Pioneers and Prominent People of Saskatchewan

 

 

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THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN 1872-1924

 

    By an Act of the Dominion Parliament, passed in 1905, the Province of Saskatchewan was carved out of an area formerly known as The North-West Territories.

 

     The fourth session of Saskatchewan's fifth legislature was recently opened with all the impressiveness that a colourful and stimulating spectacle of pomp and ceremony could produce, the military escort, the boom of cannon, and other forms and symbols of authority suggesting the traditional history of our representative form of government.

 

It is a long cry from 1924 to 1872, but it is through this period that our minds must travel back if we are to learn something of the law-making and governing activities, out of which have evolved a Provincial government and Legislature, whose progressive and desirable enactments rank high as compared with those of the other Provincial legislative bodies in the Dominion.

 

     When, in 1870, the Dominion of Canada negotiated with the Hudson's Bay Company for the transfer of its rights in Rupert's Land and the North-west Territory, she appears to have contented herself with staking out what Lord Dufferin so aptly termed "A small square on one corner of the checker-board," and naming it Manitoba. Upon this almost infinitesimal space she bestowed a full, responsible government, armed with authority, and equipped with machinery, to establish and maintain law and order.

 

 

 

 

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    The balance of the Territories-a region of empire dimensions-Canada was apparently satisfied to leave, for a time at least, to govern itself. Prior to the transfer the beneficent rule of the Hudson's Bay Company had met with success, though it was a system of persuasion rather than of force or authority and depended solely on the good feelings and good faith of the inhabitants toward each other.

 

 

     With the transfer, even this semblance of law and rule passed away.

 

     In the year 1871 Major Butler, author of "The Great Lone Land,”was commissioned by the Government of Canada to proceed to the Northwest; -"to examine into and report with regard to the state of affairs there.” His report told the Government that "Law and order are wholly unknown in the region of the Saskatchewan, inasmuch as the country is without any executive organization and destitute of any means of enforcing law."

 

     As a result of this report, the Parliament of Canada in 1872, provided the first governmental machinery for the making and enforcement of laws suitable to the Territories, and for the preservation of peace. This Act provided for the appointment by the Governor-General, of a council of eleven members afterwards increased to eighteen, to meet under the presidency of the Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba. The appointed members were:-

 

 

HON. MARC A. GIRARD,

HON. HENRY J. CLARK,

HON. ALFRED BOYD,

HON. JOSEPH ROYAL

JOSEPH DUBUC,

WM. FRAZER,

WILLIAM J. CHRISTIE

W. R. BROWN,

JOHN H: McTAVISH,

HON DONALD A. SMITH,

HON. PASCAL BRELAND,

HON. JAMES McKAY,

JOHN SCHULTZ,

A. G. B. BALLANTYNE,

ROBERT HAMILTON,

PIERRE DELORME,

W. M. KENNEDY,

WILLIAM TATE.

 

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     The first meeting of this Council was held on March 8th, 1873, and represents the first organized effort to make and administer laws for that vast area of which our Province forms a part.

 

     It is interesting at this point to note incidentally the pioneer conditions of the times, as revealed in the circumstance that, in order to attend this meeting of the Council Mr. Christie travelled two thousand miles by dog train from Fort Simpson. We are told that his Half-breed driver walked the entire distance on snowshoes, often, for days at a-time, "making track" ahead of the dogs.

 

 

     Of still greater interest is Mr. Christie's report to the Council of the civilizing influences at work among the Indian and Half-breed people at the far-away posts of the North. At Fort Simpson a Mr. Reeve acted in the dual capacity of school teacher and minister of the Anglican Church. It is a matter of history that during the years that have since passed, this reverend gentleman by what he has accomplished in the north lands has made for himself a most distinguished record in the service of the Church to which he belongs. This parson-teacher, of Fort Simpson in 1872, is none other than the Right Reverend W. D. Reeve, Assistant Bishop of Toronto. Mr. Christie further reports~ that similar activities were being prosecuted at Providence and at Isle a la Crosse, under the direction of Sisters of Charity. He told the Council of his extreme satisfaction with the excellent progress made by the Indian and Half-breed children at these two schools.

 

 

     A striking confirmation of tills report was given sixteen years later, in 1899, by the Reverend T. W. Ferrier now Principal of the Indian Industrial School at Brandon, who was greatly impressed with the results being accomplished and with the thoroughness of the work being done at Isle a la Grosse. Mr. Ferrier, in that year, before taking charge of the Brandon institution, made a tour of inspection of Indian schools, for his own enlightenment and guidance.

 

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     Approaching the Isle a la Crosse school building, on a summer afternoon, he found the door open, but no one on duty to receive visitors, presumably few and far between. Entering he followed the lead of a voice and presently came face to face with a girls school in session in charge of a Sister of Charity. At the blackboard stood an Indian girl, chalk in hand, explaining - and successfully so - for the benefit of the class the solution of a problem in Algebra, involving an equation of two unknown quantities--a mute testimony to the care and patience of those devoted women who "far from the busy marts of trade," discharge their duties as thoroughly and as conscientiously as if their task had fallen in the very centres of culture and civilization. The several executive sessions held by the Council were for the purpose, chiefly, of making representations and recommendations to the dominion Government and Parliament. Two legislative sessions of the Council were convened, one in August, 1874; the other in March, 1875. Concerning these Council meetings the Free Press, of Winnipeg, had this to say: "The task which is assigned to the Lieutenant-Governor and Council of the Territories is an important and difficult one. What they have to do, in point of fact, is to bring order out of chaos, in a territory larger than half of the continent of Europe."

 

 

     The North-west Territories Act had been in force only three years when it was repealed. A serious defect in the Act had been that it made no provision for elective representation in the Council. In the 1875 session of the Dominion Parliament Premier Mackenzie apparently realizing the necessity for more advanced legislation in the Territories, introduced a new North-west Territories Act; providing for the appointment of a resident Lieutenant-Governor who was empowered to appoint a Council of not more than five persons to aid him: in the administration of the North-west Territories, of which number the sti-

 

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pendiary magistrates, three in number, to be appointed, were to be ex-officio members.  

    

     In addition, this Act empowered the Lieutenant Governor to declare, by proclamation, any area not exceeding one thousand square miles and containing one thousand adult inhabitants, exclusive of aliens and unenfranchised Indians, to be an electoral district, entitled to send one member to the Council or Legislative Assembly, as the case might be. When the population of such an area was found to be two thousand, the district would be entitled to send two members. Male residents and householders of adult age, not being aliens or unenfranchised Indians, of twelve months' residence, were qualified to vote. Members were to be elected for two years only. So soon as the number of elected members reached twenty-one, the appointed Council was automatically to go out of existence and the elected members would become the Legislative Assembly of the North-west Territories.  (Dropping the title "North-west Council"), having all the powers previously vested in the North-west Council. The new Act gave many additional powers. It empowered the Lieutenant-Governor, by and with the advice and consent of the Council, to make, ordain and establish ordinances as to matters dealing with taxation for local and municipal purposes; property and civil rights in the Territories; the administration of justice in the Territories, including the maintenance and organization of Courts both of civil and criminal jurisdiction, and including procedure in civil matters in such Courts (the appointment of Judges of the said Courts remaining in the Governor-General-in-Council). public health, licensing of inns and places of public refreshment; landmarks; boundaries; cemeteries; cruelty to animals; care and protection of game and wild animals; nuisances; roads; highways; bridges; gaols; and generally all matters of a local or private nature, as well as the punishment by fine or

 

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imprisonment, for the violation of any ordinance by the Assembly.

 

     In a trial for crime committed within the Territories, a stipendiary magistrate was to be associated with the Chief Justice of Manitoba, or with a judge of the Court of Queen's Bench of that Province. Where the maximum penalty was not more than five years' imprisonment the case was to be tried in a summary way and without a jury, if more than five years, the trial was to be without jury only with the consent of the accused, or with a jury of six if he demanded one. In a case wherein the punishment was death, a jury not exceeding eight must intervene.

 

 

     The first Lieutenant-Governor of the North-west Territories was the Honourable David Laird. His first Council included Stipendiary Magistrates Macleod, Ryan and Richardson, and Major Irvine, with Amedee Emmanuel Forget, secretary; and Molineaux St. John, sheriff. With this breaking of the last bond with Manitoba, the North-west Territories entered on a new era of growth and development. These new appointees all took the oath of office on November 27th, 1876, at Livingstone--Fort Pelly. The seat of government was temporarily located at this point, pending the erection and completion of Government House and other public buildings at Bat6leford, the capital of the North-west Territories.

The first session of the new Council was held at, Fort Pelly in March, 1877. Six Ordinances were passed at this session, dealing with the administration of justice, registration of deeds, prevention of prairie and forest fires, ferries, infectious diseases and the protection of the buffalo. The Ordinance for the preservation of the buffalo was in the best interests of the Indians, but when put in force it met strong opposition from both Indians and Half-breeds. The thought of imprisonment for killing a buffalo seemed outrageous and they united in denouncing the law and openly defied it.

 

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    August, 1877, the seat of Government was removed from Fort Pelly to Battleford, the territorial Capital, where a second session of the Council was held In July, 1878, when Mr. Pascal Breland took his seat in the Council as the fifth appointee under the Act. At this session fourteen Ordinances were passed, one of which repealed the Buffalo Ordinance. This retrograde legislation pleased the Half-breeds and Indians, but it sealed the fate of the buffalo. In a very few years all that remained of the noble herds which once blackened the prairies, were their bleaching skeletons. These skeletons were scattered so numerously that the collecting and shipping of the bones became an important industry, in after years, the prices ranging from $80 to $100 per car.

 

 

    A third session of the council was held at Battleford In September, 1879, when ten Ordinances w e passed, dealing, among other matters, with lunatics, master and servants, licensing billiard tables, prevention of gambling, exemption of property from seizure.

 

    As indicating that even in those early days the people of the North-west Territories felt no hesitation in pressing their claims on the Government at Ottawa, we quote from the Battleford Herald, commenting on the Session just closed: "The Council was unable to legislate respecting schools for want of sufficient powers, and for roads and bridges for want of funds. It is about time that the people of the Territories, who contribute largely to the revenues of the Dominion should at least have the allowance of eighty cents per head- of the population, which is granted to the Provinces for local purposes. Besides paying the full customs and excise duties exacted in other portions of the Dominion, the people of the Territories have also to pay heavy freight rates on all the goods they import. Would it not, therefore, be common justice to allow them some expenditure on roads and bridges, In order to lessen the expense of freighting, in return

 

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for the taxes which they pay into the Dominion Treasury?"

     Between the years 1875 and 1880, the Territories made progress with surprising rapidity, despite many obstacles standing in the way of that development. Such places as Fort Ellice, Touchwood Hills, Carlton, and Prince Albert, had grown up and had become the chief places of business for a large grain-raising area. In 1879 the wheat crop was so large as to require four threshing machines working constantly for six months to thresh the yield of that year, all of which found ready sale for cash at Prince Albert, at from $1.50 to $2.00 per bushel. In 1878 Emmanuel College had been established at Prince Albert by Bishop McLean.

 

     Altogether the progress of the North-west Territories up to the end of 1880 had been satisfactory and the country was well prepared for important events that were on the eve of transpiring, which would materially alter its conditions and open up a new vista of progress and prosperity.

     The Indians had gradually taken up their abode on the various reservations, chosen by themselves in the first instance, and formally allotted to them afterwards, by the Department of Indian Affairs. The Indian was passing through a transition period-from the wild, roving, open life on the plains to a fixed abode on his lands; from his exhilarating flights on the fleet-footed barebacked mustang, to a leisurely walk in the furrow behind the plow and his plodding oxen; and from a hunter of the plains to a tiller of the soil. Naturally he did not at first take kindly to the change, but he has been gradually weaned from his nomadic habits and has learned the value of toil and its reward.

Near the close of Mr. Laird's term of office, an important event occurred in connection with our political growth, when the Honourable Lawrence Clarke, of Prince Albert, as representative of the newly created electoral District of Lorne, and the first elected member in the Territories took his seat in the last session of the Legislative Council held under Mr. Laird, in June, 1881. This session is memorable also as being the last session held at Battleford.

 

 

    In this year Mr. Laird's term of office expired. It is probable that those who know this country only in its present conditions of civilization and peace cannot realize how much we owe to Mr. Laird's wise and tactful administration. His position was no sinecure. No small portion of his time was taken up receiving deputations of discontented, often defiant, Indians, and of Half-breeds, perhaps less savage, but more cunning. Almost daily reports reached him of battles or outrages at some distant point, happily incorrect in nearly every case, but none the less disquieting. Says one writer of that time, "His residence was the central figure of an Indian encampment, because his wards loved to observe and comment on his every move. His kitchen was an Indian restaurant, where meals were served at all hours, while his guests waited. To add to the pleasure of such environment, his actions and motives were misconstrued and misrepresented by the eastern newspapers, ready with their criticisms, despite their display of a vast ignorance of everything pertaining to the North-west, in the very articles in which they censured the Lieutenant Governor.

 

     Following the removal of the capital from Battleford to Regina, the first meeting of the North-west Council was convened in August, 1883, under the

Presidency of the Honourable Edgar Dewdney, Lieutenant-Governor. Six elected members presented themselves, viz.: Frank Oliver, Edmonton; D. H. McDowall, Lome (Prince Albert); J. C. C. Hamilton, Broadview; J. H. Ross, Moose Jaw; T. W. Jackson, Qu' Appelle; and William White, Regina.

 

      Only six appointed members came to the Council.

In the following year the elected members were in-

 

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creased to eight, by the election of J. D. Geddes and J. G. Turriff, for Calgary and Moose Mountain, respectively.

     At the Session of 1883 twenty-two Ordinances were passed and several resolutions were adopted and forwarded to Ottawa, among the latter being one which has grown into a hardy perennial-a request for the removal or reduction of the duty on agricultural implements.

 

 

     The Session of the following year seems to have accomplished little in the way of legislation, but there is evidence that the members of the Council had constantly in view the importance of responsible government. Attempts were made at this session to introduce Ordinances "providing for the establishment of a Legislative Government, and to provide for the administration of the public funds instead of leaving the expenditure in the power of the Lieutenant-Governor only. In view of the fact that this was the beginning of a determined struggle on the part of the Council for increased powers and a larger jurisdiction in local matters, we can scarcely endorse the assertion made by a writer of that time, that "the Session of 1884 was rather remarkable for the length of its debates than for the importance of the business transacted." Still less is this writer justified in claiming that the members of the Council of 1884 "seemed satisfied to drift along in a haphazard way," because, as a result of the movement initiated then; and of the agitation persistently carried on afterwards, many of the demands for which the people were then pressing were conceded. Among these may be mentioned representation in the House

of Commons and in the Senate of Canada; settlement of Half-breed claims; cancellation of colonization companies' charters, and the establishment of a Supreme Court and Court of Appeal.

 

 

    The following year, 1885, was in many respects a memorable one in the history of the North-west Territories. On the 24th of January the Canadian Pacific

 

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Telegraph line was completed from coast to coast, thus establishing telegraph communication over an entirely Canadian line. This was the subject of congratulatory messages between the Governor-General and Lieutenant-Governor Dewdney. In this year the Bell Telephone Company extended its operations into

the Territories.


     In November the last spike in the Canadian Pacific Railway was driven by Sir Donald A. Smith, at Craigellachie, B.C., and the first through tram was run over the whole line from Montreal to Port Moody, on the Pacific.

On January 29th, 1885, the Dominion Parliament opened at Ottawa. During the Session-the longest ever held up to that time-questions relating to the Territories occupied much of the time. On March 26th scarcely two months after the opening of the House, the first shot in the Riel Rebellion was fired at Duck Lake. Four days later, on March 30th, a Commission was appointed to investigate the claims of the Half-breeds.

 

 

    Though nearly forty years have passed since this most regrettable incident, it is yet too soon for history to decide definitely where, or on whom, the responsibility should be placed. It is still for the future to determine. In the Federal Parliament there was an attempt on the part of the Opposition to throw responsibility on the neglect and inaction of the Government, whose supporters, in turn, accused the opposition of having caused the trouble, more or less directly, by creating grievances and discontent in the minds of the people, by words and acts, for the purpose of embarrassing the administration.

 

     Possibly the weight of argument will be with Doctor Oliver in his view that the rebellion of 1885 bulked too largely in the popular mind because it is the only dramatic incident in the history of the Territories, and that, while it is not without importance, it was

 

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not sufficiently significant to justify the interest it aroused.

 

 

    In the autumn of 1886 the Honourable Thomas White, then Minister of the Interior, toured the Territories, so that, by personal observation, he might have a better knowledge of the country and its needs. Everywhere the people turned out to receive him and to present petitions, setting forth their grievances and suggesting remedies for the consideration of the Ottawa Government. A fairly typical illustration of, the ambitions and aspirations of the people of that day may be found in the petition presented to Mr. White at Prince Albert. This document asked, among other things, for Territorial representation in the Federal Parliament, abolition of the North-west Council, to be superseded by a Legislative Assembly; creation of Saskatchewan as a Province extending to Hudson's Bay, with the capital at Prince Albert; provincial control of public lands; a court house with resident Judge; establishment of money order offices; extension of the Habeas Corpus Act to the Territories, and the appointment of local Government officials from among local residents.

 

 

     In 1887 Viscount Boyle, member for Macleod, on succeeding to the Earldom of Shannon, resigned his seat m the Council, and the vacancy thus created was filled by the election of a young-lawyer who, from the fourteenth day of October, 1887, until the thirty-first day of August, 1905, gave his time, his indomitable energy and his brilliant talent to advocating the cause of the Territories. In him the demands of the people for popular government found a champion. The political of the West, during those years, might well be summed up in the history of the political activities, during the same period, of. Frederick William Gordon Haultain. Though one of the youngest members in years and in legislative experience, Mr. Haultain at once received recognition as an authority and guide. The House was not slow to see in him a debater of

 

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the first rank, possessing critical and administrative abilities of a high order, legislative acumen a well trained legal mind, and a firm belief in the rights of the people in their relation to British law and institutions. Almost from his first entrance into the House he was looked up to as leader, and in succeeding sessions he became the acknowledged chief spokesman to champion the cause of democracy. With patience and courage he persistently struggled for the attainment of his purpose. He came into public life at a time which called for a man of integrity, courage and progressiveness, when our country was passing through a trying period of constitutional evolution. It would have been difficult to find one better qualified to answer the call.  The Session of 1887, on the initiative of Mr. Haultain, petitioned Parliament for the abolition of appointed members in the Council, and asked that one of its members should preside over its deliberations instead of the Lieutenant-Governor, who should function by and with the advice of an Executive Council, chosen and summoned by him from among the members of the Council. In compliance with this request the Act of 1888 was passed.

 

 

     In July of 1888 the term of The Honourable Edgar Dewdney as Lieutenant-Governor expired. Shortly after he was appointed Minister of the Interior and entered the Federal Parliament as member for East Assiniboia. He was succeeded, as Lieutenant-Governor, by the Honourable Joseph Royal, who convened the first Legislative Assembly of the Territories in October. This Assembly was composed of elected members, assisted by three legal experts, as they were termed, Messrs. Richardson, Macleod and Rouleau who occupied seats in the House, but whose capacities were purely advisory.

    Mr. Royal's first official utterance was an assurance to the Assembly that he was in full accord with their legitimate aspirations for such constitutional powers

 

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as would give, them a thoroughly representative government. He had been in close touch with the constitutional development of Manitoba, where he had served as a member of its first Assembly, and later as Speaker and Minister.

 

      He soon learned, however, that his new sphere of duty lay, not in a province, but in territories, and that in discharging the obligations of his dual office, the carrying out of instructions from Ottawa must of necessity thwart the progressive evolution of the popular will of the Territories. Assisted by an advisory council of his own selection - Messrs. Haultain, Jelly, Neff and Mitchell - in preparing estimates for submission to Ottawa, he clearly indicated to the Assembly, that the control of public expenditure had been conceded to the Territories.

 

     In October of the following year, 1889, His Honour -inspired, it was believed, from Ottawa took the position that while the Assembly had full control over revenue collected in the Territories, "The law required him to expend the Dominion grants under the direction of the Dominion Government, and not under that of the Assembly." He even refused to lay his estimates before the Assembly, pending their transmission to Ottawa. He conceded to his Advisory Council the privilege, but denied them the right to tender him advice. The issue thus created was clear and the resignation of the Advisory Council was prompt. It was a concise and logical analysis of the situation, couched in the language of the statesman, the diplomat and the courtier. Through it all we can trace the fine hand of Premier Haultain. The closing paragraph reads: "We therefore tender our resignations because we cannot continue to work under a system in which our most important powers are granted to us only in the form of concessions and because we are unwilling to accept responsibility without a corresponding right of control. Let us assure Your Honour of our most grateful appreciation of Your Honour’s

 

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personal kindness to all of us, and of the continuance of loyalty and attachment on our part."

