gould, arrived Friday, bringing 2100 tons of coal for the R.N.C., which she discharged at the railway pier. She sailed again yesterday afternoon.

Messrs. R.W. Stedman and Mason Benner, of Dayton, Ohio, who here hunting along the upper Humber, came here Monday. They returned home today, each with three good caribou heads, trophies of their hunt.

A small schooner owned by Mr. P. Doman, was driven ashore Wednesday night in Frenchman’s Cove. With the assistance of the residents and of two Canadian schooners, she was refloated Thursday night, without sustaining any damage.

The Oblique was out on her trial trip Friday afternoon. The boat was formerly propelled by gasoline, but it proved so unsatisfactory that Angwin & Co. removed the engine and had the launch docked early in the summer. The boat was cut in two and made longer by twelve feet. A steam engine was then installed, from which the owner expects better satisfaction.

A terrible railway accident happened on Oct. 15th, near Shrewsbury, London, when an express train jumped the track, with the result that 19 passengers were killed and 40 injured. J.F. Stewart, well known in Bay of Islands, was on board the same train with his ten year old daughter, and miraculously escaped unhurt. They were in the rear coach, which accounts for their escape.

A man who was before the Police Court and fined some time ago, and being given a certain time to pay the money, left the country without so doing, and for whom a commitment to the Penitentiary was issued, returned by one of the steamers a few days ago. Yesterday he was arrested and taken to the Pen.

HERRING FISHERY: There has been a great improvement in this fishery the past week, and the fishermen are feeling jubilant over the prospects of a good voyage. Good catches of herring have been taken this week in Humber Arm, the highest being eighteen barrels in one day for a boat. In the Middle Arm the fishery is better, and boats have taken as high as twenty four barrels in one day, and on Monday, Kennedy’s crew secured about seventy barrels. This is a very good showing, and it looks as though the fishery will be a good one after all. By the end of the week there will likely be three or four cargoes ready for market, the chartered vessel of Mr. Mclean’s will be the first to get clear, as she is almost ready now. The following American vessels have arrived since last report: Dauntless, Capt. Thorp., Blanche, Capt. McCuish, arrived Wednesday, S.P. Willard, Capt. Peterson came Friday. There is now a fleet of 41 American and Canadian vessels in the Bay and a number of local craft. Other vessels are to leave Gloucester in a day or two, and the fleet will likely total sixty before the end of the season. — Western Star."

November 8 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "There were three arrests by the Police yesterday, two drunks and one drunk and disorderly.

The Newfoundland Highlanders meet for drill at the C.L.B. Armoury at 7.30 tonight.

The Police are now working on a serious criminal cases, and an arrest will likely be made today.

A case of scarlet fever was yesterday reported to the Health authorities from 133 Bond St. The patient is being nursed at home.

Patrick Boggan, of Portugal Cove, died at the Signal Hill Hospital yesterday, cancer of the stomach being the cause of death.

Mr. Pike’s residence on Pennywell Road, and Mr. Whitten’s on Wickford St., were released from quarantine yesterday morning.

Three employees of the Reid Co.’s Electrical Works resigned their positions yesterday, owing to a difference arising with the Foreman.

Adam Randell of Harbor Deep, who was brought up on the Portia a few trips ago to enter the Lunatic Asylum, died at the institution a short time ago.

The tenement house at Rope Walk Range, where the case of typhoid fever developed on Wednesday, was disinfected yesterday, and will be released from quarantine today.

A skating party and five o’clock tea was given at the Roller Rink yesterday afternoon, by Mrs. F.H. Donnelly and Miss Madeline Donnelly, about eighty ladies and gentlemen being present.

Watchman James Kennedy of the Reid Co.’s Station, found a $5 gold piece in one of the cars, Wednesday night. He promptly returned it to the owner, Mrs. W. French of Coley’s Point, C.B.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; J.T. Murphy, Halifax, W.W. Dillon, J.G. Angwin, Sydney; W.S. Bales, Brandford, Ont.; W.H. Kennedy, Harbor Grace; Jas. C. Jones, P.F. O’Reilly, Placentia, George Ingerman and wife.

The schooner Active, Dan Winsor, of Wesleyville, arrived in port Tuesday with a full cargo of dry fish. The Active fished at Dead Island, Labrador and secured a full voyage, but it took two months to cure it, owing to weather conditions.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including; E.M. Spalding, Rev. E.W. Nichol, Mrs. P. O’Neill, S.R. Knight, J.W. Small, R. Boyle, Mrs. O’Dell, Miss Harris, Miss Ryal, F.W. Rioux, B. Janes, Adj. Ogilve, S.A., Adjt. Parsons, S.A., Ensign Downey, S.A.

A special meeting of St. Vincent de Paul was held on Wednesday night. The Secretary of the Council of England wrote, asking for a correct list of the officers of the local Society, and for a copy of the last report. These were ordered to be furnished him. One new member was admitted to membership.

The schooner Will-of-the-Wisp, was brought yesterday from Alex Goodyear & Sons by Thomas Lake of Heart’s Content, who sold his schooner, Florence, to Mr. J Barret, of Change Islands, both skippers being well pleased with their new purchases. The two schooners are moored at Goodridge’s wharf and will load supplies for their home ports.

Mrs. Edward Chafe wishes to thank all who helped in the search for her husband. The men of Petty Harbor and other places will please accept her thanks.

The local committee of the Royal Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen meet at 3 o’clock this afternoon at Government House. We understand that business of an interesting and far reaching character will be brought forward by Dr. Grenfell, who leaves for New York in a few days.

Mr. Charles Liddy, son of Mr W.H. Liddy of Torbay, leaves on the Silvia today for Southbridge, U.S.A. to take a position with the American Optical Co. of that place. His brother who is working with the same company secured the position for him. The many friends of Mr. Liddy wish him every success in his new work.

The schooner Belle Franklin, A Haynes, is at Duder’s wharf, taking in freight for Bell Island.

The schooner Alabama ,Samuel Maker, master, arrived Wednesday night, from Open Hall, having on board a full load of fish. she is now anchored in the stream.

The schooner NellieM., Stephen Mullowney, arrived Wednesday night from Sweet Bay, B. B., laden with fish oil, cooper’s lumber and hoops, which are being discharged at G. Browning & Son’s wharf.

There was some trouble at one of the wharves yesterday evening, about towing a schooner up the harbor. Two tugs, seeing a signal in the schooner’s rigging, arrived at the same time, and both claimed the job. One of them backed out and left the other to do the towing. Some hitch arose in passing the line from the schooner to the tug, which caused those on board to loose patience, and she also quit the work, leaving the schooner with all lines uncast and a stiff breeze blowing from across the harbor. The schooner’s crew had to hustle to fasten her to the wharf again.

The schooner Maud, Cornelius Whiteway, arrived yesterday from Musgrave Harbor, having a full load of fish and oil on board.

The M. Lloyd Morris, Capt. Williams, sailed from Fogo on the 4th November, with 3,500 qtls prime codfish, shipped by the firm of J.W. Hodge.

At 10.30 last night, several outport men had a “scrap” in Bowring Bros’ Cove, but no one was hurt. Being told that the Police were coming, they hastened to their schooners.

The schooner Maggie Sullivan, Capt. George Downer, which left port at 2 p.m. last Saturday for Fogo, arrived at her destination at 11 a.m. next day, making the run in twenty-one hours.

The schooner Larkspur, Howell, arrived Wednesday night from Cat Harbor, Straight Shore, with 900 qtls of fish on board, after a passage of twenty-four hours. She is now anchored in the stream."

November 9 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. Terenee Kennedy is now raising the roof of his residence at the corner of Cochrane and Water Street.

The steamer Progress towed the wrecked steamer Nereus from Bell Island on Wednesday. The latter is to be placed on the slip here for repairs.

Mr. McLachlan, Government Inspector of Boilers, was in town on Wednesday. Mr. Pitts arrived by Tuesday night’s train and put up at Gordon Lodge. Rev. J McNeil returned from St. John’s that night.

The owner of a vicious dog which recently bit a man, was before the Court on Wednesday for having said animal in his possession. He was ordered to destroy it immediately. Several civil cases were disposed of the same day.

The funeral of the late Robert French took place on Wednesday afternoon, many citizens paying their last tribute of respect to the departed man. The British Society attended the funeral and interment was made at the C of E Cemetery.

The funeral procession, planned to take place on Nov. 5th, did not occur that night and has been postponed indefinitely, because the promoters of the petitions asking for the widening of Kerry Lane have been informed that the petitions will be laid before the Government-in-Council. Nothing like promised cremations to make representatives notice petitions.

Mr. Reuben Gordon’s mare had twin foals this week. This is a rare occurrence. Only one of the foals is living.

Mr. T.C. Badcock of Carbonear was in town on Wednesday and Dr. Ames, wife and children of Broad Cove today, the last named putting up at Gordon Lodge.

Mr. Thomas Hanrahan, R.C. School Inspector, returned from his inspection tour North on Tuesday, having come to Carbonear by the S.S. Ethie that morning.

Messrs. Munn & Co. received word yesterday that their steamer Louise would take freight to Bell Island and proceed to Cobb’s Arm to load lime stone for Mr. F. Score of St. John’s.

The directors of the United Towns Electrical Company, held a meeting at Carbonear on Wednesday afternoon. It was decided to begin the erection of poles to Bay Roberts and Freshwater as early in the spring as possible.

The writer learns from Dr. Allen that M. Bigourdan, a well known Astronomer, has announced that the planet Mercury will pass in front of the sun on next Thursday, Nov. 14th. This happens only once in a hundred years.

The marriage of Miss Annie Stapleton, daughter of Mr. John Stapleton, and Mr. Joseph Moriarty, took place at the residence of the bride’s father at 5 p.m. Wednesday. The ceremony was performed by Rev. W. Finn, of the Cathedral. Mr. Richard Hayden, uncle of the bride, gave his niece away. The bride was beautifully attired in a gown of white silk, with bridal veil and wreath, and carried a shower bouquet of white hyacinths. Misses Aggie Thomey and Sadie Hayden attended the bride, as first and second bridesmaids respectively, the former being tastefully arranged in cream net with black picture hat, the latter in pale blue with hat to match. The groom was supported by Mr. Michael Stapleton, brother of the bride, and his own brother, Mr. Edward Moriarty. After the ceremony, a reception was held at which about 40 guests were present. Fr. Finn, in a very pleasing manner, complimented the happy couple upon the auspicious occasion and paid a deserving tribute to each upon the good opinions held of them in the community. During the entry of the bridal party into their retirement from the room, where the ceremony was performed, Miss Casey played Beethoven’s Wedding March. A very pleasant evening was spent by the assembled guests, singing and dancing being indulged in. The groom’s present to the bride was a handsome gold bracelet those to the bridesmaids; gold brooches. The bridal presents were many, useful and valuable. Mrs. Moriarty will remain at her parental home a short time before going to her new residence.

The house recently infected with scarltina on Kitchen Hill, has been fumigated and the quarantine raised. The father of the family down with the disease, is a man trusting to his daily wage to obtain support for his household, and when he was prevented from seeking work by reason of the quarantine, he had to depend upon the Relieving Officer for the maintenance of his family. Owing to the peculiar circumstances of this case, when the quarantine should have been released, the house could not be fumigated, and the father could not seek employment until disinfection had been performed. True, this case was exceptional, and may not occur again, but the privations to the family were none the less felt. Cannot something be done in future when contagious diseases appear, whereby patients may be removed to an improved established Hospital or lazaretto for treatment and care, and so allow bread winners to go about their daily work? Some such way out of the difficulty is understood to exist at St. John’s, then why should not some such institution be allowed in this town? The cost would not be very great and the obstacles in the way are not so numerous as to make the proposition impracticable. Public monies are granted for public uses, and no better use could be made of them than for the preservation of the health of a community. St. John’s does not contribute the entire revenue of the country, of which much is spent there, and although it may desire to have the share of the money, it surely does not want all the diseases of the Island carried to the capital. Will nobody speak for the outports?

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 7th, 07"

November 9 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The T.A. Society holds its regular monthly meeting at 2.15 p.m. tomorrow.

S.S. Silvia sails at 11 a.m. today taking additional passengers Miss B. Furlong, in saloon, and 18 in steerage.

The St. John’s Rifle Club’s annual dinner will be held at Donovan’s Thursday next, the 14th November.

A Levee will be held at Government House at 11 a.m. today in honour of the birthday of His Majesty King Edward VII

The marriage of Mr. H.N. Burt to Miss M Milley takes place in Cochrane St. Church, on Thursday next Nov 14th.

There were four arrests by the Police last night; two were drunk, and two were drunk and disorderly, one of whom was given in charge by his mother.

Mr. W.B. Payne, yesterday received a message from Port Saunders to the effect that Flatts' steamer, Matilda, had arrived there O.K. Thursday night.

Miss Amy Hickey is now at Glace Bay, where she is vocalist with a moving picture show, being run by Mr. R.J. Macadam, who was here with the Robinson Opera company, last fall.

The schooner Annie M Sproul, Arch Elliott of Change Islands, arrived in port Thursday with a cargo of seventy-five thousand feet of lumber from Dog Bay, which is being discharged at the Horwood Lumber Co.’s East end wharf.

The S.S. Euphrate, Penny, which went to Heart’s Content Wednesday, left here Thursday with the Lake Simcoe in tow, but had to put into Trinity out of the gale. They will probably arrive here today.

Captain William Cluett takes passage in the S.S. Silvia, from his home in Gloucester, where he resides with his sister, Mrs. Pine. The Captain will be in command of a schooner of the large class and he expects to be back in Bay of Islands for a cargo of herring a fortnight hence. Last winter he was Manager for a number of schooners there in the interest of a syndicate of owners.

The schooner Blue Jacket, William Kent Master, is loading general cargo for H. Week & Co., Bay Bulls.

The schooner, May Queen, Andrew Aspel, Master, is loading general cargo at Bowring’s wharf for M. P. Cashin, Cape Broyle.

The schooner Rose May, Solomon Budgell, Exploits, is landing a cargo of 50,000 feet of lumber from Brown’s Arm, Exploits Bay at the Horwood Lumber Co.’s East end wharf.

The vessels Helen Stewart and Monie and Minnie, left P.E.I. yesterday, with full cargoes of oats for G. Neal. Both will be due here about Tuesday next.

The schooner Mabel, George Jones, arrived in port Wednesday night from Little Bay Islands. Yesterday she hauled into Bishop & Monroe’s wharf, and began discharging her cargo of 13,400 qtls of fish, shipped by Strong & Murcell.

Mr. P.J. Davis, of Fox Harbor P.B. is in town in connection with his fishery business. Mr. Davis' schooners did well fishing at Cape St. Mary’s past summer. He is expecting one of them to arrive in port today, laden with dry fish. His crews will make high wages as the result of their summer’s fishery."

November 9 1907 DEATHS ANDREWS — Yesterday the 8th November, after a long and painful illness, Sarah J Andrews. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from the residence of her brother-in-law, 11 Mullock Street. Friends please accept this, the only intimation.
November 11 1907 FATAL ACCIDENT "Joy Turned to Mourning.

A shocking accident occurred yesterday, between 3 and 4 in the afternoon, at Logy Bay, through which James Hedderson lost his life by the bursting of a gun. A wedding party had just started for Torbay and some of the younger men and boys were firing joy guns in honour of the event. A young lad, standing near Hedderson, was about to fire a gun, into which he had put an extra large charge, when Henderson asked to be given the fire arm, and it was handed over to him. The gun, which no doubt was old and unfit for use, exploded. A piece of the metal struck the poor fellow on the left cheek and entered his head, killing him almost instantly. When the man fell, a messenger was despatched immediately to Clovelly Farm, about a mile distance, to telephone the city for medial aid, but before the service of a Doctor could be procured, another messenger arrived with the information that he was dead. Hedderson was married, about 34 years old, leaves a wife and four children to mourn their loss. He was a native of Turk’s Gut, near Brigus, where his father, mother and sisters are living. His wife belongs to Logy Bay, where he has also a sister married. The sad affair has cast a gloom over the settlement. Deep and sincere sympathy is expressed for the bereaved family in which the News joins."

November 11 1907 BACK FROM LABRADOR The S.S. Virginia Lake, Capt. W. Parsons, arrived from Labrador Saturday night. The entire passage, excepting one day, was fine and the round trip was the quickest for the season — 14 days. The weather along the Labrador Coast is exceptionally mild for this time of the year, and not a bit of snow on the hills. There has been no frost experienced up to the time the Virginia left Rigoulette. The natives of the Coast are now preparing for the winter’s work, and some are getting ready to go inland until the spring. At different places there is still a sign of fish, but the voyage has been given up. All the visiting fishermen have left the Coast. The Virginia brought 200 casks of whale oil, 700 sacks of guano, 40 casks of cod oil, some other small freight, and the following passengers: J March, Customs Officer Bradburry and family, and Misses Swoffied (2).
November 11 1907 SIX MONTHS FOR ASSAULT Constable Quinlan arrived Saturday night from Bay of Islands with a prisoner named Henry Cornein, aged 26 years. Cornein was before Magistrate McDonald last week, charged with criminally assaulting a girl fifteen years old, and the case being proven, he was sentenced to six months hard labour. A warrant has been issued for another jack-o-tar, who it is said committed a similar offence, and he will be brought before the Magistrate at an early date.
November 11 1907 NEW TRAMWAY AT BELL ISLAND The Dominion Iron & Steel Co., Bell Island, began work last week on a new tramway from the ore pits to the loading pier on the front of the Island. The cars on this tram will not be haul by an endless cable, operated by a stationary hauling machine at the end of the line. Instead, a locomotive, or traction engine, will be used to draw a train of loaded cars. To avoid the steep gradients over which the cable tramway passed in a straight line from pier to pit, the new line has to take a more circuitous route. It will follow roughly the course of the East end road, then passing West near Murphy’s Hotel, and through Kelly’s farm to the pier, thus avoiding Chapel Hill and other high grounds, which always were a source of trouble to the cable road. This will be an immense improvement, being much less dangerous that the cable system. It will also facilitate the work of getting ore to the storage pockets quickly, when several steamers are to be loaded. Much larger cars will be used, and a steamer’s cargo can be rushed from the stock pile to the loading pier, in a very short space of time, when all arrangements in view are perfected. It is said that a steel framed pier trestle will be erected next summer, so as to obviate loss and delay from fire, such as occurred the past season. The various construction and works at Bell Island, already perfected by the two Companies operating the mines, are far ahead of and greatly eclipse, anything of an industrial nature yet attempted in Newfoundland.
November 11 1907 YESTERDAY’S FIRE ALARM An alarm of fire was sent in from box 28 at 11.45 yesterday morning, which brought the West and Central Firemen to the house of John English, 42 Long’s Hill. The blaze was only a slight one, and was caused by some kindling wood in the oven of the kitchen stove igniting, and filling the house with smoke. A few buckets of water put it out, and the service of the Brigades were not needed. No damage resulted. The all out signal was sent in at 11.50.
November 11 1907 GOOD WAGES Capt. Patrick Carrol, with a crew of four men, in the schooner J.T. Dunphy, of Red Island, P.B., did remarkably well fishing at Cape St. Mary’s the past summer. They stocked $2,900 for their season’s catch, and the crew shared $290 a man, being the third best in the fleet. Albert Rielly of Argentia, and his crew of four men, were high liners, stocking $3,300 which gave each man a very nice sum of $330 for his summer’s wages. J. Dunphy’s crew in the Mary Joseph, shared $260 a man and a crew in one of Davis’s boats, Fox Harbor, P.B. made $320 a man.
November 11 1907 CAPLIN SCHOOL When the Prospero was coming South from Placentia to St. John’s, Capt. Fitzpatrick reports seeing what was evidently a large school of Caplin, the birds were hovering about in all directions, and to all appearances, were following the caplin to land. Caplin were taken on the Southern Shore last week, and it appears that they are still in that vicinity – an unknown happening at this time of the year to any of the present generation.
November 11 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrive at Port aux Basques at 8 a.m. yesterday with the following passengers; M. and Mrs. Cowan, W.M. Butt, Dr. C.J. Howlett, C.T. Young, George Rowe, S.H. Steele, Walter Rowe, H.H. Smith, J.M. Howley in saloon and 45 in second cabin. The express is due at noon.
November 11 1907 PERSONAL "Mr. W.K. Piercey left for Botwooville by last evening’s train.

Councillor Ellis left for the West Coast by last evening’s express.

Dr. Grenfell left by last evening’s express on his way to New York.

Mr. White, Light House Inspector, left by train last evening for the Northward.

Dr. C.J. Howlett, who was in Canada the last two weeks, returns by today’s express.

Mr. G.M. Goddard of Burin, who was in town on business during last week, left for home Saturday last.

Mr. V. Turpin of St. Lawrence who was visiting the city during last week, left for home by the S.S. Glencoe.

Mr. N. Fisher, of Bay of Islands, who was on business in the city last week left for home by yesterday’s express.

On Oct. 29th at St. Bernard’s Church, Enfield, Nova Scotia, Miss Josephine, daughter of Mr. Cornelius Hogan, of this city, was married by Rev. Father Kinsella, to Mr. William J King, of Wellington, N.S.

The pulpit of Gower Street Church was occupied yesterday morning by the Rev. Mr. Angwin, a Newfoundlander by birth, son of a well known Missionary of earlier days. This is Mr. Angwin's first visit for 47 years. Mr. Angwin of Bay of Islands, is a brother. "

November 11 1907 PROSPERO BACK FROM WESTWARD The S.S. Prospero, Capt Fitzpatrick, arrived from the Westward at 4 p.m. yesterday, after a fairly fine trip. The Prospero left on 30th Oct. and experienced fine weather until after leaving Port aux Basques the 3rd Nov., when heavy Southerly winds, with dense fog was encountered, which continued up to the 5th. Tuesday night last at 11, the steamer reached Sydney for bunker coal, and left again at 2 a.m. Wednesday. The weather was fine on the return trip, until Grand Bank was arrived at Thursday night, when fog again was run into, and for the next twenty-four hours there was no change. Saturday and yesterday it was fine and clear. The Prospero brought 400 packages of freight and the following passengers: Capt. Manley, J. Morrey, H. Coady, Misses S. Kearley and Condon in saloon and 80 second class.
November 11 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The St. John’s Clerk’s Association holds its monthly meeting tonight, after the store closes.

Messrs Beeton and Wool of the Harmsworth Co., arrived from Grand Falls by Saturday’s express.

H.M.S. Brilliant sails this morning for Quebec and Montreal, and later will go South. A number of Reservists go by her.

A large ship named the Fortune is now at Lewisporte, loading lumber from the Newland Co., for Buenos Ayries. She will be ready to sail this week.

The Harmsworth Co. will commence cutting pulp wood at Red Indian Lake at an early date, and a large number of men will be engaged at the work during the winter.

John Mead of Pushthrough, Fortune Bay, was brought in by the S.S. Prospero yesterday, to enter the General Hospital for medical treatment. He is suffering from an internal complaint.

The Glencoe took the following outward passengers from Placentia yesterday: Col. Sawyer, Dr. Mattarrissn, wife and three children, G.M. Goddard, G.J. Cummen, V. Turpin, G.J. LeMoine, A.R. Hadden, Miss Keeping, Miss Parsons, Mrs. Darby, Miss Harding.

By Saturday express, two experts arrived from Toronto bound to Cape Race, where they will install an improved oil tank at the Lght House. Its installation will do away with the necessity of bringing the oil by hand to the lamps, as an automatic pump will be attached. They leave for the Cape by the S.S Prospero.

The weather along the line yesterday, was fine excepting at Port aux Basques, where it was raining. Last night’s reports are: Port aux Basques, S.E., strong, raining, 38 above. Bay of Islands, calm and dull, 60 above. Quarry, S.W., light, raining, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 48 above. Clarenville, S.W., light, dull, 48 above. Whitbourne, S., light, dull, 42 above.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: Miss Dawe, Miss Peach, J.J. O’Reagan, R. Goodyear, J Williams, P. Berry, Howlland, Dr. Grenfell, Miss Malachi, R. White, G.W. Pike, T.C. Culleton, P.S. Patten, Miss O’Reilly, N. Fisher, B.I. Walsh, T. Pippy, Councilor Ellis, O. Emerson, J. Walsh, W.K. Piercy.

Mr. Michael Brien, of Outer Cove, and Miss Bridget Roach, of Logy Bay, were married yesterday afternoon at Torbay. The wedding party which consisted of a large number of friends of the bride and groom, drove in carriage from Logy Bay and Outer Cove to Torbay, where the ceremony was performed by the Rev. M.J. Clarke. On returning to Logy Bay, the rejoicings of the party were ended through the news of the accident, through which James Hedderson lost his life, as noted in another column, was learned. The usual wedding festivities were dispensed with, out of sympathy for the bereaved family.

The schooner Ethel Grace, Herbert Pike, is taking a general cargo for E Penny & Son, Carbonear.

The Virginia Lake reports having seen the S.S. Kite near Battle Harbor, Wednesday last, going North.

From Channel to Rose Blanche there is a good sign of fish, and when the weather is suitable, the fishermen do well.

The funeral of the late Mrs. J Murphy took place yestrerday and was largely attended. Interment was at Belvedere.

The T.A. Society held its regular monthly meeting yesterday, at which fourteen applicants were admitted to membership.

The schooner Avon, John O’Driscol, sails this morning for Conception Harbor, laden with winter supplies for several people of that place.

The S.S. Alcides of the Donaldson Line, reported missing last week, arrived in St. John N.B. on Tuesday night. She had been delayed by heavy weather, but sustained no damage.

An unfortunate woman was arrested on Water Street Saturday night, in a drunk and disorderly condition. She will appear before the Magistrate this morning to answer the charge against her.

Last week John Murphy of Battle Harbor, had a try on the fishing grounds, and jigged a full boatload, six quintals. Last year, Mr. Murphy secured fish at Battle Harbor until the ice froze on the Harbor.

The Prospero brought five Naval Reservists yesterday, who came to put their drill on board H.M.S. Calypso. They are M.B. Cox, E. Ashford, S. Chapman, from Harbor Breton and H. Murphy and P Kennedy from Fermeuse.

Four drunks, and one drunk and disorderly, were arrested and brought to the Police Station Saturday night. All were given their liberty yesterday morning; the drunk and disorderly having to make the usual deposit of five dollars.

One of the livers at Rigoulette almost blew his hand off in a gunning accident more than two weeks ago. He had to wait until the arrival of the Virginia Lake to have the injured member dressed by FR. Boyle, and it was in a bad state when the Dr. reached him.

The schooner Golden Hope, James Houlian, arrived Saturday from Placentia with a load of fish and oil.

Mr. George Penny of the firm of John Penny & Sons, Ramea, arrived in town Saturday on a short business trip.

Hudson’s freighter, Abib, is loading freight at Steer Bros. wharf for Adam’s Cove and other places on the North Shore.

The schooner Britianna, A Butler, sails today for Middle Arm, White Bay, to load lumber at Pilley’s mill for R. Templeton.

The schooner Maggie Sullivan, Downer, arrived in port Saturday morning from Twillingate, fish laden to Crosbie & Co.

The schooner Shamrock, George Dicks, is loading provisions at Baird, Gordon & Co.’s for R. Dunford, Hemitage Bay, and John Penny & Sons, Remea.

The schooner Spotless Queen, from St. Kyran’s, Virginia, Mary H. and Clematis, Fox Harbor P.B., Mary, Cape Broyle, and Cappa Hayden, Fermeuse, arrived in port Saturday, all laden with dry fish.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, is loading freight at George Neal’s wharf for J.B. Martin, Bell Island. She sails this morning. The Belle Franklin, A . Hynes, is also taking freight at the same wharf for other business men on Bell Island.

The schooner Advance, William Keefe, is loading at George Neal’s wharf for P. Templeman, Bonavista.

A lady’s brown neck fur, which was picked up at 8 last night, was left at the Police Station, where it may be had by the owner.

The schooner Ada, Peard, is discharging coal at Baine Johnston’s Southside premises, under the supervision of Mr. Kent, who has taken a contract for the work.

There are three schooners, each bearing the mane of “Mary”, now at Goodridge’s wharf, one each from Cape Broyle, Fermeuse and Fox Harbor, P.B.

George Neal’s new house flag was hoisted for the first time on Saturday, in honour of the King’s birthday. The design is a white crescent partly enclosing a whit five pointed star, set in a dark blue ground, and is one that will be easily recognized. We hope 'ere many years, to see the flag of this progressive business concern flying from may other poles o'er land and sea.

Mr. William Taylor, of Clark’s Beach, made a trial shipment of eight bundles of sea grass by Burke’s schooner, David M. Hilton, which arrived from Brigus a few days ago. The grass is used in the upholstering business, and Mr. Taylor found a ready market for it. Large quantities of it can be gathered at South River, and if properly looked after, it could be made quite a paying industry.

Mr. Weston Hunt of Bell Island, arrived in town Saturday and will return today. Mr. Hunt has been for many years a trusted employee of the Dominion Steel Co. He is now going into business for himself, and will open an up-to-date Blacksmith Shop on Main Street, West Bell Island.

Between 11.30 and 12 Saturday night, an express man, who was late on his rounds, had a narrow escape from a serious accident. At the top of Long’s Hill, near Rice's stable, there is a part of the street which is very dark. A Grocer’s boy, who was into some house nearby, left the hand cart standing across the middle of the street. The express man did not see the cart, was driving his horse at a rapid pace down the hill directly for it, when fortunately for him, a gentleman who was coming up the hill, saw the obstruction and springing before the horse, stopped him just a few feet from the car, thereby averting an accident which would undoubtedly have ended in serious injury to both horse and driver. Young lads who are out delivering parcels should be warned by their Masters to be more careful, and leave their cars when it is necessary to do so, at the side of the street near the sidewalk."

November 11 1907 DEATHS BUGDEN — On Sunday morning at Pilot’s Hill, Mary, wife of the late Benjamin Bugden, of Trinity, in the 75th year of her age, leaving four sons and one daughter to mourn their sad loss. Canadian and American papers please copy. The remains will be taken out by Tuesday morning’s train for interment at Trinity.
November 12 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. John Duff, of Carbonear, was in town today.