 

 

     A week later this resignation was accepted. A new Advisory Council was chosen, consisting of Messrs. Brett, Betts, Jelly and Richardson. Within ten days these gentlemen had twice placed their resignations in the hands of the Lieutenant-Governor, who finally signified his acceptance. Mr. Thomas Tweed, of Medicine Hat, was then approached by His Honour and requested to form a new Advisory Council. After consulting the members of the Assembly, Mr. Tweed submitted the names of Clinkskill, Cayley and Neff as his colleagues, and expressed his willingness to assume office, but only on the granting of three conditions by the Lieutenant-Governor. These were: a full accounting of expenditures for the previous year, 1888-89; that the estimates to come before the Assembly should show the full amount of the Dominion vote for Territorial purposes; and that all money should be voted by the Assembly and expended by the Advisory Council.

 

     His Honour was obdurate and would not yield, though his attempts to form an Advisory Council in the confidence of the Assembly had proved abortive. The Assembly then passed a memorial to the Minister of the Interior recommending among other matters that the Lieutenant-Governor be not a member of the Advisory Council, and that "It should be declared definitely that Dominion grants to the Territories should be expended only on a vote of the Assembly." On the following day the House was prorogued.

 

     During the recess the Lieutenant-Governor selected an Advisory Council consisting of Messrs. Brett, Betts, Richardson and Secord. On calling the Assembly together, in October, 1890, His Honour stated that he had been "obliged to select a council from among those willing to comply with the law, whether they possessed the confidence of the House or not." No mention was made in His Honour's speech of the existing friction, but that the Assembly intended to continue the

 

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struggle soon became evident, for when the standing committees of the House were struck, It was found that the minority party were not represented in any degree not a name of any member of the Advisory Council, or those supporting them, appeared on a single committee.

     Mr. Secord asked leave to introduce a bill respecting insurance. Then Mr. Haultain threw down the gauntlet. At the close of an address, which brought forth an indignant protest from Mr. Betts, he said, concerning Mr. Secord's bill, "It takes the honourable gentleman a long time to learn things: He ought to have understood by this time that he is only wasting the time of the Assembly in making any motion or introducing any bills. We don't oppose his bill.  It may be a very good bill, but so long as he continues to place himself at variance with the wishes of the Assembly we do not intend to let him exercise the rights of the House." The Assembly further intimated its determination to refuse leave for the introduction of any motion relating to finance, unless the Lieutenant Governor accepted advice from the majority. The administrative efficiency of the board chosen from the minority was severely criticized. The estimates were simply placed on the table, receiving no consideration, and the House was prorogued.

 

     It was now clear that relief could come only from Ottawa. The Parliament of 1891 passed legislation abolishing the Advisory Council and vesting the executive Government of the Territories in the Lieutenant Governor and an Executive Committee. The Assembly then met and passed an Ordinance creating an "Executive Committee to advise the Lieutenant Governor in his administration of the affairs of the Territories. The first Executive Committee chosen was composed of Messrs Haultain, Clinkskill, Neff and Tweed. One member, Mr. Haultain, thereafter known as Chairman of the Executive Committee, took up his permanent residence at the seat of Government. He could now

 

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be held responsible for the conduct of public affairs a distinct advance on the road to responsible government.

 

    In March, 1892, Premier Haultain visited Ottawa and succeeded in getting an appropriation in lump sum of $193,200, instead of an, itemized vote. This placed real power in the hands of, the Executive Committee. They could now use their discretion in spending the Dominion grant to meet the actual expenses of the country. During the Premier's absence in the East, H. S. Cayley, successor on the Executive Committee to James Clinkskill, who had resigned, held the post of acting premier. On Mr. Haultain's return to Regina in, June, Mr. Cayley resigned and formed an opposition party. Developments came when the House met in August. Mr. Betts, of Prince Albert, at the conclusion of the Premier's Budget speech, charged the Government with ignoring the members of the Saskatchewan district when choosing the Executive, and then moved a resolution, "That the Executive Committee does not possess the confidence of this House." The resolution carried on a vote of thirteen to twelve.

 

     Remarkable was the parliamentary procedure that followed. The Executive Committee promptly resigned, and the new Committee, Messrs. Cayley, McKay, Mowat and Reaman, at once found it impossible to carry through their legislation. An amendment by Mr. Haultain, that a bill introduced by the Executive be referred back for amendment, was carried when James H. Ross came down from the Speaker's chair and voted with the ''yeas.'' Then the Speaker and Deputy Speaker resigned, leaving the House evenly divided, thirteen against thirteen, without a Speaker. Mr. Cayley moved that Mr. Sutherland be elected Speaker. What followed is tersely told in the Journals. "And the question being put by the Clerk, the members divided, and the votes being equal the Clerk declared that no election had been held, and the

 

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Clerk having left his seat at the table, the members dispersed."

 

     On the following morning, September 1st, Messrs. Haultain and Tweed called upon His Honour with the information that the Opposition members were willing to support the election of Mr. Magrath for Speaker. They were told in reply that by an extra issue of the Gazette the House had been prorogued.

     In the brief three months' recess that followed, the deadlock was broken by the grim reaper. A vacancy, caused by the death of Mr. Joel Reaman, of Wallace, was filled by the return of Mr. F. R. Insinger, a supporter of the Haultain party.

 

     The Assembly met in December. The Cayley Administration resigned. James H. Ross was elected Speaker. By a vote of fourteen to eleven the Assembly elected an Executive Committee of Messrs. Haultain (Premier), Tweed, Neff and Mitchell. Under premier Haultain the struggle for a completely responsible Government was carried on. His demands were finally conceded by Parliament, in an Act which came into force October 1st, 1897. By this Act the old Executive Committee was replaced by an Executive Council, which became the Territorial Cabinet. The first Cabinet was composed of Messrs. Haultain, Ross and Bulyea, with Messrs. Mitchell and Magrath as non-portfolio members.

 

     The functions of this Cabinet were to aid and advise the Lieutenant-Governor, not only in financial affairs, but in every matter of government. This was the great constitutional principle for which the elected members of the Assembly had struggled for more than a decade. Though the Territories had now a full measure of responsibility in government, the process of constitutional development was still incomplete. Provincial autonomy was the goal in view. Without this boon, for which they must wait eight years longer, the Assembly could not borrow money, charter railways,

 

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or other transport facilities, or administer justice in criminal cases.

 

     Sixteen years had now passed since the first elected member had taken his seat in the old North-west Council. What the people of the Territories had

achieved during those years made no mean record. In that period the school, municipal and judicial systems had been established. A peculiarly gratifying feature of the school system was, that there had been inaugurated a common inspectorate, a common examination, a common qualification of teachers and an almost completely uniform system of text books.  At this time the Territories were on the eve of a remarkable growth of population and development.

 

   An aspiration for self-government had brought the Executive Council into existence. True to the principle from which it emanated, its activity found expression in promoting self-rule and encouraging municipal organization. The vigorous immigration policy of the Honourable Clifford Sifton in the Dominion Cabinet, created an immense increase in the population of the Territories. For these incoming settlers the country must be made habitable. Roads trails culverts, bridges, reservoirs, public wells firebreaks and ferries must be provided for the settler, as well as educational facilities for his children. The vast areas and widely scattered settlements rendered government works expensive, and the Territorial government must finance the cost. Though the Federal grant was doubled, it was wholly inadequate. Up to i900, people had expressed no strong desire for a provincial status, providing the integrity of the Territories remained intact. It was only increasing financial necessities and the inability to cope with the financial, difficulties that led the Government and the people to seek for full provincial powers, "Financial embarrassments, rather than constitutional aspirations" to quote the words of Mr. Haultain. The expenditure in eight years had increased fourfold. An increased

 

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annual grant from Ottawa was accepted by the Assembly as "Affording a temporary and partial amelioration of otherwise impossible, financial difficulties.

 

     In 1889 provincial status was only a suggestion; in 1890 it was the prayer of a petition. In 1902 it was a demand because of the insistent financial needs of the Territories. Beyond an expression of sympathy with the proposal, the Dominion Government remained inactive. Its refusal was based on the plea that the population was too sparse, that conditions were changing because of increasing population, and that the people were not unanimous on the question of creating one or two provinces.

 

     The last excuse had its origin in the fact that in the Assembly Doctor Patrick, of Yorkton, supported by R. B. Bennett, of Calgary, and five others, had made an unsuccessful motion for the erection of two provinces. The motion was prompted by a fear that Manitoba might be extended to absorb a part of Eastern Saskatchewan. There was a complete unanimity against this contingency.

 

 

     In 1903 an address of the Assembly was sent to Ottawa couched in unambiguous phraseology, insisting upon immediate financial aid and the establishment, of provincial institutions. Ottawa replied, offering to place in the supplementary estimates for the coming year $250 000 to cover the over-expenditure in the Territories and an advance of capital account up to $500,000 from time to time, for public works, under approval of the Dominion Government.  It took courage to refuse a cool half-million, but Premier Haultain rejected the offer. He was endeavouring to obtain, in the most practical fashion, definite recognition by Ottawa of the financial necessities of the Territories, and he pointed out that the Assembly had asked for $880,000 for use during 1903, whereas the grant proposed was the same as for the previous year, Which had fallen short by a cool half million. Subsequent offers were made by the Federal authorities, all of which were in-

 

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adequate and which contained offers of advances of capital account for roads and bridges, to be approved by the Government at Ottawa. A quotation from Premier Haultain's letter of June the 15th, to the Minister of Finance, reveals the sound position which he maintained:-

 

      "With regard to the proposed provision for the Government of the North-west Territories, I would say that a supplementary vote of $250,000 for over-expenditure will be a welcome addition to the slender resources of the Territories. The addition of $250,000 to the amount provided in- the main estimates, while helpful so far as it goes, falls far short of the amount requested by us and shown to be absolutely necessary in the various statements already submitted.

 

     "I would further respectfully submit that the argument of 'Provincial undertaking' does not apply to the Territories. I need hardly remind you that the Territories are not a Province, and that they do not enjoy the revenues or powers of a Province, and further that it is the opinion of the Government and Legislature of the Territories that the 'liberal allowance' you provide is not liberal enough to establish an analogy. We are not only ready, but anxious, to assume responsibility for all Provincial undertakings, and with that end in view we have been pressing for the granting of Provincial institutions to the Territories.

 

     "With regard to the question of an advance on capital account, I can only refer you to my letter of April the 20th and the position therein taken up. An advance on capital account is nothing more or less than a loan upon which eventually we should have to pay five per cent per annum. We feel indisposed to consider an invitation to borrow money as a satisfactory settlement of our request for the necessary amounts to carry on the affairs of this country. At all events the proposition to give us an advance on capital account of $250,000, already debited with $84,000, for the bridges

 

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mentioned above, is one which, we cannot entertain. We cannot reasonably object to the requirement of the consent of the Governor-in-Council to any broad scheme of expenditure under this heading, but to be obliged to ask Consent to every detail would be as burdensome as it would be unnecessary. After all the money would be advanced to the people of the Territories, and its proper expenditure might safely be entrusted to their responsible Government Legislature." It will thus be seen that Mr. Haultain was not at that time pressing so much for Provincial autonomy but was rather insisting upon the payment of an adequate amount for current expenditure and the right of the Territories to control the expenditure of capital account without interference by the Federal authorities.

 

     In the same year, 1903, there sprang up outside the Territories an awakened interest in Provincial autonomy. The question had passed beyond negotiation between Governments. It became a matter of public discussion In the House of Commons, in which, among others, R. L. Borden and Frank Oliver took part. The public press was not silent, but insisted that Provincial autonomy should become an accomplished fact without further delay. The Montreal Star stressed the disadvantages under which the Territories were placed through being deprived of the many powers conferred upon other provinces by the B.N.A. Act. In March, 1904, the Calgary Herald) in an impatient moment, asserted that the administrative delay at Ottawa was sufficient to cause another rebellion in the Territories. Doctor D. J. Goggin, who in former days had been Superintendent of Education in the Territories writing in the Toronto News, saw in the delay certain powerful political influences, urging for a guarantee that Separate Schools and dual language must be an integral part of any autonomy measure submitted to Parliament. In a later issue the News said editorially, "The government dare not act for it fears the raising

 

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of the Separate School Question." Beyond mentioning, In addition, that the autonomy terms found disfavour with Professor Goldwin Smith, it is not relevant to this sketch to review all the bitter newspaper controversies, or to touch upon the outbursts of feeling and passion that found vent in the protests of mass meetings. Suffice it to say that these opinions were voiced by people outside the Territories. Separate Schools had never been an issue in Territorial elections. In October, 1904, the last Session of an Assembly representing the Northwest Territories concluded its work. Early in the following year, by two Acts of Parliament, the Territories were created into two provinces -Saskatchewan and Alberta-with the dividing line at the fourth meridian.

 

     The school issue was settled by a compromise guaranteeing separate schools entirely subject to provincial control.

    

     While the final negotiations for autonomy dragged through their various stages, Messrs. Haultain and Bulyea took up their residence at Ottawa, accompanied by Mr. John A. Reid, as Clerk of the Executive Council of the Territories.

 

     In closing the record of the Territories there is a temptation to linger over the names of the men to whom Saskatchewan owes a debt of gratitude, and through whose devotion, wisdom and foresight she finally emerged from Territorial to Provincial rank.

 

     So long as Saskatchewan shall have a history, the names of Frederick W. G. Haultain, James H. Ross and Frank Oliver will stand out in bold relief.

 

 

 

 

LAW COURTS

 

After surveying, with some detail, the gradual broadening of the country's powers in law making, we naturally look for a corresponding process of evolution in law administration. In this we are not disappointed. On July 15th, 1870, the North-west Terri-

 

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tories became a part of the Dominion of Canada. An Act of the Dominion Parliament of 1873 made provision for the appointment of stipendiary magistrates, with jurisdiction to try, summarily and without jury, certain minor criminal cases. More serious cases, carrying a maximum punishment of seven years, were taken before a Judge of the Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench, or two stipendiary magistrates.

 

     The first attempt at establishing a regular judiciary for the Territories was made in 1875, when by a New North-west Territories Act, provision was made for the establishment of judicial districts throughout the Territories. By this Act the jurisdiction of the Manitoba Court was limited. By this same Act, however, the Queen's Bench Court of Manitoba was given appellate jurisdiction over Territorial tribunals, and for several years this was the only Territorial Court of Appeal.

 

     In 1877 the trial of Territorial criminal cases was withdrawn from the Manitoba Court and jurisdiction vested in a stipendiary magistrate and one justice of the peace. In capital cases a magistrate and two justices of the peace must preside.  A stipendiary magistrate might also determine claims for damages, not over $500, and claims arising out of contracts up to $1,000. Proceedings might be conducted in either the French or English language.

 

     An Ordinance of the North-West Territories brought into existence three judicial districts, for which provision had been made by a Federal law. These were designated the "Saskatchewan," "Bow River," and "Qu'Appelle" districts. A stipendiary magistrate, resident in each district, acted as judge therein. The district courts were given the same jurisdiction as exercised by the courts of law and equity, and by the Surrogate Courts in the Province of Ontario.

 

   An important change was made in the Territorial judiciary in 1886, when by an Act of the Federal Parliament a Supreme Court of the North-west Territories

 

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was created, composed of five judges, appointed by the Governor-General-in-Council, by letters patent under the Great Seal of Canada. All former Acts, not consistent with the new Act, were repealed. The Supreme Court was given vastly widened jurisdiction, having all the powers incident to a superior court of civil and criminal jurisdiction under the law of England, and the rights and privileges possessed by Her Majesty's Superior courts of Common Law, by the Court of Chancery and by the Court of Probate in England. In addition, the Supreme Court was, under the direction of the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council, required to sit en bane for the purpose of hearing appeals.

 

     In the following year five judicial districts were formed: Assiniboia, Eastern and Western; Alberta, Northern and Southern; and Saskatchewan.

The Dominion Act of 1905 creating the Province of Saskatchewan, while continuing in force all the laws of the North-west Territories, consistent with the Federal Act, provided that the Provincial Legislature might abolish the Supreme Court of the North-west Territories. This was done in 1907, when the Saskatchewan Legislature, by passing a Judicature Act, "abolished the Supreme Court of the North-west Territories, as well as the jurisdiction, powers and authority belonging to the said Court."

 

     The same Act constituted and established the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan. To this Court was given the jurisdiction formerly exercised by the Territorial Supreme Court, now abolished. It was, in addition, given the jurisdiction, rights, powers and privileges, vested prior to 1873 in such courts of England as the High Court of Chancery, Queen's Bench, Common Pleas at Westminster, Exchequer, Probate, Commissions of Assize, Oyer and Terminer, and General Goal Delivery.

 

     The Supreme Court of Saskatchewan, sitting en bane, had not only all the appellate powers of the old Territorial Supreme Court, sitting en bane, but also

 

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the appellate jurisdiction, held in 1908 by the Divisional Courts of the High Court of Justice, and the Court of Appeal in England.

 

COURT OF KING'S BENCH

 

By The King's Bench Act, passed in 1915, the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan, Its officers and Jurisdiction powers and authority, were abolished, and the Judicature Act under which it had been created, was repealed. By the same act a Superior Court of Record to be called His Majesty's Court of King s Bench was established, vested with the same jurisdiction as had been exercised under the Supreme Court Act. At the Session of the Saskatchewan Legislative Assembly, held in 1919-20, the jurisdiction and powers which in England, were exercised by the Lord High Chancellor as visitor of corporations, were conferred upon this Court.

 

COURT OF APPEAL

 

     By another Act of the Assembly of 1915 ~ Court of Appeal was organized, consisting of a Chief Justice and three other judges (since increased to five) who, in addition to being ex-officio judges of the Court of King's Bench, have jurisdiction corresponding to that formerly possessed by the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan, sitting en bane. In each of the twenty three judicial districts, into which the Province is divided a district court is held, presided over by a district judge whose jurisdiction in civil cases is similar to that of a county court judge in Ontario. He has also certain criminal jurisdiction, in the exercise of which his court is styled "The District Court Judge's Criminal Court." A district court Judge has Jurisdiction also as a Surrogate Court Judge, in his district. Appeals lie from courts of justices of the peace, and of police magistrates, to district courts; and from the latter, in civil cases up to fifty dollars, to the Court

 

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of Appeal. An appeal from the Surrogate Court may be taken to the Court of King's Bench.

 

     Justices of the peace, police magistrates, and provincial magistrates are appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor-in-Council.

 

PROVINCIAL INAUGURATION

 

 

 

     In accordance with the Dominion Statutes creating the Provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta, their birth was to date from September 1st, 1905. One week prior to this Amedee Emmanuel Forget was gazetted as the first Lieutenant-Governor of the new Province of Saskatchewan. He had long been identified with western affairs. Twenty-eight years before he, as Clerk of the North-west Council, had called the first meeting of that body at Fort Pelly, N.W.T. In the late eighties he was appointed Assistant Indian Commissioner, and later Indian Commissioner, as successor to Hayter Reed, when, in 1894, the latter was promoted to the position of Deputy Superintendent of Indian Affairs at Ottawa. Still later (1898) Mr. Forget received the appointment of Lieutenant-Governor of the Territories. On taking the oath of office, on September 1st, as Saskatchewan's first Governor, he said: "I have seen the country grow up from its birth, progress through youth, and to-day, with you; I have the intense satisfaction to see it giving birth to two fine Provinces."

 

     A significant feature of Territorial government administration, up to this time, had been the entire absence of party politics, which had found no congenial soil in which to take root. Two outstanding representatives, in the wider field of Dominion affairs, of the conservative and liberal parties, respectively, Messrs. Haultain and Ross, had been opposed to the introduction of party politics into the Assembly, and had struggled together for more than a decade in a substantial furtherance of the cause of responsible government.

 

 

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     In a review of this period Walter Scott, in his paper, the Regina Leader, of September 30th, 1897, paid this tribute to Mr. Haultain: "Punctiliously honest, possessing political courage which has stood the test in more than one severe trial, and being imbued with a progressiveness which is wholly free from any tincture of 'splurge' or recklessness, it is scarcely possible to imagine anyone better qualified to occupy the place which he has occupied in the period of evolution through which this country is passing."

This eulogy had been but a crystallization of public opinion and sentiment, and had found an echo in the minds and hearts of the people of the West, who confidently looked to the Lieutenant-Governor to call upon Mr. Haultain to form the first Provincial Government.

 

     The explanation offered by Sir Wilfrid Laurier, in the House of Commons, was that because Mr. Haultain had made serious objections to some clauses of the autonomy bill in its passage through the House, there was no doubt he would have attempted to destroy the constitution of the new Province, and therefore could not have been considered by the Lieutenant-Governor.

 

    The loss which the country sustained by the retirement of F. W. G. Haultain from the leadership of the Legislative Chamber of Saskatchewan has been compensated for in the elevation of Sir Frederick Haultain to the bench, where, as Chief Justice of Saskatchewan, his eminent qualifications find ample scope.

 

 

THE FIRST CABINET

 

On September 12th, 1905, Premier Scott announced his first Cabinet:

PREMIER-Walter Scott, also Minister of Public Works and President of the Executive Council.

 

ATTORNEY-GENERAL--John Henderson Lamont.

 

MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE-William Richard Motherwell, also Provincial Secretary.

 

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PROVINCIAL TREASURER - James Alexander Calder, also Minister of Education.

 

These appointments were endorsed by the people at a general election held on December 13th, when the Scott government secured a majority of eight members.

Under the Autonomy Act the choice of Saskatchewan's Capital, or seat of government, was left to the Assembly. Not a few of the members from the northern districts were in favour of Saskatoon. After listening quietly to the arguments advanced, the Premier delivered his quietus, asserting that unless the seat of government could be retained at Regina, he would resign and take the question to the country. Regina was chosen.

 

     One of the matters to which the new Government first directed its attention was the erection of a suitable building for legislative and executive purposes. On the fourth of October, 1909, the corner-stone of the splendid pile on the south bank of the Wascana Lake was laid with fitting ceremony. Though the structure was not completed until 1912, the government, under a special arrangement with the contractors, entered into occupancy in December, 1910.

In 1916 Premier Scott, owing to ill health, resigned his office, being succeeded by the Honourable William Melville Martin, whose resignation was followed by his appointment to the Court of Appeal in 1922. His successor, the Honourable Charles Avery Dunning, is still leader of the Government and of the Liberal party in Saskatchewan, which has held the reins of power for nineteen years.

Of the four members who made up the first Saskatchewan Cabinet, the Honourable Walter Scott has retired from public activities; the Honourable J. H. Lamont is Judge of the Court of Appeal; the Honourable W. R. Motherwell, representing the City of Regina in the Dominion House, is Federal Minister of Agriculture, and the Honourable J. A. Calder, after

 

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serving in the Union Government War Cabinet, was, in 1921, appointed to the Senate of Canada.

 

THE PRESENT PROVINCIAL CABINET

 

PREMIER-C. A. Dunning, also President of the Council, Provincial Treasurer and Minister of Railways.

 

PUBLIC WORKS-A. P. McNab, also Minister of Telephones.

 

 

EDUCATION-S. J. Latta, also in charge of King's Printer's Office and Bureau of Publications.

 

AGRICULTURE AND MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS-C. M. Hamilton. ,

 

 

ATTORNEY GENERAL-J. A. Cross, also Bureau of Child Protection.

 

 

HIGHWAYS-J. G. GARDINER, also Bureau of Labour and Industries.

 

 

PROVINCIAL SECRETARY-J. M. Uhrich, also in Charge of Bureau of Public Health.

 

ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE

 

Any sketch, however brief, of the history of the Prairie Provinces, would be sadly incomplete without some, reference to that splendid body of men who, in the interests of safety and peace, dwelt so long amongst us, and who in so large a percentage were men of energy, patience, tact, decision and fertility of resource in emergency-the North-west Mounted - Police-respected and welcomed by law-abiding people wherever they went, and held in wholesome dread by evildoers.

Organized solely for the benefit of the Northwest Territories, the, .North-west Mounted Police Force was not, in any sense, under the administration of the Government of the Territories, nor did the Territorial treasury contribute in the slightest degree to the financial up-keep of the force. 'Brought into existence by an Act of the Federal Parliament,' the affairs of this organization were administered by the Federal Govern-

 

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ment, and its maintenance was provided for from the Federal exchequer.

 

     As early as the year 1870, when the Hudson's Bay Company transferred Rupert's Land to Canada, Sir Donald A. Smith, and afterwards the North-west Council, urged the Dominion Government to send into the country a police force, which, it was thought, would exercise a salutary influence in keeping the Indians quiet, and in preserving law and order. These recommendations were endorsed by numerous other persons, who knew the country and its needs.

Not until three years later, in May, 1873, was any action taken at Ottawa. Then Parliament assented to a law establishing a police force for the North-west Territories. This action was taken after Captain Louis de Plainval, commanding the Provincial Police in Manitoba, had prepared and submitted to Sir John A. Macdonald a complete plan for the organization, equipment and distribution of a mounted constabulary throughout the Territories.

 

     It is interesting at this point to note the requisite qualifications for enlistment. These were a sound constitution, ability to read, write and ride, a good character, and to be active and able-bodied. The list of appointed officers was limited to commissioner, superintendents, paymaster, surgeon and veterinary surgeon.

 

     In September, 1873, three divisions of fifty men each were sent over the Dawson route, arriving at Fort Garry late in October, taking up their winter quarters at the Old Stone Fort. Lieutenant-Colonel W. Osborne Smith took temporary command, pending the arrival of Colonel French, who had been appointed Commissioner. This officer arrived in November, and, as the result of his representations to Ottawa, the force was increased to 300. Early in May 1874, a force of sixteen officers, 201 men and 244 horses left Toronto for the Territories, coming via Detroit, Chicago, St. Paul and Fargo, to Dufferin, near the present site of Emerson, on the Canadian boundary line.

 

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     In June the Stone Fort detachment joined the new arrivals at Dufferin, and on July 8th the combined forces started on their long, tedious march into the Great West. In the column, as it moved away, might pave been seen men who in later years won distinction in the service of Canada and of the Empire. Colonel French, Commissioner; Superintendents Gagnon, Crozier, Jarvis and Griesbach; Major Walsh, Sergeant. Major Sam Steele, Major McLeod, arid others-these are the names of men whose wisdom and tact were factors in the "Peaceful and wonderful development of what was once the red man's country."

 

     It was an astonishing cavalcade-men in bright uniforms, carts and wagons loaded with supplies, plows, harrows, mowing machines, and other implements of agriculture, droves of cows, calves and oxen. When closed up the train was two and a half miles long and when straggling, fully five miles from advance to rear guard.

 

     For four weary months these men marched, day after day, on picket or guard duty at night, working at high pressure, drinking water which came through the filter still the colour of ink, horses and oxen dying for want of food-still these men pushed on with dogged determination. Net a man grumbled or shirked. At the beginning of the march in July the thermometer registered 100 degrees in the shade, and thirty degrees below zero at the conclusion of a two-thousand-mile journey in November. It was "The longest march on record of a force carrying its supplies."

 

     The goal in view was the country of the Bow River, the Belly River and the Cypress Hills. At Roche Percee one division, under Inspector Jarvis, branched off, to proceed to Fort Ellice, Fort Carlton and on to Edmonton, a march of 875 miles by trail. The main body pushed on westward.

 

     The force first established itself at Belly River, but owing to feed shortage moved to Old Man's River.

 

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     Barracks were erected at several points in the southwest and a considerable number of men left in charge. Early in October Ottawa advised Commissioner French that Fort Pelly had been selected as headquarters for the force. The column then began its return march by way of Fort Qu' Appelle, where they arrived on October 15th, thence to Fort Pelly and Fort Ellice, a division being left at each of the last two points; The remainder of the force then marched to Dufferin, their starting point, and went into barracks for the winter. The chief problem for the police had been the control of the Indians. And what had they accomplished? Let an eye witness tell the story. The Reverend Father Constantine Scollen, a Roman Catholic missionary among the Indians, writing to Indian Commissioner Laird, under date of September 8th, 1876, says:

 

     "Ten years ago the Americans crossed the line and established themselves on the Belly River, where they carried on traffic with the Blackfeet in intoxicating liquor. The fire-water flowed as freely as streams from the Rocky Mountains. Hundreds of Indians fell victims, some poisoned, some frozen while intoxicated, many shot down by American bullets. In 1870 smallpox came, destroying six or eight hundred. Those who survived drank the poisonous beverage to drown their grief. They sold their robes and horses for drink and then began killing one another. In the summer of 1874 I was travelling among the Blackfeet. Their poverty was painful to see. Formerly the most opulent Indians in the country, they were now clothed in rags, without horses and without guns. But this was the year of their salvation. In that very summer the Mounted Police were struggling against the difficulties of a long journey across the barren plains to bring them help. This noble corps reached their destination the same fall, and with magic effect put a stop to the abominable traffic of liquor with the Indians. They are now becoming more and more prosperous,

 

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well clothed and well supplied with horses and guns. They acknowledge that the arrival of the Red Coats has been to them the greatest boon."

 

     In July, 1876, Commissioner French resigned his position and was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel James Farquharson Macleod. Colonel French returned to England, to resume his duties with the Royal Artillery. The sergeants at headquarters presented him, before his departure, with an address and a gold watch and chain. The corporals and constables presented Mrs. French with an address and a service of plate. On arrival in England, Colonel French was decorated with the K.C.M.G., and later was in command of the troops in New South Wales during the Boer War. "He left his mark on the North-west Mounted Police by laying the foundation of its splendid efficiency."

 

     In October, 1876, Fort Macleod was made the headquarters of the police.  During Commissioner Macleod's term of office important treaties with the Indians were negotiated. On his appointment to the, position of stipendiary magistrate he resigned his commissionership. He was held in high regard by officers and men. His retirement was a great loss to the force. His influence with the Indians was enormous. With them he was the personification of truth and fair dealing. In 1887 he was appointed Judge of the Supreme Court of the North-west Territories, a position which he held until his decease in 1894.

 

     In 1882 Lieutenant-Colonel A. G. Irvine was appointed Police Commissioner. In 1883 he demolished Fort Walsh and transferred headquarters to Regina. He was exceedingly popular with the force. During his term of office occurred the Riel Rebellion of 1885. Through the whole campaign Colonel Irvine's scouts performed valuable services. Two of his scouts, after the battle of Batoche, captured the rebel leader, Riel.  His defence of Prince Albert was one of the features of the campaign. The presence of his men at that im-

 

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portant point saved Prince Albert from falling into the hands of the Half-breeds and their fierce allies. Commissioner Irvine's resignation, in 1886, came as a surprise to all who knew him. He was popular with all the people of the West, and a hard-working, conscientious officer, who had served his country faithfully for many years.

 

     The appointment of Commissioner next fell to Lieutenant-Colonel Lawrence W. Herchmer. The lines had fallen to him in places much more pleasant than those of any of his predecessors. On coming into office he found a well-trained and highly disciplined corps to carry out the duties assigned to it, and was able to do much for the benefit of the settlers and others who required advice and protection. Each settler was visited by the mounted police and signed the patrol slip, with remarks thereon, as to whether he or she had any complaints. If any, these were attended to at once.

 

     Under Commissioner Herchmer the force reached a very high state of efficiency. The training was the best, the men a fine class, handsome, and well educated. The commandants were made responsible for the efficiency of the men, who were soon in advance of -the time in everything that goes to make good scouts, soldiers and police. The divisions were able to take the field, complete with transport, in less than half an hour at any time of the day or night. Smaller parties, required in emergency, were in the saddle in fifteen minutes from the time they were aroused from their slumbers.

 

     They were men of this type of efficiency who came under the control of Superintendent Aylesworth Bowen Perry, when, in 1900, he became Commissioner Herchmer's successor in office. At the close of the Riel Rebellion he, as Major Perry, had been mentioned in General Middleton's dispatch as one who had done excellent work during the campaign, and to whom his thanks were greatly due. In 1897 he had gone over-

 

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seas in command of a contingent in connection with Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee. He afterwards discharged a similar duty on the occasion of King George's coronation. In 1909 His Majesty conferred upon him the Order of C.M.G.

 

   Shortly after his taking office as Commissioner, His Majesty King Edward VII bestowed upon the force the title Royal North-west Mounted Police, in recognition of their services throughout the empire, more particularly in South Africa.

 

     On the outbreak of the South African War, in 1899, numerous ex-members of the force were found in the first Canadian contingent sent to the scene of action.  On the organization of the second corps of Canadian Mounted Rifles, leave of absence was granted to many officers and men who joined this contingent. Engaged under Colonel Steele, of the Strathcona Horse, were thirty or more members and ex-members of the northwest Mounted Police. For conspicuous bravery in South Africa, Sergeant A. H. Richardson was awarded the Victoria Cross. Colonel Steele was presented with the Victorian Order, and the C.B.; Majors Belcher and Jarvis, the C.M.G.; Captains Sanders, Mackie and Cartwright and Lieutenants Christie and Leckie, the D.S.O. Many non-commissioned officers and men were granted the medal for distinguished conduct on the field.

 

 

   On the attainment of Provincial standing, and pending the organization of a Provincial Police Force, the Saskatchewan Government, in 1905, negotiated with the Federal authorities for the services of, the Mounted Police at a cost of $75,000 per annum. This arrangement was terminated in 1916, the Province in the meantime having built up a Provincial force.

 

   When, in 1914, the whole world was plunged into the great European war, a desire was manifested among all ranks in the Royal North-west Mounted Police to find a place in the fighting line. Prompt release was given to the British Reservists, fifty-five in number,

 

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who were serving in the police ranks, that they might rejoin the British forces. The Dominion authorities owing to home requirements, were reluctant to grant further releases. As the result, however, of repeated requests, permission was granted early in April, 1918, to members of the force, to enlist for service overseas. On May 30th a draft of twelve officers and 726 non-commissioned officers and men left Regina under command of Major G. L. Jennings, were formed into Squadron "A" in England, and, landing in France in October, were immediately sent to the front and served In the battle area until the Armistice. For a time this squadron was attached to the Canadian Light Horse, and subsequently to Corps Headquarters.

 

     On their return to Canada, in May, 1919, they were transferred back to the force, the Minister of Militia expressing his deep appreciation of their services.

 

     Under command of Major George Worsley, Squadron "B" was organized for service in Siberia, going out via Vancouver. In its ranks was a large percentage of skilled horsemen. It was quartered in the vicinity of Vladivostock, and earned a reputation of being conspicuous for its efficiency and good conduct.  This squadron returned home in July, 1919 its only regret being that it did not have the good fortune to see active service.

 

     It is a gratifying record, and in harmony with the  magnificent traditions of the Mounted Police that apart from the enrolment of many ex-members, no fewer than 1,386 officers and men eagerly risked their lives in the defence of the Empire and of better world conditions.

 

DOMINION-WIDE JURISDICTION

 

In January, 1920, important changes far-reaching in their effects, were made in the organization of the Royal North-west Mounted Police, under two Orders-in-Council, based on legislation of the previous year.

 

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These changes were made in pursuance of the policy adopted by the Government to have only one Federal force, controlled by a single head, and exercising jurisdiction in every part of Canada.

 

     Since early Confederation days there had existed in eastern Canada a body known as the Dominion Police. From 1885 Sir Percy Sherwood had been Commissioner of this body until 1913, when he became Chief Commissioner. By the changes referred to the Dominion Police Force was absorbed by the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, and the name of the latter changed to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Over this increased force, Dominion-wide in its operations, Commissioner Perry, with headquarters at Ottawa, was given control In March, with the King's approval, the Prince of Wales consented to accept the position of Honorary Commandant Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Commissioner Perry, after a service extending over forty years-eighteen as inspector, superintendent, and major (Canadian Militia), and twenty-two as commissioner-resigned his office in April, 1923, and, on retiring, was given the rank of Major-General.  Assistant Commissioner Cortland Starnes succeeded to the vacancy thus created.

 

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NEWLANDS: His Honour the Honourable Henry William, K.C., Governor of Saskatchewan. Born at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, March 19th, 1862, a son of James Newlands, of the Fife of Keith, Banffshire, Scotland, and Henrietta Harvey, of Foy, in Cornwall, England. Married Mary Patterson Stewart, of Montreal, and has two daughters. Educated at the public schools of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Admitted to the Bar of Nova Scotia, March 24th, 1883. Came west to Winnipeg the same year, and to Prince Albert, Sask., in 1885. Practised law in Prince Albert until 1897, when he was appointed Registrar of Land Titles at Regina and Inspector of Land Title Offices for the North-west Territories. Was made a K.C. in, 1903. Appointed Judge of the Supreme Court of the North-west Territories, January, 1904; of the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan, 1907: and the Court of Appeal, 1920. Retired in February, 1921; with the title of Honourable -London Gazette, 28th June, 1921. Appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan, 1921 (Feb. 17th). A Presbyterian; Liberal. Address; Government House, Regina.

 

HAULTAIN: Sir Frederick; K.C.M.G., Chief Justice of Saskatchewan. Ex-Premier N.W.T. Probably no citizen of this province deserves the term "pioneer" better than the Chief Justice of Saskatchewan. No one has played a more conspicuous part in her development; no one has won more honour or esteem from her citizens. The history of the old N.W.T. will always be associated with his name, and he stands to-day probably her best known public man.

 

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     Born at Woolwich, England, November 25th, 1857, son of Lieut.-Col. F. W. Haultain, R.A., and Lucinde Helen Haultain, Sir Frederick came to. Canada in early life, was educated at Montreal High School, attended the Collegiate at Peterboro, Ont., graduated from Toronto University in 1879, with the degree of B.A., and was honoured by his Alma Mater in 1915 with the (hon.) degree of LL.B. 

 

     Called to the Ontario bar, 1882.  Created K.C. (Dom.), 1902; Saskatchewan, 1907.   Practised at MacLeod, Alta., 1884. Member North-west Council, 1887-88. Member Legislative Assembly, 1888-1905. Was called upon by the Lieutenant-Governor to form the first Executive Committee of the North-west Territories, December, 1891. Remained leader of the Executive Committee until 1897, when by Federal Act provision was made for an Executive Council, and he was called upon by the Lieutenant-Governor to form an Executive Council. Premier; Attorney-General; Commissioner of Education, North-west Territories, 1897, until Province was established in 1905. Member of Saskatchewan Legislature and leader of Provincial Rights Party, 1905-12. Represented North-west Territories at the Coronation of His late Majesty King Edward VII, 1902. Appointed Chief Justice Supreme Court of Saskatchewan in October, 1912, and Chief Justice Court of Appeal for Saskatchewan in March, 1918. Knighted on the first of June, 1916. Elected Chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan, 1917. Club, Assiniboia. Recreation, golf. In religion an Anglican. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

DUNNING: The Honourable Charles Avery, Premier of Saskatchewan. Born at Croft, Leicestershire, England, a son of Samuel and Katherin Dunning. Married Ada Rowlett, July 3rd, 1913, and has two children. Came to Canada in 1902, at the age of seventeen, and engaged in farming near Yorkton, later acquiring a homestead near Beaverdale. Became a leading spirit

 

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of the local Grain Growers' Association. In the-debates which were such an important feature of the Grain Growers' gatherings in the early days, Mr. Dunning took an active part, finding here a congenial field for the development of a natural gift for clear and forceful public speaking.

 

     Always a student, an omnivorous reader, with a retentive memory, it was not long before Mr. Dunning's ability as a debater won him more than a local reputation. He was the unanimous choice as delegate to the Grain Growers' Association Convention at Prince Albert, in 1910, when his history began to be intimately woven with that of Saskatchewan. Later in this year he was elected a District-Director, member of the " Central Board and Vice-President of the Association the following year; then a Provisional Director of the Saskatchewan Co-operative Elevator Company, Secretary Treasurer of the Company, the first General Manager, by a unanimous vote of the board; a member of the Royal Commission to look into the question of agricultural .credit and also. of grain markets in Europe; a member of the Canadian Council of Agriculture, in the Martin Government, as Provincial Treasurer; member of the Canada Food Board as Director of Food Committee; successively Minister of Agriculture, Minister of the Bureau of Labour and Industries, Provincial Secretary and Premier at the age of thirty-six. A Liberal; Address, Parliament Buildings, Regina, Sask.

 

MATHIEU:  His Grace Archbishop Olivier Elzear, Archbishop of Regina. Born in the city of Quebec, December 24th, 1853; son of Joseph and Marguerite (LaTouche) Mathieu. Educated in Quebec and Rome. Professor of philosophy, Laval University, 1878. Rector of Laval University, 1898. Bishop of Regina  1911. Named Archbishop, 1915. Doctor in philosophy, doctor of theology, doctor of the Academy of St. Thomas of Rome. Officer of the Public Instruction of France.

 

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     Knight Of the Legion Of Honour Of France, and a Companion Of the Order Of Michael and George, England. Address, Bishop's Palace, Regina.

 

HARDING: The Right Reverend, Malcolm Taylor MacAdam, D.D., Bishop of Qu'Appelle, and Chancellor Of St. Chad's College, Regina, Saskatchewan. Born 1863, educated in England in 1886; a missionary Of the Church of England on the Upper Ottawa River, Ontario, 1888. Curate of Holy Trinity Church, Brockville, Ont., 1189. Curate of St. George's Cathedral, Kingston, Ont., 1893. Recorder and Rural Dean of Brandon, Manitoba, 1900. Chaplain of the Manitoba Dragoons, 1903. Archdeacon of Assiniboia and examining chaplain to the Bishop Of Qu'Appelle, 1909. Coadjutor Bishop Of the Diocese Of Qu'Appelle, 1911, Bishop Of Qu'Appelle. Residence, Regina, Sask.

 

LLOYD: The Right Reverend George Exton., M.A., D.D., Bishop of the Diocese Of Saskatchewan. Born January 6th, 1861. Married Miss Marion Tuppen, Of Brighton, England, in 1885, and has three sons and two daughters. His youngest son was killed at Vimy Ridge, serving with the 28th Sask. Regt. Was educated at St. John's College, London, England; Wycliffe College, Toronto, and at the University of Toronto. Served through the North-west Rebellion in 1885 with the University Company of the Queen's Own of Toronto, and was severely wounded. Was appointed chaplain of the regiment. Founder of the Rothesay College for Boys, New Brunswick. Chaplain and afterwards leader of the British Colony in Saskatchewan, known as the Barr Colony. Founded and built Emmanuel College, Saskatoon. Elected Bishop Of Saskatchewan, 1922. An M.A. Of University Of New Brunswick; D.D. Of St. John's College, Winnipeg; D.D. of Emmanuel College, Saskatoon; D.D. Wycliffe College, Toronto. Address, Bishops Thorpe, Prince Albert, Sask.