Mr. James A Power went out by this morning’s train to North River, where it is likely he will remain over Sunday.

The S.S. Virginia Lake arrived from Labrador at 5 p.m. today, and after a short delay, left for St. John’s

Mr. Frank Severn is expected from Brooklyn, B.B., by Monday’s express. His household effects are being brought by schooner to Port de Grave.

A bargantine was seen in the Bay this afternoon. She is supposed to be the Amy Louise, Capt. Sheppard, from New York, with anthracite coal, and will probable reach port during the night.

Flags were displayed at the various Mercantile Premises and some private residence here today, in honour of the King’s Birthday. May His Majesty live to see many returns of its anniversary.

Mrs. Cowperthaite, wife of the Pastor of the Methodist Church here, who had been very unwell for the past ten days, is still not much improved, but hopes are entertained that in a few days her health will be much better.

A number of gentleman intend driving to Heart’s Content tomorrow (Sunday) to be present at the ordination service to be held in the Church of England there that day. His Lordship Bishop Jones and several Clergymen, passed through here to Carbonear by this afternoon’s train, to proceed to Heart’s Content.

“Diamond Jubilee” Lodge S.O.E. proposes holding a soiree at the British Hall next Monday night, in the honour of the King’s birthday. As the notable day fell on Saturday this year, it was decided to commemorate the event on Monday. A very pleasant night is anticipated. Mrs. Hyden caters for the occasion.

Mr. James Ryan of Spaniard’s Bay, Hon. Eli Dawe and Mrs. Arthur Barnes, was in town on Friday. Mr. German Pilley, of Shoal Bay, B.B. who was staying at Cochran House all the week, left for St. John’s by that evening’s train. He leaves for home by Sunday’s express. Mr. Charles Howell, of Green's Harbor, T.B. who carries on business, was in town the same day selecting goods for his fall trade .

The Presbyterian congregation here deeply regret that Rev. Joseph McNeil, who came to supply for two months, cannot be prevailed upon to accept the charge of the Church. Circumstances which the Rev . Gentleman cannot control compel him to seek work elsewhere; but it is with real sorrow the congregation contemplate his departure, which takes place about the end of the present month. Another Clergyman is expected here, to take his place by that time

The Road Board had men today repairing that part of Military Road between Garland Street and Stratton's Hill, and also the sewer at Kitchen’s Hill. Repairs to French’s Lane and other places badly needing such, will be done next week. The members for the District, when in town yesterday, visited the new public wharf at Caplin Cove and expressed themselves pleased with the work done there. The Chairman of the Road Board should feel gratified by the compliment. This wharf will be planked as soon as material can be had.

It does seem a pity that old men, who have spent all their lives in hard toil, should be denied work when they apply for it. Of course employers want to get as much work done as they can, and will rather employ young and able men when they can be had; but the old men think after toiling hard all the summer, they should not be denied work in the fall, even though young men are ready to take the work offered. There is some reason in the complaint of the old men, but how to meet their vies, appears to be a most difficult problem.

The Harbor bouys were taken in this week, probably it is the custom to remove them for the winter during the early part of this month, but it is not in the interest of those who “occupy their business in deep water” that the bouys should be removed so early in the season. Craft are constantly coming and going at this time of the year, and when entering port at night, now that the nights are long, it is very difficult to see the logs which have replaced the bouys. It would be better to allow the bouys to remain put until the coming and going of vessels have become less frequent.

The street light at Harvey Street at the foot of Garland Street, seems to have caused much trouble to those who look after the lighting of the town. It is said more new bulbs have been put in at this place than at any two poles in the town. It would appear that boys, who frequent the locality, have in sheer wantonness broken the bulb there time and time again, by throwing stones at the light. Cannot a watch be set to catch the mischievous urchins who deserve the utmost rigor of the law?

Our citizens must be pleased to learn that the Historical Society of St. John’s, at its quarterly meeting held this week, enthusiastically admitted Claudius Watts, Esq., of this town, an honorary member of that Society. This was done in recognition of the obligation by the Society to Mr. Watts for valuable information furnished by him, who is in his 97th year. Mr. Watts is an exceptional man in body and mind, and although the former is gradually weakening, the latter seems to be still quite active for the bright intelligence which today marks the marvellous intellect, of the old gentleman, cannot fail to call forth the admiration of anyone privileged to converse with him. His mind truly is a store house of varied information, especially on matters related to the musty part. May it be as clear to mark the centenary of his birth as it is now!.

Correspondent, Harbor Grace, Nov. 9th, ‘07"

November 12 1907 WEDDING BELLS COPPIN — JANES: November 6th will be a day long to be remembered at Glovertown, for on that day Rev. H.G. Coppin, a former and esteemed Pastor, was united in matrimony to Miss Beatrice, oldest daughter of Ambrose Janes, Esq., J.P. Early in the morning, bunting was flying from many poles which spoke forth the esteem in which the contracting parties were held. The ceremony was performed at the residence of the bride’s parents, which was beautifully decorated for the occasion, the Rev. J.R. Saint, S.T.L. of Fogo, officiating. The bride charmingly gowned in white satin and lace veil and orange blossoms, was attended by her sister, Ida, who was handsomely attired in pale blue silk and silk chiffon. The groom was supported by Mr. Wesley Janes, brother of the bride. After the ceremony, numerous guests sat down to tables which fairly groaned beneath the weight of good things provided. After doing justice to the supper served, short speeches were made wishing the newly wedded pair every happiness. The bride was the recipient of many valuable and useful presents, the groom’s present to the bride was a handsome silver toilet set, and to the bridesmaid, a chaste gold locket and chain. Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Coppin will shortly leave for their future home, Nipper’s Harbor, followed by the good wishes of the entire community. T.J.J.
November 12 1907 ARRESTED FOR SPIKING TRACK During last week, the railway track near South River, was spiked by some unknown persons, but was fortunately discovered by the Sectionman, before any danger resulted. The matter was reported to the Police Authorities at Brigus, and Constable Bishop was given the matter to work up. Though he had little evidence to work on, he arrested three young men yesterday, who are believed to have committed the offence. This morning they will appear before Magistrate Thompson at Brigus.
November 12 1907 SCHOONER HISPANOLA SEIZED AT SYDNEY The banking schooner Hispanola, Capt. Walter Kennedy, was seized at North Sydney a few days ago by the Canadian Authorities. It is alleged that Captain Kennedy failed to report to the Canadian Customs early last spring, hence the cause of the seizure. Capt. Kennedy, we learn, contends that his failing to report was due to circumstances over which he had no control. The ice pack was off Sydney Harbor, and to report he would have had to walk over the floe, with continuous danger surrounding him, and even then would not possibly meet a Custom's Official. Under the circumstances, it is expected the vessel will be released without any fine imposed.
November 12 1907 SPLENDID CATTLE FROM WEST COAST Yesterday’s freight train brought thirty head of cattle from Grand River, in charge of Mr. Archie McIsaac and Mr. John McLellan. These beasts are in exceptionally good condition and are equal to, if not superior to, cattle imported from Canada. The Farmers of Grand River and Little River find a ready market here in the city for all the cattle they can raise, and the prices that have been realized in the past, and particularly this season, is a great inducement for even further efforts on the part of the industrious Farmers of the West Coast.
November 12 1907 S.S. HARMONY REACHES PORT The S.S. Harmony, Capt. Jackson, arrived in port yesterday morning, from Moravian settlements, having visited Macovic, Hopedale, Nain and Herbron. She passed the Dianna on Oct 22nd going North. Capt. Jackson reports fine weather up North, with no snow or frost. Mr. Heath, the Company's Agent at Nain, came as passenger, and also two children from the Mission who are going to Germany to attend school. As freight, she brought 2,600 quintals of fish, 600 barrels of trout, and a quantity of salmon, furs, etc. The schooner Columbia is reported as having been ashore North of Nain, and that part of her cargo was jettisoned before she was refloated. The Harmony will discharge her cargo here and then load for London.
November 12 1907 WRONG HOUSE Sunday night, an outport man, having about $16 in cash and a bank book worth $500, walked into the West End Fire Station, and asked the chances of having a night’s good enjoyment. He was told he had struck the wrong place, but could not see eye to eye with the Guard, with the result that he was locked up. Yesterday morning he was brought before the Magistrate and pleaded he had made a mistake. He was allowed to go free, with a warning not to make another such error.
November 12 1907 GOT A FRIGHT Daniel Walsh of Holyrood, who came in from Kelligrews by yesterday morning’s train, received a scare when he could not find his purse containing $120. He left Holyrood Sunday afternoon and walked to Kelligrews, where he put up at the house of Mr. Tilley, taking yesterday morning’s train to town. He did not miss the money until after he reached the city, having paid his fare from some loose change, which he had in his pocket. After communicating with Kelligrews, it was found that he had left the money at Mr. Tilley’s house.
November 12 1907 NAUTICAL "The S.S. Dageid is due today from Montreal and Sydney.

The S.S. Regulus will leave Botwoodville today for New York.

Schooner Canada finished loading today at Bowring Bro and sails for Brazil.

S.S. Dictator is now at Smith Co.’s awaiting a chance to load fish for market.

S.S. Coban is now at Placentia, discharging coal for the Reid-Newfoundland Co.

The S.S. Bonavista left Montreal at 2 a. m. Saturday last. She is due here next Saturday.

Schooner Ionia, Hearld, will finish discharging her cargo of sand at Kennedy & Mullaly’s today.

The S.S. Adventure arrived from Sydney Sunday morning, coal laden, she began discharging at A. Harvey & Co premises yesterday

The S.S. Smyra will leave Montreal the 20th November for this port. This will be the last boat from Montreal for the season and a large quantity of flour and other food stuffs will come by her.

A report from Halifax that the schooner Selia which left here for Burgeo on October 29th, was missing, is unfounded. She arrived at Burgeo on Friday last, all well. The Selia belongs to Mr. Moulton.

The three top mast schooner, Helen Stewart is due here this morning from P.E.I. with a full cargo of oats. S.S. Cape Breton leaves Sydney today with a cargo of coal for Lewisporte, for the Reid-Newfoundland Co."

November 12 1907 PERSONAL "Mr. F.C. Jerrett returned to Brigus last evening.

Messrs Walter Tucker and A. Earle, of Carbonear, were amongst the visitors to the city last week.

Mr. J. Foots of the D.I. and S. Co.’s Employment Agency, Bell Island, arrived in the city last night.

Mr. G. Penney of Ramea, is at present in the city on business, and is a guest at the King Edward.

Mr. M.F. O’Toole, Conception Harbor, is at present in the city on business, and is staying at the Crosbie.

Mr. S. Churchill of the Public Works Office, who was along the line on business, returned by last night’s train.

Mr. E. Pike, of Channel, has been in town the last few days on business. He leaves for home by this afternoon’s express.

His Lordship Bishop Jones, who was at Heart’s Content, officiating at the ordination ceremonies, Sunday last, returned by last night’s train.

We learn on good authority that the report that Messrs Patten and Forsey has dissolved partnership is incorrect. These gentlemen, two of the most popular and enterprising of Grand Bank’s citizens, are extending their business, and the rumour probably took its rise from the sale of a number of small vessels which was done in order to purchase vessels of a larger build. "

November 12 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Virginia Lake will take a full cargo of freight to Labrador this trip. She sails at 6 this afternoon.

Passengers who arrived by yesterday’s express, say that caribou have been scarce along the line the last week. Those in the interior, near Howley and vicinity however have done well.

The shore train arrived at 10.40 last night bringing: His Lordship Bishop Jones, Rev. G.H. Bolt (?), G. Adams, S. Churchill, Mrs. G. Kearney, and about 40 second class.

The latter part of last week the herring fishers at Bay of Islands were getting on an average of 25 barrels a day for a fleet of five nets, and several vessels were almost loaded and ready for market.

As a result of a disagreement with a high official, a number of members of one of the city organizations resigned on Sunday last. It is expected however, that the matter will be amicably settled.

The last few nights there has been considerable annoyance caused the residents of George Street by the presence of some of the rough elements, and the Police have been called to give the place special attention.

Eighty four of the schooners which were in port the past three weeks, were represented by thirty sevens names, in some instances three, and even four, vessels were named alike. This condition of things must have been very confusing to shippers.

The weather conditions along the line yesterday, were favourable, it being fine and warm all day. Last night’s reports are: Port aux Basques, calm , fine, 48 above. Bay of Islands, S.W., light, dull, 50 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 40 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 48 above. Clarenville, calm, raining, 42 above. Whitbourne, S.W., light, dull, 43 above.

The News received the following from Messrs Job Bros. & Co., yesterday: “The harmony reports that the Columbia, Capt. Carroll, which was chartered by the Moravian Missionaries to bring cargo from their station, got ashore North of Nain, jettisoned part of her cargo, but was got off again. She was only slightly damaged, and is coming South. Capt. Carroll had one of the Moravorian Missionary Pilots on board at the time she struck. The Diana is reported by the Harmony passing North of Okak, on the 22nd Oct. going to Chidley to load the Moravian goods there, and should be back here next week.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, will sail this morning, with a full load of freight, for Bell Island.

The city was very quite last night, only one drunk being arrested. He was let go after be had sobered up.

Constable R. Quinlon, who arrived from St. George’s Saturday night with a prisoner, returns home by today’s express.

Fish was found plentiful on the local ground yesterday, one of the boats that remained out all day came in at dark, loaded.

F. Jerrets schooner, Puritian, left Burin, last night, for Green’s Harbor, Trinity Bay, where she will be repaired during the winter.

Two prisoners were arrested yesterday under warrant. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning to answer the charges against them.

The S.S. Ingraham is due back to Bay of Islands tomorrow with Mr. J.J. Murphy and party, who were inspecting some timber claims in Hawke’s Bay.

The brig Amy Louise, passed Cape Spear at 5 p.m. yesterday, bound for Harbor Grace, with a load of hardcoal from New York, for Munn & Co.

Men from the Central, East, and West Fire Stations were out box testing yesterday. Every thing was found to be in working order, which very much reflects on the efficiency of the Fire Department.

Messrs. Archie McIsaac and John McLellan, who arrived yesterday from Good River, report a very poor harvest in the Codroy Valley, hay and oats being almost an entire failure, on account of the long continuance of wet weather

The schooner Monnie and Mannie, which is coming consigned to George Neal, with a cargo of oats, put into Trepassey last evening. She left P.E.I. on the 7 Nov. and evidently had a fair run down. She should arrive here today.

The schooner Muriel, Capt. Hilton, arrived in port yesterday morning from Port Mulgrave, after a passage of six days, having harbored at Louisburg on the way. She brought 96 head of cattle, 18 sheep, 1 horse, and 75 cases of eggs to J & W Pitts. This is the last trip the Muriel will make to St. John’s this season. She sails today for Bridgewater, N.S. All the cattle brought by her were sold yesterday, at Pitts premises and fetched good prices.

The schooner Shamrock, Capt. G. Dicks, sails tomorrow morning, laden with general merchandise for Hermitage and Remea.

The man named Snow, of Boncoddy Street, who was working at Smith Co., met with an accident on Saturday, which laid him off work. A fish drum fell from a height of nearly twenty feet and struck him on the shoulder, bruising it badly. Dr. Leslie was called and on examining the injured, found there was no fracture of the bone. Snow has had to remain in bed since Saturday and will not be able to get about again for a few day's

The residents of the Western part of Merry Meeting Road, McNeily Street and Summer Street are badly in need of a public well. At present, they are depending on a private source for their water supply. At times this well becomes fouled and its water is not fit for use. The nearest tank is where the line or new water pipes crosses Merry Meeting Road, about a quarter of a mile away. In winter times, it is a great hardship on women and children to be forced to go such a distance for water, especially so as there is no protection from the wind along the road, which is in the most exposed part of the city. Some time ago a petition was sent to the City Council to have one or two wells, fitted with pumps, sunk near Summer Street. The matter was then referred to the City Engineer, and has not been attended to since. Meanwhile the people of this section are patiently waiting for something to be done before winter sets in."

November 13 1907 CARBONEAR "An old resident of Irishtown, in the person of Mr. Michael O’Brien died on Sunday last, aged 79 years, and was buried Tuesday in the R.C. Cemetery

Mr. C.T. James, Sub-Collector of H.H. Customs at Channel, paid a short visit here this week, looking up old friends of his native town.

The crew of the shipwrecked vessel that was recently lost on the Treaty Shore, came up by the S.S. Portia to St. John’s, and arrived here Wednesday night.

The anniversary of Gunpowder Plot was duly celebrated by the youngsters on the 5th Nov. The “cheering ray” illustrated many hills around about.

Mr. Morale, of Jersey, who does a large fishery business in the Straits and is therefore well known to some of our people, called to see them before leaving for the Old Country.

The memorial erected to the late Miss Nicholl, has been connected with the water service and electric current, so that thenceforth a fountain of pure water will flow in troughs on either side of its base, while the summit will bear a brilliant arc light. Mr. C. Henderson superintendent the work.

Five venders of hop beer were summoned before Judge Penney on Monday, it being alleged that the compound sold by them, contained more that 2 per cent alcohol. The case was postponed for a week.

A case of slander was heard at the Court House on Thursday before Judge Penney. Both the plaintiff and defendant were of the feminine sex, and during the past season were “sisters” in the same harbor at Labrador. It was while the voyage was being hauled that the peace was disturbed. His Honour upon being satisfied that the slanderer was guilty, a fine of $10 was imposed which was paid.

Ensign Strickland, of the Harbor Grace S.A. Corps., has been transferred here to take the place of Adjutant Pitcher, who goes on furlough for three months.

Mr. Jno. Maddock, partner in the firm of J & J Maddock, arrived from St. Anthony, via St. John’s, Wednesday afternoon.

Duff & Sons barquentine Kenneth Victor, Capt. George Dean, sailed again for Sydney in ballast, to load coal for that firm. Capt. W.J. Kennedy goes to Sydney also on his schooner Luetta.

The fishermen’s committee met Mr. Donald Morison, K.C., Thursday at the Court House, when the grievance as to what price should be regarded as current for Labrador fish was laid before him.

Rorke & Sons schooner Lena, sailed Saturday for Boston, taking a full cargo of cod and salmon. Capt. Peter Cullen goes in command.

Mr. W.S. Bowden, Jeweller, is back from Bell Island, after an absence of four months and resumes his trade here at the old stand, opposite T.C. Badcock’s.

A meeting of the United Towns’ Electric Company was held Wednesday afternoon, to consider a position from lighting the town. As far as we can learn, the funds to foot the bill are to be derived from surplus monies collected in water taxes. A satisfactory agreement has been reached, and the Company will immediately start at the work.

An interesting program consisting of choruses, solos, duets and recitations, was rendered on Friday night at the Methodist school-room by the Women’s Missionary Auxiliary.

Mr. Turner is here from St. John’s this week, surveying land for the proposed extension of Bennett’s Hill, in a direct line to Water St. The proposed plan of running through a middle street has been evidently abandoned, notwithstanding the fact that a survey and estimates have been shelved in the Col. Secretary’s Office, a long ago. The job in hand calls for a very paltry allocation, but is nevertheless, looked upon by the people with divided suspicion; on the one hand as a stale bait to attract votes, and on the other as a little game of self between interested parties, while the benefit to town residents in general, will be next to nothing. Our nominal representative unfortunately, belongs to a class of weaklings, who allows himself to be wholly governed by the whip party, and is abundantly satisfied with the smallest crumbs that fall from the Executive table to his District, unmindful of the fact that the Heads of Departments, who bestow the charity, know little and care less, about what his constituents really require.

CORRESPONDENT, Carbonear, Nov. 11th, ‘07"

November 13 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The shore line train arrived at 10.30 last night. Very few passengers came by her.

The C.C.C. will hold a sociable at Smithville on the 20th November. Members of the brigade will attend in uniform.

Mr. George Skinner, of the Nova Scotia Steel Co.’s staff, Wabana, came to town yesterday, and is staying as the Crosbie.

The schooner Lizzie, Richard Seaward, arrived Monday evening from Fox Harbor, Trinity Bay, with the summer’s catch of codfish taken at Labrador, on board.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers, including; Major and Mrs. Morris, Mrs. E. Larkin, P.F. Curtis, H. Reid, R.B. Simmonds, G.H. Coultas, R. Devana.

Four arrests were made by the Police last night, four drunkenness and one for being drunk, disorderly and fighting. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning.

A light is needed at the junction of Golf Avenue and Mundy Pond Road. The residents of these localities would also be thankful if they could be supplied with water either by tank or wells.

A notice appeared in last night’s Gazette saying the Government have been notified by Earl Elgin, that aliens who shall enter the United States, after an uninterrupted residence of at least one year, immediately proceeding such entrance in Newfoundland, shall be exempt from the Head Tax of four dollars.

The crews of many of the outport schooners in port often go on shore, leaving no person on board in charge of the vessel and its contents. In some cases they even leave the doors of the cabin and forecastle open, thus placing opportunities in the way of any dishonest person who may be loitering around the wharves.

Work is progressing on the foundation of the new C.E. Commercial Academy Springdale St. The site selected is to the North of the Methodist Guards’ Hall, where there is ample room for a playground around the school. When the work of erection begins, it will be pushed ahead until the building is finished. It is the intention of the School Board to have all in readiness for Principal Butler and his staff of assistants to conduct their classes in the new building after next summer's vacation.

The S.S. Cape Breton sails today for Sydney.

The S.S. Bruce is due back to Port aux Basques this morning.

There is now sixty one male prisoners doing time in the penitentiary for various reasons.

A few of the local fishermen were on the grounds yesterday, and did fairly well. One boat got about 7 cwt., the others from 1 cwt upwards.

Passengers who arrived from Placentia by last night’s train, say there is good signs of fish at Cape. St. Mary’s but the weather is too changeable for the small boats to go to the grounds.

Mr. A.E. Foran, who has been in the city the last two weeks, returned to New York by Sunday’s express. His brother Charlie goes with him.

The marriage of Miss Evelyn Boone to Mr. Robert Wright, Jr., takes place tomorrow afternoon, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Springdale St.

Mr. E. Larkin who left here a few weeks ago on a health trip, is at present seriously ill at Boston, and his wife left by last evening’s express to visit him.

Last night was the coldest for the season along the railway. At Port aux Basques it was snowing, and at the Quarry the thermometer registered 12 degrees of frost.

The residents of Gold Avenue, Mundy Pond, Springdale, and Casey Street, are well pleased with the repairs that have been done to these streets, which were torn up by the heavy rain storms a few weeks ago. The side drains have been repaired in many places also.

A few weeks ago, a yacht owned by a West End Blacksmith, sank near Kennedy & Mullaly’s wharf, and after an unsuccessful attempt to refloat her, the owner sold her for 50 cents. Monday, Diver Glynn got her above water, and she is now safely moored at Kennedy & Mullaly’s wharf."

November 13 1907 JOKE OF 1907 "Jeweller — ""You say you want same name engraved on this ring?""

Young Man — ""Yes, I want the words. 'George, to his dearest Alice,' engraved on the inside of the ring.

“Is the young lady your sister?”

“No, she is the young lady to whom I am engaged.”

“Well, if I were you I would not have ‘George, to his dearest Alice' engraved on the ring. If Alice changes her mind, you can’t use the ring again.”

“What would you suggest?”

“I would suggest that the words be ‘George, to his first and only love.’ You see, with that inscription, you can use the ring half a dozen times. I have had experience in such matters myself.”"

November 14 1907 ARRESTED AGAIN Hugh Walsh, who has been arrested for safe keeping for the hundredth time, was brought in again last evening. Walsh, while quite harmless in his normal condition, cannot be trusted when suffering from mental aberration, and on several occasions, the Police were called, prevented him from bringing harm to himself and other members of the family. Some time ago, the unfortunate man chased a woman along the Queen’s Road with an axe, and but for the interference of the Police, would have probably killed her. Walsh who is periodically affected, should be given proper attention, else a serious matter may follow.
November 14 1907 WITH OATS The schooner Monie and Memie, Capt. Fudge, arrived in port yesterday morning after a passage of five days from Souris, P.E.I. She left Souris last Friday. On Monday she harboured at Trepassey, where she remained until Tuesday evening, and reached here yesterday at 10 a.m., having a fair run down the shore. The cargo consists of 2,170 bushels of oats, consigned to George Neil.
November 14 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived at Port aux Basques at 8.20 a.m. yesterday, bringing the following passengers: R.A. Chambers, Miss W. Boone, Miss G. March, Miss L. Burke, Miss A McIsaac, Mrs. H. Cunningham, F. Brazley, Geo. Craig, Capt. C.C. Young, Capt. A Glavine, and 48 in steerage. The express is due at noon.
November 14 1907 ANOTHER SCHOONER A TOTAL WRECK A telegram from Musgrave Harbor, was received yesterday by Mr. T.W. Abbot, of Musgrave Harbor, who is at present in the city, to the effect that the schooner Ethel S., was lost at Doating Cove, a small harbor just to the South of Musgrave. The Ethel S., Capt. Newman Gillingham, was in port two weeks ago and landed her cargo of fish at Crosbie and Co.’s wharf. A freight for the home port Musgrave Harbor, was taken on board. This was landed on arrival at the latter port, and the vessel then started for a round of neighbouring harbors, on the Straight Shore and vicinity, collecting fish to make a second cargo. On Tuesday evening, when on the way back to Musgrave from another harbor, she mis-stayed near the land at Doating Cove, and there not being room to warp around, she went on the rocks, though every effort possible was made by those on board to keep her off. The Captain and crew succeeded in getting on shore in safety. A sea on at the time, soon caused the vessel to become a total wreck. As this shore is one of the most exposed places on the Coast, every part of it being open to the ocean, she will break up in a very short time. At the time of the wreck, the Ethel S. had on board two hundred quintals of fish belonging to different fishermen, who had placed it on board, for shipment to St. John’s. These men will feel the loss of their fish. Capt. Gillingham will also feel greatly the loss of his fine schooner.
November 14 1907 WRONGLY SUSPECTED A short while ago, a complaint was made to the Authorities that a Postal Official on one of the Bay Boats had not been conducting matters right. A Police Officer was sent to investigate, and made a round trip, but could not find nothing that in any way would connect the Officer with the charge made. It is said according to reports, that the story that the Postal man was delinquent, came from another Official, who had not been on friendly terms with the suspect. The matter is now under the consideration of the Authorities and it is likely some trouble will follow.
November 14 1907 LOSS OF THE ORION. APPEAL FOR AID "OUT OF SIXTEEN LOST, ELEVEN WERE FAMILY MEN.

Marystown, November 13th. — A meeting was held here last night for the purpose of raising subscriptions for the widows and orphans of the crew of the schooner Orion, numbering sixteen men. Mr. Avery, Magistrate at Burin, occupied the chair, a committee was formed and will gladly receive any donations for that purpose. (Signed) M.T. Flynn.

Marystown has take the initiative in a movement for the relief of the widows and orphans of the Orion’s crew. Grand Bank mourns the loss of her sons and sympathises deeply with her fellow mourners in Mortier Bay. Burin sorrows with those who sorrow, and throughout the District and the Island, is grief and sympathy.

A vessel staunch and strong in every particular, 6 ½ years old, 65 tons registered, after having weathered the storms and dangers of the year, when returning home disappears, leaving no clue as to the cause of her disappearance.

Aboard her were sixteen men and of them, eleven were men of family. The tragedy is awful enough in itself, but when the agonies of the widows and orphans are considered, the passing of the brave fellows becomes matter of minor moment, for having paid the price of admiralty, they are in the protecting hands of the All-Father.

In His hands too, are the widows and orphans: but the Brotherhood of Man is as much a fundamental doctrine of Christianity as the Fatherhood of God. It is man’s privilege as well as his duty to aid.

St. John’s made a noble response to the appeal for the Trinity Bay suffers. Will she be less generous now? We believe not. According as God has prospered, our citizens will respond. We shall gladly acknowledge, through our columns, the receipt of any subscriptions of any kind, through any source, and see that they reach the proper quarter.

“He gives twice who gives quickly” and if the bitterness of grief and the agony of bereavement can be assuaged in the least by the lessening of the burden caused through the loss of the breadwinners, then let those who have not been called upon to drink the cup, give tangible evidence of their gratitude, by helping the widows and orphans, who have been called to drain it to the dregs.

Read the Telegram from Mr. M T. Flynn, which appears above, and then, of your kindness and gratitude, tender your contributions towards the relief of the sufferings and privations of brokenhearted widows and helpless children. Their grief only kindly Time can assuage, but every dollar will aid in lightening the burden that now presses upon the shoulders of gentle women and on children of tender years."

November 14 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Prospero left at 10 a.m. yesterday, going West, with the following passengers: Messrs W.B. Hanes, O. Cooler, Veitch, P. Cashin, J.F. Roach, G. Butt; Mesdames G Ryan, Myric, Freebairn, Misses F. Morcy, James Vinicombe, Strang, Fowler, Myric, O’Neill; and 62 in steerage. Potria left Baie Verte at 2.30 p.m. yesterday, going West.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is due Bay of Islands. Ethie is due Clarenville tonight. Clyde is due at Lewisporte tonight. Dundee is due at Port Blandford tonight. Virginia Lake is due at Tilt Cove, this morning. Glencoe left Port aux Basques last night. Argyle leaves Placentia today going West."

November 14 1907 FROM TRINITY During yesterday and last night, about twenty schooners arrived from Trinity, all with cargoes of dry fish. Coming across the Bay Tuesday night, it blew a heavy N.W. gale, accompanied with snow, and most of the craft had to double reef. One of the number being deeply laden, ran for Western Bay, and remained there until yesterday morning. The others came along, and reached port between midnight and 2 a.m. yesterday.
November 14 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Mr. Alex Quinn and Miss Mary Wiseman are to be married at the R.C. Cathedral tonight by Fr. Finn.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner L.E. Young, Capt. Bartlett, was at Sydney on Monday and loaded coal there after a short delay.

A rumour is currently about town, that a Roller-rink is shortly to be started here, but confirmation is obtainable.