 

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PRUD'HOMME: Joseph Henry, D.D., D.0.L: Bishop Of Prince Albert and Saskatoon. Born at St. Boniface, Manitoba, Sept. 9th, 1882. A son of His Honour Judge Louis Arthur and Miss Appollins C. (Henault) Prud'homme. Educated at St. Boniface College (Manitoba), (Jesuit Fathers), Seminary of Philosophy and Theology (Montreal), Canadian College (Rome). Secretary to Archbishop Langevin, 1910 and 1915. Chancellor of the Archdiocese Of St. Boniface, 19111921. Professor at Seminary, St. Boniface. Editor of "Les Cloches de St. Boniface," 1920. Secretary of the bulletin, "La Societie Historique, de St. Boniface," 1908-21. Appointed Bishop of Prince Albert and Saskatoon, 1921. Consecrated Bishop Oct. 28th, 1921, in St. Boniface Cathedral, by Archbishop Dr. Maria, Apostolic Delegate. Roman Catholic.  Bishop's residence, Prince Albert.

 

BROWN : The Honourable James Thomas, Chief Justice of the King's Bench Court Of Saskatchewan. Born at Huntington, Quebec, son of ,Samuel and Margaret (White)Brown. Married Alice M. Lewis, of Moosomin, in 1902. Has four sons and a daughter. Came to Manitoba in 1893. After three years removed to Moosomin, N.W.T., where he practised law in partnership with the firm of Brown, Wylie and Mundell. Created a King's Counsel in 1897. Agent for the Attorney-General in 1904. Elected to the Saskatchewan Assembly in 1905, for the constituency of Souris. Contested the seat for the Federal house in 1908 and W3;S defeated. Appointed a Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan, 1910, and received his present appointment in 1918.

 

LAMONT: The Honourable J. H., Justice Of the Court of Appeal, Saskatchewan. Has a long and honourable connection with the Province. Practised law at Prince Albert; elected to the Local Assembly; member of the. Cabinet, ex-Attorney-General; appointed to the Court Of Appeal.

 

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McKAY: The Honourable James, K.C., B.A., Justice of the Court of Appeal, Saskatchewan. Was born in the Province of Manitoba in 1862, son of the late Wm. McKay and Mary (Cook) McKay. Married, 7th of April, 1900, Florence A. Reid. Was educated at St. John's College, Winnipeg (honours: medal for ancient and modern history, university medal for classics), graduating with the degree of B.A. Called to the Bar of Manitoba in 1886; practised in Winnipeg for one year; went to the North-west Territories in 1887. Practised at Prince Albert until appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court of Saskatchewan in 1914. Appointed Queen's Counsel in 1894. At one time was a member of the City Council of Prince Albert. Liberal-Conservative candidate for the House of Commons in 1896, opposing Sir Wilfrid Laurier, by whom he was defeated. Elected to the House of Commons for the constituency of Prince Albert, 1911. Father a factor in the employ of the Hudson's Bay Company. Served with the Scouts in the Rebellion of 1885. Appointed Judge of the Court of Appeal of Saskatchewan, 1921. Religion, Church of England. Clubs, Assiniboia, Regina. Recreations, golf and curling. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

TURGEON: Hon. William Ferdinand Alphonse, RA., K.C., Justice of the Court of Appeal of Saskatchewan, ex-Attorney-General of the Province and chairman of the Western Grain Commission. Born Bathurst, N.B., June 3rd, 1887; son of Onsiphore Turgeon, M.P., and Margaret (Baldwin) Turgeon. Educated New York City, Laval University. Called to the New Brunswick Bar; came to Prince Albert and formed partnership with Hon. J. H. Lamont, 1903. Sworn in as Attorney-General of Saskatchewan, Sept. 23rd 1907. Elected to Saskatchewan Legislature, for Prince Albert, 1907. Ran in two constituencies, 1908; elected for Duck Lake, but was defeated for Prince Albert. Contested and won constituency Humboldt,

 

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1912. Was again successful in 1917. Married Gertrude Boudreau, of Petit Rocher, N.B., 1901. Has two sons and three daughters. Liberal, Roman Catholic. Address, Angus Street, Regina, Sask.

 

MARTIN: The Honourable W. M. Justice, ex-Premier of Saskatchewan. (Court of Appeal.) Was born at Norwich, Ont., Aug. 22nd, 1876, a son of the Reverend Wm. and Mrs. Martin. Attended the Clinton (Ont.) Collegiate, and is a graduate of Toronto University, from which he holds an honour degree in classics, 1898; Ontario Normal College, Hamilton (Ont.); Osgoode Hall (Scholarship), (1892-3); was classical master, Harriston (Ont.) High School, 1889,1901. Was urged to accept the nomination for House of Commons in the Western Assiniboia, Con., 1906. Declined. Was elected for Regina 1908 and again in 1911. Resigned in 1917 to accept the Premiership of Saskatchewan at the time of the resignation of ex-Premier Walter Scott. He was re-elected in June of that year and held office until 1922, when he resigned and was appointed to the Court of Appeal of Saskatchewan. He married, in 1906, Violette Florence Thompson, daughter of Walter Thompson, Esq., of Mitchell, Ont., and has one son. He is a member of the Masonic Order of A.F. and A.M. A Liberal. Presbyterian.

Address, 2042 Cornwall St., Regina.

WETMORE: The late Honourable Edward Ludlow, ex-Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench of Saskatchewan.  Born May 24th, 1841, at Fredericton, N.B, his father being C. P. W. Wetmore, Clerk of the Legislative Assembly, and his mother a daughter of Colonel Richard Ketchum of Woodstock, N.B. U. E. Loyalist. Was educated in grammar schools at Fredericton and Gagetown. He graduated with honours in arts from the University of New Brunswick, in 1889. Was called to the bar in New Brunswick in 1864. Made a Q.C. in 1881 and rapidly became one of the

 

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leaders of the bar of his Province. In 1872 he married Eliza J. Dickson, daughter of Charles Dickson. In 1874, 1875, and 1876 was Mayer of Fredericton. He subsequently became a member of the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick, and Leader of the Opposition from 1883 to 1886, when he was appointed to the Supreme Court of New Brunswick. Came to the North-west Territories in 1887, and was one of the five puisne judges appointed to the North-west Territories during that year, his Judicial District being Assiniboia. On the death of Chief Justice McGuire, he became Chief Justice, and when autonomy was granted he was appointed Chief Justice of the King's Bench of Saskatchewan, retiring in 1912. In 1908 the University of New Brunswick conferred the degree of LL.D. upon him. He died on January 19th, 1922, at Victoria, B.C.

 

MOTHERWELL: Honourable William, M.P., Minister of Agriculture for the Dominion of Canada. Born January 6th; 1860. Married Adeline Rogers (deceased) Kate Gillespie, 1908. Has been a prominent figure in the farming life of the west for many years. Was Minister of Agriculture in the Saskatchewan, Government. Elected for Regina City (Federal), 1921. When the Hon. Wm. Mackenzie King formed his Government, Mr. Motherwell was chosen as his Minister of Agriculture. Farms a large tract of land near Abernethy, Sask. Address, Ottawa.

 

 

McNAB: The Honourable Archibald Peter, Minister of Public Works and Telephone, Saskatchewan Government. Born May 29, 1864, Glengarry, Ont. Son of Malcolm and Margaret (McCrimmon) McNab. Married Edith Todd April 20th, 1892. Has four sons and two daughters. Educated in Glengarry. The Hon. Mr. McNab in private life is a miller and grain merchant; Was president of the Saskatoon Milling and Elevator Co. First elected to Saskatchewan Legislature for Saskatoon

 

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 in general election 1908. Re-elected at general election 1912. Appointed to the Cabinet as Minister of Municipal Affairs, Dec., 1908. On rearrangement of portfolios became Minister of Public Works, August,1913. Elected for Elrose Constituency at general election 1917, and elected for Saskatoon City at general election 1921. At the time of the retirement of Premier Martin, held the Portfolio of Public Works and Public Health. When Premier Dunning assumed office in April, 1922, was allotted the portfolios of Public Works and Telephones. Member Wascana Country Club, Assiniboia Club (Regina), Saskatoon Club and Saskatoon Country Club. Liberal; Presbyterian. Residence, Regina, Sask.

 

LATTA: Honourable Samuel, Minister of Education, Government of Saskatchewan. Born at London, Ontario, April 3rd, 1886, son of John and Elizabeth (Barrell) Latta. Married Annie Agnes Boyland, daughter of Captain Jas. Boyland, of London, England. Mr. Latta was educated at London and St. Mary's Collegiates, Ottawa Normal School. Was clerk of the township in Middlesex County. Member of the Rural Council (sec.-treas). Last Mountain Valley. Taught school in Ontario before coming west. Editor of the News, Govan, Saskatchewan. Elected to the Saskatchewan Assembly; called to the Cabinet, Provincial Secretary; Minister of Education, author of several educational works. A popular speaker on educational subjects. Methodist. Liberal. Address, 2051 Cameron St., Regina.

 

HAMILTON: The Honourable Charles, Minister of Agriculture, Saskatchewan Government, son of Andrew Hamilton, of Indian Head, one of the pioneers of that district. Was first elected to the Saskatchewan Legislature in: July, 1919, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of. the Hon. R. M. Mitchell, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly. Appointed Minister of Agriculture in 1920. Liberal. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

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CROSS:  Colonel, The Honourable James. Albert. (K.C., D.S.O.), Attorney-General of the Province of Saskatchewan, barrister and solicitor (Cross, Jonah, Hugg & Forbes). Born at Caledonia Springs, Ont., Dec. 11th, 1876; son of George Henry and Marian (Kenny) Cross, both Canadians of Irish. descent. Married Ida Bell Dawson, of Regina, Sept. 7th, 1905, and has one son and a daughter, Educated at Collegiate Institute, Vankleek Hill, Ont. Came to Regina, Sask., from Ontario, 1898, and taught school for a time. Studied law in Regina and was called to the bar of Saskatchewan, August 5th, 1905. K.C., 1916.. Member Regina Public School Board for four years and chairman one year. Served overseas, C.E.F., with 28th Batt. and 27th (City of Winnipeg) Batt. Awarded D.S.O. and mentioned in dispatches. District Officer commanding Mil. Dis. No. 12, from June 1st, 1918, to Sept. 1st, 1919. In 1916~ while overseas, was elected to the Saskatchewan Legislature to represent the Saskatchewan soldiers in Great Britain. Elected to Legislature for Regina City in general election, June 9th, 1921. Entered Saskatchewan Government as Attorney-General, April 5th, 1921. Re-elected by acclamation in May, 1922. An ardent Liberal in politics and has always taken a keen interest in public affairs.

Methodist. Address, 1934 Sixteenth Avenue, Regina.

 

UHRICH: The Honourable John M.Ph.C., M.C., Provincial Secretary and Minister of Public Health, Saskatchewan Government. Born June 7th, 1877, at Formosa, Ont., son of Ignatius and Caroline (Braehler). His father was an Alsatian and his mother Canadian, his father being a French veteran of the Franco Prussian war. Dr. Uhrich was educated at the Separate Schools, Formosa, Ont., at Walkerton High School and the North-western University, Chicago, Ill. He was married in June 1910, to Catherine, daughter of J. B. Tischart, of Formosa, Ont. He is a physician and surgeon. In polities a Liberal. Was first

 

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 elected to Saskatchewan Legislature at the general election of 1921. Upon the retirement of the Hon. W. M. Martin from the Premiership and the appointment of the Hon. Chas. Dunning to that position; on April 5th, 1922, Dr. Uhrich became a member of the Government with the portfolio of Provincial Secretary and Minister in Charge of the Bureau of Public Health. He was elected by acclamation in the following byelection in the Rosthern Constituency, on June 5th. In religion Dr. Uhrich is a Roman Catholic. Residence, Regina, Sask.

 

GARDINER: The Honourable James Garfield, B.A., Minister of Highways and Minister in Charge of Labour and Industries, Saskatchewan Provincial Government. Born Farquhar, Ont., Nov. 30th, 1883, son of James C. and Elizabeth Gardiner, of Kirkton, Ont. Married Violet McEwen, of Craik, Sask., Dec. 25, 1917, and has one son and one daughter. Educated at the University of Manitoba. Mr. Gardiner moved with his parents in early life to Lincoln, Nebraska (1891) where he attended school and gained knowledge of the central prairie west. Lived one year in the lumbering town of, Alpena, Michigan. Returned to Ontario in 1896, where his parents again took up farming. Migrated to the West in the harvest excursion (1901). Worked on the farm in the summer and attended the secondary school at Clearwater, Manitoba, for three years, at the end of which time he came to Saskatchewan (1904), holding second-class teacher's certificate. Attended Normal School in Regina in the spring of 1905. Entered Manitoba College, Winnipeg. Matriculated in autumn of 1906.  Graduated, after specializing in history and political economy, from Manitoba University, 1911. Became principal, Lemberg Public School, May 1st, 1911, where he taught grade VIII, third and second-class work, until elected to the Legislature, June 25th, 1914, to represent the constituency of North Qu'Appelle. Re-elected to the Legislature

 

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 in the general election, 1917, by increased majority, in the general election of 1921 by acclamation. Taken into the Cabinet under Hon. Chils. Dunning when he formed his Government in April, 1922. Elected as Minister by acclamation. Member of the Union Church. Address, 2100 Rae St., Regina, Sask.

 

MACDONALD: The Honourable Hector Y., Justice of the Court of King's Bench, Saskatchewan. Born at Margaree, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, 1876, son of Alexander and Janett MacDonald. Married Mary Jane Gillies, 1908, and has one daughter. Educated at St. Francis Xavier University and Dalhousie Law School. Articled to Drysdale & MacInnes. Called to the Nova Scotia bar 1903. Practised at Port Hood, Inverness County, also Sydney, N.S. (Ross & MacDonald.) Came to Saskatchewan in 1906, practised in partnership with the Honourable T. H. McGuire, Moosomin, Sask. Came to Regina and was attached to the Attorney-General's Department. City Solicitor for Regina, a member of the firm of MacKenzie, Brown & Co. Appointed to present position March 2nd, 1918. Member of the Assiniboia Club (Regina), Wascana Country Club. Member of the Knights of Columbus. Recreations, motoring, fishing, golf and shooting. Residence, 2303 Rose St., Regina.

 

EMBURY: Brigadier General, C.B., C.M.G.  The Honourable John Fletcher Leopold, Judge of the King's Bench of Saskatchewan. Born November 10th, 1875, son of Allan and Frances R. Embury. Married Dora Williams, of Barrie, in 1904. Has one son and three daughters. Educated at Toronto University and Osgoode Hall, Toronto. Practised law at Regina. Served with distinction in the European war. O.C. 28th Battalion, 13th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Infantry Brigade, and was on the staff of the Imperial G. H. Q., 1914-1919. Mentioned in dispatches three times. Awarded the C.B. in 1919. C.M.G. in 1916. Returned to Canada and appointed to the King's Bench, 1918.

 

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BIGELOW: The Honourable Henry Veeder Puisne Judge of the King's Bench, Saskatchewan. Born at Lynn, Mass, U.S.A., November 6th, 1874, a son of James E. Bigelow and Henrietta Agnes Bigelow. Married Mary Typper, daughter of the late John Tupper. Esq., and Mrs. Tupper, of Halifax Nova Scotia and has seven children-five boys add two girls. Mr. Justice Bigelow's parents moved from the United States to Truro, Nova Scotia, where he received his elementary education in the public and high schools later attended Dalhousie University on graduating with the degrees of M.A. and LL.B. Was called to the bar of Nova Scotia In 1900 and practised at Truro for seven years. Came West in 1907 and settled in Regina, being admitted to the bar of the North-west Territories. Was subsequently made a K.C. and appointed Justice of the Court of King's Bench, Saskatchewan in 1918. Member of the Assiniboia Club, Wascana Country Club. His recreations are curling, tennis, motoring. fishing and golf. He was the first president of the Saskatchewan Tennis Association and was formerly president of the Regina Curling Club, and secretary of the Saskatchewan Motor League; a member of the Masonic Fraternity and Past Provincial Grand Prior of the Knights Templar for Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Has been identified with community service in many ways. Was president of the S.P.C;A. for many years, and also the first president of the Regina Branch of the Navy League. Religion, Anglican. Was Warden of St. Paul's Church, Regina, for several years and member of the Executive of the Synod of the Diocese of Qu' Appelle. Address, 2363 Smith Street, Regina.

 

 

 

 

TAYLOR: The Honourable George Edward Puisne Judge of the King's Bench, Saskatchewan. Born at Winnipeg, Manitoba, 27th December, 1878, son of George Taylor, of London, Ont. (Mayor), and Mary

 

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Ann (Maguire) Taylor. Married Mabel Cecelia Ryan January 1st 1904 and has one son and four daughters. Educated at London and Toronto, Ont. Studied law with Meredith & Fisher, London, Ont., and at Osgoode Hall. Graduated and called to the bar in Ontario 1902 and Practised with Meredith & Fisher, London, Ont. Admitted to the bar of Saskatchewan in 1906 and practised at Moose Jaw until 1918. Appointed K.C. in 1913; appointed Justice of the Court of King's Bench, Saskatchewan, March 1st, 1918. Member of the Moose Jaw Club; Assiniboia Club, Regina; Moose Jaw Golf Club.  Recreation, golf. president for Southern Division Saskatchewan Musical Association, 1923-1924. Religion, Presbyterian; Trustee of St. Andrew's Church, Moose Jaw. Address, 175 Athabasca St., Moose Jaw.

 

MACKENZIE: The Honourable Philip Edward, Puisne Judge of the King's Bench of Saskatchewan. Born at London, Ont., January 9th, 1872, a son of Philip MacKenzie and Elizabeth Langley. Married Agnes Strickland Vicars, daughter of John J. Vickers and Catherine (Moodie) Vickers, of Toronto, Ont., 24th of September, 1902. Educated at Collegiate Institute, London, Ont.; graduated from Toronto University 1893, B.A. and LL.B., 1895. Studied law at Osgoode Hall, graduated and called to the bar in Ontario in 1896. Appointed Crown Attorney of Kenora District 1903-10. Admitted to the bar of Saskatchewan in 1910. Agent of the Attorney-General for Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Judicial Dist., 1911-21. Appointed King's Counsel, Saskatchewan, 1913. Appointed Justice of the Court of King's Bench, Saskatchewan, 1921. Member of the Baconian Club, London; Assiniboia
 Club, Regina; Union Club, Victoria; Riverside Golf Club, Saskatoon; Victoria Golf Club, Victoria; Royal Colonial Institute, London, England. Recreations, golf and rowing. Formerly a member of the Argonant Rowing Club, Toronto, and member of

 

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 the winning crew in Junior and Intermediate fours. Member of the Anglican Church. Address 812 Spadina Crescent, Saskatoon, Sask.

 

 

PERRY: Major General, Aylesford Bowen, C.M.G., Hon. A.D.C., formerly Commissioner Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ont. Born County of Lennox, Ont., Aug. 21st, 1860. Educated Napanee High School, Royal Military College (Kingston). Graduated 1880 (the first graduate from the college). Gazetted [sic] lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 1880, but was forced to resign his commission through continued ill health. Served as Inspector Mounted Police 1882 was all through. North-west Rebellion, serving with distinction, 1885, with rank of major in -Canadian Militia. Promoted to rank of Supt. in recognition of his services. Called to the bar of the North-west Territories in 1896. Went to England in command of the detachment sent to the Diamond Jubilee of Queen

 Victoria, 1897. Appointed to command of the force in the Yukon Territory, 1899. Promoted Commissioner, 1900 (Aug. 1st). Appointed Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George, 1908. Appointed Hon. A.D.C. to his Excellency Governor-General Earl Grey. At the Coronation of King George and Queen Mary was in command of the contingent of police sent from Canada. Hon. A.D.C. to His Excellency the Duke of Devonshire; Commissioner of the combined forces of police, R.N.W.M.P. and Dominion Police, under the name of R.C.M. Police, 1920 (Feb. 1st). Married Emma Duranty Meikle, daughter of Geo. L. Meikle, of Lachute, Quebec. Has one son, Lt.-Col. K. M. Perry, D.S.O., professor of strategy and tactics, Royal Military College, Kingston, Ont., and two daughters, Mrs. Gordon Campbell of Vancouver, and Mrs. G.L. Jennings, of Regina. Club, Rideau (Ottawa). Presbyterian. Residence, Vancouver.

 

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General Archibald MacDonnell, O.C., of the Royal Military College at Kingston, pays the following tribute to General Perry, in the Review, the College

periodical:

"In the voluntary retirement of Commissioner Perry, the Dominion has lost the services of a gifted, many-sided man, whose talents and energies have been placed whole-heartedly at Canada's disposal for forty long, strenuous years.  "It is not often given to an officer to serve for forty years in the same force, and in a force which is admittedly the finest Frontier Armed Constabulary the world has yet seen. For the last twenty years Commissioner Perry has commanded and made peculiarly his own the Mounted Police, to such an extent that every order bears the firm imprint of his hand and every move indicates his wise guidance; further, under his stern but just rule there has been fostered in the force a pride in itself and its high standard or what the prairie man terms A pride of 'trace and trail,' which has enabled it to reach and keep its present unrivalled position."

 

Read the R.M.C. record of the ex-cadet who made the force his life work:

Joined the R.M.C. June 1st, 1876, at the age of fifteen years and ten months.

Left the R.M.C. June 30th, 1880.

Lance-Corporal, January, 1877.

Corporal, June, 1877.

Sergeant, September, 1878.

C.S.M., August, 1879.

Awarded the Governor-General's Gold Medal for proficiency.

 

Mathematics-Honours.

Military Engineering-Honours. Artillery-Honours.

Tactics, Military Administration and Law-Honours.  Geometry, Drawing and Design-Honours. Surveying-Honours.

 

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Physics-Honours. Chemistry-Honours.

Civil Engineering-Honours.

Freehand Drawing-Special Mention. French-Special Mention. Drills-Honours.

Discipline (N.C.O.'s)-Honours. Conduct-Exemplary.

"R E. Commission, 1880. Resigned, 1881. R.N.W.P. Inspector, 1882. Superintendent, 1885.  Commissioner, 1900.

"I think I am safe in saying that it has never been equalled, has never been surpassed. In 1900, when he was promoted Commissioner, in succession to Colonel Herchmer, the order promoting Commissioner Perry read in the most complimentary way, and he has more than fulfilled all expectations. In fair weather and foul his strong hand has always been on the helm of the old force, guiding its destinies wisely and well. Thousands and thousands of miles of country have been explored, and British Law, Order, and the accompanying Fair Play enforced in the furthermost limits of Canada.

History will eventually prove what this work has really meant to Canada, and will, I firmly believe, pay full tribute to the wise brain, indomitable courage, faith in Canada and able administration of Aylesworth Bowen Perry, as one of the builders of Canada one who took and lived up to our college motto: 'Truth, Duty, Valour,' as his guide through life, and who made the most of his opportunities. It will be long before we see his like again."

 

DOBIE: Reverend George Nelson, D.D., Archdeacon and Deputy Procurator, Diocese of Qu' Appelle, Warden St. Chad's College, Regina. Son of James and Jane Dobie. Born Rowanburn, Canobie, Scotland. Educated Blennerhasset and St. Paul's College. Came to Canada 1886. Ordained by Bisbop Anson

 

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first Bishop of Qu'Appelle, 1888. Worked in various parishes in Diocese of Qu'Appe1le. Appointed Warden of St. Chad's College by Bishop Grisdale, 1909. Archdeacon of Regina, 1909. Dean of Qu' Appelle by Bishop Harding, 1922. Assistant Secretary and Registrar, Member of General Synod since 1905. Principal Synod of Rupertsland since 1893. Deputy Procurator, 1920. Address, St. Chad's College, Regina, Sask.

 

 

 

CALDER: Hon. James Alexander, B.A., LL.D., Senator. Born Sept. 17th, 1868, Oxford County, Ont., son of James Calder and Johanna McKay, - both born in Scotland. Family removed to Ingersoll, Ont.; to Winnipeg, 1882. Father died in 1882 and mother still living. Educated Ingersoll public schools until 1882~, and public and high schools, Winnipeg (1882-85); Manitoba College (1885-88; honour graduate in science, Manitoba College, 1888 (Silver Medallist). Called to the bar, North-west Territories, 1906; not practising. Principal Moose Jaw High School, 1891-94. Inspector Schools, North-west Territories, 1894-1900. Deputy Commissioner North-west Territories, 1901-05. Elected to the Saskatchewan Assembly at first general election, 1905; upon the formation of the Scott ministry 1905, was appointed Provincial Treasurer and Commissioner of Education, later Minister of Railways and Highways. In the general election of 1908 was defeated in the Milestone division, but at a bye-election, December 7th, was elected for Saltcoats by an overwhelming majority. Re-elected for Saltcoats, general election, 1912 and 1917. Was honoured by Toronto University with the degree of LL.D. Upon the retirement of Premier Scott, in Oct., 1916, was offered the Premiership of Saskatchewan, but declined. Accepted the portfolio of Minister of Immigration and Colonization in the Union Government, on its formation in 1917, and was elected for the Moose Jaw constituency in the ensuing general election of December, 1917. Resigned portfolio in Saskatchewan Government on entry in

 

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Federal Cabinet. On the retirement of Sir Robert Borden from the leadership of the Union Government, in 1921, his name was frequently mentioned as possible successor. Resigned portfolio and was elevated to the Dominion Senate December, 1921. Has been appointed First Vice-president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, London. Married and has one son. Presbyterian. Liberal. Clubs, Assiniboia, Regina; Rideau, Ottawa. Recreation, golf. Residence, Ottawa.

 

 

    

FATHER LEBRET; FATHER HUGONARD: Pioneer missionaries of the Roman Catholic Church. The Indian Industrial School at Lebret was named after Father Lebret, who was one of the earliest missionaries of the Roman Catholic Church.

Father Hugonard, who for many years had charge of the school, was also one of the greatest of the pioneer priests. His influence with the Indians was of great value to the Government in the stormy days of 1885. It is reported that "Star Blanket," the chief of the File Hill Indians, decided to rejoin the rebellious tribes on the banks of the Saskatchewan. Accordingly he camped in the Qu' Appelle Valley, and his warriors engaged nightly in their war dances. Father Hugonard was away when these preparations started, and when he arrived home, Star Blanket was about to lead his braves to the scene of hostilities. Girding up his soutanne, Father Hugonard strode down the valley to the camp of Star Blanket. He Was in the lodge with his wives when the priest arrived. Father Hugonard pointed out to him the folly of his course and told him that he would probably end on the gallows. Star Blanket, however, insisted that he was going on the war path. He said that now was the time to drive the white man out of the country and he was going to take it. Whereupon the burly priest seized the Indian by the throat and before he had time to reach for his knife choked him into unconsciousness, and threw him amongst his wives, at the same time ordering

 

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them to take him back to the Reserve. Utterly humiliated, Star Blanket returned home and his followers melted away. When news came to the File Hill Reserve of the hanging of a number of northern Indians at Battleford, after the rebellion had been suppressed, Star Blanket came to Father Hugonard and with tears in his eyes thanked him for preventing him from engaging in it. Father Hugonard passed a long life at the little village in the Qu'Appelle Valley. Before he died, some years ago, he had been growing feeble for some time and it was seen that the end was not far off. Many of the older Indians came to his bedside and he spoke to them all in their native language with cheerfulness and content. He passed away, sincerely mourned, not only by the natives in the country for whom he had done so much, but by all white people, Catholic or Protestant alike, with whom he had come in contact.

 

WILLOUGHBY: The Honourable Wellington Bartley, B.A., LL.B., Senator. (Barrister) Willoughby & Beynon. Born County of Peel, 1859, a son of. John and Margaret (Armstrong) Willoughby. Married Susan Smedley Jones, of Philadelphia, Pa., 1892. Educated Hamilton Collegiate, University of Toronto. Entered university 1880; graduated 1883. Articled in law to N. G. Bigelow, Esq., Toronto. Called to the bar and practised in Toronto. Come West in 1897, to Moose Jaw, practised alone, afterward Willoughby & Pickett [Willoughby, Pickett & Craig (Willoughby, Craig and Beynon), now Willoughby & Beynon.] Contested Cardwell constituency, Conservative interest in 1896 (defeated); contested Moose Jaw constituency, 1912. Was elected and sat for the City of Moose Jaw until 1917. On the elevation of Sir Frederick Haultain to the bench was chosen as leader of the Conservative party in the Province (1912). Elected and reelected. Resigned in 1917 and was called to the Dominion Senate. He has been appointed on numerous Standing

 

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Committees, notably the Divorce Committee of the Senate, many Special Committees--Hudson Bay Ry., Grain Marketing, etc. He is solicitor for the Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian Government, City of Moose Jaw and many corporations.

Clubs, Rideau (Ottawa), Prairie (Moose Jaw) Assiniboia (Regina), Kiwanis. Member of Masonic Fraternity. An Anglican. Conservative. Address, Moose Jaw.

 

 

SCOTT: Honourable Walter, ex-premier of Saskatchewan,. 1905-16. Was born in the Township of London Ont. (County of Middlesex), October 27th, 1867.  a son of Mr. and Mrs. George Scott. He was educated at the public schools. Came to the North-west Territories and for a great number of years engaged in the newspaper business; became a partner in The Regina Standard in 1892; became owner and editor of The Moose Jaw Times in 1894. Acquired The Regina Leader in 1895. This he edited and managed until 1900. He was honoured by the" Western Canada Press Association that year by being elected president. Contested the Federal constituency of Assiniboia in 1900, against the late Nicholas Flood Davin, and was elected; reelected, 1904, and at the formation of the Territories into the two provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan was invited by Lt.-Governor Forget to form the First Saskatchewan Ministry (1905). This he did, resigning his seat in the Canadian Commons. He was successful in forming a Cabinet, he himself being President of the Council and Minister of Public Works.

 

During the period of his Premiership he went to the country several times and was successful on each occasion, easily defeating the opposition party (Provincial Rights), led by the Hon. F. W. Haultain, now Sir Frederick Haultain, Chief Justice of Saskatchewan.

 

Mr. Scott, as Minister of Public Works, began and finished the Parliament buildings at Regina; laid the

 

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foundation of the University at Saskatoon, and erected large bridges at Saskatoon and Battleford, besides numerous court buildings, and carried on as well 1arge annual programmes of highway and bridge building. In 1912 relinquished that department and assumed the Department of Education, remaining also President of Council. In 1916 retired, owing to prolonged ill health. In 1912 and 1914 Mr. Scott travelled for his health, going to Panama, Russia, twice to Germany; and in the latter year around the world, Visiting New Zealand, Australia, Ceylon, India, Egypt and Italy. A  public career of nearly twenty years' continuous and usually exciting service, cut short at forty-eight years of age, is not common in Canada. Entered Parliament at 32. Mr. Scott became Premier at 32; the later fact indicates that he had made a mark in Parliament. During his eleven years as Premier, a mass of sound, aggressive achievement stands to the credit of his administration. In his last session he granted full suffrage to women; under him Saskatchewan led the way - in liquor prohibition. The bars and all liquor licenses were abolished 1st July, 1915. Perhaps next to this anti-liquor measure, the outstanding Act of Mr. Scott's regime was that adopted in 1911, creating the Saskatchewan Co-operative Elevator Association. In 1908 his Government inaugurated a public telephone system. In the earlier years, the capital location had to be decided, courts established, high schools, collegiates, university and agricultural colleges. Inaugurated laws regarding labour and workman's compensation enacted. Railways were built; the common school system expanded. Under Mr. Scott's premiership Saskatchewan grew to third place In population and output of products. It was upon his motion that the Capital was fixed at Regina. At the Coronation of King George and Queen Mary in Westminster Abbey, June, 1911, Mr. and Mrs. Scott were Saskatchewan’s official delegates. Married in 1890 Jessie Florence Reid, daughter of E. B. Reid, Esq., of Smith’s Falls, Ont.,

 

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and an ex-postmaster of Regina. Has one daughter. Club-Assiniboia (Regina), Wascana Country Club (Regina), Union Club (Victoria). Liberal; favoured Union Government at Ottawa during- war period. Presbyterian. Resides in Victoria, B.C.

 

TUXFORD: Brigadier General George Stuart, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., Legion d’Honneur. Canadian Garage, Moose Jaw. Born Penmorfa, Carnarvonshire, Wales, 1870, a son of James George and Harriet Elizabeth Tuxford (both deceased). Married Jemima Thomson and has one son, Lieut. James Archibald Tuxford. Educated Willingboro Grammar School, Northhamptonshire, Eng. Came to Canada, 1888. Farmed at Buffalo Lake, Moose Jaw, 1,700 acres. Was instrumental in securing for Moose Jaw the armouries, the first rural telephones, and the C.P.R. branch north to Outlook. Went to the Klondyke in 1899. Entered the Canadian Militia in 1906. European War 1914-1918 as Lieut.-Col. Commanding 5th Can. Batt. which he organized at Valcartier. Brigadier General Commanding 3rd Canadian Infantry Brigade from March 1916 to end of war. Occupied the bridge head on the Rhine: Mentioned In dispatches eight times. C.M.G.; 1916. Legion d'Honneur, Croix de Guerre, 1916. C.B. (Mil.), 1917. D.S.O. and bar, 1918. Made honorary member Canadian and Kiwanis Clubs after return from the war. Anglican. Address, 127 River St., Moose Jaw, ask.

 

Ross: Honourable James H., Senator. Moose Jaw and Montreal. Commissioner in the Yukon. Member of the N.W.T. Legislative Assembly. Speaker of the Territorial Assembly. Came to the West in the early eighties; drove a dog train in the hinterland of Manitoba; settled near Moose Jaw; while a comparatively young man, engaged in ranching in the Qu' Appelle Valley in partnership with William Riddell, Esq. Was the first member of the Assembly from Moose Jaw.

 

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Resigned in 1887 to contest the, constituency for the Federal House (defeated). Mr. Ross enjoys the reputation of being the strongest administrator the Yukon had during the pioneer days of the Klondyke. Mr. Ross suffered a sad bereavement when his wife and infant child were drowned when the Canadian Pacific liner Islander went down on the Pacific Coast. Mr. Ross afterwards resigned the Commissionership and was elected representative for the Yukon in the Federal House at Ottawa. He has been a strong political partisan all his life, but singularly free of personal animosities is esteemed by all. A pioneer of this last frontier in Canada.

 

 

 

REED: Hayter, Ex-Commissioner of Indian Affairs, N.W.T. Came to West with the Wolseley expedition; one of the few survivors left. Married Miss Armour, daughter of Judge Armour, a family that has given to Canada many brilliant professional men. When the provisional battalion was disbanded in Winnipeg and Colonel Allan McDonald came to Qu' Appelle as Indian Agent for treaty, some time in the seventies, Mr. Reed also went into the service of the Indian Department and was agent at Battleford for a period. He was a man of strong personality and executive ability, and soon attracted the attention of the Honourable Mr. Dewdney, who at that time united the two offices of Lieut.-Governor of the North-west Territory and Indian Commissioner. Mr. Reed was appointed as Assistant to the Administrator of the Indian Department, with the title of Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Held this position during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885, and on one occasion came very near being captured by the Indians. Promoted to the Commissionership, afterwards Deputy Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs at Ottawa. Retired, from the civil service. Was secretary St. James Club, Montreal, superintendent in charge of hotels, Canadian Pacific Railway. In this work he was greatly

 

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assisted by Mrs. Reed who as an Interior decorator has few equals on the continent. Travellers over the Canadian Pacific will see her splendid handiwork in the artistic decorations of the Chateau Frontenac, the Royal Alexandria, the Empress and other hotels of that system.   Mr. Reed is now retired and spends his time between Montreal and his summer home at St. Andrews, N.B.

 

 

HERCHMER: The late Colonel Lawrence. North~West Mounted Police. This is just a little tribute from the editors of this work to the memory of the above giant soldier. No name is more affectionately remembered in the annals of the "Mounted" that that “Old Sorrell Top” as he was called (in allusion to his ruddy complexion.) 

 

Served as an ensign in the elderly days with the British Army. Col. Herchrmer enjoyed the reputation of a being a martinet, but a just one, and he established an  esprit de corps amongst his men never exceeded by any similar body.  He contributed in no small way to the splendid reputation which this force built up throughout the years.  Organized the Canadian Mounted Rifles and took them to South Africa.  Col. Herchmer died in Vancouver only a few years ago, after a long life spent almost entirely in the service of his country.

 

 

PERLEY: The Late Senator William Den late of Wolseley, Sask. Born at Blissville
N. B. Fredericton Feb 6th 1838, a son of the Honourable William Perley (Member of the N. B. Government) and his wife, Sarah Perley. Married Miss Phoebe ?A. Stiffs, of Hamstead, N.B., and his children are to-day citizens of the West, viz.: E. E. Perley Esq. Mayor 0f Wolseley; Mrs. Levi Thompson, wife of the ex-member for Qu'Appelle; Mrs. John Banbury.  Senator Perley was

Probably the best-known man in the range of the N.W.T.  Was one of the first settlers in the Wolseley district, and identified himself with public affairs from

 

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the beginning. He brought political prestige with him, for he had taken an active interest in public affairs in his native Province, and was no stranger to the leaders of the Conservative party. He was a candidate in New Brunswick in the general election of 1878, and again in 1882, being defeated by narrow margins on each occasion. Coming West in 1882, he located at Wolseley. Here his ability became recognized at once, and he passed rapidly through the stages of trustee, councillor, territorial legislator, and M.P., until 1888, when, on August 3rd of that year he was appointed to the Dominion Senate. During the twenty-one years that he held the seat in the upper chamber, his political activity never abated, always taking an active and useful part. As a member of the old North-west Council, Mr. Perley and two others were chosen by a vote of the council to go to Ottawa on a "Better Terms" delegation, to have certain grievances removed from which the people were complaining. The delegation was very successful in their efforts and this was mainly the cause of Mr. Perley receiving the nomination in the Conservative party's interest in the first Dominion election for the N.W.T. in 1887. He was elected by a majority of 726. The Hon. Edgar Dewdney was his successor, and was taken into the Cabinet as Minister of the Interior. In 1893 Mr. Perley was asked by the Haultain Government to accept the position of Commissioner for the North-west Territories at the Chicago World's Fair. Senator Perley farmed over 3,500 acres at Wolseley, and was one of its earliest settlers.

 

MURRAY: Walter Charles, M.A., LL.D., President of the University of Saskatchewan. Born 1866, son of Doctor Charles and Elizabeth (MacKenzie) Murray. Married Christina Cameron, 1895, and. has three daughters. Dr. Murray was educated at Fredericton Collegiate, the University of New Brunswick; (B.A., University of Edinburgh), (M.A. Honours in Philosophy), Berlin- (Canadian Gilchrist Scholar 1887-90).

 

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Dr. Murray was professor of philosophy with his alma mater (U.N.B.), 1891:  Munro professor philosophy, Dalhousie University; 1892-1908.  He is an honorary L.L.D. of Queen’s University; Kingston, 1904; University of Alberta, 1915; McGill University, 1921; F.R.S.C. Member of Carnegie Foundation for Teaching, 1920; author of many educational works.  Address, University of Saskatchewan.

 

 

McKay: Dr Angus, “Saskatchewan’s Grand old Man of Agriculture."   The above term was applied to the citizens of Indian Head a banquet tendered him by the citizens of Indian Head and the Province generally last winter (1923).  Ministers of the Crown and others all united in paying splendid tribute to one who may justly be called the father of scientific farming in Saskatchewan.

 

  Dr. MacKay, who is the Inspector of Western Experimental Farms, was born Jan. 3rd, 1840, in Pickering township, Ontario county, a son of Donald and Margaret (Broadfoot) Mackay.  Married Elizabeth Arthur Gunn, daughter of Mr. Gunn, of Whitby, Ont., and has two sons and two daughters.  Education at the public school, Pickering, grammar school of Whitby.  Passed through the Military School in Toronto, under lt. Col. Dennis.  Was lieutenant in 34th. Battn., Whitby, Ont., and took part in Fenian Raid In 1866.  Received land grant for services.  Came west in 1882 to settle in Indian Head District he purchased a large tract of land for R. Miller, Wm. Williamson and E. Boone and self, from the agent of Osler, Hammond Nanton, of Toronto.  This he worked with his partners up to 18870.  That year was appointed Supt. of the Indian Head Experimental Farm at that time representing the old North-West territories.  Resigned as Supt. in 1913.  Was a candidate for the N.W.T. Assembly in 1885.  Defeated by W.D. afterwards Senator Perley.  Was president of

 

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one of the first Agricultural Societies in the Territories, and still belongs to it. Was captain of the Home Guard during the North-west Rebellion of 1885. In 1892 collected and prepared a large collection of Territoria1 products and personally installed them at the Chicago World's Exposition In 1893. In 1895 was appointed manager by Lt.-Governor MacIntosh of the Territorial Exhibition in Regina. Was chairman of the Indian Head Hospital when opened in 1895, and when changed to a municipal hospital was again made chairman.

 

Is to-day chairman of the Advisory Council of the Saskatchewan, Agricultural College. A full-sized portrait of Dr. MacKay was presented to the College by the Agricultural Societies of the Province In its early years. In May, 1923, the University of Saskatchewan conferred the honorary degree of LL.D. June, 1921, the Canadian Society of Technical Agriculture asked Dr. MacKay to accept an honorary membership: These are but a few brief facts gathered from the life of a citizen who has spent a long career in the service of the West.

 

LAIRD: Lt.-Colonel, the Honourable H. W., Senator. Born at Port Dover Ont., Jan. 4th, 1868, son of Rev. W. H. and Mrs. Elizabeth (Burke) Married Lilly Blanche de Foe, 1899. Has six children-two sons in the C.E.F. Lt. Homer Warring was killed in action in France (Royal Air Force). President Regina Cold Storage Co., Inter-ocean Brick Co.; Mayor of Regina for two terms. Has always taken a keen Interest in militia matters; served with the Queen's Own of Toronto for four years; Captain with Northumberland Battery seven years; Major A.S.C. three years. Organized 3rd Div. Train during the European War. Proceeded to France (Command). Was an unsuccessful candidate for the Provincial Assembly in 1905-08; Appointed to the Senate.  Conservative. Anglican. Address, Regina.