Mr. Edward Quinn, who was Storekeeper with Messrs. R.D. McRae & Sons at Grady, the past summer, resumed work today with Messrs R Rutherford & Co.

Miss Jessie Gordon, C.E. Schoolteacher at Spaniard’s Bay, returned to her school by Monday’s train, having spend a couple of days with her parents here.

Mr. Joseph Pumphrey of Messrs Rutherford & Co. Grocery Store, who have been laid by with pleuro-pneumonia, is now convalescent, and his many friends will be delighted to see him about again in a few days.

His Lordship Bishop March, left by Monday’s train for North River to attend the opening of a bazaar there last night. The bazaar is in aid of the fund for the new Church, which Rev. Dr. Whalen was in course of erection.

The sale of work which a committee of ladies of St. Paul’s Church intended to hold in St. Paul’s Hall on the 13th and 14th November, will now take place in Coughlan Hall on these nights. A special feature of the last night will be a soup-supper which, no doubt will be well patronized.

Mrs. Wm. Herder on Saturday night, while passing along the sidewalk on Water Street near the lane leading to the Archibald Boot and Shoe Factory, slipped on the uneven ground and severely wrenched one of her ankles. She was assisted to Mr. P.J. Fitzgerald’s shop and soon after, driven home, where she will have to remain quite for three weeks before using the foot.

In the District Court on Monday, a young woman sued her master at the Labrador fishery, for wages due her. Defendant not showing any just reason for with holding the wages, judgement for the amount claimed went to the plaintiff. Mr. Kearney argued well for the plaintiff, and afterwards wrested from the Court the allowance on a brief fee. Another case for the recovery of fishery wages was also heard, and plaintiff obtained judgement for $11 and costs. Mr. Kearney for plaintiff.

To show the eagerness which people show towards visiting the moving picture halls here, a story is told of a poor woman who thought she ought to see the wonderful sights described by the hand-bills, which solicited public patronage. In order to procure money to see both shows the same night, this poor woman went to her flour-barrel, and seeing it contained only a little flour, she emptied it into a coverlet, sold the barrel for 10 cents, and took in the sights.

One day last week, while removing Davis old house on the Southside of Mosquito, a man discovered a T.D. clay pipe, which evidently has a history. The house just taken down, is said to have been built more than a hundred years ago, and as the pipe was found enclosed within the wall plate above the window, it is supposed to have been left there by a workman when the house was being built. The man who found the pipe last week, in spite of the mould encrusting the T.D. and the damp tobacco, applied matches to the latter until he succeeded in obtaining a smoke. How long are T.D. pipes in existence?

Mrs. Stephen Andrews passed peacefully away last night at the age of about 70 years. She leaves a husband, two sons, George, of W.H. Thompson’s Drug Store, and William now living on the West Coast.

The thank-offering meeting of the local branch of the Women’s Foreign Missionary, was held at the Presbyterian Church on Monday night. Rev Dr. Robertson of St. John’s, was in the chair. Mrs. R.S. Munn, Sr., president of the local branch, read the annual report. Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite (Methodist) and Rev. J McNeil, gave addresses. Solos were sung by Misses Louise Thompson and Masie Duff; a duet by Misses Duff and Flora Munn and a recitation given by Miss Cron.

The soiree held by “Diamond Jubilee” Lodge No. 236, S.O.E., in the British Hall on Monday night in honour of the King’s birthday, was a most enjoyable affair. The hall was tastefully decorated with festoons of crepe tissue, flags, and other bunting, and Chinese lanterns. After the regular fortnightly meeting of the lodge was over, a program of songs, addresses and gramophone selections, was rendered, and patriotic enthusiasm manifested itself in the utterance of the various speakers. About fifty members of the Order sat down to a splendid supper provided by Mrs. Myrden, who in her customary manner, exactly suited the palates of those at the tables. The following toasts were gone through: “The King,” proposed by President Ernest Simmonds, and acknowledged by the members singing the National Anthem; “Supreme Grand Lodge,” proposed by Past President W.A. Oke and emphasized by the members singing, ""We are Jolly Good Fellows”; “Sister Lodges” proposed by Bro. W. Harris, and responded to by Bro. Strowbridge; “The Flag” proposed by Past President Ernest Jones, responded “Rule Britannia” and “Absent members”, proposed by President Ernest Simmonds, and notice by the singing of an appropriate song. Songs and gramophone selections alternated until midnight. At 9.30 p.m. fireworks were set off from the street. Altogether, this commemoration of the King’s birthday was highly successful and all the who participated were fully satisfied with the pleasant occasion. The committee in charge of the preparation deserves the thanks of the Lodge for the manner in which the work entrusted to them, was executed. The knowledge of a thing well done, is a compensation in itself. This Lodge is in good financial standing, its funds being greater that in any previous year and its membership increasing, so that this year is likely to be the most successful one since the Lodge started.

Rev. F. Severn arrived from Brooklyn, B.B., by yesterday’s express, and left by this evening’s train for his new mission, Port de Grave.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 12th, ‘07"

November 14 1907 SUPREME COURT "(Yesterday) Present: Chief Justice and Mr. Justice Johnson.

Samuel Manuel vs. Joseph Elliott. — Day set down for the 4th.

Edward F. Harvey vs. George Barbour — This is an action for $1,750.35, for the price and value of a vessel built and delivered by the plaintiff to the defendant, and has since June 19th., and is now, in possession of the defendant, and he has not paid the price agreed to be paid therefor, or any part thereof. Mr. W.R. Howley for plaintiff ; Mr. Morison, K.C. for defendant.

The defendant counterclaim for $246.78 for work and labour done, and materials provided, and money paid for the plaintiff, in respect of said schooner.

W.R. Howley moved for leave to amend statement of claim and reply. Morison K.C., was heard against the motion, and moved for an adjournment and also costs of the day, if amendments are allowed.

It was ordered that the proposed amendments be furnished in writing, and that the defendant have the cost of the day. It was also ordered that the future hearing be adjourned till today at 10 o’clock. The Court adjourned till today at 10 o’clock."

November 14 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The whaler Sabraon shipped three firemen yesterday for the whaling voyage in Southern waters.

The rain storm of last night did not extend far along the line, as West from Whitbourne it was fine and freezing.

The Rifle Club’s annual dinner takes place tonight at Donovan’s, the party going out by special train at 7 o’clock.

Six boats were out on the fishing grounds yesterday, and secured fairly good catches, ranging from two to three hundredweight.

Mr. Peter Cashin who has been at Bowring Bros’ office for the last year, resigned a few days ago, and left for his home at Cape Broyle, by the S.S. Prospero yesterday.

The dance to be given at Smithville is not under the auspices of the C.C.C. but permission has been given some of the senior boys of the corps to attend the dance in uniform

Mr. Phillips, formerly of H.M.S. Brilliant, but now retired from the Navy, has secured a position with the Reid Nfld. Co., as Diver, and at present is at Fair Islands, trying to secure an anchor, which was lost from the S.S. Dundee.

Capr. Stanley Barbour’s schooner Stanley G. Barbour, finished discharging cargo of fish at Bowring’s yesterday, and will begin loading today, taking on board provisions and general merchandise for Newtown B.B.

The schooner Mermaid, Thomas Johnson, arrived yesterday, from Round Harbor, Notre Dame Bay, with a full load of 1.500 quintals of dry fish. After landing her cargo of fish, the Mermaid will load provisions and other goods for S. Blackler, Nipper's Harbor, N.D.B.

Murphy’s schooner L Moore, of Placentia, is now at Goodridge wharf landing seven hundred quintals of fish from St. Shott’s, near Cape Pine. When discharged, she will begin taking on board supplies for the people who shipped the fish, and other residents of St. Shott’s.

A Police Officer was arresting a half drunk disorderly last night, when his companion struck the Officer and ran. The Policeman in persuing his assailant, lost the one he was about to arrest, and both escaped him. As the two are known, they will likely be summoned before the Court.

Several outport men visited the Penitentiary Tuesday and were shown through the institution by Superintendent Parsons. They were agreeably surprised to see that the prison was kept very clean. The broom making department was also visited, and the method of making brooms explained to the visitors.

The schooner Ernest S Young, Mark Sheppard, sailed for Harbor Grace yesterday.

Mr. Tobias W. Abbott of Musgrave Harbor, is at present in town on business.

The schooner Shamrock, George Dicks, sailed yesterday for Hermitage Bay and Ramea.

Miss Mary Buckley who was visiting friends in Boston, will return by today’s express.

To Correspondent: – “Daily News Reader.” Your letter will appear in tomorrow’s paper.

The schooner Empire finished loading yesterday at Bishop & Monroe’s and sails today for Oporto.

The schooner Swan, David Costello, is loading a general cargo for M.F. O’Toole, Conception Harbor.

The schooner Pioneer, John Drake, arrived in port Tuesday night, from Oderin, laden with fish and oil.

Three arrests were made by the Police last night, one drunk, one drunk and disorderly, and one who is demented and was placed in the lockup for safety.

The schooner Lady A, George Arnold, arrived yesterday morning from Alexander Bay B.B., with 400 quintals of fish, 160 hundred weight of birch bark, and 5,000 feet of lumber.

The S.S. Amphitrite, Larder, arrived yesterday morning from Trepassey, having on board a cargo of deals taken from the wrecked Cyril. She is berthed at the wharf of Kennedy, Mullaly & Co.

The Gladys B. Smith, Corcum, arrived yesterday morning from Sydney, with 180 tons of coal to Kennedy, Mullaly & Co., after a passage of 3 days. She would have been here two weeks ago but for the long delay at Sydney awaiting a chance to load.

S.S. Rosalind left New York at 3 p.m. yesterday for this port.

A number of new houses have been erected at the top of Springdale Street on the Mundy Pond Road. The city is slowly spreading out in this direction.

A few days ago at Bell Island, the steamers Mary and Progress were in collision. The whale back deck of the S.S. Mary was much broken; no damage was done the Progress. The collision was accidental.

The following registered at the King Edward yesterday: George Penney, Ramea, P.T. Power, Placentia, T.R. Power, Placentia, Dr. G.N. Murphy, St. John’s; W.G. Donnelly, St. John’s; C.R. Penney, Carbonear.

The schooner Vivian, John Clarke, arrived in port yesterday from Dog Bay, with a cargo of one hundred thousand feet of lumber, to the Horwood Lumber Co. She is discharging at the company’s West End wharf. Capt. Clarke will sail again for Dog Bay when he has finished landing, after which he will take freight to Brigus."

November 14 1907 DEATHS BROWNING — Yesterday morning at 9 o’clock, Elizabeth Blair, widow of the late Gilbert Browning. Funeral on Friday at 3 o’clock p.m.
November 15 1907 BIG PULP PROPOSITION The S.S. Ingraham left Nipper’s Harbor yesterday morning at eight o’clock, coming this way, with Mr. J.J. Murphy, the American Millionaire, and the cruisers who were looking over Murphy and Parrell’s pulp areas on the North East Coast. From messages already received in town, prospects are bright for the establishment of large pulp mills on those properties. The Ingraham will arrive here this morning.
November 15 1907 WEDDING BELLS "WRIGHT - BOONE: Last night, a very pretty wedding took place at the residence of the bride’s parents, 23 Springdale Street, when Miss Evelyn F., daughter of Mr. W.T. Boone, was united in matrimony by the Rev. Charles Hackett to Mr. Robert Wright, Jr., of the well known Water Street firm of Robert Wright & Son. The bride was charmingly attired in cream Brussels net over Liberty satin, and was attended by her cousin, Miss Clarice Samways, and Miss Annie Wright, sister of the groom; the bridesmaids being daintily gowned in cream silk. The groom was supported by Mr. Walter Edgar. After refreshments had been served and congratulations tendered, the happy couple drove to their future residence, 52 Prescott Street, where they will be “At Home” to their friends after November 24th. The bride was the recipient of many handsome presents, testifying to the esteem in which she is held. The bridegroom is the eldest son of Robert Wright Esq., who for many years has occupied a prominent position among the successful business men of Newfoundland. He has already won an honoured place in commercial circles, and promises to maintain and enhance the reputation for energy, enterprise, and business ability, that the firm already enjoys. To the bride and groom we tender best wishes for a long union of uninterrupted happiness.

BURT — MILLEY: Another pleasing ceremony took place at 8 o’clock last night at the Cochrane Street Church, the occasion being the marriage of Mr. H.N. Burt, Manager of Alex Scott’s Dry Goods Store, New Gower Street, to Miss M Milley, daughter of the late Mr. John Milley. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. F.R. Matthews, B.A., in the presence of a large party of friends of the happy couple. Mr. F.W. Pincock acted as best man; Miss Edith Milley was bridesmaid, and little Miss Mary L. Burt filled the position of flower girl. The bride looked charming. She wore cream silk crepe-de-chene with bridle veil and orange blossoms, and carried a bouquet of white carnations and ferns. The bridesmaid who is a sister of the bride, wore pale blue silk crepe-de-chene, and the little flower girl was prettily attired in white, carrying a basket of flowers. After the ceremony, the party drove to No. 8 Colonial Street, the residence of the bride, where a reception was held, at which forty guests attended. The presents received by the bride were numerous and costly, among them being a double set of carvers, and two dozen silver knives from the Cochrane Street Sunday School and Epworth League, both the bride and groom being Teachers in the School and members of the League. The News wishes Mr. and Mrs. Burt much happiness in their future life."

November 15 1907 INFANTICIDE An arrest was made by the Police last night, in connection with an alleged case of infanticide and concealment of birth. The body of the infant is now in the morgue. It was discovered in a cistern at the top of the house in which the accused was a servant, and must have been there some days, as decomposition had set in. The odour from the decomposing body caused the lady of the house to make an investigation, which led to its discovery. The matter was then reported to the Police, and Detective Byrne was given the case. The arrest of the unfortunate girl was made a few hours later.
November 15 1907 NAUTICAL The S.S. Siberian will not be due here from Liverpool until next Wednesday. The S.S. Dageid, from Montreal via gulf ports, is due to arrive tomorrow. The S.S. Akmerianna arrived at Liverpool yesterday at 3 a.m. The Halifax City is due from Liverpool today.
November 15 1907 HEALTH Lena Carew of Barnes Road, was discharged from the Fever Hospital yesterday afternoon. There are now in the city, eleven cases of scarlet fever being nursed at home, and twenty-one in the Fever Hospital. Six cases of typhoid fever are now being nursed at home, and seven in St. George’s Hospital. Only one case of diphtheria is under supervision; the patient is being nursed at home. This makes thirty-two cases of scarlet fever, and thirteen of typhoid, and one of diphtheria; in all forty-six cases of infectious diseases, of which twenty-eight are at the Hospital’s, and eighteen at the homes of the patients.
November 15 1907 PERSONAL Amongst the recent birthday honours, the first name is that of Sir Charles Tupper, now the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles Tupper, Bart, G.C.M.G., who has been made a member of the Privy Council. Rev. F.W. Colley, of Carbonear, returned home by Wednesday night’s train.
November 15 1907 WEST COAST NEWS "The schooner Renown, Capt. Paul Young, arrived Monday from Sydney, bringing a cargo of coal to Mr. J. O’Brien.

Several cases of scarlet fever are reported in Baker’s Cove and Cox’s Cove, Middle Arm. Dr. Fisher visited these places Monday, on the Atlantic, and prescribed for the afflicted .

The S.S. Harlaw sailed from here Saturday night taking a full cargo of barrel herring and codfish to Sydney and Halifax. This steamer will only make two more trips here this year.

The American vessel Dora A Lawson, came in Sunday from Bonne Bay. When taking the entrance to Humber Arm she ran aground on Wood’s Island. With the high tide next morning she was successfully floated.

On Bonfire Night, a young lad, Ernest Taylor, living with Section Foreman Sheppard, was demonstrating the occasion, when a charge of gun powder prematurely exploded, badly burning the boy’s face, but he is now improving."

November 15 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "J.C. Foote, West Wabana, registered at the Waverley yesterday.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, is loading freight at George Neal’s wharf for J B Martin, Bell Island.

The schooner Maggie Belle, Eli Dalton, arrived Wednesday, from Smith's Sound, fish laden.

R.E. Chambers, M.E., Manager of the Nova Scotia Steel Company, Wabana, arrived in town yesterday.

The schooner Bonanza, Patrick Whelan, arrived from Indian Arm, Bonavista Bay, Wednesday evening with fish oil and hoops.

The S.S. Amphitrite is discharging a load of deals, saved from the wrecked Cyril, at E.H. & G. Davey’s wharf.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday; O.J. Owen, T.P. Miller, Grange, England; R,E. Chambers, New Glasgow.

Munn’s schooner Procyon, Thomas Noseworthy, Master, came off dock yesterday morning. She is now taking in a general cargo for Munn & Co., and will sail for Harbor Grace tomorrow.

The schooner Romeo, James Walters, arrived in port Wednesday evening. Her cargo consists of twenty thousand feet of lumber, from Smith Sound, and a quantity of fish, taken on board at Trinity.

Merry Meeting Road, between the West Eend of St. George’s Field and Moore’s Lane, is badly in need of repairs. Nothing has been done to repair the washouts and holes, made in it by the heavy rains of October.

The S.S. Mary, Dawe, arrived from Bell Island last night.

The fishermen of Long Harbor, Placentia Bay, get fair catches of fish any day it is fine enough to visit the fishing grounds.

The schooner St. Patrick, Daniel Bruce, arrived from Long Harbor, B.B. Thursday night, laden with fish , oil , herring and shooks.

The schooner Olive, William Evans, Grand Bank, has finished landing her cargo of 1,200 qtls. of fish , shipped from Lamaline, and will now load freight for Grand Bank.

The health Inspector - General McGowen, was slightly improved yesterday.

The schooner Vernie May, Christian, arrived Wednesday from Bell Island after landing freight for the Dom Iron and Steel Co. She will again take on a freight for same company.

Four arrests were made by the Police last night. One arrest was made under warrant, two was for drunkenness, one of whom was a female, and the fouth for alleged infanticide and concealment of birth.

Mr. J.C. Foote, of West Wabana, arrived in town yesterday on business, for the Nova Scotia Steel Co. Wabana."

November 15 1907 MARRIAGE McLARREN – O’REILLY — At Boston, November 1st., in All Saints Church, Aleck McLarren, to Miss Bride Frances O’Reilly, of St. John’s Nfld.
November 15 1907 DEATHS JACKMAN — At 7 last night of appendicitis, Alice, the beloved child of James and Mary Jackman, aged 2½ years.
November 16 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "The schooner Delta, W.C. Barnes, Master, left for St. John’s on Wednesday morning.

Master Thomas French went to the Postal Telegraph Office here this week to learn the Operating business.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner Fetella, Simeon Wells Master, arrived at Sydney on Wednesday to load coal.

Messrs. Munn & Co.’s brigt. Amy Louise, Capt. Sheppard, arrived from New York Tuesday afternoon with anthracite coal. The passage was a stormy one. The Capt. left for St. John’s by this morning's train.

In the District Court on Wednesday morning, the Manager of the Slip here, endeavoured to obtain payment for the dockage of a certain vessel. The Court could not hold with the plaintiff and dismissed the case.

The schooner Quickstep, J.J. Keefe, Master, arrived from the Labrador via Trinity Tuesday night. This schooner is generally the last fishing vessel from this port to arrive from the Labrador, and she again brought the key this year.

Mr. George Parsons, Manager of the Nicklodian, is now staying at Gordon Lodge. Messrs Thorburn, McNab and John Henderson, who arrived by Tuesday night’s train and Mr. Trites, who came by Wednesday afternoon train also put up at the Gordon.

Now that another house has been placarded for scareletina, (scarlet fever) it would be well if the Board of Health would have the old Military Barracks fitted up as a lazaretto, so that in cases of the disease spreading, the wage-earners of the infected families may be at liberty to seek employment and not be a burden upon the Relieving Office.

The S.S. Virginia Lake en route to Labrador, arrived from St. John’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, and sailed again at 9 a.m. It took this steamer 12 hours to come from St. John’s, and this is not surprising, if the reports are correct. The Government is to be congratulated upon having such a suitable steamer upon the Labrador service.

Although it has been said that it was whispered into the ear of somebody, that a street light would be placed at the junction of Military Road and Garland Street, it may be relied upon, no electric will be placed there in the near future, even though the Telegram Correspondent may wish it, in his own or the public interest, unless he can prevail upon the Government to stand the whole expense of putting it there. It would require the erection of at least a half dozen poles and the Company is not likely to go for that expense for the sake of only one light. The Correspondent's allusion to Harbor Grace Island light is irrelevant to the question; as the present writer does not remember ever referring to the proposed light for the benefit of the Telegram Correspondent or anyone else.

Mrs. (Rev.) Severn and child, who were on a visit to St. John’s, were expected by this afternoon’s train. It is likely they will leave for their new home at Port de Grave during this week.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Stephen Andrews took place Wednesday afternoon, when a large number of citizens followed the remains to their resting place in the C. of E. Cemetery.

Mr. W.H. Kennedy who travels for the Thomas Smyth Co., of St. John’s, recently purchased a horse which he will use in visiting different places in this Bay. Mr. Kennedy is very energetic and it looks as if he means to hustle business.

A Missionary meeting will be held at the C. of E. Schoolroom, South Side, on Tuesday night next, with visiting speakers being Revs. W C. White, of Heart’s Content and F. Severn of Port de Grave. On Wednesday night the same deputation will address a meeting of Christ Church.

The sale of work in connection with St. Paul’s Church which is being held in Coughlan Hall, was well patronized on Wednesday night. The abundant supply of useful and ornamental goods, and the refreshment tables, literally groaned under the weight of dainty dishes, which attracted quite a large lot of patrons and gave the attendants a busy time. The proceeds of the night amounted to $267., a larger sum than was taken on the first night of the sale last year. Another good sale is expected tonight when a soup-supper will be special attraction.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 14th, ‘07"

November 16 1907 BRIGUS NEWS "Miss Jennie Spracklin arrived from New Harbor, T.B., by Saturday evening’ express.

Bearns’ property opposite Smith’s Corner, has been sold to Mr. Thomas Roberts. If the Government bought the lower part of it, and ran a road through to connect with the Riverhead Road, it would be a great convenience.

Miss Mary Rorke of Carbonear was in town last Sunday.

The schooners Helen, John McRae, and Canopus, are overdue from Sydney with coal cargoes.

Business this fall has been the dullest for many years.

The schooner Charlotte, W. Clark, sailed on Monday for Trinity Bay, where she will get a thorough repair. The Puritan is also there and will be given new deck and topsails.

The Hue Mattress Factory will be brought to Brigus and erected near the Railway Station.

Rev. J.W. Bartlett arrived from Grand Bank last Monday.

Miss Nillie Bowden of St. John’s is spending a holiday with Mrs. F.H. Hue.

The ball in the Cabot Hotel last week was the best on record. Arch Smith and Will Bartlett the two promoters, are to be congratulated.

The schooner Pilot arrived from St. John’s on Tuesday, with provisions for Hiscock firm.

Smith’s Island Store was auctioned the first part of the week. The highest offer was considered too low, and the sale was called off.

Brigus Nov.14th. "

November 16 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Cacouna left Montreal Thursday for this port. S.S. Almeriana arrived at Liverpool at 3 p.m. Thursday. S.S. Dagied is due here today from Montreal and Gulf ports.
November 16 1907 PERSONAL Mr. W.F. O’Reilly, Magistrate of Placentia, is in town. Inspector General McGown was slightly improved again yesterday. There passed away of heart disease on Monday the 17th Nov., at Sydney C.B., James Burns, Chemist and Druggist. The deceased was indisposed but a day or two and his death came as a surprise to all who knew him. One of nature’s noblemen, universally beloved and esteemed, not only in Sydney but in all the country around about. He leaves a blank difficult to fill. Mr. Burns stood high in the Masonic order. Mrs. Sidney Woods is a sister and Dr. W.V. Burns, late of this city, a brother of the deceased.
November 16 1907 WEATHER REPORT The weather along the line yesterday, was the worst experienced the season. There was but little change last night, the latest reports received being: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine, 20 above. Bay of Islands, calm, dull, snowing, 30 above. Quarry, N.W., light, snowing, 17 above. Bishop’s Falls W., light, dull, 21 above. Clarenville, calm, fine. 30 above. Whitbourn, W., light, dull, 38 above.
November 16 1907 NEW WATER WORKS The construction work on the new water service is rapidly progressing, and 5,600 feet have been done to date. The old pipes, which were put down last year, have been taken up, and replaced with new ones, which have been tested under a most severe pressure and will give satisfaction. Engineer Ryan and staff hope to have the line completed this season, and a full supply of water will be given to the higher levels.
November 16 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Blackhead Road is in a terrible condition at present, and needs repairs forthwith.

J.T. Murphy, Halifax, and W.F. O’Reilly, Placentia, registered at the Crosbie yesterday.

The B.I.S. will hold its regular quarterly meeting tomorrow immediately after Mass.

In the letter published yesterday from Bay of Islands, for J.A. Bartlett read J.A. Barrett.

The Cochrane House has been purchased by M.W.V. Drayton, and will be run by him in future.

The local fishermen were outside yesterday and secured good catches. The fish sold at remunerative prices in the Coves.

The people of Holyrood are making arrangements for a sociable to be held in the Star Hall there next week.

The Reid Company is now building ten freight cars at their work shop at the Dock. Two have been completed, and the others will be constructed during the winter.

The schooner Springfield, Styles, arrived in port yesterday afternoon from Fox Harbor, Random, after a quick run of nine hours, bringing a varied cargo of 250 quintals of fish, 2 turns of oil, 23 thousand feet of Cooper’s lumber, 3 cows, 7 sheep and some poultry.

W. J. Styles schooner, Isabel Alice, arrived yesterday afternoon, from Fox Harbor, Random, having made the run in about nine hours, which is a very quick time, for such a distance. The Isabel Alice had on board 300 quintals fish, 2 turns of oil, 17 thousand feet of Cooper’s lumber, 1 cow and 5 sheep.

At nine last night, a young woman walking along Water Street was suddenly seized with a fit of weakness, and fell to the sidewalk opposite the door of Parsons Photograph Studio. She was lifted up by persons who were passing, and brought into the hallway of the building, where she recovered after a time. When she had sufficiently revived, she was conveyed to her home in a cab.

The case of the King versus Augustus Sweeney for manslaughter, has been postponed until December.

There will be a welcome meeting at No.2 Barracks, Livingstone St., tomorrow, to Adj. Barr, the new Chancellor. It will be led by Lieut. Col Rees. All will be welcome.

The Reid Co. will within a few days, instal new signals along the railway. The signals will have green and red lenses and will be so worked as to save considerable delay to trains. When the train is required to stop at a station for orders, the red is shown, and when it can pass, the green is exhibited. At night these will be lighted, and the Engineer and Conductor will be able to ascertain if the road is clear without delay.

The schooner Minnie, John Miller, arrived in port yesterday from New Bonaventure, Trinity Bay, after a quick run of nine hours, laden with fishery products.

The schooner Mauna Lea, Davis, Greenspond, has finished landing a cargo of fish from Cape Charles, Labrador. She is now at Bennett’s wharf, loading provisions and general merchandise for F. Moore, St. Anthony.

Mr. George Neal, the enterprising Produce Merchant, is enlarging his office, rendered necessary by the increased work resulting from the extension made in his business. His wharf, stores, offices alike, are busy centres, and growing busier every week.

Schooners arriving in port yesterday reported that it snowed very hard along the North side of Trinity Bay Thursday night, from ten till after midnight. While the snow was falling here, early yesterday morning, the weather was clear and fine in that section.

The shore train arrived at 9.45 last night bringing about 30 passengers.

The S.S. Sobraon, is now at the dock pier being made ready for her whaling voyage.

The whalers Puma, and Lynx, S.S. Stord, and S. S. Petral, are now on Dry Dock being overhauled. The former two are being made ready for their cruise South.

Brakeman Charles Graham, who had his hand badly injured a few days ago, and is being treated in Hospital, was much improved yesterday. It will be some time however, before he will be able to resume work.

Constable Wells arrived by train from Carbonear yesterday, having in charge a prisoner named Henry Deer, of Flat Islands, who was sentenced to four months by Judge Penney at Carbonear, for assaulting a relative."

November 18 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "W.G.R. Hinds, the man who is to open a five cent show in the T. A. Hall, will arrive by today’s express.

Over ninety miners are returning from the Sydney’s by today’s express. They are returning to spend the winter with friends.

Sunday’s express brought in a large number of passengers including: W.J. Scott, M. Martin, J Manuel, H.P. Cornick, W.H. Greene, P. Martin, R. Simms.

Saturday afternoon, Constable Nugent was called to the Railway Station to arrest an outport man who was creating a disturbance. The man was under the influence of liquor.

The P.E. Island schooner Helen Stewart, is now due to George Neal with 12,000 bushels of oats and other products. She harbored at Trepassey yesterday out of the storm.

Whale oil increased in value in the foreign market the past few weeks and is considerably higher that the price given last year, and in consequence, some of the whaling concerns will share good profit.

The Reid Company will have their snow plows thoroughly polished with graphite before they will be placed in service, which will make them more useful in snow fighting; the snow not sticking to the plow as it otherwise would.

The Ingraham returned from Hawke’s Bay Saturday, with J.J Murphy and a party of American capitalists who have been inspecting timber areas. The visitors were favourably impressed with the properties, and it is expected that a sale will be made.

Mr. H.P. Cornick, formerly of the Timber Estates, arrived from Lewisporte Saturday on a visit to friends. He leaves again tomorrow for Millertown, where he has accepted a position with the Harmsworths at Millertown, where the latter company will begin mining operations at an early date. Mr. Cornick is accompanied by his child.

A lane known as Rocky Lane, leads from the West part of Merry Meeting Road to Newtown Road. This lane, though a public thoroughfare, has become a dumping ground for all kinds of refuse, ashes, etc., thrown from the sanitary cars into the lane, while all the animals, such as dogs and cats, etc., that perish in the central part of the city and on the higher levels, are given open air graves there. It is also stated that the residents of Merry Meeting Road, West past Summer Street and McNeilly Street, who have not yet been honoured with nightly visits from the city patrol cars, made this lane a depositary of sanitary refuse. Its condition can be more easily imagined than described, and it is a standing menace to the health of the people who lived near it.