 

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ORMOND: Col. (Hon. Brig.-Gen.) Canadian Permanent Forces. Commanding Mil. Dis. No. 12, Regina Sask.  Son of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Ormond, of Winnipeg, Man. Married Anna Laurie, daughter of John Orchard Cadham, of Portage la Prairie, Man. Served in the European War, 1915-18; Wounded. Mentioned In dispatches. D.S.O. and Bar, 1917. C.M.G., 1919. Holds the Russian Order of St. Stanislas (3rd Class), Croix de Guerre. Clubs, Rideau (Ottawa), Assiniboia (Regina), County Club (Portage la Prairie).

 

COWAN: David W., D.D.S., Ex-Member of Parliament. President of the Canadian Dental Association In 1911. Sec.Treas. of the Dominion Dental Council of Canada. Associate editor of the Dominion Dental Journal.  President of the St.John's Ambulance Association for Saskatchewan. Vice-President of the Returned Soldier~ Association for Regina. Alderman of the City of Regina (Mayor) ; officer commanding Canadian Dental Corps, No. 12, Mil. Dist. Member of the Union Government, (Regina). For nearly thirty years a prominent citizen of the West, who has given of his best to the service of the country. A man with a fine conception of public service.

 

BURTON : His Worship Mayor Stewart Coulter Mayor of Regina. Manager. and wholesale grocer (Cameron, Heap, Ltd.). Born at Lindsay, Ont., June 8th, 1877, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Burton. Married Helen D. Pope, Feb. 15th, 1919, and has a son and a daughter. Started work with Canadian Pacific Railway at Kenora, where he remained twelve years in the freight department. In 1903 he entered the employ of Cameron & Heap, wholesale grocers, as accountant. Came to Regina 1907 and opened the business in that city, as manager, and secretary-treasurer.  The firm was the first wholesale grocery house to open up in the province. Mr. Burton has occupied this position

 

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continuously ever since. He has been President of the Manitoba Wholesale Grocers Assoc., Vice-President Wholesale Grocers Assoc., President Regina Board of Trade, 1914-15. He is a Potentate of Wa Wa Temple, A.D. and M.S. and a 32nd. degree, Mason. Alderman of the city from 1919 to 1922. Elected Mayor in 1923 and again in 1924. Member of Assiniboia Club, Regina, Wascana Country Club, Rotary Club Canadian Club. Address, City Hall, Regina.

 

STAPLEFORD : Ernest William, B.A., D.D., President Regina College. Born St. Catharines, Ont., 1874, son of Edmund and Annie (Blake) Stapleford. Married Maude Bunting, B.A., and has one son and three daughters. Educated at Victoria College and Toronto University. Ordained minister of the Methodist Church, 1906. Spent 1907 abroad in study at Oxford. Pastor Fairview Methodist Church, Vancouver, 1908. Resigned in 1911 to become secretary British Columbia Educational Conference. Appointed President Regina College, 1915. Member Regina Golf Club.  Recreation, golf, motoring. Address, Regina College, Regina.

 

BROWN: The late Honourable George William, ex-Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan, born at Holstein, Gray County, Ontario, May 30th, 1860. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brown. Was educated at Mount Forrest High School, Brantford College, and Toronto University. Married Annie Gardner Barr, of Norwich Ont. Came to Regina in 1882, and farmed for many years at Rose Plains. Studied law and was called to the bar for the North-west Territories, forming a partnership with Norman MacKenzie, K.C. MacKenzie Brown & Company. Was defeated as a candidate for the North-west Territories in 1888. Elected in 1894 and again elected in 1898. Played a very prominent part in all the affairs of the City of Regina, and the Province of Saskatchewan, for many years. Director of the Northern Trust Company and

 

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member of the Advisory, Board of the National Trust Company. Operated a large stock farm and took a keen interest in education, being a member of Board of School Trustees for Regina. Made a very generous donation for the foundation of Regina (Methodist) College, and was the first president of the Board of Governors. Was for years an Alderman of the City of Regina, and in 1910 was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Saskatchewan. Was a member of Manitoba Club, Winnipeg, and Assiniboia Club Regina; and in religion, Methodist. Died February 17th, 1919.

 

TRANT: William, barrister, journalist and publicist. Formerly Police Magistrate of Regina. Born at Leeds, Yorkshire, England, March 14th 1844 son of Mr. and Mrs.. William Trant. Was educated at the Mechanic's Institute and Grammar School, Leeds. Was a journalist and war correspondent before coming to Canada in 1889. Paris during the Franco-Prussian War. Editor and founder of several papers in India. Homesteaded near Dubuc, N.W.T. Was editor of the Regina Standard in 1895; Regina Leader, 1901-02. Called to the Saskatchewan bar in 1904. Practised at Arcola and Regina, partnership with Mr. Rimmer. now His Honor Judge Rimmer. Appointed Police Magistrate of Regina, 1907. Was the organizer of the Regina Agricultural Society in 18?5. One of the organizers of the Children’s Aid Society. Was a former president of the Canadian Club. A frequent contributor to English periodicals.

 

 Spent a long and useful life in public service. Now retired and lives in Victoria.

 

FORGET: The late Honourable Amadee E., Ex Lieut.-Governor of the N.W.T. and Saskatchewan Ex-Commissioner of Indian Affairs, N.W.T., Ex-Senator for the Dominion of Canada. Born in Marieville; Que., 1847, and was educated by the Jesuits; Married, in 1876, Miss Drolet, daughter of Colonel Drolet, and a

 

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sister of Chevalier Drolet, of the Papal Zouaves. Studied law with Sir Adolphe Caron; called to the Quebec bar in 1871. During the trial of Lepine at Fort Garry, in the early seventies, he represented one of the French dailies of Montreal. Coming to the West, Mr. Forget made a careful study of Western conditions, and in 1876 was appointed secretary to the Honourable David Laird, the Governor of the Northwest Territories; accompanied Mr. Laird to Swan River, where the first Government House west of Manitoba was held in a series of rude log buildings. On the removal of the capital to Battleford, Mr. Forget became Clerk of the Council. When the capital was finally transferred to Regina and the first elements of responsible government introduced, Mr. Forget became Clerk of the Legislative Assembly, where he was of the greatest assistance to the legislators, many of whom were unfamiliar with legislation and procedure. In 1885 he was Commissioner for the settlement of the Half-breed claims. In 1888 he was appointed Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs. On the retirement of Hayter Reid, about ten years later, he became Commissioner; was appointed Governor, on the retirement of the Hon. Mr. Cameron. On the passing of the Autonomy Acts he became the first Governor of the Province of Saskatchewan. Was afterwards appointed to the Senate. He died some years ago in Ottawa. He was a man of great subtlety and ingenuity of mind. He was a born diplomat, and was singularly happy in his dealings with the Indians.

 

JOHNSON: Reverend Frederick Wells, B.A., D.D., Archdeacon of the Diocese of Qu'Appelle. Born London, England, 1865, son of Raymond and Barbara (Wells) Johnson. Married Margaret Lock in 1893, and has a son and two daughters. Educated at Kensington, England, and St. Johns, Winnipeg. Came to Canada in 1885 and engaged in farming. Homesteaded north of Indian Head. Served, in the Rebellion

 

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of 1885 in the transport section.  Taught in St. John’s College, 1890. After graduation from St. Johns was curate at St. Pauls, incumbent of Craven Pense, rector of Fort Qu'Appelle (1894-1904) and St. Johns, Moose Jaw (1914-1924), his present charge.   Created archdeacon in 1909. Chairman of Moose Jaw Hospital Board, chairman United Committee on Welfare Work, Hon. president Social and Moral Reform, District Trustee Kiwanis Club, Hon. Chaplain Sons of England, member Kiwanis Club. A Conservative. Address, St. Johns Rectory, Moose Jaw, Sask.

 

LAKE: Sir Richard Stuart K C M.G., Ex-Lieut.- Governor Saskatchewan.  Pioneer Farmer and member of the N.W.T. Assembly. Sir Richard was born in Lancashire, at Preston, in 1860, a son of the late Lieutenant Colonel Percy Lake, His Majesty’s 54th and 100th Regiments, and Margaret (Phillips) Lake, of Quebec.  He was educated at Haversham School, England.  In early life was in was in the service of the Admiralty and in Cyprus 1873-1883. Coming to Canada, he farmed for many years in Assiniboia, N.W.T.  near the town of Grenfell. Was a member of the old North-west Assembly, 1898-1904. Elected to the Canadian House of Commons 1904-1911 He was a member of the Public Service Commission, 1911-1912 An ex-member and president of the Local Branch of the Federation League. He was also vice-president of the Territorial Grain Growers’ Association.  An active member of the Anglican Church and a delegate to the Provincial and General Synods.  President of the Provincial Red Cross and Patriotic Leagues.  Went to Geneva as a delegate to the Red Cross Convention, 1920.  Created K.C.M.G. in 1918.  Married Miss Dorothy Fletcher, daughter of Jas . Fletcher, Esq., F.R.C.S., of Ottawa.  Has three sons and one daughter.  Is a member of the Assiniboia Club (Regina), Rideau (Ottawa).  Is a fellow of the Royal

 

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Colonial Institute, London. A member of the Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M. An. Anglican. Now resides in Victoria, B.C.

 

RIMMER: His Honour Reginald, Judge of the District Court and Surrogate Court, Judicial District of Arcola. Born at Southport, Lancashire, England, 1865 son of Edward Johnston Rimmer and Sarah Frances (Boothroyd) Rimmer, of Southport and Liverpool, England. Comes of Yeoman stock in England, the family having been landowners In the county for centuries. Judge Rimmer's father was Mayor of Southport and justice of the peace for the county. Married in 1893 to Leonie Marchant, and has three daughters and three sons (two deceased). Educated at Southport and Liverpool and was articled in law to Wm. Dixon, barrister, of Liverpool. He afterwards read with John Ohester, barrister of Lincoln's Inn, London; practised in England from 1888 to 1892, when he came to Winnipeg and was affiliated with A. E. Richards, who latterly became a Judge of the Appellate Court in Manitoba; latterly formed partnership with the late Nicholas Flood Davin at Regina. Was called to the bar in Saskatchewan in 1892 and appointed legal adviser to His Honour the Lieutenant- Governor, to which position he was succeeded on the grant of autonomy to the territorial government by the Honourable Frederick W. G. Haultain. In 1898 appointed law officer in the Department of Indian Affairs at Ottawa, for the investigation of claims by the Dominion Government against Ontario, his advice and opinion on the subject being ultimately justified by the decision of the Privy Council. Returned to Regina in 1904 and formed partnership with Wm. Trant. Was prominent in the practice of his profession in many important criminal cases, and had a large practice in civil law. In 1907 he was appointed Judge of the Judicial District of Cannington, since re-named Arcola, and is the Senior District Court Judge of the

 

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Province of Saskatchewan, and became the first president of the District Court Judges Association. He is an original member of the Knights of Columbus in Regina, and was the first Grand Knight of the Order in Saskatchewan. Has been prominent in Red Cross and other benevolent and charitable institutions. Mrs. Rimmer was president for many years of the Lady Patronesses of the Grey Nuns' Hospital, at Regina, and also a leading member of various musical societies.

 

McLORG: His Honour, Edward Arthur. District Judge for Saskatoon. Born Beverstone rectory Gloucestershire, son of an Anglican clergyman. Educated Clifton College. Came to Canada, 1883. Barrister, North-west Territories, 1887. Practised at Moosomin, 1887-1907; received present appointment 1907. Served in Boulton's Scouts during the North~ west Rebellion, 1885 (Medal). Anglican., Residence, Saskatoon, Sask.

 

WOOD: His Honour Judge Charles Edward Dudley, Judge of the Judicial District of Weyburn.  Born in Washington, D.C., October 16th, 1856. Son of Charles Edward Dudley and Susan (Thomas) Wood. Married Anne D. Comes, of Southern U.S.A. stock. His father was a graduate of Westpoint; his uncle, Robert Wood, Surgeon-General of the U.S.. Army. The family is related to Jefferson Davis, President of the U.S. Confederacy. General Zachary Taylor is a great uncle. His Honour was a master at Trinity College school for three years; resigned. Joined the N.W.M.P. in 1880, and came as a recruit to Fort Walsh in the Cypress Hills. Drafted to Fort Macleod.  While on leave founded the Macleod Gazette. This was the third paper in the N.W.T., the Battleford Herald being the first, and Frank Oliver being the founder of the second at Edmonton. His Honour founded the Gazette in 1882 and ran it continuously until 1903; partnership with E. T. Saunders, Esq., with whom he also founded

 

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the Lethbridge News. The editorials for these papers were for, the most part, written by F. W. Haultain (Now Sir Frederick, Chief Justice of Saskatchewan.) His Honour articled himself in law to Mr. Haultain and, was admitted to the bar of the N.W.T. in 1896. Practised until 1903. Went to Regina in partnership with Mr. Haultain under the firm name of Haultain & Wood., Appointed Deputy Attorney-General, 1904, an office he continued to hold until 1906; returned to private practice and formed a partnership with McCausland Turnbull & Wood. Continued until 1913, when he was appointed to the Bench. His Honour is a qualified locomotive engineer, having in his spare time qualified in Fort Macleod. He is Hon. General President Saskatchewan Steam and Operative Engineers; trustee of the Anti-Tuberculosis League; Hon. fife member of the Regina Boat Club; president Weyburn Golf Club (1923) ; member of the Masonic Order. Anglican. Governor of the Fort Qu' Appelle Sanitarium. Address, Court House, Weyburn.

 

Ross: Brigadier-General Alexander C. M. G., D.S.O., Judge of the Judicial district of Yorkton. Born at Forres, Murrayshire, Scotland, 1880, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Adam Simpson Ross. Married Beatrice Scott in 1909. Educated in the public and high schools of Saskatchewan. The Ross family came to Canada, 1886 to Regina. His Honour was articled in law to James Balfour, K.C., and called to the bar in 1901. Practised in Weyburn, afterwards in Regina; partnership with T. C. Johnson, Esq., afterwards Mr. Justice Johnson. On Mr. Johnson's elevation to the bench, formed partnership with Mr. Bigelow, now Mr. Justice Bigelow afterwards with the firm of Hogarth & Ross. At the outbreak of the war was major, 2nd in command of the 95th Sask. Rifles, and acted as recruiting officer for unit First Contingent, also second. On mobilization of the 2nd Division was appointed captain in command of Regina Company, afterwards B

 

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 Company. Became junior major with the 28th Northwest Battalion, January, 1915. 2nd in command in April, same year. Overseas in May and with unit to France, Sept., 1915. Organized and commanded First Division School, in Oct., 1915. Rejoined unit, Jan. 1916, St. Eloi, and took part in every engagement in which corps fought during his command. Ypres in June; Somme, Sept. Succeeded General Embury in Command of 28th Batt., Sept., 1916. Commanded unit continuously until Oct. 2nd., 1918. Appointed Brigadier-General in Command 6th Inf. Bde., which he took to the Rhine and afterwards to England. Awarded C.M.G., D.S.O., and mentioned in dispatches seven times. Resumed practice in Regina after demobilization; took command of M.D. No. 12, September 1st, 1919. Resigned Oct., 1920. Appointed Dist. Court Judge Sept. 13th, 1921. Still retains rank in Canadian Militia. Colonel (Hon. Brigadier-General) command 21st Inf. Bde. Vice-pres. for Dominion Infantry Association. President for Saskatchewan, President Yorkton United Service Club. Vice-pres. Yorkton Canadian Club. Hon.  Member Assiniboia Club, Regina. Member Wascana Lodge, A.F. and A.M. Yorkton Golf Club. Anglican. Address, Court House, Yorkton.

 

BALDWIN: His Honour Judge Joseph, B.C.L., Judge of the Judicial district of
Kindersley. Born St. George, N.B., Dec. 8th, 1872, son of Henry and Mary Adelaide (Messnett) Baldwin, a daughter of Lt. Col. Geo. J. and Mrs. Messnett of Fredericton, N.B., and has two sons and a daughter. Educated at St. George public and high schools and King's College Law School, St. John, N.B. His Honour comes from United Empire Loyalist stock. His great grandfather, Dr. Claude Messnett, was a surgeon in the French navy, was captured by the British and brought to Halifax, a prisoner, during the period of the Napoleonic wars, early part of the nineteenth century. He was released

 

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on parole and settled at St. George, N.B., where he practised his profession for many years, Being the only physician in the district, his work. carrying him afield into Maine as far as Portland and other places. His Honour's maternal great grandfather, Reverend Samuel Andrew came from Connecticut to New Brunswick after the Revolution, bringing many of his congregation with him; settled at St. Andrew, where he was rector of All Saint's Church (Anglican) for many years. His Honour graduated from King's College Law School and was articled to Judge H. M. Cockburn, of St. Andrews, and latterly to J. B. M. Baxter, KC., of St. John, now the Honourable J. B. M. Baxter, KC., M.P.; admitted as an Attorney and called to the New Brunswick bar 1901, practising at St. George until 1906, when he came west to High River, Alberta, and was employed by J. E. Varley, Esq. Coming to Saskatchewan he was employed by J. D. Ferguson, Esq., KC., Saskatoon, afterwards practised at. Swift Current (1913). Was appointed Judge of the Kindersley district, 1914. Recreations, golf and curling. Address, the Court House, Kindersley,  Sask.

 

GRAVEL: His Honour Judge Alphonse, Judge of the Judicial District of Gravelbourg. Born Arthabaska [sic], Que., Dec. 3rd, 1875, a son of Dr. L. J. and Miss Jessie (Bettey). Educated at Nicolet College and Fordham University New York City; obtained degree of B.A., 1896. Studied law at Laval University and graduated with the degree LL.B. in 1899. Admitted the same year to the bar of Quebec, where he practised law for several years, before settling in Saskatchewan. Senior member of the law firm of Gravel & Gravel, Moose Jaw (fifteen. years). Is one of the pioneers of south-western Saskatchewan, and one of the Gravel brothers after whom the town of Gravelbourg was named. Appointed District Court Judge for Gravelbourg, July, 1922. Married in 1912 to Paula Trudeau, daughter of

 

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the late Dr. Trudeau, of St. Johns, Quebec, and has one daughter and two sons. Devotes his leisure to the study of history and genealogy, pertaining to the epoch of the French Regime in Canada. A Roman Catholic. Address, Court House, Gravelbourg.

 

"It is of interest to note that His Honour descends in a direct line from Joseph Masse, "Gravel de Brindellieres, a native of Dinan, Province of Brittany, France, who emigrated to Canada in 1641, and settled at Chateau Richer, now in the county of Montmorency fifteen miles from Quebec City, where a representative of the family still occupies the old homestead originally granted by the king of France. It will thus be seen that the Gravel family are deeply rooted in the soil of Canada."-Editor.

 

TURNER:  Harris, M.L.A., journalist, soldier, publicist. Born at Markdale, Ont., Oct. 3rd, 1887, son of, Adam and Mary E. (Black) Turner. Educated at the public school, Collegiate Institute of Orangeville Ontario. Married Alice M. Moyer, daughter of Dr: and Mrs. Sylvester Moyer, of Saskatoon, and has one son and one daughter. Has been a journalist for many years, Vancouver and elsewhere. Joined the C.E.F. with the 1st University Company, Saskatchewan, April 1915; served with the Princess Patricia Regiment. Was elected to the Saskatchewan Assembly by the vote of the overseas Saskatchewan soldiers, in 1917; re-elected at subsequent election; senior member for Saskatoon city and elected leader of the Opposition. Vice-president of G.W.V.A., Editor of The Progressive.  Address, Saskatoon, Sask.

 

GREGORY:  (Colonel) Charles Ernest, KC., barrister. Born Frederickton [sic], N.B., 1869, a son of Charles G. and Mary Gregory. Married Maude C. Graham, 1891, and' has one son. Educated King's College, Windsor, N.S.; Dalhousie University, Halifax: Appointed a King's Counsel for Nova Scotia, 1905 ;

 

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King's Counsel for Saskatchewan, 1912. Came to Regina, 1918, and entered into counsel work only s now general counsel for the Saskatchewan Gram Growers' Association. Joined Canadian Militia 1904. O. C. 18th Battery, C.F.A. Joined Canadian Ex. Force Dec. 30th, 1915. Overseas, 1916, 1917. Now 0. C. 10th Brigade, C.F.A. Clubs, Prairie (Moose Jaw), Assiniboia (Regina). An Anglican. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

KNOX: Andrew, M.P., farmer. Born in Derry county, Ireland, in 1886, son of James Knox and Mrs. Knox (nee Boyd). Married Elizabeth Short, of Cecil, Saskatchewan, in 1900. Mr. Knox was educated at Coleraine, Ireland. He. comes from a North of Ireland family that has figured prominently in the agricultural business for several centuries. Came to Canada and engaged in farming in the Prince Albert district of Saskatchewan. Was a director of the Saskatchewan Grain Growers' Association, 1907-18. Elected to the House of Commons in 1918, as a Liberal Unionist. Re-elected in 1921 as a Progressive. Presbyterian.