Mr. McGrath’s new paper will, we understand, be issued tomorrow.

The Christmas edition of the Free Press will be issued on December 17th.

A handsome mural tablet has been erected in Gower Street Church, to the memory of the late Rev. Dr. Milligan.

The schooners that went ashore at Twillingate in the September storm, are now practically all removed from the rocks. A number of them have been repaired, some at big expense, and will be fit for the trade next summer.

Hard frost last night. Winter is here!

At Greenspond and vicinity, some catches of small herring were taken last week.

Over $14,700 has already been subscribed toward the removal of the debt on Gower Street Church - another $6,000 and the Trustees will be able to sing the “Nunc Dimittis.”

A young woman named Penny was brought in by Constable Benson from Carbonear, Saturday last, and taken to the Lunatic Asylum for treatment. She was somewhat violent on the way over.

The weather up country yesterday, was fine West from Exploits. East from that point, the conditions were about the same as in the city. Last night’s report is: Port aux Basques, calm, fine, 38 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., strong. Snowing, 42 above. Quarry, N.W., light, showery, 20 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W., light, dull, 28 above. Clarenville, calm, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, calm, fine, 35 above.

The whaler Port Saunders, operating at Hawke’s Bay, has only landed 30 whales to date. The shareholders are not likely to receive any big profits from this turnover.

An important case having reference to timber areas, will come before the Supreme Court for hearing tomorrow. Several witnesses who will give testimony at the trial, arrived in town from Bootwoodville, by Saturday’s express.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: M Beaton, J Haynes, M. Sullivan, A.E. Foran, C Foran, Miss G. Eldon, Miss S.A. Day, R. Walsh, Mrs. A Johnstone, Miss Daley, M. Thistel, Mrs. Saxton, Miss M. Delaney, W. Tulk, R. Hill, H. Conwan, T. Curran, W.H. Horwood, J.S. Taylor, J.W. Owens.

Acknowledgement. — We have received the following amounts toward the relief of the families of the crew of the Irion, and other storm suffers, if any not yet provided for: Isaac C. Morris $5.00. Rev. C. Hacket $3.00. Daily News $5.00. J. Alex Robinson $5.00. Capt. J.R. Moss $5.00. ------- $23.00."

November 19 1907 PORTIA BACK FROM NORTHWARD The S.S. Portia, Capt. A. Kean, arrived in port at 7.30 last night, from Northern ports. She left here the 8th Nov. and called at every port North to Griquet. Fine weather was experienced almost the whole trip though it was somewhat cold. From Nipper’s Harbor, North, some ice had made near land, but is of insignificant thickness. The Coast, coming South, had a very wintry appearance, all the hills and headlands being covered with snow. The Portia brought a small quantity of freight and the following passengers; Messrs. Bussey, Simms, Maddcock, McCormack, Neah, Hear, Huelin, Foots, House, Budgell, Snow (2), Herbert, Quirk, Loveridge, Saunders, Winsor, Bishop, Brown, Snelgrove, Maguire, Fowlow (3). Collis, Lockyer, Mesdames Howlett, Kean (2), Barbour, Snelgrove, Green, O’Neill, Matthews, Turner, Barter, Misses Williams, McCormack, Winsor, Doyle, Bishop, Hanan, Piercy, Snelgrove (6), Pack, Lanham, Matthews, Froud, Blunden, and 90 in steerage.
November 19 1907 S.S. DAGEID IN PORT At noon yesterday, the S.S. Dageid, Steenson, arrive from Montreal via Gulf ports, after a passage of fourteen days, with a general cargo to Shea & Co. The ports called at are Charlottetown and Summerside, P.E.I., and North Sydney. The run from Sydney was made in a little over two days. All the way from Montreal to St. John’s, stormy weather was met with. One hundred and thirty sheep were taken on board at Prince Edward Island, but two of them perished in transit, and many others more or less injured, owing to the rolling of the ship.
November 19 1907 MAN MISSING FROM MADDOX COVE Patrick Murphy of Maddox Cove, has been missing since Saturday night, and his friends are fearful that he is not alive. Murphy was a Seaman on the Diana, and only returned to his post Saturday morning. In the afternoon he left Maddox Cove, taking along with him some purchases, and friends in St. john’s thought he had reached home safely. Mrs. Murphy, hearing that the Diana arrived Saturday, and her husband not turning up, left Maddox Cove yesterday morning for here, to learn the cause of his absence. About a mile from her home, she picked up two parcels which she brought to town. She immediately on reaching here, visited her sister-in-law to enquire for her husband, and in the meantime showed the parcels she had picked up. Her sister-in-law was horror-stricken, as they were none other than two she had tied up for the missing man Saturday afternoon. The finding of the parcels so near his home, makes it plainly evident that Murphy strayed away from the road sometime Saturday night. The Police were informed of the occurrence and Constable Lawlor and Tobin were sent to look for him. A number of men from Petty Harbor and Maddox Cove are also engaged in the search, but up to late last night, they were unsuccessful.
November 19 1907 A SAD CASE By the S.S. Portia, Phene Ellesworth, a blind orphan, arrived from Carmanville to enter Hospital. The girl is only eight years old, and is a daughter of one of the unfortunate men who were smothered in the woods at Carmanville last spring. Today the little one will go in Hospital and have an operation performed on her eyes. After the operation the girl will be sent to the Halifax School for the Blind.
November 19 1907 COLUMBIA SAFE The schooner Columbia, Carrol, which went ashore on Northern Labrador, and for the safety of which friends of those on board were getting anxious, was seen at Seldom-Come-By by the S.S. Portia. Capt. Carrol was on board the Portia and reported all his crew well. The Columbia was harbored at Englee when the Portia was going South.
November 19 1907 PERSONAL Capt. E. Bishop of Wesleyville arrived in the city last night. Mr. William Duff arrived from Carbonear yesterday on business. Mr. H. Frazer of the R.N. Co., who was up country photographing, returned by yesterday’s express. Mr. E. Hearn, Manager of I Perlin’s stores, Tilt Cove, arrived in the city by the S.S. Portia, on a visit. Mr. J. McCormack of Coachman’s Cove, is at present in the city on business, having arrived by the Portia. Mr. Robertson, of the Bowser Oil Tank Co., leaves by this evening’s train on a business trip over the line. Capt. Jesse Winsor arrived from Westeyville by the Portia, last night and will remain a few days on business. Mr. Stephen Loveridge, representing the firm of William Ashbourne of Twillingate, is now in the city make some heavy purchases for that business. He will be returning home by the Portia on Thursday. Mrs. Samuel J Brookman, mother of Dr. Brookman, formerly of Bay of Islands and Greenspond, died at Sydney on Wednesday night in her 59th year. Mrs. John Bartlett and Mrs. Dr. Kendall are sisters, and Mr. H.C. Burchell, formerly Government Engineer, is a brother of the deceased lady. The cause of death was apolexy. The funeral took place on Saturday.
November 19 1907 ORION DISASTER "Today we are in a position to report considerable progress, as will be seen from the accompanying letter from Mr. Davidson. He has handed in a cheque covering the subscription from some firms which he represents in the Island.

St. John’s Nov. 18, 1907.

Dear Sir.—

Enclosed please find a cheque which I have to ask you to deposit to the credit of the “Orion” and general relief fund, pending the distribution of same to the widows and orphans who have suffered the loss of their loved ones. We cannot make up their loss but we can try by our acts of sympathy.

The cheque amounts to $143.30, particulars of which are enclosed.

Yours very truly, (Signed) W.H. DAVIDSON.

In addition to the foregoing, we have pleasure in acknowledging further subscriptions. One for $10.00 from “The North River Catholic Bazaar Committee, per Rev. Dr. Whalen,” suggests a method of increasing the funds which is well worth consideration. The success that is achieved by bazaar is alway due in a measure to outside help and it is a pleasure in turn to help others, especially when the cause is so deserving a one. This is the season for Bazaars, Sales of Work etc., and small donations from each would prove most helpful, and at the same time not place any extra burden upon the promoters.

The list stands as follows: To amount acknowledged, $23.00. Ernest W. Taylor, General Freight Agent R.N. Co. $5.00. G.W. Goodwin & Sons, Ivy Soap Works, Manchester, England, £10, - $48.66. Trummers & Co., Sea Dog Matches, London, £10 - $48.66. Aut Jurgen’s Margarine Works, Oss, Holland, £5.5 - 25.44. Kit Coffee Limited, Glasgow ,Scotland £2.2 - $10.22. Eugene Goulmy & Baar, Amsterdam Holland, £2.2 - $10.22. North River Catholic Bazaar Committee per Rev. Dr. Whalen, $10.00. Success, $1.00. Total - $182.20.

We trust this sum may be considerably augmented and that the Outports will be largely represented on the list."

November 19 1907 DIED SUDDENLY BODY ARRIVES The body of W. Bishop, late
November 19 1907 SLIDING ACCIDENT The 8 year old son of Stanley Abbott, Springdale Street, met with a painful accident last evening while sliding. Young Abbott was coming down the incline at good speed and collided with another slide, owned by a boy named Roberts. The crash was very heavy and Abbott was thrown off into the drain. He was picked up in an unconscious condition and brought to his home, where the Dr. was called. It was found that the boy’s leg was badly fractured and he also had a deep cut in his forehead, which required five stitches to close it.
November 19 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "The little steamer Nereus belonging to Bell Island, was taken on the slip here this afternoon.

Mr. Hillyou arrived in town Friday night, and put up at Gordon Lodge. He left again this morning.

On Monday Next, Miss Bride Lee will began an engagement as singer with the Nickelodin at the Academy Hall.

Mr. John Pumphrey, who was ill for a couple of weeks, has been about these two days and will return to his post in Messrs R. Rutherford & Co.’s Grocery on Monday.

The S.S. Euphrates arrived from St. John’s this morning with a quantity of staves for Messrs Murray & Crawford. She takes back some cod oil and a number of fish drums.

Mrs. Severn, child and maid, for Port de Grave, and Mr. G.H. Badcock for St. John’s, went out by this morning’s train. Mr. Badcock and wife are expected to return tonight.

Messrs. Munn & Co. were apprised by cable on Friday, that their schooner Nellie Louise, Capt. Mark Burke, had arrived at Pernambuco on Thursday, after a quick passage of 31 days.

The anthracite coal brought by the brigt Amy Louise, is meeting with a ready sale, and the ship is expected to be discharged by next Tuesday, after which she will go to Sydney for coal.

Rev. A.M. McLeod, under the direction of the Halifax Presbytery, will supply at the Presbyterian Church here about the end of the present month, when Rev. J. McNeil will take his departure.

In the District Court, two sharemen at the Labrador fishery, applied for the recovery of money due them from a planter. Defendant’s son who was in Court, admitted his father’s liability, so judgement went to plaintiffs for the amount due them with costs.

Trade was brisk at some of the stores on Water Street today; but notwithstanding an occasional busy day, the amount of trade done here this fall, up to the present, does not approach that done by most of the shops up to the same time last year.

The public waiting room of the Post Office has recently been done up, the walls having been stained with an oak pattern and varnished. The room now looks tidy and will no doubt present a respectable appearance until a more suitable office building in placed in the proposed Public Building, which will certainly adorn the town, if the proper course is taken by our citizens.

The receipts at the sale of work at Couglan Hall on Thursday night amounted to $114. This sum with some small amounts which came in the next day, and the proceeds of Wednesday night’s sale, aggregated $385, an amount only $4 less than that taken at last years sale which ran three nights. Quite a lot of superior goods, which could not be sold at a low figure, were not disposed of, and will be kept for another sale at some future date.

The President of “Diamond Jubilee” Lodge, S.O.E., are in receipt of a copper shield forwarded by the Supreme Grand Lodge at Toronto. The shield commemorates the death of Nelson, Oct, 21st 1805, and will be kept by the lodge as a souvenir, in memory of the Battle of Trafalgar and the death of “the greatest sailor since the world began.” Upon the shield is a print of Nelson’s Flagship, Victory, as she was in 1805, under which is an inscription as follows: “England experts that every man will do his duty.” Death to Nelson Oct 21st , 1805, Centenary Memento Oct. 21st 1905, containing copper from H.M.S. Victory. From the Lords of the Admiralty to the British and Foreign Sailors Society, E.R. VII. The shield will be suitably mounted and put in a conspicuous place in the lodge room, so that all who visit the room may be reminded of that memorable occasion, when liberty and rest were secured to the millions of the British race by the achievement of a national hero. The president has also a number of watch chains of the same design for distribution among the members of the lodge. The lodge hopes to secure a bust of Nelson done in the same metal and mounted upon “Victory” oak.

Mr. Thomas Snow, in an interview with your Correspondent, complained strongly of the treatment accorded him by the Authorities here, in connection with the sad occasion which eventuated in himself having to convey his wife to the Insane Asylum at St. John’s. Mr. Snow wishes to have his case brought to Public notice and urged the writer to lay bare the facts. He claims to be a poor man who would be unable to do what has been done for his wife only for the assistance given by friends in sympathy. He states that he asked Judge Seymour for assistance to take his wife to St. John’s. This the Judge refused to do as the Magistrate suggested that Mr. Snow see the Relieving Officer.

The Relieving Officer flatly refused to give aid, and the Local Member for the District was applied to, but no assistance whatever was obtained by the distressed man. Not even a Policeman to take charge of the unfortunate woman, was allowed. The husband had a most trying time on the train and says his experience was a cruel one. At Brigus Junction, a Policeman boarded the train and suggested that the patient’s hands be tied with a rope, but this the husband would not permit.

After a most trying journey, which called for constant vigilance on the part of the husband, the wife was taken to her destination. At St. John’s, all the Police assistance necessary was easily and readily obtained, but here, no help whatever could be got from the Authorities. Even the Doctor who filled out the required form for admission to the Asylum, charged a fee of $5, which under the processing circumstances, the husband promised to pay.

Such is the story told by Mr. Snow which, if it has not another side, indicates that much unnecessary trial was placed upon a poor man, who it seems did not posses the knowledge how to make his claim known, in order obtain assistance, which is due to every citizen no matter what his station in life may be.

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 16th, ‘07"

November 19 1907 BELL ISLAND NEWS "FROM PIT TO PIER:

Quite a number of steamers have been loaded with ore and sailed again during the past week.

Rev. Fr. McGrath is organizing a concert under the management of the Misses Donnelly, which is to take place at a near date. There is good vocal talent amongst the principals of the program and a successful all round result is anticipated.

It is understood that one of the moving picture shows have taken St. Joseph’s Hall and will arrive here soon to give a short season of exhibitions. We bespeak their success.

The weather was very cold last night, the thermometer showing several degrees of frost.

Workmen are still arriving and being employed by the two companies. Business is being rushed ahead smartly, night and day, and preparations for the winter will soon be completed.

Friday and Saturday next, will be busy days on the Island, being Chamber’s and Whitney’s pay days respectively, when some $70,000 will be disbursed

The Road Commission here have been at work, and they have actually placed ashes over the public road, after allowing it to be knee deep in mud and whole fall. Now however, OH Generous boom! —they have actually fixed up about an eight of a mile of it.

There has been added to the inhabitants of Bell Island, a real live Baker, who proved a great convenience on the Island. It is gratifying to see the familiar bread car on its rounds every morning.

Everything in Police and Customs quarter have come to a dead calm and happiness quiet and content permeates the land.

The Daily News is now being eagerly look for every evening in this part of the Island, and “From Pit to Pier” is read with interest by nearly all the inhabitants. It is one little column in the whole Island devoted to their interest, and the only means by which, so far, their sentiments, favourable and otherwise, can be made public. Now that the elections are within a year of us, your paper will soon be a boon to your subscribers during the coming winter months.

Another grand social event was given at St. Joseph’s Hall last night , Nov. 12th. A return soiree was given the ladies of Bell Island by the gentlemen of Wabana, at which the “Exiles” attended in goodly numbers. Some 80 persons participated, and dancing to lively music was kept up till 3.30 a.m. The ladies were richly attired in gay costumes, whilst the gentlemen appeared “well fixed” for the occasion. Our local Baker catered, and everything was done so well by the gentlemen of the committee, that not the slightest hitch occurred during the whole program, which consisted of some 24 dances, songs and luncheon. A beautiful new 3 step or mazurka, the grateful motion of which would delight a lover of the Terpsichorean, was danced by some eight or ten couples with Mr. McDonald leading. Both he and his lady partner did full justice to this beautiful dance. Prof. Kneeland furnished the music for this special event which is a beautiful soft air played in slow time. The latter played and danced together. A very nice hornpipe was danced by Mr. P. O’Brien. Mr. J Burke was Floor Manager, and was indefatigable in his efforts to please all, which he did to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. True democratic courtesy and good will prevailed throughout. At the request of Mr. Burke, Mr. W.J. English announced notably Mr. D. Jackman, with “Hauled Him Back Again.” Mr. P Doyle with “My Irish Mollie” but the crowning event of all was Mr. F. Jardine’s “Adieu Marie” which received echoing applause. Later, a very nice quartette was rendered – “The Old Oaken Bucket” – with Mr. McDonald in the treble. It was a pity the Superintendent of Construction, Mr. Dan McKinnon could not be present, as business called him away. Foreman Dan in an all round good fellow not only at amusement, but at work - the men under his control simply love him, so genial and cheery is his disposition, and all work done under his supervision has generally met with full approbation. The soiree broke up, and after “They are jolly good fellows” had been sung, all returned to their homes feeling that they had spent one of the most enjoyable evenings for a long, long time.

CORRESPONDENT. Bell Island, Nov 12th."

November 19 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Glencoe arrived at Port aux Basques at 9 p.m. yesterday. Clyde left Nipper’s Harbor at 4 p.m. yesterday going North. Dundee left Port Blandford at 4 p.m. yesterday. Argyle left Placentia at 6.30 p.m. yesterday on the Red Island route. Ethie left Clarenville at 12.30 p.m. yesterday.
November 19 1907 NAUTICAL S S. Corean arrived at Glasgow Sunday morning. S.S. Adventure will leave Sydney tomorrow for Harbor Grace. S.S. Regulus is now loading hard coal at New York for St. John’s. Schooner Leah, Whidden, is loading drum fish at Bowring Bros. for Brazil. Schooner Roanoke, Capt. H. Petite, is loading fish for Halifax at Smith Co.’s wharf. Benson’s schooner, St. Elmo, will leave tomorrow for Morton’s Harbor to load fish for St. John’s. Barqt. Galatea, Connors, in ballast to Baird, Gordon & Co., arrived from Oporto yesterday after a passage of 25 days. Schooner Margaret Murray, Williams, is loading at Bowring Bros. for Oporto. She sails this afternoon. Barqt. Golden Hind, Hearld, sailed for Pernambuco yesterday with fish in packages from Bishop & Monroe. S.S. Ulunda arrived at 5 yesterday morning two and one half days from Halifax, and will sail for Liverpool tomorrow. Schooner Water Sprite, Edward Kean, arrived Saturday night, from Brookfield, Bonavista Bay, with a cargo of 900 quintals of fish. S.S. Kenora Hayton, 18 days from Glasgow to Montreal, arrived in port yesterday, short of coal. Bowring Bros. are her agent.
November 19 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The S.S. Rosalind had not arrived up to press time.

There are no new cases of infectious diseases reported at the Health Office since last issue.

There were three arrests made last night, a drunk, a disorderly, and drunk and disorderly. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning.

The Rev. Mr. Gericke, the Moravian Missionary, was entertained at Government House yesterday by their Excellencies Sir William MacGregor and Lady MacGregor

A young man named Snow of Pilley’s Island, arrived by the Portia last night to enter Hospital. He was looked after by his father on the passage.

Yesterday was the busiest along Water Street for some weeks, the shop hands having all the work they could attend to. It was also a busy day along the waterfront, there being thousands of quintals of fish landed.

It was reported about town last night, that a young man living on a suburban road, has committed suicide by severing the arteries of his arm with a razor. The News enquired from the Police but they knew nothing of such an occurrence.

Passengers who arrived by last night’s express, reported herring very plentiful in the Arms at Bay of Islands and some good hauls are being made daily. Several schooners with frozen and salted cargoes respectively, will be ready to sail for markets this week.

Two seamen from the S.S. Kenora amused themselves on Water Street last night, and soon had a large crowd following them. Constables Coady and Hann objected to the proceedings and arrested the seamen, this morning they will answer for their conduct before the Magistrate.

Off Cape St. Francis last night, when the Portia was passing, a large ship brilliantly lighted could be seen a short distance off. Suddenly all lights went out and did not show again, at least up to the time the Portia entered the harbor. The steamer was evidently the one that passed the narrows at 8 o’clock and the disappearance of the lights was no doubt due to an accident to the ship’s dynamo.

The weather along the line yesterday was the coldest for the season, there bing 25 degrees of frost registered at the Quarry. Last night is was also cold at the Quarry, the reports being; Port aux Basques, S.W. light, fine, 38 above. Bay of Islands, calm, fine, 40 above. Quarry, N.E., light, fine, 10 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 23 above. Clarenville, N.W., light, fine, 30 above. Whitbourne, N.W., light, fine, 30 above.

A large steamer passed the narrows last night at 8 going South, evidently an ore boat from Bell Island.

All the hotels in the city are now filled. At one of them last night, several who sought admission, had to be refused, not a single room being vacant.

Several schooners coming into port last night were becalmed in the narrows from 8 o’clock until 11. Two of them had to drop their anchors to prevent the tide taking them on the rocks.

The “Evening Chronicle” will make its bow to the public tomorrow afternoon. As will be observed by reference to our advertising columns, Mr. McGrath requests that all advertisements for the first issue be sent in not late than noon today.

There is a good sign of herring about White Bay and fair hauls are being made daily.

Miss Maher, of Petty Harbor, who is on a visit to friends in the city, met with a very painful accident, Saturday morning. In going down Bannerman Street she slipped on the ice and fell, breaking one of her arms below the elbow. Dr. Campbell was called to attend the injured and on examination, he found it to be a single fracture of one of the bones between the elbow and the wrist.

The following guests registered at the Crosbie yesterday and last night: W.B. Ford, Wabana; D.A. Ryan, Trinity; Arthur Terroux, Montreal; George J Baker, Boston; C.A. Norman, Michigan; W.J. Murphy, Boston; C.A. Jerret, Brigus; Wm. Duff, Carbonear; W.M. Belfoor, Botwoodville, H.J. Hannon, Botwoodville, E.A. Whiteman, Botwoodville, Jesse Winsor, Wesleyville. C LeDrew, Botwoodville, John Connors, Botwoodville, E. Bishop, Wesleyville, B. Good Vancouver, B.C., Mrs. B. Goose, Vancouver, B.C. M.W. Taylor, James Greening.

At present, the Police have a number of Privates and Sergeants layed off with illness. The only Sergeant doing duty at present is Sergeant Peet.

The express arrived at 7 last evening, bringing; Sir R. Harvey, J.W. Grant, H. Frazer, A Whitemen, D.A. Ryan, C. Drew, J. Noseworthy, H.C. Curtis and about 40 others, mostly pogie fishermen, returning from New England, to spend the winter at home.

At 7.35 yesterday morning, an alarm from box 34 brought the Central and West End firemen to the residence of Mr. Kielly, Water Street West. The blaze was only a slight one, the wood casing around the fire place having caught fire, owing to a defect in the chimney. It was put out with a few buckets of water and the services of the brigade were not needed. Another alarm was sent in at 11.57, from box 26 but the Firemen did not reach the scene. The wires had become crossed and the alarm did not ring, so as to indicate the right box. The blaze this time, was at the house of Mr. Coffin, Butcher, New Gower Street, where a pan of fat had caught fire. No damage was done, and it was put out in a few minutes. The crossed wires were adjusted later."

November 20 1907 ORION DISASTER In last night’s issue of the Evening Telegram, appears a list of the subscriptions received by Messrs Gear and Davey, towards the Orion Relief Fund. The amount collected by them, so far is $1,040.50 and no doubt further sums will be added. Considering the large demands upon the public of St. John’s, this generous response is most gratifying; and we congratulate the Members for the District upon the success which has thus crowned their efforts. The sum realized, augmented by subscriptions received from other sources, will do much to alleviate suffering in the stricken homes.
November 20 1907 BODY FOUND NEAR HOME The body of the missing man Murphy, was found yesterday forenoon, by Constables Tobin and Lawlor. The Police searched both sides of the road from the place where the parcels were picked, and after continuing for about three quarters of a mile, found the corpse about 40 feet from the side of the road, in a thicket of alders. The body was on its side, and was partly frozen. The face was somewhat marked; the theory advanced, being that the marks were caused from falling. Neither along the road nor about the deceased’s clothing, was any liquor or liquor bottles found, and the report that he had been inebriated. The unfortunate man did not live at Maddox Cove, but was on his way there to see his wife, who was spending a few weeks with her brother. Where the body was found was about three hundred yards from where his wife was staying. How he wandered into the woods will remain a mystery. In the afternoon, the remains was taken to the morgue, and a post mortem examination was made by Dr. Rendell, who pronounced death due to exposure. Last night the body was coffined and taken to his late home. Murphy’s death has created great sorrow among his friends and it is particularly sad, considering that he had only returned from a Northern sea voyage, and was going home to see his wife. General and sincere sympathy is expressed for the family of deceased, in which the News joins.
November 20 1907 LEFT HOME AND CAUSED TROUBLE Monday morning, a young man named Bowe, of the Goulds Road, came to town to dispose of the day’s milk supply, and as per usual, he was expected to return at the customary hour. Monday night, the horse returned, but without the owner, and Bowe’s family became anxious. Yesterday morning, he not having turned up, the matter was reported in town, and a general search was organized by friends. The search was unsuccessful however, and those engaged at it could learn nothing as to where the missing man was. The News however, learned last night that Bowe joined the train at Waterford Bridge, Monday night. Leaving his horse go home, he bought a ticket for North Sydney, and was carried as far as Port aux Basques, where he will likely join the S.S. Bruce for the coal fields. It is alleged that Bowe did not leave exactly on a health trip, and this morning the authorities at Port aux Basques will be cabled to arrest and send him back.
November 20 1907 REGULUS STRIKES A SNAG "(Exclusive to Daily News)

New York, Nov. 19th — The steamer Regulus, from Lewisporte for New York, lumber laden, is ashore twenty miles east of Fire Island. There is not much sea running and the steamer is in no immediate danger. The crew are aboard and throwing the cargo overboard in the attempt to float her. Tugs have gone to her relief. Harvey and Co. of St. John’s, are the owners."

November 20 1907 INJURED AT TICKLE HARBOR Cornelius Sullivan, of Harbor Main, met with a serious accident yesterday afternoon, while engaged at railway fencing work at Tickle Harbor. Sullivan was close beside another workman, who was driving a nail which broke off when struck, and hit Sullivan in the jaw, the point entering his eye. He was knocked unconscious and a copious stream of blood flowed from the wound. After a few moments however, he revived, but unable to see, and it is believed he has lost his sight. The matter was reported to the Reid Co., and the injured man was brought in by last night’s train for medical treatment. Mr. Sullivan is a hard working man, about 60 years old, and the last summer, was Master of a schooner at Labrador, securing a good voyage of fish.
November 20 1907 FINED FOR BREACH OF GAME LAW Capt. McClaire, an English sportsman, was before Magistrate March at Bay of Islands yesterday, charged with violating the Game Laws, which being proven, he was fined $150. The fine was paid. It will be remembered, some time ago the News called attention to this matter, having been informed that McClaire killed a caribou on the 19th Nov. The happening was then taken notice of by the Authorities, and Sergt. Sheppard, who is a special Game Warden, was instructed to look after the Captain. The Sergeant secured sufficient evidence, and had the offender brought to justice with the above result.
November 20 1907 BOY ARRESTED FOR LARCENY Last night, two Policemen doing duty in the West End, captured two boys in the act of stealing. The Officers were on their way to the Railway Station, and near the archway to the R.N. Co.’s freight sheds, saw the lads emerging from McCarthy’s Junk Store with a bag. Being questioned by the Police they acknowledged that they had entered the place and taken some articles of different value. Both who are old offenders, were taken to the Police Station and will be arraigned before the Magistrate today.
November 20 1907 ROSALIND ARRIVES The S.S. Rosiland, Clarke, arrived in port from Halifax and New York at 5 a.m. yesterday. She made a fine run from New York to Halifax and from the latter port met fine weather to here. She brought a full cargo, several packages of freight, and the following passengers: Miss T. Simpson, Miss A Worrall, Miss M. Smith, and 82 steerage, from New York; Messrs J Moore, G.A. Humphries, R.C. and Mrs. Mason, H.C. Robinson, J.H. Monrce, C.H. Bell, and 1 in steerage from Halifax.
November 20 1907 A MORAVIAN MISSIONARY Yesterday, we had the pleasure of meeting the Rev. Mr. Gericke, who after eleven years continuous service at the Moravian settlement on Labrador, is now proceeding to the Moravian headquarters at Herrnhaut, Saxony, with the intention of working in the Home Mission field. Mr. Gericke came out eleven years ago on the last trip of the old sailing vessel, Harmony, going direct from London to Macovic, (Makkovik) the journey occupying 45 days. This is his first visit to St. John’s. His father and maternal grandfather were also Moravian Missionaries, and he and his mother were both born in Greenland. During the Governor’s visit he missed seeing him, as he was at Ramah, where His Excellency was unable to call. On Monday with Mrs. Gericke, he dined at Government House, so that now Sir William has a personal acquaintance with all the Missionaries who have been labouring on that Coast during recent years. Mr. and Mrs. Gericke with their three children, and one belonging to a brother Missionary, leave by the Ulunda today.
November 20 1907 THE LATE FRANK CURTIS Many there are in St. John’s who will learn with deep regret of the death of Mr. Frank Curtis of Salmonier, youngest son of the late Garrett Curtis, who was one of our old settlers and shipbuilders of that place. The former was one of the active intelligent spirits of that section, entrusted with the performance of much confidential Government work such as surveying the public lands, revising the census and electoral lists, etc. He was one of the noted shots and guides of the Avalon Peninsula; the friend of the officers of the Royal Newfoundland Companies, who with invited comrades from the garrison at Halifax, made Salmonier their headquarters in the shooting season, with their relays of splendidly trained Englished pointers and setters; but not the best shot amongst them, as he candidly admitted, could equal the sure and brilliant style in which Mr. Curtis brought down his birds, right and left. Subsequently he took service with his friend, the late Smith McKay, in the latter’s great development of the Tilt Cove Copper Mine. All have gone to the brighter land, we trust; bright, genial, generous souls, and the world is darken for their departure. Mr. Curtis married, at Tilt Cove, Miss Hoskins, daughter of the Mining Captain there, who, with three intelligent sons and two daughters, survive him.
November 20 1907 CARBONEAR "Messrs E. Penney & Son’s schooner Ethel Grace, Herbert Pike, Master, arrived from St. John’s Wednesday night, bringing a full load of provisions, coal, groceries, etc. That firm intends opening a general store on their premises to the East of Tucker & Cameron’s.

Miss M Udell left Wednesday afternoon for Montreal, via St. John’s, to undergo surgical operation there for an affection of the throat. Her brother, Mr. William Udell accompanies her.

Two of Messrs Rorke & Sons schooners arrived Tuesday from Trinity and Bonavista Bays respectively laden with wharf sticks, firewood, etc.

A new desk of handsome design was placed in the Court Room on Wednesday. In appearance, it is a vast improvement on it predecessor. The work is from the skilful hand of Mr. George Colbourne, Foreman at J.P. Guy’s Furniture Factory.

Capt Handcock of the Mary Parker, one of Ryan & Co.’s schooners, arrived here Saturday with the belongings of the ill fated Mikado’s freighter. The Mikado was commanded by skipper Richard Murphy of this place, and ran ashore coming home, in Stag Harbor Run.

At dance at St. Patrick’s Hall on Thursday night attracted great numbers. The clock indicated 3.45 a.m. before the floor manager realized that there was an end to all things. Messrs Hamilton and Sweeney furnished music for the occasion.

Messrs J and J Maddock’s trader Onward, Jno. Pike Master, arrived Saturday, bringing a full load of fish, oil, etc, for the firm.

A youthful fishermen of 24 summers, hailing from the “marsh” and a fair resident of “Dear old South Side Hills” launched out in the matrimonial sea Thursday last. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. T.B. Darby, B.A. in the Methodist Church South Side, and witnessed by many.

Capt. Josiah Penney’s two schooners arrived from Red Bay this week. These are the last vessels to arrive from the prosecution of the season’s voyage.

Mrs. (Rev.) Chass Hackett returned to her home in the city on Saturday.

Constable Wells was dispatched Friday morning with one Henry Deer, who was convicted the day previous by Judge Penney, in a lawsuit for assault against his nephew, in which he was the aggressor. The prisoner was incited by an imaginary claim on a piece of land to which he had no clear title. It is said that this small strip of innocent soil at Flat Rock has been an incessant bone of contention between the contracting parties for years.

The annual Missionary meeting of St. James’ Church took place at 7.30 p.m. Thursday evening. As on former occasions, a large and attentive congregation attended. Revs C. Carpenter, Harbor Grace; F. Severn Island Cove and F.W. Colley, were present, also Mr. Norman of Coley’s Point. Earnest addresses on Missionary themes were delivered.

A young woman by the name of Julia A Penney, who has shown signs of mental derangement of late, was taken in charge by the authorities, and on Saturday, Constable Benson was ordered to take the unfortunate woman to the Lunatic Asylum. She is a grand-daughter of an old lady locally known as “Aunt” Susan Penney.

Owing to a slight mishap at the Power House, Mr. Cooper was obliged to shut off the electric current from 7 to 7.15 p.m. Thursday evening. To the business places, which were not prepared for such an emergency, the inconvenience was considerable.

Several transfers have been taken place recently in real estate. The residence and lands formerly occupied by the late Capt. R. Pike’s family have changed hands, and are now the property of Mr. Herbert Taylor of J and J Maddock’s firm; while two building lots, immediately situated to the rear of the Post Office, have been bought out from Miss Stapleton. One of the lots is already being excavated by the purchaser with a view to building.

Mr. George Winsor, accompanied with a crew of sailors, went out by Thursday express, en route to Gloucester to bring down a schooner recently purchased by Messrs Duff and Sons Ltd.

The law suite in which several hop beer sellers are involved, is further postponed until the Supreme Court sits here.

CORRESPONDENT, Carbonear, Nov. 18th, ‘07."

November 20 1907 HEALTH NOTES A house on Cochrane Street will be released from quarantine and disinfected today. There was only one case of scarlet fever at this house; the patient, a little girl, was reported yesterday fully recovered. No new cases were reported yesterday at the Health Office. Since last Friday, not a single new case of either scarlet or typhoid fever has developed in the city, and it looks as if these diseases are under control at last.
November 20 1907 NOT THIS YEAR The statement of one of the evening contemporaries, that Dr. Stewart is expecting the warship Brilliant to call at St. Anthony and convey him to Labrador, to take the necessary steps to combat the spread of disease amongst the Esquimaux, is well founded, but so far as we can ascertain, somewhat premature. Drs. Grenfell and Hutton have both voiced the need for such a service to be instituted, and we learn that arrangements were in progress with this object in view. They have however, not measured, and the Brilliant will scarcely visit the Labrador again this year. Apart from this, those in authority know nothing about Dr. Stewart’s contemplated sojourn on the Labrador Coast.
November 20 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Portia sales tomorrow at 10 a.m. for the Northward. Prospero left Bonne Bay at 8.20 a.m. yesterday.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Glencoe leaves Port aux Basques this morning. Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake is North of Tilt Cove. Clyde left Nipper’s Harbor at 1 p.m. yesterday, inward. Dundee left Bonavista at noon yesterday. Ethie left Carbonear at 4 p.m yesterday. Argyle left Sound Island at 3.25 p.m. yesterday, inward. Bruce is due Port aux Basques this morning."

November 20 1907 PERSONAL Col H.B. Robinson arrived by the Rosalind on a business trip. Mr. E.C. Brown, of King’s Cove, is at present in the city on business. Dr, McCollough, Magistrate of Oderin, leaves for there this morning to take up duties. Dr. and Mrs. Ames who were visiting the city yesterday, returned to Broad Cove by the evening’s express. Mr. and Mrs. E. Pike of Port aux Basques, who were visiting their daughter, Mrs. A Pretty, left for home last evening. Miss Peet, daughter of Sergt. Peet, who has been spending a vacation at Montreal with friends, will arrive tonight by the Bonavista. Constable William March returned from Placentia Bay Saturday night, where he was on fishery protection service, and yesterday resumed city duty. Mr. R.C. Mason, of New York, accompanied by Mrs Mason, arrived by the Rosalind yesterday, and are staying at the Balsam. About four months ago, Mr. Mason was here and bonded several timber claims, and is very much interested in the recent proposition for the establishment of a pulp concern at Hawke’s Bay. Mr. and Mrs. Mason will remain in the city for a few days.
November 20 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Sergt. Sparrow is at present confined to his room suffering from a cold. Sergt. Noseworthy is also ill.

The St. Thomas’s Organ Fund Committee will meet in Canon Wood Hall tomorrow at 4 p.m. to transact important business.

The express last evening, took out; A and Mrs. Pike, H. Donnelly, Dr. and Mrs. Ames, P Griffin, and about 80 pogie fishermen.

The three masted schooner Mildred, recently built for Job Bros & Co., at Lunenburg, left for here, Monday. She is commanded by Captain Keeping.

About twenty workmen crossed from Bell Island yesterday and came to town. They had been working there since last spring, and are returning home with well filled purses.

About 100 Conception and Trinity Bay men joined the outgoing express last evening, at Brigus Junction. Most of them did poorly at the fishery this season, and are going to Sydney to work in the mines during the winter.

Yesterday afternoon, a wall on Water Street, opposite Cash’s, caved in, the pavement falling into the sewer. During the afternoon, the atmosphere was very unpleasant in the vicinity, and immediate repairs should be made.

At 2 a.m. yesterday, Sergt. Peet, while doing duty on Water Street, found a Witless Bay man in Sclater’s doorway, who was quietly removing his clothing, mistaking the place for a bedroom. The Officer took him to the Station for safe keeping.

About 80 pogie fishermen arrived by the Rosalind yesterday. Most of them are Conception Bay men, and left for their homes by the afternoon express.

Mr. J. Syme reported to Supt. Sullivan yesterday, that his office window had been broken Monday night, and he suspected robbery was attempted. Detective Byrne went to investigate and learned that it was broken by an inebriate, who will be summoned.

Mr. Lawrence Glasco, Butcher, died at his home yesterday morning, after an illness of two days. Deceased was the oldest son of the late John Glasco who carried on butchering business in the West End for half a century. Deceased leaves a widow and six children.

Messages were received in town yesterday from Marystown, saying that the schooner Golden Rod, Capt. Robert Lundrigan, arrived from Burin Monday night, and reported having lost George Bride, one of the crew. He was struck by the main boom when the vessel was coming out of Sydney, and knocked overboard. The body was not recovered.

The weather along the line yesterday was similar to that experienced in the city. Last night it was also mild, the latest reports being: Port aux Basques, calm, fine, 43 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., light fine, 36 above. Quarry, S.W., light, dull, 32 above. Bishop’s Falls, calm, snowing, 30 above. Clarenville, calm, dull, 38 above. Whitbourne, calm, dull, 30 above.

At Old Perlican, Capt. A Barret will build a forty ton schooner during the winter, to replace the schooner S.E. Parker, lost last spring. The frame will come from the West side of Trinity Bay, and the planking and decking has been ordered from Clarke’s mill at Springdale, N.D.B. The service of Mr. Amos Piercy, a builder of first class reputation, has been secured to build the schooner. Capt. Barret is a most successful fish killer, and will use his new schooner at the Labrador fishery.

At noon yesterday Mr, J. M. Dooley of the Waverly Hotel, while going to Pleasantville, discovered a horse perishing at the rear of the old Gun Club House. The animal was unable to rise and it was evident that the poor beast had been nearly starved, as its bones were almost protuding through his skin, and both its fore legs were badly cut. Mr. Dooley phoned Inspector Sullivan on the matter from Pleasantville, and an officer was sent down to investigate. From marks in the ground, it could be seen that the human owner of the poor animal had used another horse to drag it to where it was found, thinking no doubt that the building would prevent the horse being seen, and that it would soon perish. The horse is black with a white face. Detective Byrne was detailed to look up the owner, who will likely get into trouble through his ill human act.

The Supreme Court on Circuit opens at Brigus on Friday next; at Harbor Grace on Monday, and Carbonear on the following Friday.

“Main Hatch,” writing from Carbonear, says, “In my recent letter I forgot to say that no blame attaches to Capt. Batten, in the S.S. Walrus, with regards to water. The ship was jammed. He did his work well and it is surprising how he brought her out of such difficulties. All credit is due him.

Capt. McClaire, who has been fined for a violation of the Game Laws, will have another case to deal with before he leaves for home. One of his guides is now claiming $40 back money which the Capt. forgot to pay him, because he (guide) objected to his violation of the laws.

Capt. Thomas Pye, of Brooklyn, B.B., left in his schooner Curfew for home yesterday, laden with winter supplies for himself and neighbours. His daughter, Miss Annie Pye, came to the city at the same time by steamer two weeks ago, to help make the season’s purchases and visit friends. Of these she has a host, for Miss Annie has spent some six years in the Old Bay State, and her bright happy and dignified manner makes her a welcome guest with all. She returns home on Thursday’s train.

Three arrests were made last night two for larceny, and one for being incapable. They will appear before the Magistrate this morning.

The floating whale factory Sobraon, and the whalers Lynx, and Puma, leave this morning on their cruise South. The Sobrson carries a large supply of coal, and to avoid delay on the trip the whalers will be coaled at sea.

There is quite a lot of fish yet to come in from outports. Capt. Jesse Winsor of Wesleyville, has fully 1,700 quintals to send along, and many other Northern skippers have greater or less quantities to be shipped here within the next few weeks."

November 20 1907 DEATHS GLASCO — On the 19th November of pleuro-pneumonia, Lawrence Glasco aged 42 years, leaving a wife and 6 small children to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Thursday at 2.30 p.m. from his late residence No.6 Gilmore Street. Friends and acquaintances please accept this the only intimation. – R.I.P.
November 20 1907 FUNERAL NOTICE MURPHY — The funeral of the late Patrick Murphy will take place this afternoon at 2.30 o’clock from his late residence, Livingstone Street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this the only intimation.
November 21, 1907 ROW ON TRAIN MAN INJURED When the local train was coming up the Broad Cove section last night, some passengers started a row, and made an assault on Conductor Bezant. The latter was collecting tickets when the fight started, and was called by some others of the passengers to stop the trouble. As soon as he interfered he was attacked by the disturbers, and was called upon to defend himself. In doing so he hit one of the men a severe blow which stunned him, and falling to the floor of the car, struck his head against the iron support of one of the seats, laying it open for several inches. This had the effect of stopping the disturbance, and frightening mostly all on the train. All that could be under the circumstances, was done for the injured man, and he was put off at Clarke’s Beach, where a Doctor was called. The train left before the Medical man arrived and the condition of the injured man was unknown by the train hands. The person who caused the row and assault the Conductor will be arrested today.
November 21, 1907 COLUMBIA HERE FROM UP NORTH The schooner Columbia, Capt. Carroll, which had been up North to take cargo for the Moravian Missions, returned last night, after a very eventful trip. As already told by the News, the schooner was ashore at Black Island and part of her cargo had to be jettisoned before she was refloated. An Esquimaux Pilot was on board at the time, and when she struck, those on board were surprised. The boats were put out but there was no immediate danger. When she was refloated, she was leaking some what, and temporary repairs had to be made before the crew would risk coming home in her. After some delay, the schooner was made seaworthy and the passage home started. Coming up, several harbors were made, the weather at times being very severe. The Columbia is leaking at present and will have to be docked for repairs. Capt. Carroll and crew are well.
November 21, 1907 FISH CARGOES TURN OUT BADLY During the last season some of the fish shipped from Labrador to the Mediterranean was not so well cured as in other years, due no doubt to the continuous bad weather and the desire of the shippers to be first in the market. It is said that at present there are two whole cargoes in the market that are unsaleable, and unfit for consumption, and will likely have to be thrown overboard, while two other cargoes have turned out so badly that the shippers will not realize the price of the freight. The market is also depressed and the shippers of Labrador fish this season, do not stand to make a fortune.
November 21, 1907 PERSONAL Rev. N.S. Facey left by the S.S. Portia for Change Islands. Mr. Thomas Tucker, of Burnt Point, North Shore, is in town. Mr. Joseph Bishop of Western Bay is in the city on business. Inspector General McCowen was much improved in health, yesterday. Rev. Dr. Whalen, P.P. North River, arrived in the city last night. Capt. T. Bonia, M.H.A. was a passenger from Placentia by last night’s train. Mr. D.A. Ryan, Bonavista, leaves this morning by the S.S. Portia for home. Mr. R.E. Chambers, General Manager for the Nova Scotia Steel Co., is in town. Mr. E.J. Crocker, Trinity, who was in town on business, returns home by the S.S. Portia. Mrs. (Rev.) Edgar Taylor of Green’s Harbor arrived in town on Tuesday's train, and is spending a few days with her sister, Mrs. Jessie E. Ellis. Capt. Courage returns to Catalina today. During the last season he commanded the banking schooner, Marshal Adams, and though being last in beginning the voyage, landed 1,700 quintals.
November 21, 1907 WEATHER REPORT "The weather along the line yesterday was exceptionally fine. Last night it continued so, the latest report being: Port aux Basques, N.E., light, fine, 30 above. Bay of Islands, Calm, fine, 24 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 12 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.W., light, fine, 10 above. Clarenville, N.W. light, fine, 20 above. Whitbourne, N.E. light, fine, 24 above."
November 21, 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The Bruce arrived at Port aux Basques at 12.20 p.m. yesterday bringing; A.E. Chown, Staff Capt. Holmer, Lieut. House, S.J. Green, John and Mrs. Kelly, R.C. and Mrs. French, Miss J Bursell, J.E. Burgess, J.H. Eustace, P.A. Garcin, P. Delaney, J. Baxter, Mrs. W.J. and Master Janes, and 80 in steerage. The express is due at 5 p.m.
November 21, 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner L. E. Young, Capt. Bartlett, is now on her way from Sydney with coal to this port.

The schooner Precyon, Thomas Noseworthy, Master, arrived from St. John’s on Sunday morning with a load of general provisions for Messrs Munn & Co.

His Lordship Bishop March left by Monday evening’s train for Spaniard’s Bay, to attend the opening of a bazaar which is being held in aid of repairs to the R.C. Church there.

The friends here of Rev. Dr. Whalen are very pleased to know of the great success which attended the bazaar recently held at North River. The amount raised from all sources approaches $1,600.

Mr. Louis Lawton who has been Druggist for Dr. Jones at Avondale, arrived by Saturday night’s train and left for St. John’s by this evening’s train on a visit to his parents. He will go to Bell Island on Saturday to take charge of Dr. Jones’ drug store there.

Mr. J.W. Murphy arrived by Friday night’s train. Mr. Z. Garneau, representing P. Garneau Files & Cie of Quebec and Mr. W Taylor representing the Robert Taylor Boot & Shoe Co., Ltd., of Halifax, came in by Saturday night’s train, and put up at the Cochrane House.

The schooner Lizzie M., William Day, Master, arrived last night from Greens Harbor, T.B., to Messrs Munn & Co., with a miscellaneous cargo. The schooner Nelson, Thomas Hart, Master, arrived from Lady Cove, T.B., this morning, with a cargo of lumber to Mr. Thomas Ross.

A man who had been assaulted by a Blacksmith in a shop on Saturday night, had his assailant before the Court today. The disput which preceded the assault, was caused by the defendant thanking the plaintiff for the latter refusing the Carpenter who was repairing the roof of Christ Church schoolroom, to stand a ladder on his ground. An altercation followed which ended in the defendant striking plaintiff more than once. Judgement was given to plaintiff for $2.50 with cost or 7 days."

November 21, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Passengers arriving from Placentia by last night’s train say there is a splendid sign of herring and fish in St. Mary’s Bay, and when the weather is find good hauls are made.

A Naval Reserve man reported to the Police last night that he had lost forty dollars. Sometime after, he returned to the Station with the information that the money had been picked up and left at Mr. A. Rendell’s office, where it was handed over to him.

A Plancentia Bay man, who is here in a schooner, lost a purse from his pocket yesterday evening containing over one hundred dollars. He was partly under the influence of liquor at the time, and can scarcely account for his actions. The matter was reported to the Police.

The sons of Capt. Richard Fowlow of Trinity, who lost his life by falling over the head of his wharf, will conduct the business, as they have been doing for some years past, owing to the advanced age of their father, who was turned seventy. Capt. Fowlow was one of the wealthiest planters of Trinity Bay, his estate being valued at between thirty-five and forty thousand dollars. The labours of his industrious successors, let us hope now that our leading staple is reaching its intrinsic value will be attended with a like good fortune.

Several Newfoundland fishermen who have been engaged pogie fishing on shares for a Long Island, N.Y. firm, will it is feared, lose heavily in consequence of the firm’s embarrassment. They employ a number of steamers, but the destruction of their principal oil rendering factory by fire, together with the interruption of business facilities resulting from the stringent money market, crippled their resources to an extent that involves a compromise. The shipped hands who are however, the fewer number, will be paid in full, but the share-men it is said, will be mulcted.

Tuesday night a disgraceful fight occurred on Merry Meeting Road between two brothers. Both before and after the fight, the language indulged in was anything but edifying. The people of the neighbourhood consider the presence of his family not only an annoyance but an infliction as well. Rows and fights between them are of frequent occurrence, and disturb the whole place. So often have they come before the Court for various offences, that the Magistrate remarked on one occasion, when a member was at the bar, that he wished he could make the whole family leave the city, and that it would be a blessing to be rid of them.

A full attendance of the members of Cochrane Street Choir is requested tonight at a quarter past nine, in the Primary Room, when the Christmas music will be taken up.

Capt. Thomas Pye of the lost schooner Duchess of Fife, is home at present in Brooklyn B.B., recuperating from the bodily injured received in the fierce September hurricane that cost him his command. He will procure a new fit-out this winter.

A number of schooners in port engaged in freighting the leading staple from the outports hither, will make another trip and some of them two more trips, before winding up the year. The business of a large number of outport people will run into the Christmas season.

The Supreme Court, His Lordship the Chief Justice presiding, will open circuit settings at Brigus on Friday next, and for that purpose, His Lordship and officials with members of the bar, will leave town by this evening’s train. Mr. Arthur Knight who has been retained in several cases at Brigus, Harbor Grace and Carbonear, informs us that quite a busy time is expected, and in addition to the civil business, two criminal cases at least, will come up for trial.

The shore train arrived at 10.55 last night, bringing Capt. T. Bonia, Rev. Dr. Whalen, J Foote, Mrs. (Capt.) Dawe and about 50 second class.

There is a good sign of herring along the Southern Shore, and daily, the fishermen get good fares in nets. Several salmon have also been taken during the last few days.

The two lads who were arrested Tuesday night for stealing a bag of lead, were before the Magistrate yesterday and the charge being proven, were sent down for two months.

The schooners Jennie Jones, Ellis, and Margaret Murray, Williams, sail today for Oporto. Both are good sailors and an interesting race is expected. Several wagers have been made on the result.

Two arrests were made by the Police last night, one a drunk and the other a drunk and disorderly, the latter a woman.

There will be a tea and concert in Centenary Hall tonight. Teas will be served from 5.30 to 7.30; concert 8. Tickets are only 30 cents.

Sydney reported a heavy N.E. hurricane last night, it bring the worst felt for some time. Cape Race also reports a N.E. gale, though at other places it was not felt.

Some of our local fishermen were on the grounds yesterday and were rewarded for their energy with good catches, which sold at remunerative prices in the market.

An unfortunate young woman who was only recently released from the Penitentiary, was arrested again last night, for being drunk and disorderly. The girl is only in her teens and it was a pitiable sight to see her being brought along by the Police. She will be arraigned before the Magistrate this morning."

November 21, 1907 DEATHS REDMOND — Yesterday morning, Catherine, relict of the late Thomas Redmond. Funeral on Tuesday at 2.30 p.m. from the residence of Mr. J.P. Curtain, Hayward Avenue. Friends will please accept this the only intimation: – R.I.P.
November 22, 1907 SALVAGE TUG PETREL’S TRIP "Yesterday afternoon, tug Petrel, owned by the Reid Newfoundland Company, after having been generally overhauled, made a special trip. For several weeks the steamer has been on dock and thousands of dollars have been expended to put her in her present condition. She is fitted with steel sheer legs on the after end, with a powerful hoisting engine, to lift from 60 to 70 tons. Today there is no steamer for wrecking purposes better equipped in Canada. Situated as she is in St. John’s, the value of the Petrel is more than intrinsic, and had she been in service when the Micmac went ashore at Broad Cove, there was every possibility of her being refloated. A barge, the “Sylvester Neelon,” is also ready for carrying salved cargo or supplies.

The Reid Co. have every facility for quick despatch of men and material to any part of Newfoundland and Labrador Coasts, as the whole sea coast is served by the company’s eight steamers, over which they pass once and twice a week. These are in touch with the railway service, and keep in almost daily communication with the whole Island and Labrador. Besides, the dock accommodation is the largest this side of the Atlantic, and has facilities for carrying out temporary or permanent repairs. The shops on the dock are fitted with modern tools for hull and machinery repairs. The compressed air plant is of large capacity and the supply of air tools, for all class of work, but especially for ship repairs, is alway on hand.

With a concern such as the Reid Company operating such a powerful tug as the Petrel, in the event of any further wrecks on the Newfoundland Coast, there is almost a certainty of successful salvage work, which necessarily means employment to local artisans and labourers. Those who had the pleasure of the trial trip were: R.G. Reid, Capt. English, G. Wheately, Inspector McLachan, H. Crawford, J. Taylor, C. Alcock, Mr. Therroux, J. Jardine, T.J. Foran, M.A. Devine, R. Dowden, P.K. Devine, T. Cook, R. Jeans. Following is a description of the Petrel, and barge Sylvester Neelon:

Twin Screw Salvage Strm Peterl. 346 tons gross register. 199 tons net register. 123.8 feet long 26.3 feet beam. 9.6 feet deep. 2 Tubular Boilers. 2 Cylinders 18in X 20in. Fitted with heavy Sheer Legs and Boom, Boats, Lines, Cabin furnishing and usual ship’s gear, and the following Salvage Gear: Three Diving Outfits, One 15in Centrifugal Pump, with suction and discharge pipes. Three 12 in, Centrifugal Pumps, with suction and discharge pipes. Three 10 in Centrifugal Pumps with suction and discharge pipes. One 6 in Centrifugal Pump, with suctiion and discharge pipes. One Air Compressor with hatch plates and six locks for expelling water from vessel by compressed air. One Air Compressor for supplying divers. Electric Light Plant, One Lathe, One Vertical, One Screwing Machine. 50 feet 4 in Copper Flexible Steam Hose, 169 feet 2 ½ in Copper flexible Steam Hose Heavy towing hausers, large supply of ropes, blocks, and general tackle for salvage purposes,

Wooden Built Barge Sylvester Neelon: Built 1875. Gross Tonnage, 304. Length 137.0 feet. Breadth 26.2 feet. Depth 12.0 feet."

November 22, 1907 VIRGINIA LAKE AT TILT COVE The S.S. Virginia Lake, Capt. Parsons, arrived at Tilt Cove at 3 p.m. yesterday, and left again at 4 p.m. Capt. Parsons sent the following report to Reid Newfoundland Co., “Arrived at Rigoulette the 8th. Strong N.W. winds, with clear frosty weather all trip, excepting Sunday, when snow storm was encountered in Sandwich Bay. All bays, harbors and runs freezing up; very little snow on ground along the Coast. There is no shipping North of Battle Harbor.”
November 22, 1907 S S KITE AT BATTLE HARBOR The S.S. Kite which went north to Rigoulette to land supplies and also 40 men for the Gillport Lumber Co., reached Battle Harbor on her return trip Wednesday. On the passage down she had very stormy weather until reaching Battle Harbor, but after leaving there going North, fine weather was had. There was a delay of several days at Rigoulette, landing cargo. Returning, fine weather was experienced to Battle Harbor. The Kite should arrive tomorrow.
November 22, 1907 FACTORY CLOSED AT HAWKE’S HR. The whaling factory at Hawke’s Harbor has closed down for the season. The voyage has been successful, the catch being 63 whales. Among them are several sperms, which are very valuable. The other whales captured were much larger that those taken last year, and the yield of oil is expected to exceed last year’s by one-half. The Cachelot will return here within a few days.
November 22, 1907 PRISONERS ARRIVE A young man named Robert Green, of Scilly Cove, Trinity Bay, who was charged with having criminally assaulted a young woman named Hiscock, was brought in by yesterday’s express from Bay of Islands, to stand his trial in the Supreme Court. He came in charge of Dist. Inspector Bartlett. Another man named Grebble, recently sentenced to four months imprisonment, was also brought in to serve his term in the Penitentiary.
November 22, 1907 WESTERN NOTES "(From the Western Star)

Sergt. Sheppard, who is Special Game Warden on the preserved area, came to town by Monday’s express with Capt. Henry Maclear and wife, of England. Capt. Maclear was reported to have committed a breach of the Game Law by shooting a female caribou in closed season. Sergt. Sheppard was informed of the matter, and found the accused at Grand Lake on Sunday. He was before Magistrate March yesterday and fined $150.

As Capt. Cameron’s gasoline launch was coming in the Bay on Sunday, her wheel ropes parted off Middle Arm Point. The wind was blowing at the time, causing the waves to break over the little boat. Things looked serious for a time, and by the time the steering gear was repaired, the boat had drifted to within one hundred years of the rocks. The 4 persons on board had light hearts, when the boat was steered away from the dangerous and treacherous breakers.

Work in Summerside Slate Quarry was suspended last week, the reason assigned is that negotiations are being conducted for its sale. The closing down of the industry for a few months will put about thirty men out of employment there, and will be a loss to the community. Two small cargoes of slate are ready for shipment, and it was thought that the article would have been put on the market this year. Everything is in working order there and the seams of slate-marking material exposed, are of the best quality. It is earnestly hoped that the suspension of operations will be of short duration.

Capt. Carl. C. Young, of Gloucester, arrived Wednesday to superintend the loading with herring of his vessel, Dauntless and W.E. Morrisey.

Capt. F. Hall arrived from Gloucester on Friday, to look after the loading of his vessel, Ralph L Hall, with salt bulk herring. Capt. Hall has chartered the Canadian vessel Eva June, to take a frozen cargo of herring.

Mr. Frank Beazley, a representative of the Halifax Cold Storage Co., arrived Wednesday to superintend the loading of several vessels with herring. This is Mr. Beazzley’s fourteenth season coming here and he has always made a pretty good success of the fishery, which good luck, we feel sure, will attend his efforts this fall. One vessel, the Mary W.S., Capt. Schraderm, arrived on the 12th and will take a frozen cargo. She is now in Middle Arm where scaffolds are being erected. Mr. Beazley has chartered Capt. Snow’s vessel Torata, to take salt bulk.

Capt. Sam Butt, of St. George’s, who came to Bay of Islands a few days ago, is purchasing herring for his “smoker” at St. George’s

Capt. Paul Young’s vessel, Renown, has been chartered by the Gordon-Pew Fisheries Company, to take a cargo of frozen herring to Gloucester.

About thirty local hunters, who were up country, returned home by special train on Sunday night. Some of them were very successful in securing a fine lot of venison, while others fared poorly, not having secured more than two carcasses each.