 

 

DAVIDSON: The Venerable Gilbert Farquhar, M.A., Archdeacon of Regina, Rector St. Paul's Church (Regina). Born London, England, Feb. 4th, 1871, son of Gilbert and Harriet Laura Davidson. Married Marion Jane Sherwood Taylor, July 10th, 1902. Educated at English schools and Trinity College, Toronto. Came to Canada 1889, and lived for two years in Aspdin, Muskoka; studied at Trinity College, Toronto, and while there was in charge of the music at St. Hilda's Church. Curate of St. Anne's, Toronto; 1895-98. Travelling secretary for Trinity College; 1898-99. Fellow and lecturer Trinity College, 1899-1901. Vicar of St. George's, Guelph, Ont., 1901-1907; rector, 1907-18. Rural Dean of Wellington, 190?-1909: Archdeacon of Wellington and Halton, 1911-1918. One of the

 

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 Governors of Bishop Strachan School, Toronto.  Appointed rector of St. Paul’s Church, Regina, 1918.  Appointed Rural Dean of Regina, 1922.  Member for many years of General and Provincial Synods.  Dean Starr Lecturer at Trinity College, Toronto.  Member of the Council of St. Chad’s College, Regina and hon. Lecturer in Ecclesiastical History.  Member of the Advisory Committee of the Qu’Appelle diocesan School (Girl’s).  Lecturer on various subjects.  Address, St. Paul’s Rectory, Regina.

 

LANGLEY:  Honourable George.  Son of James and Mary Ann (Barker) Langley.  Born Nov. 10, 1852, at Saffron, Waldon, Essex, England.  Married Ellen Hales and has four sons and one daughter.  Educated at the Saffron Walden Schools.  Came to Canada 1893; was elected to the Legislature in 1905, 1908-1912, 1917.  Called to the Cabinet and allotted the portfolio of Municipal Affairs.  Was also in charge of the Bureau of Public Health.



 

 

 

RAMSLAND: Mrs. Sarah K. M.L.A., Kamsack. Born at Buffalo Lake, Minnesota, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. McEwen. Married M. O. Ramsland in 1906. Was educated at Hutchinson, Minn. and St. Cloud. Came to Canada in 1906 and lived at Buchanan seven years, moving to Kamsack, where Mr. Ramsland was elected to the Saskatchewan Legislature in 1918. On the death of her husband Mrs. Ramsland became the candidate of the Liberal party in the bye-election of 1919 the first woman to be elected to the Saskatchewan House.

 

 

BRYANT : Mrs. Mable Myra, president Women's Canadian Club, Regina. Born near Durham, Ont., youngest daughter of Nelson and Annie Jane (Todd) Boyd.  Parents moved to Regina in 1901 attended public schools of Regina; graduated with distinction from Regina Collegiate Institute obtained first class teacher's professional training at Regina Normal

 

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School. Taught in Portage la Prairie and in Regina. Married James Fraser Bryant in August, 1908. Member Board of Directors of the Y.W.C.A. since its organization, in 1910. Secretary of the Board from 1915 to 1921; active in various departments of Knox Presbyterian Church; president women’s organization of Knox Church, 1920-21. Life member of the Red Cross. Active in Red Cross work during the war. Associate member Women's Musical Club. President Women's Canadian Club 1922-23-24. Recreations, gardening and motoring.  Presbyterian. Address, 3220 Albert Street, Regina.

 

STAPLEFORD: Mrs. Maude Bunting, B.A., wife of President Stapleford, of Regina College. Born St. Catharines, Ont., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bunting of that city. Married Dr. Stapleford, 1907, and has one son and three daughters. Educated at St. Catharine's Collegiate and Toronto University. Is ex-president Women's University Club; president Local Council of Women; president Provincial Council of Women; ex-pres. Women's Educational Club. Graduate from Victoria College, University of Toronto (honours in modern languages), 1907. Member of the Methodist Church. Address, Regina College.

 

GRAHAM: William Morris, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Western Canada. Born at Ottawa, Ont., January 11th, 1867, a son of James F. Graham and Mary Wright (Morris) Graham, of Ottawa, Ont. Educated at public schools of Winnipeg and Manitoba; College, Winnipeg. Married to Violet Helena Anne Wood, daughter of James H. and Mrs. Wood, of Birtle, Manitoba. Entered the Department of Indian Affairs at Birtle, Man., as clerk, in the year 1885, and has for thirty-nine years been continuously in the Department and has held the various posts of Agent, Inspector and Commissioner. Mr. Graham, by reason of his long experience and his natural ability, must be regarded as an authority on the problem of the Indian in Western

 

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Canada. Long ago he realized that no longer could the Indian obtain a living by fishing, trapping and hunting, except in an ever-narrowing portion of the North-west; consequently for years the Indian has been taught the rudiments of agriculture and that he must be self-supporting. The task of transforming a race of nomadic hunters into tillers of the soil is a formidable one, and in planning it foresight faithful service and great patience have been most necessary. The problem has been successfully dealt with by this experienced Old-Timer. During the Great War he was responsible for bringing under cultivation under the Greater Production Movement twenty-one thousand acres of raw land, and he almost doubled the acreage under cultivation by the Indians themselves. Under his supervision the Greater Production Movement was continued after the war period until it was possible to transfer the acreage to individual operation. Commissioner Graham is thoroughly acquainted with every phase of life in the West. He travelled the trails before the days of the railway and hotels, and has been actively identified with every phase of colonization and development. He has been identified with the Boy Scout movement from its inception in Saskatchewan, having occupied a position on the Provincial Council. He is an ardent sportsman, and embraces every opportunity to indulge in outdoor life. Clubs Assiniboia and Wascana Country Club. Mrs. Graham has also taken a prominent part in public affairs. During the years 1912 to 1914 she was president of the Western Art Association, and was largely instrumental m the erection of the Treaty Memorial at Fort Qu'Appelle. She was the first president of the Women's Canadian Club at Regina, on organization in 1920. Both locally and provincially she has been most active in Red Cross Work and has held the office of provincial Vice-president. She is also interested greatly m the work of the Junior Red Cross. Religion Church of England. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

 

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BROWN: Thomas Dowrick, B.A., K.C., barrister-at-law, Regina, Sask. (Brown, Thomson, McLean, Graham & Brown). Born at Port Hope, Ont., son of John Brown and Elizabeth Jane (Dowrick) Brown, of Cornwall, England. Married Evelyn Roberts, a daughter of John Dab Roberts and Sara (McClung) Roberts, of Cobourg, Ont., in August of 1909. Educated at public schools in Ontario and Manitoba; graduated from Wesley College, Manitoba University, in 1900, with degree of B.A. Articled as student-at-law at Moosomin, to J. T. Brown, now the Honourable Mr. Chief Justice Brown of the King's Bench of Saskatchewan. Called to the bar of the N.W.T. in 1905. Practised at Regina. Became member of the firm of Balfour, Martin, Casey & Brown in 1909. In 1910 formed partnership with Harold F. Thomson, Esq., as Brown and Thomson; firm now known as Brown, Thomson, ,McLean, Graham & Brown. Appointed Director or Prosecutions under the Saskatchewan Temperance Act, 1920. Appointed K.C. in 1915. Was Examiner of Law Society of Saskatchewan, from 1907 to 1913. Editor of the "North-west Territories Law Reports" in 1907; editor "Saskatchewan' Law Report," 1915 1923; Saskatchewan editor of the "Western Weekly Reports" from 1911 to date. Dean of Wetmore Hall, Law Schools of Saskatchewan, at Regina, 1913 to 1923. Is member of the Senate of the University of Saskatchewan. Religion, Methodist; member of the Board of Governors and of the Executive Council of Regina (Methodist) College; member of the Quarterly Board of Management of the Metropolitan Methodist Church. Sports, motoring and golf. Member of Regina Golf Club. Clubs, Assiniboia, Regina; and Wascana Country Club. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

COLES: William Richard, M.D., C.M., F.R.S.M., physician, Regina, Sask. Born at Milton, Prince Edward Island, on the 24th of March, 1874, a son of Charles Coles and Elizabeth (Crabbe) Coles, of Milton, F.E.I.

 

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Married Lilla J. Richards, a daughter of William and Elizabeth Richards, of Cape Traverse, P.E.I., and has two daughters. Educated at the public school, P.E.I., and graduated from Trinity College Toronto. Ont. in medicine, in 1901; took post-graduate work in Chicago, 1905; and In London, Eng., 1912-13. Practised medicine at Murray River, P.E.I., until 1903. Came west in the fall of 1903, and practised medicine at Regina ever Since. Has been associated with the military from early youth, when connected with the Garrison Artillery at Charlottetown, P.E.I. Received commission in the C.A.M.C., 1909. In the Great War became medical officer of the 195th Batt., C.E.F., 1916, with which unit he went overseas. Upon the Battalion being broken up in England, he was appointed to No, 11 Canadian Hospital at Shorncliffe and subsequently was on the Staff of No.7 Canadian Stationary Hospital, 4th Field Ambulance, and in 1918 was appointed to No. 11 Imperial Hospital at Rouen. Returned to Canada in 1918, and was detailed for duty at St. Chad's Military Hospital, Regina, with the rank of major: Demobilized in August, 1919. Present rank, Lieutenant-colonel, C.A.M.C., attached to Military District No. 12. Is a member of the United Services Institute and G.W.V.A. Member of the A.F. and A.M. Sports, golf. Member Wascana Country Club. Religion, Church of England. Address, 2430 Victoria

Avenue, Regina, Saskatchewan.

 

BROWN: Evelyn Roberts, wife of Thomas Dowrick Brown, B.A., K.C., of Regina. Born at Cobourg, Ont., daughter of John Dad Roberts and Sara (McClung) Roberts, of Cobourg, Ont., formerly of Cornwall England. Married in August of 1909. Educated at Cobourg, Ont. Mrs. Brown has been prominently identified with community and public service work for many years. Entering the Red Cross as a life member, she at different times had been secretary vice-president and president of the Regina Branch. She has

 

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been for many years a member of the Executive of the Saskatchewan Division of the Red Cross Society, and is at the present time its vice-president and also chairman of its Standing Committee on Medical and Nursing Services. An important contribution made by this committee to the public welfare is the establishment and supervision in remote parts of the Province of Red Cross hospitals, locally known as "Outposts." For several years has been one of Saskatchewan's representatives on the Central Council of the Red Cross for the Dominion. Was one of the organizers of the Women's Canadian Club in Regina, and held the office of president in 1922, during which year the literary contest was initiated, which took the form of a short story. Laura Goodman Salverson was the successful contestant, her success undoubtedly inspiring her to further efforts, resulting in the publication of "The Viking Heart," now well-known throughout the Dominion. Mrs. Brown is a life member of the Metropolitan Women's Missionary Society and of the Y.W.C.A., of which she was hon. secretary for four years; is also a life member of the Local Council of Women, of which she was the hon. corresponding secretary for four years. She is a member also of the Educational Club, Alexandra Club, Music Club and the Forget Chapter of the I.O.D.E. at Regina. An active sportswoman, following golfing, motoring and skating. Religion, Methodist. Address, 3000 Albert Street, Regina.

 

PARKER: Reverend Julius Foster Dyke, clerk-in-holy order, Church of England. Born New Romney, Kent, England, May 17th, 1857, son of Reverend Henry Parker and Anne (Mitton) Parker. Married Maude Eliza Phillips at Battleford, 1887 (deceased); Charlotte E. M. Ridgeway, of Guelph, Ont., in 1916,. and has four sons and two daughters. Educated at Maidstone, Kent, England, and King's College, London, England. Came to Battleford in 1882; attached to

 

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N.W.M.P. Government Telegraph Service, 1884-85; served on General Strang's column during Rebellion, 1885; special constable, N.W.M.P. 1887-89. Took up Indian mission work under late Archdeacon J. A. MacKay, at Nepowewin, 1889-93; Sturgeon Lake Indian Reserve, 1893-95.  Moved to St. Andrews, Halcro, 1895; lay reader in charge; ordained deacon by Bishop Pinkham, 1896, and appointed curate of St. Andrews; Curate St. Leonards and Red Deer Hill. Ordained priest 1898, by Bishop Pinkham, and appointed incumbent of aforenamed places. Appointed vicar of St. George's, Battleford, 1901, and rural dean 1904; one of the examining chaplains 1905, all in the Diocese of Saskatchewan. Became vicar of Oxbow, in Diocese of Qu' Appelle, 1906. Moved to Lumsden, as vicar, 1912, and. rural dean of Lumsden. In 1916 received appointment as rector of St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral, Qu' Appelle, and in 1918 elected rural dean of Qu' Appelle. During forty-two years has travelled all over the West and has been a great friend of the Indians, with whom he has worked for so long. Is a keen rifle shot, curler, golfer and cricketer. Has played first class cricket in England, and has also on several occasions been on the Saskatchewan provincial team. In 1920 he won the 2nd Flight Provincial Amateur Handicap and Veterans' Competition in golf. His father before him was a keen cricketer, and in his day played for the Gentlemen of England and for Cambridge University against Oxford. Address, the Deanery, Qu' Appelle, Sask.

 

 

COMBE: The late Lieutenant Robert Grierson. (Victoria Cross). Born Aberdeen, Scotland, 1882, a son of James and Elizabeth (Jardine) Combe. Married Jean Donald, 1909. Educated at Aberdeen Grammar School. After leaving school was apprenticed to a firm of chemists. Came to Canada 1906; farmed for a short while at Virden. Later was dispensing clerk with Pennington's Drug Store, Moosomin; a pioneer'

 

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of Melville, Sask., where he started a business in partnership with Mr. Moore, the first drug store in the district. Prior to coming to Canada Lieutenant

Combe served in England with the London Fusiliers. He early associated himself with the Militia and joined the 16th Sask. Light Horse. In 1915 he enlisted in the C.E.F., with the 53rd Bn., proceeding overseas in the autumn of 1915; went to France with 27th Bn. saw action in all the battles and was killed at Fresnoy May 3rd, 1917; posthumously awarded the V.C: Gazette, June 27th, 1917:

"Lt. Robert Grierson Combe, late Can. Inf. Bat. For most conspicuous bravery and example. He steadied his company under intense fire, and led them through the enemy barrage, reaching the objective with only five men. With great coolness and courage Lt. Combe proceeded to bomb the enemy and inflicted heavy

casualties.  He collected small groups of men and succeeded in capturing the company objective together with eight prisoners. He repeatedly charged the enemy, driving them before him, and while personally leading his bombers, was killed by a sniper.

 

 

 

 "His conduct inspired all ranks, and it was entirely due to his magnificent courage that the position was secured and held.

 

 

 

  "His fellow officers write ‘He was a splendid comrade, a first class officer, and a man of infinite charm, whose cheery outlook on life and sense of honor enriched every topic he touched.' "

 

 

  As a citizen of Melville, Lt. Combe holds an equally lasting memory, entering largely into all civic affairs and their betterment. Member of the Council, president of the Board of Trade, and the father of much of its sports; he himself a prominent athlete. When war broke out, hearing the call of duty, he enlisted and was occompanied [sic] overseas by his wife who served as a V.A.D. nurse in Scotland. The publishers of this  work wish to incorporate this memorial to a gallant citizen of the Province.

 

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SECORD: The late John, Q.C., Barrister. Born at Brantford, Ont., 1847, a son of Dr. and Mrs. Levi Secord. Married Ida A. Christopher, of Ingersoll, 1875, and had three daughters and two sons. Educated at Upper Canada College and Osgoode Hall. After practising law in Ontario for a number of years, came to Regina in the early spring of 1883. Appointed Town Clerk of Regina that year, which position he held until his death in 1897. During a portion of the time, when many traces of a quasi–crown colony system survived in the Canadian North-west Territories. and prior to the establishment of a complete system of Responsible Government in 1891, Mr. Secord was a member of the Advisory Council of the Lieutenant-Governor. After having been elected for the constituency of South Regina in 1885, he devoted his endeavour as such representative almost exclusively to matters of education and as a pioneer in such matters laid the foundation of the present system. On the 6th of January, 1890, Mr. Secord was appointed by Royal Warrant one of her Majesty's Counsel, learned in the law.

 

 

 

THOMPSON: Lt.-Col. Murray, barrister. Born in Moose Jaw district, March 29th, 1888, son of Robert K. and Susan Lucas (Hopkins) Thompson. Married Lillian P. Scholes, 1915, and has two. sons and a daughter. Educated at the Moose Jaw Collegiate. and Toronto University. After graduation returned and completed law course with Caldwell & Dunn. Called to the bar and formed partnership with Major Torney (Torney & Thompson). Joined C.E.F. February, 1915; gazetted as lieutenant; attached to 46th Batt., proceeded overseas. Captain, July, 1915: won majority on the Somme, 1916; served with 46th until April, 1917; wounded at Vimy Ridge; invalided to England. Reported to unit, 19th Reserve; was appointed. O.C. Saskatchewan Regimental Depot; Chairman of Allocation Board in England, 1918; returned to France,

 

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July, 1918, in same work. Was appointed staff captain of General Embury's Staff, H.Q. Was on Demobilization Staff in France and returned to Canada 1919; resumed practice. Promoted to Lt.-Col. (Can. Militia), O.C. 12th Bde., Canadian Machine Gun Corps. Col. Thompson has always taken a keen interest in sports and was captain of the Lacrosse Club and a member of the first rugby team while at Varsity; one of the managers of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church his father being its first elder. Col. Thompson's family are  among Moose Jaw's first pioneers, Mr. Thompson driving an ox team from Brandon to where Moose Jaw now stands. Col. Thompson contested the Moose Jaw constituency in the Provincial election, and was defeated by one vote. He is a Liberal. A member of the Kiwanis and United Service Clubs. Address; Moose Jaw.

 

TANNER: The late Arthur William (Lieut.-Col., M.D.), O.C. 10th Fld. Ambulance. Born at Watford , Ont., Dec. 15th, 1876, a son of Robert J. and Mrs. Tanner, of Ottawa. Married Flora Blanche Richmond, 1902, and has two sons and three daughters (one deceased). Educated at Ottawa schools and Toronto University; graduated in 1902 and became a brilliant and successful surgeon, practising at Moosomin, Saskatchewan, for many years. In early life and while at college was a keen sportsman; captained the College Rugby Football Team, which won the Canadian Football Championship in 1897; a yachtsman and the holder of many medals won at regattas on Brittania Bay (Ottawa). A member of the Zeta-Psi College Fraternity. Always interested in the welfare of the town, he took an active part in civic affairs; was Mayor of the town, a prominent Mason, and member of the Anglican Church. When the European war broke out, Col. Tanner was one of the first to offer his services, and was gazetted a lieutenant in the C.A.M.C.

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Previous to leaving for the front he acted as A.D.M.S. of Medical Services for M.D. No. 10. Keen, alert and a resourceful soldier, Col. Tanner made rapid strides in his adopted profession, and was sent to England in command of the 10th Fld. Ambulance. After three weeks in England, the ambulance moved to France where, on June 4th, 1916, Col. Tanner succumbed to wounds received in discharge of his duties near Ypres, June 2nd. Col. Tanner is buried in the military cemetery in the Poperinghe Boeschepe Road, about a mile and a half from Ypres. This is a tribute and a memorial to one who, at the call of country, gave his life in her defence, a gallant soldier and a gentleman.

 

ELLIOTT: The  Honourable William, M.D. Ex-Minister of Agriculture (Government of the N.W.T.) Physician. Born at Mitchell, Perth Co., Ont., 1863, a son of Mr. and Mrs. James Elliott. Educated at Mitchell High School and Toronto University. Taught school in early life at Mitchell and Attwood, Ont. Graduated from Toronto University in 1889 (silver medal for general proficiency). Came west and settled at Wolseley, where he has practised ever since. Elected to the Legislature in 1898, and became a member of the Haultain Government in 1903 (Minister of Agriculture). This he held until the organizing of the Territories into what is now Saskatchewan and Alberta (1905). Remained a member of the Legislature until 1912. Went to England, 1917, as special returning officer, for the Province of Saskatchewan for the counting of soldiers' votes in the Khaki Election of that year. Went to England, 1920, and spent one year in post-graduate work in London and Edinburgh, returning to Wolseley and resuming his practice. Member of the Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, Saskatchewan and Alberta. Member of Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M. Physician to the Home for Infirm. Conservative. Methodist. Address, Wolseley, Sask.

 

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PATRICK: James Alexander MacDonald, K.C., president Saskatchewan Bar Association. (Patrick, Doherty & Co.), Barristers. Born Ilderton, Ont., June 19th, 1873, a son of George B. and Alicia Patrick, late of Ilderton, Ont. Married Sadie Pearl Hawkins, Nov. 15th, 1905, and has three sons and three daughters. Educated at London Normal and Collegiate, Regina Normal. Came to Saskatchewan 1896. Taught school for six years; articled in law to the late Lieutenant Governor Brown; called to the bar in 1904 and has practised continuously in Yorkton. Created a K.C., Jan. 1st, 1914. Bencher of Law Society since 1904. Now an ex officio bencher since 1920. Ex-president of the Law Society of Saskatchewan; ex-president of the Yorkton Board of Trade (four terms); Mayor of Yorkton (four terms). Member of the Yorkton Public School Board four years. Governor and Trustee Regina College since its inception. Trustee of the Saskatchewan anti-Tuberculosis League; vice-president Dominion Bar Association; president Saskatchewan Bar Association, 1923-1924. Contested Yorkton constituency, 1917, Conservative interest (defeated). Member of the Masonic Lodge. P.G.M. of the I.O.O.F. Member Yorkton Golf Club. Recreations, big game hunting, breeding and propagating various varieties of deer and wild fowl in private park at Yorkton. Methodist. Address, Yorkton.