Mr. L McLean had Capt. I Zinck of the Lunenburg vessel Earl V. S., before the Court Friday, for payment of a quantity of herring alleged to have been engaged by defendant last fall, delivery of which was never taken. He was fined $200 and cost."

November 22, 1907 BODIES OF FOUR MEN PICKED UP "North Sydney, Nov. 18th — Capt. Rose, of the Newfoundland schooner Hero, which arrived yesterday from Channel, reports that the bodies of four men were found last week, below the cliff at Miquelon Head, and that in Channel, the bodies were believed to be those of four of the crew of the ill-fated schooner, Tubal Cain, which left Halifax in January last for Grand Bank, Nfld., and which is believed to have gone down with all hands on the night of the fifteenth of that month, in a heavy gale.

That the bodies found are those of the unfortunate men on that vessel, is not generally believed here, as too long a time has elapsed since their tragic ending for there to be any likelihood of this being the case. A number of other Newfoundland Captains which are at present in North Sydney, express the opinion that the bodies are probably those of members of the crew of the fishing schooner Orion, which was lost while on her way home from the Labrador Coast, a little over a month ago. Some of the wreckage of the Orion was picked up recently by the Newfoundland Government steamer Fiona, on the Newfoundland Coast, and the probability is that the bodies found at Miquelon Head are those of men belonging to that ill-fated craft. A blue sweater with the initials of Capt. Forsey of the Tubal Cain, was picked up on the St. Pierre shore during the summer, and taken to Grand Bank for identification, but the relatives of the drowned man stated that the garment in question had never been worn by him."

November 22, 1907 HOTEL ARRIVALS "CROSBIE — W. Baird, Botwoodville; J.E. Burgess, Halifax; Capt. and Mrs. McClair, England .

WAVERLY — J.C. Foot, Carbonear; Thomas Walker, Brigus; James Greene, Green’s Harbor."

November 22, 1907 MIDNIGHT ARREST FOR LARCENY Last night, Sergt. Peet and Constable Nugent arrested two men of the West End, who were charged with larceny. Soon before midnight, three men visited the schooner Crown, Linehan, at Smith’s wharf. One asked for bread, and while Capt. Linehan was getting the bread, one of the others lifted a hundred pound tub of sounds. They tried to get up the wharf, but the Watchman would not let them. They went to Knowling’s wharf, and were also stopped by the Watchman. They managed, however, to get through Rogenson’s gateway, but had only reached the street when Sergt. Peet and Constable Nugent captured two of them, one having escaped. They will appear before the Court this morning.
November 22, 1907 BONAVISTA REACHES PORT The S.S. Bonavista reached port yesterday morning with a full cargo of produce, consisting of oats, potatoes, turnips, etc. She also brought 48 head of cattle and 116 sheep. She had a fairly good run to this port. After discharging, she sails for Sydney to load coal for Charlottetown, and there, will load produce and poultry for this port. The Louisburg is also at Charlottetown for this port and the Cacouna will also take a cargo here.
November 22, 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Stella Marie arrived at noon yesterday from Trepassey. S.S. Adventure left Sydney aqt 2.30 p.m. yesterday, with a cargo of coal for Harbor Grace. S.S. Carthaginian left Philadelphia at 11 o’clock last night and is due here on Monday. Schooner Bear, Nelson Sparks, arrived yesterday from Alexander Bay, with a cargo of 500 quintals fish. Schooner Maggie Sullivan, George Downer, is loading provisions at Bennet’s wharf for J.W. Hodge, Fogo. S.S. Mary came off dock yesterday. She is now at George Neal’s wharf loading cargo for Bell Island, and will sail early tomorrow morning. Schooner Samoa, G. Ledrew, has finished discharging fish at Franklin’s, and will now load general cargo for Jebez Ledrew, Board Cove, North Shore. CB.
November 22, 1907 PERSONAL J.C. Foote arrived from Carbonear yesterday. He goes out again by this evening’s train. The Rev. A. Richardson, who has been for some time working in this diocese, has been appointed Rector of Arichat, Cape Breton. The funeral of the late Mrs. Catherine Redmond takes place this afternoon at 2.30 o’clock, from the residence of her son in law, Mr. Curtin, Hayward’s Ave. Mr R.C. Mason of New York, who came by S.S. Rosalind on business, left by yesterday’s express, on return to New York. Mrs. Mason accompanied her husband on the trip.
November 22, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "The Oderian man who lost a some of money on Thursday, had not recovered it up to last night. He had $178 in his pocket, and made purchases amounting to between thirty-five to forty dollars. The balance was lost.

The Supreme Court on circuit left by last evening’s express for Brigus, Chief Justice, Sir William Horwood, A.O. Hayward, Crown Prosecutor; Clerk Butler, Crier Alsep, and the following legal gentlemen, went out: A.W. McNeilly, S.J. Foote, A.W. Knight, M.W. Furlong, K.C., F.J. Morris, K.C., P.J. Summers, W.R. Warren. Court opens at Brigus today.

At ten o’clock yesterday morning, the Parade Ground presented a scene which reminded one of the days when Fort Townshend was occupied by the Military, and drill of the R.N. Companies are practised there. Yesterday a respectable-size battalion composed of blue jackets of our Naval Reserve occupied the ground, and were put through various evolutions by Mr. Blackmore, the accomplished Drill Master and noted rifle shot of the Galypso. Marching of the whole line two deep, deploying into four companies and other manoeuvres with manual exercises, constituted the program, the Commandant watching the files closely, and calling the attention to the Company Instructor to defects in alignment and marching order, and having these blemishes rectified. The “boys” observed perfect discipline, were alert and active, and showed up well.

The wrecking tug Stella Maris arrived in port yesterday from Trepassey.

The Municipal Council holds its regular weekly meeting at 7.30 tonight.

Capt. McPhail, well known as Commander on different Black Diamond boats coming here, met with a painful accident a few days ago, when his ship was on her way to Sydney. A sea struck him, knocked him to the deck, and broke his arm. He is now in Halifax being treated.

Several schooner’s from the North Shore, Conception Bay, are now in port, loading winter supplies for people along that Coast. On some parts of the shore it is a difficult task to land goods, and after landing, to hoist them to the top of the cliff. Northern Bay and Caplin Cove are the worst places, the land being very high in both harbors.

A message received yesterday by A Harvey & Co., stated that the S.S. Regulus was refloated Wednesday. A part of the cargo had been jettisoned to lighten the ship, and she was then towed off by the aid of a powerful tug. The steamer was not damaged much, and did not leak after she was refloated. After discharging, she will load cargo at New York for Sydney.

It is a matter of widespread regret, not only in the ranks of the Naval Reserves, but also in the Nfld Rifle Club, that Mr. Blackmore will soon be severing his connection with the force, his term of service here being up. Thoroughly skilled in the details of his profession and of gentlemanly instincts, the hope is general that his successful course of instruction out here will earn for him tangible recognition of his worth at the hands of his superior officers. Today a squad of the Reserves will practice with a heavy gun in the Lighthouse Fort, and another squad will fire over the rifle range at Sand-pits.

To meet the growing requirements of the trade, the business people of the city often find it necessary to carry very large stocks, particularly those who make a specialty of any one line of goods. Yesterday, a representative of the News was shown through what is undoubtedly the largest stock of wall paper ever seen in the city. It filled the whole top flat of a building at the rear of a business house on Water Street. Beside the stock in the store, the firm has a large shipment, lately arrived, not yet brought up from the premises at which it was landed. The whole stock comprises of nearly a thousand bales. Allowing 16 yards to a piece, this would mean about 1,750 miles of paper, enough to go all around the Island following the Coast line.

The schooner Grace, Captain Roberts, arrived yesterday morning from Campbellton Mills, with a cargo of one hundred thousand feet of lumber to the Horwood Lumber Co., which is being discharged at the Company’s West End wharf.

Eight prisoners were brought in by the Police last night; four drunk, two drunk and disorderly, and two for larceny. They will all be arraigned before the Magistrate in the Police Court this morning, to answer to the charges against them. It was the busiest night the Police had for some time.

Detective Byrne succeeded in locating the owner of the horse, which was left to perish behind the Gun Club house near Pleasantville, as already announced in the News. The owner, and two other persons as witnesses, have been summoned to appear before the Central District Court tomorrow morning.

Mr. R.C. Mason, one of the owners of the Hawke’s Bay pulp areas, who left here by yesterday’s express for New York, will return in about two weeks’ time. This is Mr. Mason’s second visit to Newfoundland. He is will pleased with the prospects open to investors of capital in this Country, and will, no doubt, be closely identified with pulp lumber and mining developments in the near future, as he has associated with him several other men of means.

The weather has been very cold north the last week. In parts of Notre Dame Bay sleighs have been replaced carriages, and good driving is to be had.

The Messrs. Moore, of St. Anthony, have done remarkably well this season, and are now loading four sizeable schooners with the chief staple for this port. Two of them belong to the firm — the American built Blue Jacket, 117 tons, and the Ettie Bess; the others being chartered. All four will be sailed here by Masters engaged for the run, and will tie up on the Southside during the winter, in order to be in readiness for an early start in the spring, laden with supplies for their dealers. Messrs Joseph and Frederick Moore will come by steamer early next month."

November 22, 1907 DEATHS "MARCH — This morning, after a long illness, Walter S. March.

REDMOND — On Wednesday morning, Catherine, relict of the late Thomas Redmond. Funeral on Friday, at 2.30 p.m., from the residence of Mr. J.P. Curtin, Hayward Avenue. Friends will please accept this the only intimation. R.I.P.

COOPER — This morning after a long and painful illness, John Cooper, aged 64 years, leaving a wife, four sons, and five daughters, and a large circle of friends to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Sunday, at 2.30 p.m., from his late residence 21 Field Street."

November 23, 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "The Postal -Telegraph Office at Upper Island Cove, has been opened for business this week, with Mr. Alex Myrden as Operator.

Rev. Joseph McNeil who has been supplying at the Presbyterian Church here for nearly two months, intends leaving for Annapolis next Tuesday. Rev. A.M. McLeod, B.A., is expected here the following Saturday, to minister to the spiritual wants of the congregation for a time.

An exhibition is advertised to take place tonight at the British Hall, when a calf with two perfect heads upon one body, a lamb with two perfect heads upon one body, and a lamb with one skull-bone and two faces upon one head will be shown; also moving pictures. A concert vocal and band music and dancing will be added. The hall will be opened from 7 p.m. till midnight.

In looking over a copy of the Hr. Grace Standard, dated Feb. 19th, ‘68, the writer has noticed the following letter:

To the Editor of the Standard:

Sir: Can you inform mewhen the annual meeting of the Harbor Grace Agricultural Society takes place? I observe that the St. John's Society has reported and elected its officers for the present year. Should we not do likewise?

Your's truly, A Mamber.

It is nearly 40 years since the question was asked here, whether for the first time or not. How often since, the same question has been put, may be imagined. It seems we are a very conservative people here and dislike to change our habits, but prefer to journey along the old beaten track. It is about time we drop this query; but from force of habit, it is sure to be repeated.

Dr. William Parsons, son of Mr. Edward Parsons, of this town, who has been for some time practising medicine at Bonne Bay, has decided to come to Harbor Grace to establish a practice, and may be expected here early in December.

Mr. William Noel, of the Department of Mines and Agriculture, St. John’s, left here this morning to survey a new road to Upper Island Cove.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner Susannah, will likely leave this evening to Green’s Harbor, T.B., where she will undergo repairs during the winter.

Dr. Mahoney has been confined to his room the past three days by a severe attack of neuralgia. Hope to see him out again soon!

Mrs. Patrick Doyle, who has been to Montreal to undergo an operation for some throat affliction, returned home last week, apparently thoroughly cured of the complaint.

Capt. George Barbour and wife, of Newtown, B.B., arrived here yesterday and are guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. Spracklin, for a few days. Mr. W.P. Rogerson, of St. John’s, came from Carbonear yesterday afternoon and put up at Gordon Lodge.

Messrs. R. Rutherford & Co. made some large shipments of lumber by rail and schooner, to Bay Roberts and Carbonear last week. Mr. William Carson is putting in a new office and Messrs. Tetford & Lee are making repairs to the wharf for his firm. The firm’s contract for the building of the new Church at the South Side in nearly completed.

Several schooners from different parts of the bay are now in port, awaiting the arrival here of the S.S. Adventure, which brings a cargo of coal to Messrs. Rutherford & Co.

The missionary meeting held at Christ Church last night was well attended. Rev. C. Carpenter, incumbent of the mission, in a few opening remarks, introduced the speakers Rev. F. Severn, of Port de Grave, and Rev. W.C. White, Rector of Heart’s Content. The former speaking first, gave an interesting description of Missionary labours in Bonavista Bay. He pictured exactly how the work is carried on and the particular incidents which occur during the progress of a Missionary journey. His address was earnest, instructive, and interesting. Mr. White next addressed the meeting in a masterly effort on behalf of missions. He considered his subject under three heard, viz..Sympathy, Access of Force, and Support of Missions by largesse. In an exceptionally able manner, and with smooth persuasive tones which delighted her hearers, this gifted speaker conveyed his thoughts to others and maybe communicated to them some of the Missionary zeal so plainly discerned in the Rector of Heart’s Content.

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 21st"

November 23, 1907 GREENSPOND "The public were on Monday Nov 11th, entertained with a cinematograph show, which in point of effect, if not of character, was on par with the famous nickle of the metropolis. It proved instructive and amusing and served for the time being to enliven the monotonous strain of this community.

Rev. L. Curtis, M.A., D.D. took the services at the Methodist Church here on Sunday, Nov. 7th in the absence of the Pastor. His sermons were of the highest order. In the night he preached, “Name of Christ” and by the force of logical argument he drew out many edifying lessons on the superiority of Christ to the greatest of humans beings.

Dr. Curtis yesterday in his capacity of Superintendent of Methodist Schools examined the day school in this mission and expressed himself as pleased with the result. During the services on Sunday he urged upon the people the great need for the loyal and regular support of the glorious cause of education.

A short while ago Mr. Thompson, Sub-Inspector of C.E. schools, visited and examined the three schools in this place and encouraged teachers and pupils with eulogy, their work being uncommonly successful, the only thing he regretted was the small attendance, the rest of the pupils being needed for fish curing.

The Lord Bishop of the diocese in the hope of encouraging Scriptural study, has offered a prize of ten dollars to that school from Goose Bay to Cape Freels, which the Inspector judged most proficient in knowledge of the Acts of the Apostles and the Order of Morning Prayer. The High School won the prize and it is justly proud of the same.

The Council of Higher Education has undoubtedly done a deal of good for the cause of education in Newfoundland, yet in common with a great many, we think that it can do much better by an adjustment of the syllabus to the need of the country. The subjects permitted to be taken should be reduced to at least 7 or 8, whereas now they stand at 10; and choices should be made from such a list as this: English, Hygiene, Arithmetic, all compulsory; Geography, Commercial Correspondence, Book-keeping, Chemistry, type-writing, Shorthand, Agriculture (boys alone); Domestic Economy Sewing etc. (for girls alone). The subject is very interesting and most important and worthy of the greatest consideration.

Greenspond, Nov. 19th, 1907"

November 23, 1907 WEDDING BELLS CORBETT — SULLIVAN: The wedding of Mr. Walter Corbett of Chapel’s Cove to Miss Maria Sullivan, daughter of Cornelius and Anastasia Sullivan of Harbor Main, took place at the Church of the Holy Redeemer, Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, November 8th at 7 p.m. The bride was dressed in white net with bridal veil and orange blossoms and carried a bouquet. The maid of honour was her sister, Miss Sullivan. She was dressed in white and pink de soie. The groom was supported by his brother, Mr. John Corbett. After the ceremony a reception was held at 119 Harvard Street, where the bride and groom were the recipients of many presents, pleasing testimonials of the esteem and affection in which they are held by a large circle of friends. The assembled guests enjoyed themselves until the bright hours of morning, when they departed, wishing every happiness to the newly wedded pair.
November 23, 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home leaves Bay of Islands this morning. Glencoe arrived at Placentia at 8 a.m. yesterday. Virginia Lake left King’s Cove at noon yesterday. Clyde left Fogo at 7 p.m. yesterday, inward. Ethie left Catalina at 5 p. m. yesterday, outward. Dundee left Port Blandford at 4 p.m. yesterday. Argyle left Marystown at 4 p.m. yesterday, inward.

Bowrings: Portia left Greenspond at 1.15 p.m. yesterday, going North. Prospero left Marystown at 3.10 p.m. yesterday, coming East and is due this midnight."

November 23, 1907 BRUCE PASSENGERS The S.S. Bruce arrived at Port aux Basques at 8.30 a.m. yesterday, with the following passengers: G.M. Knight, H.T. McCoubrey, J.M. McCoubrey, W.G. Dalton, Miss M Hynes, T.H. Deen, J.H. Cole, C F. Levey, in saloon and 31 second class. The express is due at 1.30 this afternoon.
November 23, 1907 THE LATE WALTER S MARCH "It is with sincere sorrow that we refer to the death of Mr. Walter S. March which occurred early yesterday morning after a prolonged illness, at the age of 35 years. The late Mr. March was a young man of marked ability, and had his life been spared, would have without doubt, made his mark on the world. As a young man he was interested very greatly in fish culture, and was associated with the late Adolph Nielson in the management of the fish hatchery at Dildo. This subject he made a special study of, and his writings in connection with it were a valuable contribution to the literature of the subject.

Later he took a position with his brother-in-law, Mr. MacGregor in his Water Street business, but commerce offered few attractions to him. His bent was essentially literary, and when there was a vacancy in the Editorship of the Daily News, he was offered and accepted the position. About this time his eyesight began to give out, and change of occupation became necessary as the night work proving too great a tax up on him. A few months later he established the “Western Star” with headquarters at Bay of Islands which paper he conducted with credit to himself and with value to the West Coast. Whilst at Bay of Islands he married Miss Florence, only daughter of the Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite. Subsequently he came to St. John’s, joining the staff of the Reid Newfoundland Company, where he held the position of Travelling Passenger Agent.

At the beginning of the year, his malady assumed an acute form, and few men have suffered as he has done. A minor operation was performed, and some months ago he went to Montreal for special treatment. He returned however, little benefited, and since then the spark of life has been waning constantly, with occasional slight recoveries. He has now passed where there is no more pain.

The late Walter S. March was the only surveying son of Levi March, Esq., J.P. of Bay of Islands, who arrived in the city on Thursday’s express, and had the mournful satisfaction of being with his unconscious son during the dying moments. To Mr. and Mrs. Levi March this blow will come with terrible force, mitigated only by the knowledge that the suffering has terminated with the life. Mrs. MacGregor is a sister. To the young widow to whose devotion and tender ministrations the prolongation of her husband’s life for many months was largely due, and to the friends and relatives, we extend sincere sympathy. The funeral will take place on Sunday afternoon at 2.30 o’clock from the residence of his brother-in-law Dr. H.H. Cowperthwaite, 241 Duckworth St."

November 23, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Dr. Mitchell, whose horse and wagon came to grief a few days ago, is now taking action against the Council for $250.

The Shore train arrived at 10.20 last night bringing: Dr. Bullard, B. Chown, E.R. Burgess, Rev. McDermott, W.A. Munn and about 30 other passengers.

The fine dwelling house at the corner of York and Cochrane Street lately advertised for sale, has been purchased by Miss Parsons, Summer Hill, Torbay Road.

Five prisoners were arrested by the Police last night and lodged in the lockup. Two men arrested for being drunk, one drunk and disorderly, one drunk while in charge of a horse, and one drunk given in charge by a relative.

Yesterday morning, Mrs. Ann Myler one of the oldest residents of the city, died at her home, Chapel Street, after a short illness. Deceased who had reached her 81st year, had all her faculties almost up to her death, and a few months ago, was able to be about the house. Messrs James and Patrick Myler of this city, and William Myler of Boston, Mass., are home. Interment takes place tomorrow afternoon.

A number of young men of the Avalon Variety Company will shortly present a drama entitled, “Man to Man” in the British Hall. Most of the performers have been before the public on former occasions and as there have been no theatrical performance in the city for some time, owing to all the halls having been taken up by moving picture shows, it is anticipated that it will be a success.

The fishery in St. Mary’s Bay this season, was good, a favour that was badly needed in that section, where operations the last three years were very indifferent. Many master fishermen who undertook to buy out their crafts during those years, were unable in consequence to do so, and had to relinquish their ventures or sink more deeply in debt, and they wisely chose the former alternative. Herring struck into Placentia and St. Mary’s Bays the past spring — a return after many years absence, indicating that the staple fish would follow, as has been realized. Along the Cape Shore of St. Mary’s Bay, at Branch and contiguous harbors, the open boat fishery was extra fine, and at Golden Bay, the bountiful trap-net fares justified the flattering appellative.

The Virginia Lake will make another trip to Labrador, going as far as Hawke’s Harbor.

The S.S. Home on her last trip, reports having experienced fine weather, though at times it was intensely cold.

The C.L.B. band of music have another treat in store for their patrons. They are practising a beautiful Bridal March from Wagner’s Lohengin.

The two men who were caught stealing the tub of sounds from the schooner Crown at Smith’s wharf, was before the Magistrate yesterday, and the charge being proven, both were sent down for two months.

Capt. John Prince of Seal Cove, B.B., arrived yesterday in his schooner, laden with another cargo of freight to his merchant. Though over seventy-three years old, the veteran fish killer commanded his schooner in person, on the Labrador last summer, and did well, his catch being well cured and fetching a fancy price. He has besides, collected and freighted two thousand quintals of the staple to his merchants here.

The lumber mills at Glenwood and Norris’s Arm will soon close work. Almost all the lumber has been cut up and shipped, and the men will go in the woods logging.

A Chief of Staff of one of our leading Merchants, states that scarcely half their dealers have yet arrived, and as this applies in the same degree to the other exporting Merchants, the outport business will run into the Christmas Season, so that a pretty heavy trade is before the Water Street dealers for the next six weeks.

The banking Captain William Courage, of the Escex-built Oak schooner, Marshal W. Adams, owned by Captain John Smith of Harbor Breton, took passage on the Portia yesterday for his home in Catalina. The schooner stocked eleven thousand four hundred dollars ($11,400) for her season’s banking. She commenced early in April."

November 23, 1907 DEATHS "MARCH — On Nov. 22nd, Walter S. March, aged 35, Travelling Passenger Agent, Reid Nfld Co. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from No. 241 Duckworth Street.

MYLER — On Friday morning Nov. 22nd, Annie, relict of the late William Myler, aged 81 years, leaving three sons and a large number of relatives to mourn their sad loss. Funeral on Sunday at 2.30 p.m. from her late residence, No. 2 Chapel Street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend — R.I.P. "

November 25, 1907 BIG WAGES FOR FISHERMEN John Power’s boat commanded by P. Murphy of Little Placentia, has just completed the season’s fishery voyage, and landed 516 quintals caught on St. Mary’s grounds. In the boat were five men, two dories being used, and these were paid off with $301. each. A. O’Reilly’s crew in Davis’ boat, also from Little Placentia, did even better, the men sharing $360 for their season’s work. This is one of the biggest bills ever made in Placentia Bay, or by any Newfoundland fishing crew. Others of the Cape St. Mary’s fleet, also went over the $300 mark.
November 25, 1907 FISH PLENTIFUL IN ST. MARY’S BAY During last week in St. Mary’s Bay, fish and herring were plentiful, but particularly at Salmonier. Herring can be caught daily for bait purposes, and when the weather is fine, large catches of cod are taken. Friday last, there were four dories out from Salmonier trawling, with a supply of fresh herring for bait, and after a few hours, secured thirteen quintals of fish between them. If the weather continues fine the prospects for the fishermen in the locality are bright.
November 25, 1907 SCHOONER CAMPANULA MEETS ACCIDENT The banking schooner Campanula, Collins, while on her way from St. Lawrence to Sydney, struck one of the recent storms and had a hard time riding it out. One heavy squall struck her with such force that it carried away her foremast and foresail, and almost threw her on her beam ends. When she righted, temporary repairs were effected, and she continued on to Sydney. At the latter place a new foremast is being made, and when the damages are replaced, she will load coal for one of the Western ports.
November 25, 1907 COLLISION IN NARROWS Yesterday morning, the schooners S.A. Parkhurst, William Hunt, Greenspond, and Bessie R., Waterman, Change Islands, were in collision while beating in the narrows. The Parkhurst had just tacked towards the South Head, and was up in the wind, when the jibboom of the Bessie R. struck her mainsail, tearing it badly. The bowsprit of the Bessie came in contact with the main boom of the Parkhurst and snapped it off at the taffrail. Had the Parkhurst been a few feet further astern, the other schooner would have struck her on the quarter, and possibly cut her down below the water line, as she was deeply laden with fish and oil. The damage to the sail and boom will cost about eighty dollars to replace. The crew of the Parkhurst claim that it was the fault of those on board the other schooner, and Capt. Hunt will endeavour to recover damages.
November 25, 1907 TERRIBLE ACCIDENT AT GLACE BAY (Exclusive to Daily News) Glace Bay, Nov. 24th. — John Wall and William Ash, two Newfoundlanders, were terribly scalded at No.2 Colliery on Saturday. Wall died soon after the accident, after terrible suffering; Ash is likely to recover.
November 25, 1907 MR. CARTER INJURED BY EXPRESS WAGON Yesterday afternoon, Mr. Carter, Line Repairer with the Reid Company, had a narrow escape from death on Water Street, just above Steer Bros. Carter was crossing the car track as a car was coming East. One of the Company express waggons was going West at the time, and Carter, in trying to avoid the street car, fell underneath the wheels of the express wagon, which passed over his body. The driver picked him up and drove him to the Railway Station, where Dr. Paterson was called to attend him. The Doctor, on examination, found that three ribs were broken, and that his head and face was badly bruised. The injured man was sent home for treatment, and it will be some time before he will be able to resume work.
November 25, 1907 BOY OVERBOARD Yesterday morning, a young lad, Harold Lidstone, son of Engineer Lidstone, had a very narrow escape from drowning. It is customary for him to go around every Sunday morning in the Gower Street Church Mission Boat, distributing religious literature. He and his two companions in the boat, landed at George Neal’s wharf. The other two went to the West wharf and left him standing on the breastwork between the piers. Suddenly they heard a splash, and on returning back, young Lidstone was seen struggling in the water, having lost his balance and fallen in the Dock. One of the young men jumped in to the boat and quickly pulled him on board. Though chilled from his immersion in the cold water, he was nothing the worse for his sudden bath.
November 25, 1907 SCHOONER LOST WITH ALL ON BOARD. A FISH STORY. North Sydney, Nov. 20th — Capt. John Pike, this afternoon informed your Correspondent that he was told by another Captain, who arrived from the Ancient Colony lately, that a schooner commanded by Capt. Thomas Shaw, Bay St. George, Nfld., had been struck by a squall off Bay of Islands, and turning turtle, caused the loss of every one of the crew. The schooner is said to have been returning from Halifax, in ballast at the time of the tragedy. According to Capt. Pike’s informant, the cutter Fiona put off to the scene of the disaster, and succeeded in recovering the dead bodies of four of the schooner’s crew from her cabin. The other four sailors were washed overboard and drowned. At present, your Correspondent cannot ascertain the name of the schooner or any further particulars of the supposed awful disaster. — Sydney Record.
November 25, 1907 HERRING CATCHES AT BAY OF ISLANDS To date, the catch of herring taken at Bay of Islands is considerably larger than taken last year. The Gordon - Pew Company have loaded three schooners, about 6,000 barrels, with salt fish, and one with frozen cargo. These have sailed for market. Several others are loading frozen cargoes. These taking frozen herring are fitted out with artificial freezers, and the process of freezing is very simple. In the Middle and Humber Arms, big catches were made last week, and many of the fishermen made good wages.
November 25, 1907 PERSONAL "Dr. and Mrs. Guthro, of Wabana, arrived in town on Saturday. Mr. W.C. Winsor, M.H.A., arrived in town from Wesleyville, yesterday. Rev. H.J. McDermott, Congregational Missionary, Fortune Bay, is in town. Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite of Harbor Grace, is in town, having come over to attend the funeral of the late W.S. March.

Among the Rhodes scholars successful in the final honours at the schools, and the examination for B.C.L. degree, is S.M. Herbert, with honours in Jurisprudence.

Mr. R.H. Reid, who has been in Newfoundland the last six weeks in connection with pulp areas at Hawke’s Bay and the N.E. Coast, left for New York by yesterday’s express. It is understood that the proposition has been finalized, and in the spring, several large pulp mills will be erected on the property. Mr. J.J. Murphy and his associates who are interested in the matter, are to be congratulated."

November 25, 1907 NAUTICAL Schooner Resolute, Jacob Winsor, Wesleyville, arrived at 6 p.m. yesterday, laden with fish. Schooner Maggie Sullivan, Downer, sails today with a load of provisions for J.W. Hodge, Fogo. Schooner H. Fenwick, Green, arrived from Sydney Saturday with coal to Kennedy, Mullaly & Co. S.S. Smyra is expected to leave Montreal today for this port. She is a large steamer and will bring about 20,000 barrels of flour. This will be the last direct boat tfrom Montreal for the season. Capt. Matthews arrived at North Sydney on Thursday to take charge of the schooner Hispanola, as soon as she comes off the slip. She will load coal for York Harbor, and on her return take a second load of black diamonds to St. Lawrence. Capt. Kennedy returns home for the winter.
November 25, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Mr. Doolan of Perry Harbor Road, lost a fine horse Saturday from colic. It was valued at $80 and is a severe loss to the owner at this season.

Capt. Baxter Barbour’s schooner Portia, arrived in port yesterday commanded by John Blackwood, after a quick run from Brookfield B.B. The Portia is loaded with fish and oil.

A number of schooners left early yesterday morning for Northern outports, but finding the wind unfavourable outside, most of them returned. Several new arrivals also entered port yesterday.

From Bonne Bay to Burgeo, the hills were covered with snow to the water’s edge, when the Prospero was coming along. From Burgeo to Burin, the high hills were whitened, but from the latter place to St, John’s, not a bit of snow was visible.

When the Virginia Lake was at Battle Harbor coming South, boats were jigging plenty of fish just outside the harbor.

Capt. House who was in Hartigan’s banker out of Mortier Bay, arrived by the Prospero. Capt. House landed 1,300 quintals for the season.

The weather along the line yesterday, was fine right through. It continued so last night, the last report being: Port aux Basques, N.W., light, fine 32 above. Bay of Islands, calm, dull, 35 above. Quarry, N.W., light, fine, 17 above. Bishop’s Falls, S.W., light, dull, 24 above. Clarenville, calm, fine, 32 above. Whitbourne, calm, fine, 35 above.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: B. McGrath, J. Murphy, R.H. Reid, G. Arnold, A. Doblenberg, John Cousins, J Green, W. Hiscock, W. Churchill, J. Dawson, Dr. Stewart, Mrs. John X Cameron, W. Butt, F. Milly, W.J. Ownes, F. Hawkins, G. Dawe, F. Donovan, P. Blandford, J.C Southerby.

Saturday night, an outport man was assaulted near the Railway Station by two hooligans, and badly served. One of the ruffians hit the visitor without provocation, a severe blow in the face, breaking two teeth and badly cutting him about the mouth. Watchman Kennedy telephoned for the Police, but when they arrived, the man’s assailants had fled. Nightly, a gang of those useless citizens gather around the Station, and an occasional visit of an Officer in plain clothes, would do a world of good.

A man named Osmond of North West Arm, New Bay, lost a purse a few days ago, containing upwards of forty dollars. Saturday, two little boys playing around the lumber in the Empire Woodworking Co.’s yard, picked up the money. Being too young to know its value, they used it to at play, and lost a great portion of it. One of them gave an older boy a five dollar gold piece, saying it was a cent. When it was discovered what the children had been playing with, as much as possible of the money was recovered and restored to the owner.

The Virginia Lake reports the S.S. Kite narrowly escaping being frozen in at Gillesport, Labrador for the winter. The Kite proceeded 100 miles up Grand River to land men and supplies for the Grand River Pulp and Lumber Co., and while there, a heavy frost came on, freezing her up. After considerable butting however, she managed to get free, and when she got down the river, ice was making on Rigoulette Harbor. The Kite is now at Cape Charles taking on board whale oil and guano from the factory, and will be leaving today for here.

The Marconi Wireless Telephone Operators from all the Labrador Stations except Battle Harbor, arrived Saturday by the Virginia Lake. The Operator at Battle Harbor, Mr. Gordon Smith, will leave there by the Home on her next trip. Mr. G.E. Clegg of the Domino Station, goes to North Sydney; Mr. R.T. Rennie, Venision Island Station, will proceed to Cape Race; Mr. Hood from American Tickle, will take up duty at Cape Ray; Mr. Barret, Indian Harbor, spends the next few months at his home, Bay Roberts; Mr. H. Burrows, Superintendent of the Labrador Stations will join the staff in Sydney.

A message was received by a prominent Business Man of the city on Saturday forenoon, stating that the premises of Mr. John F. Roach, J.P., of Branch, St. Mary’s Bay, has been burnt down. Mr. Roach conducted a general business in merchandise, fish, oil etc.

The funeral of the late Walter S March took place yesterday afternoon, at the General Protestant Cemetery, and was largely attended. Mr. Levi March, Magistrate at Bay of Islands, and Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite, father and father-in-law respectively, were chief mourners, Mr. MacGregor and Dr. Hunter Cowperthwaite, brother-in-law , following. The service was conducted by the Revs Mark Fenwick, C. Hackett and F.R. Matthews, B.A.

The schooner Minnie Gladys, Thomas Smith, arrived yesterday from Norman’s Cove with a load of fish, oil, wood and hoops.

The funeral of the late Mrs. William Myler took place yesterday and was largely attended. At the Cathedral, the prayers for the dead were recited by His Grace Archbishop Howley; interment was at Belvedere.

An iron rudder weighting 5 ½ tons, for the sealing steamer Eagle, came by the S.S. Siberian, and 28 large and 11 smaller iron girders, were brought for M. & F Kennedy, to be used at the entrance of the new extension of St. Bonaventure’s College.

At 11.30 Saturday night at the foot of Long’s Hill, Horwood’s grocery express collided with a street car. The express was coming down the hill and the driver did not see the street car until it was too late. The horse was thrown down and both shafts of the wagon broken off. The driver had a close call but with the exception of a few bruises, was uninjured.

There were three funerals at the R.C. Cathedral at the one time yesterday. His Grace Archbishop Howley officiated.

A sum of money was stolen from a Western craft now in port, Saturday night, during the temporary absence of the crew. The matter was reported to the Police. A Detective was detailed to hunt up the culprit, who if caught, will get the full penalty of the law.

Eight persons were brought to the lockup by the Police Saturday night, and one yesterday. Two of these were given in charge by their wives for being drunk, and the others were drunk only. Three were given their liberty yesterday, on making the usual deposit as a guarantee for appearance at the Magistrate's Court this morning.

Yesterday forenoon, an inebriated was arrested by Constables Hann and Tobin. When taken in charge, he kicked, and the scene that followed was disgraceful, particularly on a Sunday morning, when citizens were going to and coming from Church. The unfortunate man had to be handcuffed and dragged to the Station. This morning he will answer before the Magistrate for his misconduct."

November 26, 1907 THIEF CAPTURED BY DETECTIVE BYRNE Last evening Detective Byrne captured a young man, who is charged with stealing a lot of furs, valued at about $1,000. A man Gillingham arrived from Glenwood a few days ago, having with him a collection of fox, otter, martin, lynx and other skins. He put up at Ryan’s Boarding House, Water Street West, and yesterday, called at Steer Bros. to dispose of the furs, taking them with him in a bag. Whilst he was trying to make a sale, a man named Robertson, of Nova Scotia, who was also boarding at Ryan’s, and evidently knew the value of the skins, sneaked into Steers’ Store after Gillingham, and while the later was talking to Mr. Dove, went off with the bag containing the furs. When Gillingham missed them, he reported the matter to the Police, and Detective Byrne was put on the case. Suspicion rested on Robertson and a description of his person was given the Officer. Mr. Byrne called at R.G. Rendell’s and found the suspect in the act of trying to sell the skins. He was immediately put under arrest and the stolen property seized. The loss to Gillingham, had not Byrne acted so quickly, would have been great. Robertson will appear before the Magistrate this morning.
November 26, 1907 MAN MISSING FROM SCHOONER Zebedee Green, a passenger on the schooner Veronica, of Scilly Cove, T.B., is missing since Sunday night and it is believed that he has been drowned. Green, with the others on board, retired at 9 Sunday night, but as 4 a.m. yesterday, when one of the crew arose to go cooking, he was absent from his bunk. The matter was reported to the Skipper of the craft and an immediate search was instituted, but he could not be found. All yesterday forenoon, the members of the Veronica’s crew were dragging the dock, but to no purpose, and in the afternoon, Diver Glynn was down but failed to find the body. The missing man is supposed to have had about $200 on him when he left. This morning the search will be continued.
November 26, 1907 NEW MOTOR FISHING BOAT The new motor fishing boat owned by Mr. John Barron, is now being put in readiness for the prosecution of fishing during the winter months, and within a few days will be ready for work. She is a very staunch deck boat, almost as large as the ordinary Western boat, and is fitted with a gasoline engine, which will drive her at a speed of more than seven knots. She is lugger rigged, has a large spread of sail and in favourable weather, the engine will not be required. She has good quarters for the crew, which will comprise of three men. She will operate about 4 miles from land, and it is expected that the market will be kept stocked with fresh fish during the winter.
November 26, 1907 SILVIA HERE The S.S. Silvia, Capt. Farrell, arrived at 2.30 a.m., from New York and Halifax. She left Halifax at 5.30 p.m. Saturday, and met with fine weather all the way down. She brought a large quantity of freight for this port and several packages of mail matter. Ten passengers came by her, three in saloon and seven in steerage.
November 26, 1907 HOTEL ARRIVALS Crosbie — D.A. Ryan, King’s Cove; J.A. Chiquett, Quebec; S.L. Gibson, Toronto; Charles F. Lovey, Dartmouth, N.S.; T.K. Churchill, Toronto.
November 26, 1907 SAD FATALITY AT WABANA East Wabana, Nov. 25th — Edward Pendergast, an employee of Dominion Iron and Steel Co., was instantly killed on the Company’s Plant at 1.45 p.m. today. He was a Face Cleaner, working in No.2 mine, and at the time of the accident, was engaged taking down ore from the back slope. His body was at once taken to the surface, where the Doctor pronounced life extinct. As a consequence of the accident, all operations were suspended. The poor fellow was a native of Harbor Main, where his remains will be conveyed tomorrow for interment. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn him.
November 26, 1907 SUPREME COURT ON CIRCUIT Harbour Grace, Nov. 25th — In the case of the Crown vs. M.J. Hawker, charged with the larceny of $400, the property of Mrs. Solomon Penney, now Mrs. Janes, which sum had been entrusted to his care. The Grand Jury were instructed as to their duties by Chief Justice Sir William Horwood, after which the Jury retired and returned at 4 p.m. Their Foreman, James D. Munn, announced a True Bill. The trial will take place on Thursday. Hawker will be defended by F.J. Morris, K.C. In the case of Carson vs. Constable Dooley, an action to recover damages from the defendant for the shooting of a setter-dog, the plaintiff was non-suited. A.W. Knight, for plaintiff; W.J. McNeily for defendant.
November 26, 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Dr. Mahoney who was indisposed for a few days, is again able to be about and to attend to professional duties.

The S.S. Virginia Lake arrived from Labrador at 11.30 p.m. Friday, and left for St. John’s at 12.30 p.m. today.

Messrs. Lee and Tetford, Carpenters, are putting a new ceiling in St. Patrick’s Hall and effecting other repairs.

Mr. Griffin, Manager here of the Royal Moving Picture Co., left for St. John’s by this morning’s train. He is expected back on Monday.

Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite left by this afternoon’s train for St. John’s to attend the funeral of his late son-in-law, Mr. Walter S. March, which takes place tomorrow afternoon.

Messrs Munn & Co.’s schooner L E Young, Capt. Bartlett, Harbored at St. Lawrence on Thursday on her way to this port from Sydney with coal. She is expected here hourly.

Sunday December 1st being Children’s Day, the Sunday School Anniversary service will be held in the Methodist Church at 6.30 p.m. A special program for this service has been provided.

Rev. Mr. Richardson, Junior Methodist Minister at Carbonear, will occupy the pulpit of the Methodist Church here tomorrow, in the absence of the Pastor Rev. Dr. Cowperthwaite.

Messrs. R. Rutherford & Co., had several car loads of logs and lumber at the Railway Station yesterday, since when they have unloaded two cars. The remainder will be discharged on Monday. A cargo of framing and plank en route to this port, is now at Seldom Come By, and the firm expects to be able to supply orders for all kinds of lumber next week.

Crown Officer A.O. Hayward, arrived here Friday afternoon and put up at Gordon Lodge. The members of the Supreme Court on Circuit arrived from Brigus by this afternoon’s train, and went to the Gordon. His Lordship Chief Justice Horwood, who presides at the sessions of the Court next week, lodged at the residence of District Inspector Bailey.

The S.S. Adventure, Capt. Couch, arrived at 12.30 p.m. today from Sydney with coal to Messrs R. Rutherford & Co. This firm is taking from the ship, all the coal it can handle during the short time allowed to discharge. It is not definitely known how many schooners will take loads from the steamer, but the greater part of the cargo will be handled here. The steamer will be working four hatches on Monday and will average an output of 80 tons an hour.

My Dear Quills, — As you expressed a wish to be present at the next agricultural exhibition held here, I have much pleasure in informing you of the grand exhibition which will be opened to the public at the British Hall on Thursday night, Nov. 21st. If you can possibly attend, I urge you to come to town and take in the sights which I am certain will repay you for any trouble that your journey hither may occasion. Knowing the deep interest you always take in matters connected with agriculture and stock raising, I impress upon you the seriousness of any neglect, either on my part or yours, which may be responsible for your absence from the show, and so I have taken every precaution against delays, and am sending this letter by express, so that you can be ready to come when my carriage calls for you. Do not hesitate to come. I will give you a shake down at my place and drive you home next day. Your old friend, PILLS.

Upon reading this letter, Quills, all eagerness to see the promised sights, made all necessary preparations for the journey, and upon the arrival of the carriage next day, was driven to town, and soon after, found himself comfortably sitting in the parlour of his old schoolfellow, Pills. After tea, the two friends made their way to the British Hall, where the promised show was in progress.

“Why are you looking so puzzled Quills?” enquired his friend.

“I do not think I am puzzled Pills, but I fancy there is room for amazement when I read the hand-bill just furnished me.”

“Oh, never mind that,” curtly replied Pills. “Come along and let us see the wonders.”

“Not so fast,” interrupted Quills. ""Not a foot further will I go until you explain to me what all this emptiness means, what do you mean by bringing me here? You promised me to come to an agricultural show, I thought.”

“Well, no” chuckled Pills. “Not that exactly, but rather a cattle show.”

“A cattle show,” exclaimed Quills. “I should say it is a brazen show of effrontery, a barren simple show of concentrated check. Where is the calf with the two heads, the lamb with two heads and two-faced lamb? Show me these curiosities.""

“Monstrosities you mean,” suggested Pills. “Be patient and you will see them in due course.”

“Look here Pills, you promised to let me know when the Agricultural Society held its exhibition, and I thought when I received your letter I was in for a treat,” complained Quills. “I think you own me an apology for bringing me here on a fool’s errand.”

“Don’t be offended Quills, my dear fellow,” soothed Pills. “I’ll explain. I was deceived myself. I thought that as you seldom see much life in your out-of-the-way place of abode, it would be nice to have you up for a day. The fellows who advertised this show are strangers, and made the people believe that the animals described were real living animals, that moving pictures would be shown, that vocal and hand music would contribute to the concert, and that dancing would wind up the night’s entertainment. Now we find the animals are stuffed skins, that the moving picture machine, if it exists, is broken, and cannot be used; that a gramophone does duty for the promised vocals, and hand concert, and that the whole affair is a huge joke.”

“But”, said Quills, “These fellows should be punished for fraud, seeing that they have taken over $50 without giving the people anything like the worth of their money.”

“Well,” replied Pills, “I think the Island Cove woman hit the mark when she said, these fellows are not cheats. They are wise men who are travelling in search of fools.”

CORRESPONDENT, Harbor Grace, Nov. 23rd, ‘07"

November 26, 1907 DEATH OF MR. MOLLOY We chronicle this morning, the death of Mr. John J Molloy, Saddler, Long’s Hill, at 1.30 this morning, after a short illness. Deceased was taken ill Saturday last with heart failure, and though the best medical skill was obtained, it was impossible to save or even prolong life. Mr Molloy was well known in the city, and a few years ago, was very prominent in athletic circles, a widow and three children survive him, to whom the News tenders sympathy.
November 26, 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Portia is North of Baie Verte. Prosper sails tomorrow.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake sailed last evening for Labrador. Glencoe is due at Port aux Basques this morning. Clyde left Lewisporte yesterday a.m. going North. Ethie left Clarenville yesterday. Argyle left Placentia last evening on the Merasheen route. Dundee left Port Blandford yesterday a.m. "

November 26, 1907 GREENSPOND NEWS "William Burry of this place, passed peacefully away at the venerable age of 67 years, on Thursday, Nov. 21st. At the fishery this summer, he contracted the fatal disease, cancer of the liver. It was not until he was forced by others , that he remitted from his work; he was an ideal Newfoundlander, of a genial and modest disposition, and was loved and respected by all who knew him. William Burry was a man – he did his duty to his God, whom he so devoutly loved and faithfully served; to his fellows, and to himself, and he now swells the number, gathered into the Lord’s garner. He was a hero, bearing his painful illness without a murmur; he could, with the Psalmist exclaim, “If thou, Lord, were extreme to mark what is done amiss, then Lord, who may abide it.” He met death as a friend, it has borne him to the Course of Paradise. Greenspond has lost a great citizen, but his work on earth is finished, and he has passed to his reward. He is mourned over by many, and leaves behind a wife, the personification of all that is good and true; six sons and daughters, five of whom are married; several grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. May they find in God the comfort that He alone can give.

The annual Missionary Meeting of St. Stephen’s Church, was held last night, and was attended by a goodly number, though the weather was somewhat inclement. The speakers were the Revs. T. Upward, of Newtown and E.E. Rusted of Salvage. The service was very enthusiastic and stirring right through. Mr. Upward treated the subject, ”Christianity Among the Red Indians”, and handled it in a most neat and capable manner. Rev. E.E. Rusted dwelt on, “Missions in China” and enlightened many on this subject. His reference to the late Boxer rising was most pathetic when thousands of native Christians, rather then recant to the brethren faith, were put to death in most horrible ways. He paid a glowing tribute to the zeal of the Chinese Christians and said that a great drawback to Missionary success was the —? (missing) and lack of zeal of many Christians, who have known the faith of Christ since babyhood. He closed with a stirring appeal for increased support to the glorious cause of Foreign Missions.

G.C. Greenspond, Nov. 23rd."

November 26, 1907 FOGO NEWS "A winter like appearance, ground covered with snow and hard frost, are the weather conditions prevailing here at the time of writing.

A young man was recently cited before Acting Magistrate Scott, and being convicted of the offence, was fined five dollars for furiously driving a catamaran with two dogs attached.

The S.S. Annie towed a wrecked schooner from Change Islands to this port. The damaged craft was purchased by Messrs Earl and will be repaired here during the winter by Mr. John Jones.

Earle’s fish vessel, laden with 3,500 quintals codfish, sailed this evening for market. There are several cargoes of the staple still remaining in the merchants’ stores, most of which will be shipped away before navigation closes.

The schooner Nina Pearl, belonging to Capt. Ambrose Payne, is still in the hands of the Carpenters — damages sustained by contact with the rocks, being more serious than that at first anticipated.

Schooner Exotic, William Oke, Jr., is discharging a load of lumber at Hodge’s.

Coal and wood are both very scarce at present, and people are beginning to look upon the fuel supply for the coming winter with some anxiety. It is to be hoped that our enterprising merchants will face the problem and secure adequate stocks of the necessary articles before the season closes.

Telegraph Offices at Tilton Harbor and Joe Batt’s Arm are in course of erection, and their completion may be looked for in the near future. The mails for the past month, have been anything but satisfactory. We would respectfully remind those in authority that the proper management of our mail service, especially at this time of the year, is of utmost importance to people in this district. The Portia which left St. John’s on the 8th Nov., arriving here on the 10th., brought no mail for this place. As a consequence, other methods had to be employed to get mails forward, which were supposed to be at Wesleyville. The Annie was despatched to Wesleyville, but having gone part the distance, was ordered back — the mails in the meantime being located at Lewisporte. Mails which should have been put on board the Portia at St. John’s and reached here on the 10th, did not arrive till the 13th. This is only one instance — but one of many — which emphasises the necessity to greater care being given to the forwarding of mail matter.

Fogo , Nov. 18th, 07"

November 26, 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Cacouna sails tomorrow for Sydney. S.S. Harmony will sail for London Friday. S.S. Siberian sailed at 12.30 a.m. on Friday. S.S. Rosalind arrived at Halifax at 1 a.m. yesterday. Barqt. Clutha, Joyce, sailed yesterday for Brazil fish laden.
November 26, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Four arrests for drunkenness were made by the Police last night

There were large catches of fish on the local grounds yesterday.

Yesterday was the busiest along the water front for sometime, thousands of quintals of fish being handled.

The Police are still looking for the persons who stole the money from the outpot schooners Saturday night.

Mr. Ready of Mortier Bay, will purchases a new banking schooner for next season. Capt. Healey will be given command.

The weather along the line yesterday, was calm and fine, last night it was cold, the thermometer at the Quarry dropping the lowest for the season.

The whaler Cachelot arrived from Hawk’s Harbor yesterday via King’s Cove. As already reported in the News she has given up the voyage for this season..

A fast mare imported by a Water Street business man by the S.S. Bonavista, has a trotting record of 2.16 1/4. She weights 1,000 lbs. and is a splendid looking animal. The owner will import a stallion at a cost of about $1,500. This improved stock will be used for stock breading purposes.

Many people complain of receiving small quarter tons and half tons of coal, and, as a result blame the coal dealer. In most cases it is not the dealer but the carman who makes the shortage. A few days ago, nearly a quarter of a ton of coal could be gathered up on Water Street West, and a pile was strewn along Queen Street. Many carman have carts with holes in them, through which the coal is alway dropping when they are carting it through the streets. The poor consumer has to bear the loss of his coal in silence.

The express arrived at 2.50 last evening, bringing: Dr. Leslie, Capt. English, R. Roberts, J.J. Taylor, and about 20 other passengers.

The schooner Abib, R.M. Hudson, is now loading at G. Neal’s wharf for Adam’s Cove, C.B. She is taking on board the last of the wharf sticks remaining from the estate of Martin Bros. These will be used in repairing the public wharf at Adam’s Cove, to strengthen it before the storms of winter approach.

The store of Miss White, Crossroads, was entered Sunday morning, and the cash drawer robbed of a sum of money, while her sister, whom she left in charge, was in another room. When she returned to the shop she saw the thief, who, finding that he was seen, escaped through the door and ran across the Mill Bridge and down the Southside, pursued by several boys. The culprit, a boy of about 15 years, it is said, is the son of a respectable citizen, and has been known to do some lifting in the past. Miss White will likely have the lad brought to justice.

The report that Capt. Thomas Shaw’s schooner had been lost with all hands, off Bay of Islands, is without foundation. The schooner is now at Bay St. George.

One case of scarlet fever on Gower Street was reported to the Health Office yesterday.

A number of outport schooners took advantage of the fine weather last night and set sail for their home ports.

Mr. J.L. Ross was cutting fodder with his horse and mower at his farm, Quidi Vidi Road Saturday, and Yesterday. It is rather late to be harvesting, just a week after hearing the first jingle of sleigh bells."

November 26, 1907 DEATH "MOLLOY — This morning after a short illness, John J Molloy, eldest son of Peter and the Late Mary Molloy. Funeral notice later.

BERESEFORD — At Gambo, on Saturday, the 23rd Nov. Philip Bereseford in the 37th year of his age. The deceased was well known and very popular at Gambo, where he has been conducting a successful business the last six years. Beside his mother and three brothers at Gambo, he also leaves three sisters to mourn him. One of his sisters being Rev. Mother Columbus, of the “Chicago Convent”. Many people all over Bonavista Bay, as well as his immediate friends at Gambo, will be very sorry to learn of the death of Phil Berseford."

November 26, 1907 THANKS Mr. Thomas Morrissey desires to thank Messrs Stephen Rodgers and Robert Downs for making his collections, and the other wharf employees of the firm of A Goodridge & Sons, for kindly subscribing on two occasions to the fund made up for him, during his recent serous illness.
November 27, 1907 PERSONAL Magistrate March who was in town to attend his son’s funeral, returned to Bay of Islands by last evening’s express. Mr. Samuel Adams of Great Burin who has been on a business visit to the city since Friday last, returns home by the S.S. Prospero this morning. Sir. R. Harvey who has been on a deer trip at Terra Nova and has been in town the last two weeks, left for England by the S.S. Carthaginian. An erroneous item in yesterday’s Free Press made it appear that Mr. Stephen Loveridge, who is in the city doing business for the firm of William Ashbourne, Twillingate, returned home by the Portia on Thursday last. This is not so. Mr. Loveridge is still in the city and does not expect to get through his multifarious duties until next week, and it will probably be ten days before he will be ready to leave for Twillingate.
November 27, 1907 PARTICULARS ON BELL ISLAND ACCIDENT Further particulars of the accident at Bell Island, Monday, through which Edward Pendergast lost his life, came to hand yesterday. Pendergast, who up to a few days ago had been employed at timbering, was working as Face Cleaner when the accident occurred. The duty of a Face Cleaner is to test the roof, sides and face of the slope after shots are fired, and to remove all the loose ore or rock, thus making the mine safe for the shovellers, drillers and others. Iron bars are used for testing the roof and digging down loose or dangerous looking ground. The hanging wall or roof at this part of the slope, was about fourteen feet from the floor. Pendergast was up a ladder placed against the side of the slope, working at the roof with a bar, when suddenly a large mass of ore, weighing about two tons, fell from the roof and brought him to the slope floor, killing him instantly. When picked up it was found that his skull was broken, the side of his face badly battered and one leg broken. Pendergast was a miner of experience having worked at Little Bay, Bett’s Cove, Tilt Cove, Workington and lastly at Bell Island. His age was about 50, and he has a son working at Bell Island with the same Company. Number 2 slope, where the faculty occurred, has an uncanny record for accidents and fatalities. Nearly all the accidents that have happened since the mines are working, have been in or near No 2 slope. Many miners have refused to work there thinking the place is unlucky.
November 27, 1907 UNDERGROUND MINING Work in the underground slopes at the Wabana Mine will be pushed briskly for the next few months, to replenish the stock piles which were greatly reduced by the shipments of ore the past summer. At the Dominion Co.’s mine, Nr. 2 stock pile has been all taken away and also a large quantity from the pile at No 1 slope.
November 27, 1907 STORM IN CONCEPTION BAY It was very stormy about Conception Bay last night, and a heavy sea hove in. At Spaniard’s Bay and Carbonear, there was a hurricane of wind and the S.S. Ethie was forced to harbor in the latter place, so fierce was the storm. Other parts of the bay the wind was also severe, it being at its height about 9 o’clock. A number of schooners that left here yesterday morning, most of them deeply laden, must have had a hard time during the night, though no doubt they all came through safely.
November 27, 1907 GOT TWELVE MONTHS The man Robertson, who stole the bag of furs from Esau Gillingham, as reported in yesterday’s News, was before the Magistrate yesterday, and was sentenced to a year imprisonment with hard labour. The prisoner said he had but little recollection of the happening, and was inebriated when he committed the theft. His Honour reminded him that drunk or sober he had no right to Gillingham’s property. The prisoner who is only 19 years old, is a seaman, and only recently arrived on the Lake Simcoe. His intentions were to go with Gillingham for the winter, trapping, and if he made a few good hauls as on Monday, he would soon be a millionaire.
November 27, 1907 HEALTH NOTES The case of scarlet fever reported Monday at 181 Gower Street, was sent to the Hospital Monday night; the house was disinfected immediately after the removal of the patient. A case of scarlet fever was reported from 64 Prescott Street yesterday. The patient will be nursed at home.
November 27, 1907 AT BELL ISLAND A number of men at Wabana Mines are now engaged at stripping, that is removing the surface deposit of clay from the ore bed. This deposit ranges from 2 to 6 feet in depth and has to be carted some distance; in places there are mounds built where the refuse is dumped, which are 20 and 30 feet in height. The work is preparatory to next season’s work, when operations will be conducted on a larger scale than heretofore.
November 27, 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North of Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake left King’s Cove at 11 a.m. yesterday, going North. Glencoe arrived at Port aux Basques at 5 p.m. yesterday. Dundee left Bonavista at 10 a.m. yesterday, outward. Clyde left Pilley’s Island at 1 p.m. yesterday, going North. Argyle left Sound Island at 1 p.m. yesterday going North. Ethie arrived at Carbonear at 1.40 p.m. yesterday.

Bowrings: Portia is north of Baie Verte. Prospero sails this morning taking a large quantity of freight and the following passengers. Rev. J Parsons, M.J. Fitzhenry, E. Kelland, J. Gibson, in saloon and 84 in steerage. "

November 27, 1907 NAUTICAL S.S. Halifax city was to leave Halifax yesterday for this port. S.S. Florence leaves London Saturday next for this port direct. Schooner Warewitch is now due from Philadelphia with a cargo of hard coal. Rourk’s schooner, Kenneth Victor, Dean, is now at Sydney, loading coal for Carbonear. Schooner Helene is loading general cargo at Harvey & Co.’s for Belleoram and Grand Bank. Bishop & Monroe’s schooner Nellie M., should be now nearing the Coast and is expected daily. Barqt. Rosina Johns, 42 days from Brazil in ballast, arrived yesterday to A. Goodridge & Sons. Schooner Randolph, Downey, has finished discharging fish at Franklin & Co.’s and will load provisions for Fogo. Schooner Helem M Stewart, Miller, 4 day from Alberton, P.E.I., arrived yesterday with a load of oats to George Neal. Schooner Montrose, Walters, 28 days from Kingston, arrived yesterday and is loading at Bowring Bros. for Brazil. She sails on Saturday. S.S. Adventure came over from Harbor Grace yesterday and anchored in the stream. When the Cacouna sails she will haul into A.J. Harvey & Co.’s wharf to discharge about 500 tons of coal, after which she returns to Sydney to load coal for this port.
November 27, 1907 CARTHAGINIAN HERE The S.S. Carthaginian, Williams, arrived yesterday forenoon from Philadelphia, after a stormy passage, head winds and high seas being experienced almost the entire distance. She brought 200 tons of cargo and 19 passengers. She sailed for Liverpool last night taking a quantity of freight and the following passengers; Sir R Harvey, Capt. Jensen, J.C. Bruce, B. Mostyn, Capt. and Mrs. McLear, in saloon, six intermediate and five in steerage.
November 27, 1907 WEATHER REPORT East from Badger Brook along the lines yesterday, it was raining and stormy; West from Badger there was a thick fog, but no rain. Last night the following reports were given. Port aux Basques, S.E., light, dull, 38 above. Bay of Islands, S.E., light, dull, 30 above. Quarry, N.E., light, foggy, 31 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.E., light, raining, 42 above. Clarenville, S.W., strong, raining, 30 above. Whitbourne, E., light, raining, 40 above.
November 27, 1907 HOTEL ARRIVALS "Crosbie – John Watson, Glasgow; James Functrion, Canada; W.H. Christian, Wabana.

Weverly – William Murphy, St. Mary’s."

November 27, 1907 CARBONEAR "Mr. Frank Parsons and family of Freshwater, have removed to Bonavista Bay, where they will in future reside.

A condemned fore and after, belonging to Messrs Duff & Sons, met her final resting place not long since by being utilized as a breakwater to the Eastward of the firm’s wharf.

Mr. Harold Maddock, Agent for the Messrs Maddock at Quirpon, Treaty Shore, arrived home by Tuesday’s express, having done a prosperous trade during the past season.

The Rose of Sharon, Rumson, Master, arrived to George Soper & Sons Tuesday, laden with provisions, etc. A capacious shop with basement built by Mr. Soper, is now being occupied by him for the storing of general merchandise.

Rev. William Finn of the Harbor Grace Cathedral, paid a brief visit here on Thursday.

Manager Williams and his staff are busily engaged this week making preparations for the street light service. About twenty bulbs of 32 candle power each will be used for the present, extending from the Railroad Crossing on the South Side to the town limits under Rock Hill. We understand a light will be placed at each of the Churches and halls also. The public no doubt will be well pleased with this new investment of their taxes.

At the S.A. Barracks on Thursday night, an immense supper was served by the ladies of the Army Corps. The small sum of 25 cents admission had the effect of drawing a large assembly of patronisers. The income from this special effort, will go towards extending the Army’s work.

The friends of Mr. Jno. Hamilton, a successful planter of this town, in partnership with his brother Michael, will exceedingly regret to hear that he is now a victim of insanity, and on Wednesday morning last was taken to the Lunatic Asylum. About an week ago, the unfortunate man first showed unmistakable signs of mental derangement, which at first was thought to be merely temporary. Day after day the case grew worse, until finally, medical opinion advised his friends to convey him to St. John’s. All who knew Jno. Hamilton must know that under normal circumstances he was one of the best of fellows. We sincerely hope that by the help of skilled treatment, he will regain his former measure of health, and that reason will enthrone itself again in due time

The interior of the Orange Hall has recently undergone a general cleaning up at the hands of an energetic committee appointed to the work. The committee and their friends may be seen daily this week practically preaching the Gospel of cleanliness, and as a result of their labours in this direction, the branch of the Order with which they are identified, can now boast of a meeting room second to none in the outport localities.

Unfavourable comment is being made of late on the “ups and downs” of the electric light. Whether the Telegram Correspondent of Harbor Grace is correct in attributing the cause to the fact of moving pictures shows at that place using the power to operate their machinery, we don’t know. The courteous Manager Mr. Williams, will no doubt remedy the evil, and bring things back to their former state of perfection.

The net proceeds of a basket party held under the auspices of the Ladies Aid, in the little town of Freshwater on the 14th Nov. amounted to $100. The system employed at these social gatherings for raising funds is somewhat of an innovation on the general methods used for swelling the Treasurer’s receipts, and might well be copied by more pretentious bodies, where finances are at low water mark. The new way is that each lady member is expected to fill one (or more) baskets with home made dainties, taking care to attach her name to the basket before sending it along to the hall. There a collection is made of all the baskets and an Auctioneer appointed to dispose of the goods. When the Auctioneer takes charge, the masculine gender takes over a monoply of the order of business in hand, and the result is that brisk bidding is put up. While as a matter of course, the highest bidder in each round has the honour of being the white headed boy. When he gets his prize, he casts a wishful eye on the attached ticket. Upon reading his fate he impatiently awaits the let up of the man with the hammer, when he makes haste to join his “better half” and the two share the joys of companionship, while making inroads on the contents of the wicker wood receptacle

The Bell Island tug Mary, arrived here Saturday night with passengers. She returns again Sunday night.

Leaves have their time to fall, and flowers to wither at the North winds’ breath; and stars to set — but oh, thou hast all seasons for thine ‘own O Death.

On Friday the 22nd Nov. there passed hence one of Carbonear’s most widely known Navigators in the person of Capt. Jno. Bransfield in the 56th year of his age. Up to within three years of his demise, he laboured in full harness of his seafaring avocation. His last ship to command was Messrs Rorke & Son’s’ clipper Lena, but during the past twenty-five years, he had been identified with other foreign going vessels both in St. John’s as well as here. The termination of the deceased Captain’s career was primarily due to consumption of the lungs, brought about it is thought, through successive colds incident to the calling of the sea. He is survived by a wife, mother, and children, the eldest son occupying a position of trust in the city. Interment took place Sunday afternoon at the R.C. Cemetery, at which a large number attended to pay their last tribute of respect.

CORRESPONDENT"

November 27, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "Rabbits were plentiful in the market yesterday and sold for 30 cents a pair.

The new schooner Mildred Keeping, will load fish at Job Bros. for Brazil within a few days.

The Alexander Street Ladies’ Aid are holding a sale of work in Victoria Hall tomorrow and Friday nights.

The schooner Helen Stewart, after discharging her cargo of provisions, will load fish at Crosbie & Co.’s for Brazil.

The machine to be used in the moving picture show at the T.A. Hall arrived by the S.S. Silvia and will be erected today.

The case of Arthur English vs. Capt. McLear was heard before Judge Conroy yesterday. English got a verdict for $6.50.

The man Green, who strayed away from the schooner Veronica, Sunday night, is still missing, and every hope of his being alive has been given up.

This afternoon at 3 o’clock, the St. Thomas’s Women’s Association will open their sale of Work, at the Parish Hall. During the afternoon, teas will be served and a concert will be given at 8 o’clock.

During the storm of last night, several houses on the higher levels were inundated, while window glass and chimneys also suffered. During the night the Council men were kept busy keeping the gullies clear.

The marriage of Mr. John Furlong, of Smithville, to Miss Margie Burke will take place at the home of the bride’s parents, Brigus, at eight this evening. The ceremony will be performed by the Very Rev. Monsignor Walsh.

A lot of new machinery will be installed at the works of the Dominion Iron and Steel Co., and the Nova Scotia Steel Co., at Wabana Mines, this coming winter. At the Nova Scotia Company’s mine, a new air compressor of the Walker type with Sterling boilers is being put up. This Company has two compressors already working, and with the extension of mining operations, it was found necessary to erect a third. An electric plant with two generators, will also be installed, and operated by steam from the Sterling boilers that supply the new compressors. The Dominion Iron and Steel Company will erect a new compressor of the same type, just to the East of the two compressors now in operation, and will also put in a second electric plant to further facilitate work in the underground parts of the mine

The shore train arrived at 11 last night having been delayed by a bad rail and picking up freight.

His Excellency the Governor and Suite will attend the performance of Her Great Match at the T.A. Hall on Friday night.

Work on the Reid Co.’s new rotary plow is going ahead rapidly, and it will be completed early in January.

The express last night, took out a large number of passengers, including; J. Paul, P Griffin, Miss Arnold, Miss M.E. Bishop, Miss Smyth, Magistrate March, B. Stein, Miss Dawe, Miss N Brophy, Capt. Bryton, J. Curtin.

The Dominion Iron and Steel Co. are preparing to open an underground slope at their West mine, Gully Pond Ridge, Bell Island. This is the first slope to be opened West though large quantities of surface ore have been taken from that section of the mines. The new slope will be known as number four.

The Police are still looking for the person who burglarized the schooners Saturday night, but the chances of their being found are very small."

November 27, 1907 DEATHS LYNCH — At Bishop’s Cove Nov. 18th Eliza Lynch, aged 60 years; leaving a husband, four sons, and three children to mourn their sad loss.
November 27, 1907 THANKS The Treasurer of St. Bonaventure’s Ladies Association acknowledges with thanks the sum of $92.72 being 50 per cent of the net proceeds of one week’s entertainment at the Five Cent Theatre. Cordial thanks are due the following ladies and gentlemen for their valuable assistance; Mesdames Hutton and T.H. O’Neill; Misses P. Jordon, M Bates, M. Furlong, A. Noseworthy, Prof. Hutton, Messrs. P.F. Moore, Leo C Murphy, J. Fewer, M. Skinner, T. Halley, J. Carter and L Carter. Also Masters J. Channing, B. Channing, and E. Rawlins and the Mount Cashel boys, who pleased all by their clever dancing.
November 28, 1907 HARBOR GRACE NEWS "Rev. G.T. Thibault of Conche celebrated High Mass at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Cathedral

Mr. James Fox, Sr., who was taken seriously ill about a fortnight ago, is steadily recovering from the effects of the attack.

Rev. James Lynch P.P., Northern Bay, who was in town last week, left for Carbonear on Saturday to join the S.S. Ethie for his Parish.

The Road Board has added to the railing along the embankment on Water Street, towards Bear’s Cove. This is an improvement, for the place was dangerous, but more rails are required before all danger to pedestrians is entirely obviated.

Messrs R.D. McRae & Sons’ schooner Clara, Capt. Falch, arrived from Europe on Saturday night 24 days from the Rock. This firm's schooner Eppie, Martin Kennedy, Master, arrived on Sunday from Brooklyn B.B., with a cargo of wharf timber, which will be used next spring in repairing McRae’s wharf.

The S.S. Virginia Lake en route to Labrador, arrived from St. John’s at 8 p.m. Monday, and left again at 11 p.m.

Mrs. Carroll, wife of Sub-Sheriff Carroll, is for a few days the guest of Mrs. E.B. Thompson, at Sunnybank.

Rev. Joseph McNeil who was supplying at the Presbyterian Church here, left for Annapolis by this evening’s train.

Lawyers F. Morris and R.A. Squires, and two Chartered Accountants from Reid & Co., St. John’s, arrived by yesterday’s train.

About noon yesterday, the men discharging the S.S. Adventure, struck for more pay. They were getting15 cents an hour and 20 cents an hour overtime. The difficulty was arranged after a short time, by the employers paying 20 cents an hour right along. Had steam been on the Adventure and the Captain on board at the time the men struck, the steamer would have left for St. John’s immediately, and the town would again be without coal. As a result of the strike, the price of coal here has advanced 20 cents per ton.

The S.S. Adventure, Capt. Couch, which brought coal to Messrs R. Rutherford & Co., left for St. John’s at 4.45 this morning. The following schooners took coal from the steamer: Flossie H., Western Bay; John Prince, Conception Harbor; Edmund, Snow Queen, Pilot, Brigus: Hope, Blackhead; Toledo, Rose of Sharon, Carbonear; Sarah Cluett, Port de Grave; Pointer, Freshwater: Minnie E., Strong, Harbor Grace. These vessels took 800 tons coal. About 1300 tons were taken from the steamer in 22 hours.

The Supreme Court on Circuit opened here at 11 a.m. on Monday, His Lordship Chief Justice presiding. The Grand Jury was in attendance. After preliminaries were arranged, His Lordship addressed the Grand Jury, instructing them in the various matters which would call for their attention, and requested them to make arrangements for the inspection of the jail. The case of the Crown vs. Manoah J. Hawler, was brought forward. Hawker was charged with the larceny of $400 the property of Mrs. Penney, now Janes, of Carbonear, South. This amount was held in trust by Hawker and it is claimed was unlawfully appropriated to his own use. Just before noon, the Grand Jury were released for a time, and were instructed to return to Court at 2.30 p.m. The hearing of several other cases was then arranged for. At 2.30 p.m. the Court was again sitting, and the Grand Jury having been further instructed in matters relating to the case of Crown vs. Hawker, it retired to the jury-room to deliberate upon the information laid before it. At 4 p.m. the jury returned to Court and through its Foreman, Mr. James D. Munn, a True bill against Hawker was announced. Hawker was subsequently admitted to bail. The case will be heard next Thursday, F. Morris, K.C., for defendant.

While the Grand Jury was deliberating in their room, the case of the Crown vs. Constable W Dooley was called. This was an action to recover damages for defendant shooting a setter dog belonging to plaintiff. The defence set forth that the dog was in a dying condition on Water Street, that plaintiff’s wife was aware of its being there, and did not have the animal removed, and that the Constable, acting under orders, shot the dog. Plaintiff’s counsel, Mr. Arthur Knight, endeavoured to show that although the dog at the time it was shot, was without a collar with the owners name thereon, setter dogs were exempt from destruction by the Police, according to the latest amendment of the Act. Eventually the case was non-suited. Mr. J.W. McNeilly for the defence.

CORRESPONDENT. Harbor Grace, Nov. 26th , ‘07"

November 28, 1907 COASTAL STEAMERS "Bowrings: Portia is still North of Baie Verte. Prosper sailed at 10 a.m. yesterday taking 20 saloon and 101 steerage passengers.

Reid Newfoundland Company: Home is North Bonne Bay. Virginia Lake left Tilt Cove at 3 p.m. yesterday, going North. Dundee left Wesleyville at noon yesterday inward. Ethie arrived at Wesleyville at 9.30 p.m. yesterday. Clyde left Tilt Cove at 1.40 p.m. yesterday inward. Argyle left Placentia last midnight going West. Glencoe arrived at La Poile at 4.40 p.m. yesterday."

November 28, 1907 WEATHER REPORT During yesterday forenoon it was stormy along the line. At 2 p.m. it moderated, and the conditions last night were: Port aux Basque, Calm, dull, 40 above. Bay of Islands, Calm, fine, 52 above. Quarry N.E., light, fine, 57 above. Bishop’s Falls, N.E., light, fine, 44 above. Clarenville, S.W., light; fine, 44 above. Whitbourne, Calm, fine, 40 above.
November 28, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "There was but little traffic on the local trains yesterday, only a few passengers going out and arriving.

It was foggy on the West Coast yesterday and last night, and the Glencoe was forced to harbor at La Poile.

The George Street Mission Circle are holding a tea and handkerchief sale in Buchanan St. School this afternoon.

Local dealers in correspondence with concerns in P.E.I. have been informed that he price for poultry this season will be considerable higher than last year.

Mr. P Stack of Petty Harbor had four fine salmon in his net yesterday, which he sold in town at 20 cents a pound. He has secured eight during the week, which has netted him over $20.

Kennedy Brothers are erecting a commodious and up-to-date dwelling house on Patrick St., for Mr. Thomas McCarthy, on a fine piece of freehold property recently purchased by Mr. McCarthy.

Passengers who arrived by last night’s train, say that fish is still plentiful in St. Mary’s Bay, and during the week, big catches have been taken on trawls at Salmonier. Herring are also reported plentiful.

Complaint is made that a pillar box in a certain part of the city is not cleared in the afternoon; thus a letter posted Thursday morning to leave the city by Thursday’s express would have to lie over until Sunday. A watch will be kept on the box for a few days, and if not cleared every evening, the matter will be reported directly to the proper authorities.

A lady coming down Freshwater Road yesterday afternoon, had a very narrow escape from serious injury. When passing the corner of Corbett’s house, an express wagon dashed around the corner, passing only a foot or so in front of her. Many of the express drivers appear to be seized with a desire for doing the corners neatly, apparently forgetful that some person many be coming along the sidewalk on the other side.

Within a few days, a large sum of money will change hands in connection with the recent pulp and lumber deal at Hawke’s Bay on the N.E. Coast.

At the C.C.C. armoury last night, Adjt. Carty read a letter from the committee asking that the band reconsider their resignation. The members of the band through Mr. J. Fox , decided to return to the Corps, under protest. The difficulty was a misunderstanding between the Commanding Officer and the bandsmen.

A disturber was arrested by the Police last night, for breaking furniture and dishes at the house of his aunt on Pleasant Street. Only a short time ago, he was released from the Penitentiary after serving a term. Last night, after getting filled with bad liquor, he started to make things lively until arrested by the Police.

H.M.S. Brilliant is now at Halifax, on her way South, having arrived there yesterday. H.M.S. Indefatigable is also at Halifax, on quarantine. As already stated, several of her crew are suffering from yellow fever, and she has come to Northern climes for the crew to recuperate. It is likely that she will come on these water for a few months.

Five prisoners were arrested by the Police last night; three drunks, one drunk and disorderly and one drunk and making a disturbance at his home.

Rev. Dr. Robertson cabled to the officials of Fort Massey Church, Halifax, on Tuesday, declining the call recently extended. The matter now rests in the hands of the Presbytery to pronounce upon. It is gratifying to know that the valuable service of Dr. Robertson are to be retained in our midst.

A slight fire occurred at the Horwood Lumber Co., Match Factory, yesterday morning, caused by some material igniting by being to near the furnace. The Western Fire Station was telephoned and Chief Kane came down and helped to extinguish it. The Brigade was not called out and no damage resulted from the blaze.

Mr. Gibson of Toronto left by the Portia yesterday, to inspect the steam plant at Cape Race Station.

The funeral of the late John J Malloy takes place at 2.30 this afternoon from his late residence Long’s Hill.

A peddler named Johnston was before the Magistrate yesterday afternoon, charged with stealing $18 from two different persons. Johnston denied the charge and was remanded for eight days pending further evidence.

If ice and weather conditions allow, the Virginia Lake will go as far North as Rigoullette this trip. The people of Labrador will be isolated from the outside world after the Virginia Lake comes South, until June next."

November 29, 1907 SCHOONER OLIVE BACK FROM FIGUEIRA The schooner Olive, Fitzgerald, 31 days from Gibraltar, arrived in port yesterday. From Cape St. Vincent to this port the run was made in 21 days, fine weather being met almost the entire trip. As already recorded in the News, Mate McCarthy was lost overboard while the Olive was at Figueira. He was ashore with the Cook, Joseph Rogers, and they had been together for some time. Both left to joint the ship, and when near the pier, Rogers left him to go to a store to get some parcels he had left behind earlier in the night. When Rogers came back, he missed McCarthy, and asked the Spanish Watchman on the Olive if he had seen him. The Watchman replied in the negative. A few minutes later he learned that a man had fallen into the dock and on investigating, found it was his friend McCarthy. The dock Police had rescued the man, and after resuscitating him, sent him to Hospital. Rogers visited him there and returned to the ship thinking matters would br O.K. At 8 next morning, Capt. Fitzgerald was informed that his Mate died during the night. According to the Cook’s story, the unfortunate man tripped over a rope that went across the pier, and was precipitated into the water. Where he fell a big sewer passed out, and it is believed that he had swallowed some matter that was coming through, as when the autopsy was held, poison was found in the stomach. Deceased lived several hours after being rescued, and was quite conscious.
November 29, 1907 NOT GUILTY HAWKER RELEASED "(Special to Daily News) Harbor Grace, Nov. 28th — The trial of the King vs. Manoah J Hawker charged with fraudulent conversion of the sum of four hundred dollars, commenced at 10 o’clock this morning. The evidence for the Crown concluded at 1 p.m. After recess, evidence for the defence began. At 4 p.m. Counsel addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant. McNeily followed for the prosecution. The jury retired at 6 p.m. and returned at 7.40 with a verdict of “Not Guilty”. The Court thereupon ordered the discharge of the accused.

CORRESPONDENT "

November 29, 1907 QUICK TRIP FROM OPORTO The schooner Percy Roy, Courtney, arrived in port yesterday evening, after a remarkably quick passage of 14 days from Oporto. Fine weather and favourable winds were met with most of the time, which accounts for the splendid run made. On the outward part of the voyage she crossed from this port to Oporto in 15 days. The Percy Roy is a splendid sailer, and is a fine sample of the better class of schooner which is being introduced, displacing alike the old style square rigger and the small class of fore -and after. Vessels of this class are suitable for either the fishery or foreign voyage. She has on board a cargo of salt for G.M. Barr.
November 29, 1907 RESERVISTS DID NOT GO SOUTH Yesterday’s express brought back fifteen Reservists, that left here on the Brilliant to put in the regular course. At Halifax it was stated to them the the Brilliant was going South to relieve H.M.S. Indefatigable, whose crew had been suffering from yellow fever, and the Reservists were asked to volunteer. Those who declined we learn, decided to return to St. John’s and came back accordingly. Upon arrival of the express they boarded the Calypso and reported to Capt. Ines.
November 29, 1907 CAPTAINS CHANGE There has been a change of Captains made in the employ of A Goodridge & Sons. Capt. Dillon of the brig. Mayflower, has been given command of the barqt. Rosina, and Capt. Johns has been transferred to the Mayflower. It is also said that some changes will be made in the shipping line of the firm after the arrival of some others of their vessels.
November 29, 1907 HOTEL ARRIVALS "CROSBIE — Judge Seymour, Harbor Grace; John P. Halliburton, Bonne Bay; S. Roberts, Change Islands; Henry Bosworth, New York.

WAVERLY — F.C. Jerret, Brigus; John Colbourne, Bell Island; Miss Pearl Colbourne, Bell Island; William Budgell, Bell Island."

November 29, 1907 WEST COAST NEWS "(From the Western Star) A number of Fox, lynx, otter and mink skins have lately been purchased by Mr. Francis Beguin, Stephenville Crossing. Among the collection are four good fox skins, for which he expects to realize $1,000. Mr. Beguin intended going to Canada Monday, where he hoped to dispose of the skins

The American vessel Senator Gardner, Capt. V. Nelson, with 1,300 barrels of salt herring, arrived at Gloucester on the 17th Nov., being the first vessel to reach there this season from Bay of Islands. The Lunenburg vessel Minnie M. Cook, Capt. Colp, with 1,214 barrels herring, arrived there on the 18th. Both these vessels sailed from here on the same day, the latter having a start of several hours, but was delayed by calling at Lunenburg.

The summer resort known as the Bunglow, at Grand Lake, has been closed for this year, and the proprietors returned to England on Friday. The season was a profitable one, as more tourist, health seekers, and sportsmen, visited that region than last year, the first season the Bunglow was opened. Its proprietors are hopeful of next year going still more profitable for them.

The S.S. Harlow arrived from Halifax, Thursday night, bringing a large consignment of goods for various dealers. While here, the Harlow took on board several thousand feet of lumber at Corner Brook for Bonne Bay, to which port she went on Saturday and returned here Monday evening. She sails for Halifax today, taking hence a large shipment of herring. The agency of this steamer has lately been given to Bagg Bros. and in the near future, her freight for Bay of Islands will be handled in Birchy Cove."

November 29, 1907 HOME REPORT The steamer Home, arrived Thursday evening. She made a very good run on her last trip having encountered fine moderate weather. She reported just a sprinkling of snow on the Northern mountains, but all the small ponds have been frozen over the past fortnight. A few fishermen at Battle Harbor and vicinity are still hand lining and make good catches of cod fish when the weather is suitable to get on the grounds. The whaler at Hawk’s Bay secured one fish last week. Whales are now getting scarce in the Straits, and the factory will likely be closed down shortly. The home brought several hundred quintals of dry cod fish, some herring, and a boiler and engine from York Harbor, as inward cargo. She sailed Saturday afternoon taking a small outward freight. — Western Star.
November 29, 1907 WEATHER REPORT Along the line yesterday forenoon, the weather was a bit stormy, but in the afternoon there was a change, the conditions being very much favourable and milder. Last night reports were: Port aux Basque, Calm, fine, 39 above. Bay of Islands, N.W., strong, fine, 29 above. Quarry, N.E., light, stormy, 30 above. Bishop’s Falls, W., light, fine, 34 above. Clarenville, N.W., light, fine, 35 above. Whitbourne, N.W., light, fine, 30 above.
November 29, 1907 SCHOONER DICTATOR LOST IN MID-OCEAN Crosbie & Co.’s schooner Dictator, foundered in mid-ocean on the 19th Nov. The crew were brought to New York by the steamer Aras, bound from Penrath to New York. The Dictator left St. John’s on Nov. 13th for Oporto with a crew of six men, and a cargo of codfish. She met rough weather for three days, which increased to a hurricane, with heavy seas. Her seams opened and she leaked badly. Two days and two nights while the crew constantly toiled at the pumps, the craft was drifting along helplessly. It was feared by those on board that their last hour was near. The lights of the steamer Aras were sighted at midnight on Nov. 19th., and distress signals being sent up, the steamer ran down to the aid of the crippled schooner. The Dictator’s crew put out their boat and rowed to the steamer. As the boat could not approach her side, lines were thrown to them from the ship, and the six castaways were hauled on board, having saved nothing. The vessel and cargo were insured. The Captain and crew will likely arrive here in the Rosalind which leaves New York tomorrow.
November 29, 1907 NAUTICAL Schooner Nellie M., is now due from Brazil. S.S. Symra was at Sydney yesterday. Schooner Checkers, Rumsey, is due from Oporto. Barque Cordelia, Taylor, is now due from Glasgow. S.S. Silvia, Farrel, sails at midnight for Halifax and New York. Schooner Montrose, Walters, will sail tomorrow for Pernambuco, fish laden from Bowring Bros. Barqt. Resina, Dillon, began loading fish in drums at Goodridge’s last night for Brazil. Schooner Maggie, Munsell, is loading provisions at Harvey & Co.’s for Strong and Mursell, Little Bay Islands.Schooner Helen Stewart, Miller, began loading fish in drums yesterday at Crosbie & Co.’s for Pernambuco. Barqt. Bella Rosa will be ready to sail tomorrow with a cargo of dry fish from Alan Goodridge & Sons, for Oporto. S.S. Harmony coaled at Harvey’s lower wharf yesterday. She sails this morning for London with oil, furs, etc. Schooner Ellen, Pittman, is discharging brick from Smith Sound, at Neal’s wharf. She also has on board a quantity of Cooper’s lumber. S.S. Mary, Dawe, arrived yesterday afternoon from Bell Island. She will load freight today at George Neal’s wharf and sail for Bell Island tomorrow morning.
November 29, 1907 COMPLAINS ABOUT COAL SCALES Several citizens complain that too much attention has not been given the platform scales upon which coal is weighted by the different firms. There is no insinuation made that these scales are not in perfect condition, but a suggestion is made that a competent inspector should be appointed to visit these places and see that the coal is properly weighted, and the scales are in perfect order. For some time people have been kicking against existing conditions, and a change in the matter is evidently desirable.
November 29, 1907 HYMENAL "BURKE — FURLONG: A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the home of the bride’s parents, Brigus, Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. when Mr. John Furlong, of Smithville, and Miss Maggie Burke, daughter of Capt. James Burke, were united in marriage by the Rev. Monsignor Walsh. Mr. James Furlong, brother of the groom, was best man; and Miss Bride Burke, sister of the bride, filled the position of bridesmaid. The bride was given away by her father. She looked charming in a dress of cream voile, trimmed with lace of a unique design; wearing a bridal veil, and wreath of lilies of the valley and carrying a bouquet of roses. The bridesmaid was charmingly attired in pale green voile trimmed with white lace. After the ceremony had been over, and congratulations tendered, the company of forty guests partook of the wedding supper, at which the Very Rev. Monsignor Walsh proposed the health of the bride, which was responded to by the groom and duly honoured by the company. A most enjoyable time was spent by all present, songs and music being in order until an early hour in the morning. The guests were the immediate friends of the bride and groom, ten of whom were from the city. Many and valuable presents were received by the bride, both bride and groom being very popular among their friends.

O’DRISCOLL — ENGLISH: A very pretty wedding took place at 78 Bond Street at three o’clock yesterday afternoon, when Capt. Ed. English, of the S.S. Fiona, and Miss Kathleen O’Driscoll, were united in matrimony by Rev. Fr. McDermott. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Tillie O’Driscoll and Mr. Frank English supported the groom. Mr. M. O’Driscoll, brother of the bride performed the duties of father-giver. After the ceremony, a reception was held, and the happy couple received the congratulations of those present. The bride and groom left by last evening’s train for Holyrood, where the honeymoon will be spent. The News extends congratulations, and wishes Mr. and Mrs. English many years of married happiness."

November 29, 1907 PERSONAL Mr. F.C. Jerret, of Brigus is in town on business. Mr. J.P. Halliburton, J.P., arrived in town from Bonne Bay yesterday. Mr. J. Colbourne, accompanied by his daughter, arrived in town from Bell Island, yesterday.
November 29, 1907 CITY AND ELSEWHERE "A purse of money picked up last night, can be had on application to Mr. M. Dwyer’s Store, Water Street.

A number of salmon were offered in the market yesterday, which were taken on the Southern Shore. They sold at 20 cents a pound.

After the fire scare last night, the audience returned to the hall considerably increased by persons who had gathered, thinking a fire was on..

Mr. J. Hood, who was in the Marconi Station at American Tickle, Labrador, left last evening for Cape Ray, where he will be stationed during the winter months.

An alarm of fire from box 15 last night, brought the Central and East End men to the Mechanics Hall, but their service were not needed, there being no fire in progress.

The Police have now been informed that the meter at Colymore’s store and been interfered with and 90 cents stolen therefrom. It is believed the theft was committed by the man Rochfort, who was sent to the Penitentiary, Wednesday.

The express last evening, took out a large number of passengers including: J.C. Batt, W. Bartlett, D. Bright, J. Hood, J.G. Claig, J. King, Mrs. Blundon, J. Pike, Miss Clide, W.J. Howley, Miss G. Butler, Mrs. Bruce, K. Sampson, J. Bishop, J Kendall, R.H. Kirby, S.G. Bryant, Rev. J.C. Adams, E. England, F.C. Rennie, J. Boyce, C.A. Warren, J Bennetee, A Crowe, C.F. Harding, J Tuff.

Two more habitual drunkards will be placed on the “black list” today.

Only one arrest was made by the Police last night, an inmate of the Poor House was gathered in for being drunk on the street.

Several of the local fishermen were on the grounds yesterday, and secured good catches, which were readily disposed of in the markets.

The schooner Can’t Help It, at Bishop & Monroe’s wharf, was surveyed yesterday, and her name changed. In future she will sail under the name Rowina Ross.

Yesterday, large quantities of fresh herring were offered for sale in the local market. They were taken in nets just outside the narrows.

Over 70 schooners left port yesterday for home places. They will gladly be welcomed.

Head Constable Freeman, who has been very ill at the Hospital, has considerably improved the last week, and will be able to be about again within a few days.

A man named Burke, of Marystown, was before the Magistrate at Burin on Tuesday, charged with smuggling. The case was proven and the offender was fined $50.00.

In order to preserve the floor of the Prince’s Rink while ice is on it during the winter, it will be covered with heavy paper and felt, the top surface of which will be tarred to prevent water getting at the maple flooring underneath. "

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