 

NOYES: The Venerable Archdeacon Robert John, B.A., B.D. Born at Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England, a son of Robert and Mary Banks (Greene) Noyes. Married Mary Rowley in 1872, and has two sons. Educated at the Wolverhampton Grammar School and Dublin University. Comes of old Norman stock. Was ordained at Manchester in 1870, and into full orders in 1871. First curacy at St. Peters, Oldham Road, Manchester (three years), 1870-73. St. Clement Higher Obenshaw, Manchester, 1874-78; incumbent of Christ Church, Southborough, Tunbridge

 

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We1ls, 1878-81; rector of Fertagh, County Kilkenny, Ireland, 1881-88. In charge of St. Luke's, Badminster, Bristol, 1888-90. Rector of Creggam Armagh, 1890-94. Rector of Killoran, Sligo, 1895-1904. Archdeacon of Achonnry, 1902-04. Vicar of St. Johns, Harborn, Birmingham, 1904-09. Marshal Saskatchewan, 1909-12. Incumbent of Christ Church, Dusseldorf, Germany, 1913-14. War found Archdeacon Noyes in Germany, and it was with great difficulty that he and his wife were enabled to leave the country, all their household effects being confiscated. Returning to Ireland, he was in charge of Lima Vady, County Derry, 1914-16. Returned to Canada and retired. His son, Herbert H. Noyes, served overseas with the 5th Sask. Battalion and was killed in action at Ypres. Archdeacon Noyes is a cousin of the famous English poet and writer, Alfred Noyes. He is a contributor to various religious periodicals. Address, Lloydminster.

 

MOXON: Arthur, B.A., B.C.L., dean and professor of law, University of Saskatchewan. Born at Rawdon, Hants County, Nova Scotia, 1882, son of Joseph and Margaret E. Moxon. Educated at Dalhousie College, Halifax (B.A.), Oxford University (B.C.L.) Rhodes, Scholar, Nova Scotia, 1906. Professor of Classics, University of Saskatchewan, 1909-1911. Admitted to the bar of Saskatchewan, 1911. Practised law, 1911. 1914, Saskatoon. Assistant manager National Trust Co., Saskatoon office, 1914-19. Professor of law, Saskatchewan University, 1919. Anglican. Address, 675 University Drive, Saskatoon.

 

MUNDELL: The late Lieutenant David, B.A., barrister- (Mundell & Proctor). Born at Inverness, Scotland, April 11th, 1883, a son of Walter and Margaret Mundell. Married Miss Stella Reany, 1909, and has one son (David) and two daughters. Educated at the public, schools, Brandon Collegiate, Manitoba University. Came to Manitoba in 1886; was articled in

 

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law to the firm he afterwards was so long associated with, Brown and Wylie, both members of which were subsequently elevated to the bench. After being called to the bar, joined the firm under the company name of Brown, Wylie & Mundell, afterwards Brown, Wylie, Mundell & Proctor. Joined the Canadian Militia, 16th Sask. Light Horse, three years commanding A Troop. On the outbreak of the European war, Mr. Mundell joined the C.E.F. August 5, 1914, with the rank of lieutenant, proceeding overseas with the 5th Saskatchewan Battalion.  Was engaged in the second Battle of Ypres, severely wounded at the Battle of Festubert (dying of wounds in No.1 C.C.S., two days later). Is buried in the Military Cemetery of Choquis. Lieutenant Mundell has been made a bencher of the Law Society and was the youngest man in Saskatchewan to be elevated to that position. Was a member of the Masonic fraternity, a keen sportsman, curler; played cricket and tennis; an ardent lover of horses; a lover of music and a clever amateur. Members of the old 5th Batt. Mess will always recall the nights and mess dinners when Lieutenant Mundell's playing was a feature of the programmes that made the long winter on Salisbury Plain less monotonous. This is a tribute and memorial to a very gallant gentleman, whose memory will long live as an inspiration to the future generations of Moosomin.

 

MCCALLUM: E. A. McCallum, Hill & Company, Scarth Street, Regina, Sask. In the early days of the present century Regina had few friends. It was the capital of the North-west Territories and a few miles out on the prairie were the headquarters barracks of the Mounted Police, but that was about all. The mud of its streets, which clung like glue to wagon wheels and human members, was a curse; its patent fecundity was not yet realized; sanitation there was none; even the water was a scourge to unaccustomed drinkers, and there was a typhoid epidemic each fall.

 

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The C.P.R. was featuring Moose Jaw, forty miles to the westward, at the expense of the capital, and the members of the Legislature who hailed from more favored locations made periodic attempts to move the seat of Government to some more desirable spot. Regina had a bad name and a curse seemed to rest upon it. It had few friends, and in the main they were but feeble apologists, and yet there was one young man who dreamed a .glowing vision of the future of this slough of despond and he had the faith that goes with works. E. A. McCallum had been studying law in the office of the late T. C. Johnstone, but a sharp attack of sickness had sent him for a considerable period to the little frame building that was dignified by the name bf "Cottage Hospital." When convalescent he found that most of his sayings had been consumed, and he would have to break his law studies to seek some more remunerative employment. He accordingly opened a small office in one of the weather-boarded shacks that then disfigured Scarth Street, and made shift to do a small brokerage and insurance business. Clients did not come along very briskly and he had, plenty of time for contemplation. He had sound judgement and keen intelligence and, not having been very long in the West, was not handicapped by the muddy rut in which his neighbours had become mired.

The first rush to the Saskatchewan valley was on. The lure of cheap and fertile land to be had almost for the taking was drawing thousands of the best class of agricultural immigrants from the Middle Western States, Ontario, and the Maritime Provinces. Northern Europe was sending out whole communities of sturdy peasants. A great English colony was establishing itself not far from the North Saskatchewan River and work on the construction of lines of railways to serve these newcomers was proceeding apace. Great stretches of the virgin prairie were being brought under cultivation, and the work of transformation was on. To the eyes of many of the old residents, long dulled by

 

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deferred hope, the signs were unreal, but they were plain to this eastern land. It seemed to him that this great movement could mean only one thing. Each train that paused at the little old erection that served as a station was crammed to capacity with newcomers, their wives and families. On every available side-track freight cars laden with live stock and settlers effects were being shunted about. The stores began to do a capacity trade, and sleeping room at the hotels was at a premium, and surely, he thought, here were all the elements of a coming boom, and still property was very cheap. City lots that had been bought twenty years before had dwindled in value until they were abandoned for taxes. Real estate had no value; no one wanted it. Mr. McCallum had his ear to the ground and was certain he heard the premonitory rumblings of a great movement. He tried to interest local capital, but he was treated with a scornful pity. He was determined to acquire property. He went to G. T. Marsh, who at that time was the agent who represented the Townsite Trustees, an, organization which controlled the interest of the C.P.R. and the Government in the Regina townsite, and made a proposition to purchase some forty blocks, many of which were situated within a few blocks of the centre of the city. The price asked for these blocks was in the neighbourhood of $200, and they each contained forty twenty-five foot lots or twenty fifty-foot ones, and the terms of payment were easy and extended. But Mr. McCallum had no money, and even then the movement was beginning. He carefully perused the contract Mr. Marsh handed him; then, placing his finger on an essential clause, he insisted that it be radically changed before he made this payment. As he had foreseen, Mr. Marsh declared he had no authority to make this change, and it would have to be submitted to the head office at Montreal. To this Mr. McCallum agreed, making the stipulation that the property was to be held for him in the meantime, and of course the change was not agreed upon; but

 

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it gave Mr. McCallum the necessary time. Values were rising and he made some provisional sales which brought in some cash. A little money was obtained from some relatives, and when the contracts came back from Montreal he was ready with the payments. When the boom was in full swing the property so acquired was worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Shortly afterwards he formed a partnership with his brother Edgar McCallum and W. H. A. Hill, and the firm of McCallum, Hill & Co., which has been a household word in Regina for more than twenty years, came into being. The fruits of the first investment enabled them, to extend their operations and acquire more property, selling their closer-in holdings and taking the proceeds to buy more extensively farther out. The first acreage they acquired was a, portion of a farm immediately to the south of the city, which was purchased from G. T. Marsh for a price in those days of cheap lands. They named it Wascana Park, subdivided it, and it sold rapidly.

In 1905, by a vote of the Legislature, the capital of the new Province was established in Regina, and it was apparent that grounds would be required for the site of the Parliament Buildings. The choice of location was limited, and McCallum, Hill & Co. were determined -to keep up their reputation of being in advance of any real estate movement. They accordingly bought from R. Sinton a section of land on the hill immediately south of the Wascana Creek, in what was

Certainly the most desirable location available. In order to shut off any possible competition, they bought a place known as the Kline Farm, immediately to the westward of the first purchase and consisting of a little over, a thousand acres, from the local firm of Gray and Hamilton, and a Minneapolis capitalist named Gates. They also bought land to the south from D. D. McLeod, of Regina. There were not wanting prophets in Regina who foretold disaster. The operations were the largest in real estate that had

 

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yet been carried on. These three young men had acquired a great quantity of property and their commitments were enough to daunt the boldest speculator. Yet their judgment was quickly vindicated. The Provincial Government, not finding any other position available, paid what was then a handsome figure for a portion of the Sinton property. The Kline farm was plotted out in lots, named "Lakeview." Buildings began to be erected. There was a brisk commerce in lots, values doubled overnight, and it was not long until Lakeview was the best residential suburb of Regina. After engaging in many real estate transactions and contributing in no small degree to the upbuilding of Regina, Mr. McCallum and his partners erected on their property, at the corner of Twelfth Avenue and Scarth Street, one of the finest office buildings in the West, on the ground floor of which they have their offices. It is ten stories in height, 125x75, and is equipped with every modern convenience.

 

 

E. A. McCallum, who has thus seen the reality of the vision he dreamed twenty years ago, is of the stock of the Scottish Highlands, which has given so many good citizens to Canada. His grandfather, Archibald McCallum, sailed from Inverary in Argyleshire to Canada, more than one hundred years ago, and took up land in the Ottawa valley between Ottawa and Montreal. He was of the pure Celtic
race and Gaelic. He did not acquire English until after his arrival in Canada. E. A. McCallum was born on his father's farm, at Cumberland, in 1869, the son of Donald McCallum and his wife, Jane McCaffrey. After attending public school he took a teacher's certificate and taught for two years at Spittsville, Ontario. He later attended high school at Vankleek Hill, where he took his second-class certificate. He thence came to Regina and went to farm work with Cooney Brothers at Wascana. He taught school for a few month IS at the Forest School, some miles southwest of Lumsden. In 1898 he entered the office of the late Hon. Mr.

 

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Justice Johnstone, as an articled law clerk. His real estate activities, however, were not compatible with the study of law and although he kept his articles for four years, he abandoned the profession. In 1904 he married Miss Potter, of Vankleek Hill (deceased), and has one son and one daughter. In 1912 he went through the experience of the cyclone and only by the greatest good fortune escaped serious injury. As it was, his house was destroyed and he and both his children were bruised and shaken.

 

    In addition to being the head of McCallum, Hill & Co., he is connected with several other enterprises, and, is president of the Saskatchewan Guarantee and Fidelity Company, which was organized in 1908 to do a general bonding business. He has for many years been a member of the Executive of the Regina' Exhibition Association, and had also long been the representative of the Regina Board of Trade to the Trades, and Labor Council.

 

   During the war he served on many committees which dealt with war conditions. Despite a physical infirmity, he made some strenuous efforts to go overseas, but was rejected on account of physical disability.

   He is a Liberal in politics, and a Presbyterian in religion. He is one of the most constructive citizens of Western Canada.

 

MACPHERSON: Major Murdock Alexander, M.A., LL.B., barrister. Born at Grand Ance, Cape Breton, N.S., April 16th, 1891, son of Alexander and Margaret, (Campbell) MacPherson. Married Iowa Briggs, 1915, and has two sons. Educated at Richmond Academy, Pictou Academy and Dalhousie University. Taught school in Cape Breton. Taught in the Maritime Business College. Articled to Hector, McInnis, Fulton & Kenny. Came to Saskatchewan in 1913 (Swift Current). Partnership Buckles, Donald & MacPherson.  Enlisted, 1915, C.E.F., 68th Battalion. Was also with 128, 209th (lieutenant); France, 1916 (reverted) ; 10th

 

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Battalion. Saw service at Vimy Ridge, Arleux. Wounded April, 1917. Invalided to England, Canada; discharged 1918. Resumed practice at Swift Current. Opened present practice in Regina, 1921. Contested Regina constituency 1921, Conservative interest, against Hon. Wm. Motherwell and Dr. McLean (defeated). Ex-president G.W.V.A.; first vice-president Saskatchewan Command, G.W.V.A. Solicitor for the Soldier Settlement Board. Presbyterian. Conservative. Address, Regina.

 

 

McDONALD: D. H., banker, Fort Qu' Appelle. Comes of an old Hudson's Bay Co. family. His-father, Archibald McDonald, was a native-born Scotchman who rose high in the service of the company, and was at one time its oldest commissioned officer. He held undisputed sway over the great region of what is now known as Central Saskatchewan. His son, Mr. D. H. McDonald, early became a private banker at Fort Qu' Appelle, farms on a large scale, was one of the prime movers in the Saskatchewan Valley Land Co., has been interested in politics for many years, member for the Qu'Appelle constituency, was at one time, Leader of the Opposition, is one of the directors of the Western Colonization scheme, is interested in the history of the West and has a large library of matters relative to the North-west, which is perhaps the best of its nature in the country.

 

JOHNSON: Evelyn Madill, wife of Lorne Johnson, born at Vroomanton, Ontario, a daughter of James L. Vrooman and Margaret Madill. Married April 18th, 1916. Graduate of the Toronto Conservatory School of Expression in 1912 and post-graduate in 1913 (A.T.C.M.) Taught expression, public speaking and physical culture in Brandon College, Toronto Conservatory and Presbyterian Deaconess Training Home,. specializing in recitals in Canadian literature and Ibsen dramas. Formerly a member of the Canadian

 

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Literature Club, Toronto, and the Women's Art Association, Toronto; and the U.E. Loyalist Association. A present member of the executive of the Educational Club and the Red Cross, Regina. Regent of the Forget Chapter, I.O.D.E., 1920-22; honorary regent, 1923-24; corresponding secretary of the L.C.W., Regina, 1920; financial correspondent, 1921; first vice-president, 192224; member of the Art Committee; convener of Everywoman Fund of Provincial Council of Women, whereby $50,000 was raised to provide treatment for destitute tubercular mothers. Member of Women's Canadian Club, Wascana Country Club. Recreations, golf and horticulture. Religion, Protestant. Address, 2159 Scarth St., Regina. .

 

HEARN: Lieut.-Colonel. John Harvey, B.A., LL.B., barrister and solicitor. Born at Sydney, N.S., 1882, son of Jas. H. and Elizabeth (Miller) Hearn. Married Sarah Henrietty 1914, and has two sons and a daughter. Educated at Sydney Academy, St. Francis Xavier University, Dalhousie University. Irish stock. Family in Canada many generations, originally from, Waterford, Ireland. Colonel Hearn's father was prominent K.C. of Sydney, N.S. Articled to Humphrey Mellish (now Judge Mellish); was called to the N.S. bar in 1908, came west and was called to the Saskatchewan bar. Started practice at Wadena and has practised 1Jhere continuously, Contested Humboldt constituency in Federal election of 1911, against Dr. Neely, and was defeated. Contested Wadena constituency for the Provincial House and was defeated by small vote. Joined C.E.F. Nov., 1915; organized Wadena independent company of infantry, Feb., 1916. Appointed colonel with authority to raise 214th battalion which he did, taking it to England, 1917. When battalion broke up, returned to Canada and resumed practice. Mayor of Wadena, 1912-13-18. Solicitor for the town of Wadena, rural municipalities of Lake View Lake Side, Kelvington, Sasman, Canadian Bank of

 

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Commerce. Member of the Saskatchewan Law Association. Catholic. Conservative. Now practising in Saskatoon, Sask.

 

 

GORRELL: Arthur Stirling, M.D.C.M., physician. Specialist eye, ear, nose and throat diseases. Born  Farrans' Point, Ont., Nov. 18th, 1869, son of George Taylor and Katherine (Fulton) Gorrell. Married Ethel J. Cherry, Oct. 26th, 1898, and has three sons and one daughter. Educated at Brockville Collegiate Institute and McGill University. Past County Master, Loyal Orange, Lodge, county of Carleton, Ont. Past District Deputy Grand Master, A.F. and A.M., Ottawa District. Grand First Principal, Grand Chapter Canada, R.A.M.; Grand Master, A.F. and A.M., Grand Lodge of Saskatchewan. Lieut-Col. R.A.M.C. (Retired). 1st A.D.M.S., Mil. Dist. No. 12. Past President Medical Staff, Regina General Hospital and Regina Grey Nun's Hospital. An Anglican. Address, 2303 Cornwall St., Regina.

 

GREENE: Mrs. S. A., regent of the Moose Jaw Daughters of the Empire, and ex-secretary of Canadian Patriotic Fund. Born at Goderich, Ont., a daughter of Roland and Jane (Morris) Williams. Father came to Canada from Kingston, Jamaica. Grandfather was Mr. Justice Williams, of the court of Middlesex County, England. Married W.. H. Greene, and has one son, W. Harvey Greene, Engineer, Moose Jaw. Comes of pioneer stock. Father was one of the original settlers in Huron County, Ont., coming there from the West Indies.  Mrs. Greene was married and lived in Toronto. Coming west, in 1911, to Moose Jaw, at the outbreak of the war she took a keen interest in all war work, and as a member of the LO.D.E. was, in any movement for its advancement. In 1916 was appointed secretary, Moose Jaw Patriotic Fund, and its administration. To this she brought much executive ability, and a large number of cases have been

 

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adjusted and much money disbursed: Her administration has given satisfaction both to the Head Executive Board of the Fund and to the soldiers and dependents
benefited. Mrs. Greene was elected vice regent, Moose Jaw Chapter, I.O.D.E., in 1916, and regent, 1917, a position she has filled continuously ever since. She is secretary of the Y.W.C.A. Board; one of the committee on the Beauleau Home for fallen girls, and is a member of the joint committee for joint welfare work. In these she is deeply interested and gives of her time freely in their behalf. Mrs. Greene's husband served overseas during the war with the Royal Engineers. She is a life member of Moose Jaw Chapter, I.O.D.E. One of the National Councillors, I.O.D.E., and second vice-president, Provincial Chapter. Address, Moose Jaw, Sask.

 

CLEMESHA: Frederick Chapman, architect and sculptor (Clemesha & Portnall),. Born Preston, England, Aug. 3rd, 1876, son of Alfred Clemesha Esq.,

J. P. and Laura Wesley Leighton, of Buzzard, Bucks, Eng. Married Isabel Bernice Riddell, of Preston, Aug. 4th, 1914, and has two sons. Educated at the Friend's School, Bootham, Yorkshire. Was several years on tea estates in Ceylon. Ranched three years in the Argentine Republic. Came to Canada 1901, and worked on Western ranches for two years. Came to Regina 1903, and was successful in several large architectural competitions, including the Battlefield Memorial. Joined 46th Battalion, Canadian infantry, as lieutenant (1915); continuous service until Armistice (wounded). Member Assiniboia Club, Regina; Union Club, Brussels. Recreations, swimming, sailing, music. Has travelled in India and the East. Member of the Society of Friends. Address, Regina.

 

 

 

 

BALL: Augustus H., M.A., LL.B., Deputy Minister of Education for Saskatchewan. Educated Haberdashers' School, London, England; University of

 

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Manitoba. Came to Winnipeg, Man., 1890; law student with Munsen & Allan; lecturer in classics, Manitoba College, 1896-97. Taught school near Qu' Appelle 1897. Principal Maple Creek School, 1898-1901. Principal Moose Jaw, 1901-1903.
Appointed inspector of schools with headquarters at Yorkton, 1903. Appointed. assistant - principal Regina Normal School, 1911. Appointed Deputy Minister of Education, 1912. Appointed Provincial Commissioner Boy Scouts, 1915. Lieutenant 249th O.S. Batt., 1916; captain, 1917.  Returned from overseas 1918. Organized Schools' Patriotic Fund; Belgian Relief Fund for Children and Schools Red Cross Fund. Decorated with the Order of the Silver Wolf, 1921, for services to Boy Scout movement. Chairman Commission for the Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children. Chairman Junior Red Cross Committee. Presbyterian. Residence, 2237 Retallack St. Regina, Sask.

 

 

AULD: Francis Hedley, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Provincial Government of Saskatchewan. Born Covehead, P.E.I, June 14th, 1881, a son of David Higgins and Elizabeth (Cairns) Auld. Married Elizabeth - Smith. July 5th, 1911. Three children. Educated Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown, P.E.I. Secretary of Statistics, Saskatchewan Government, 1907; Director of Agricultural Extension, University of Saskatchewan, 1910-1912. Deputy Minister of Agric culture for Saskatchewan, 1915; vice-president Western Canada Live Stock Union; president of the Rotary Club of Regina, 1922. Presbyterian. Address, 2830 Retallack St., Regina.

 

 

 

PATRICK: Thomas Alfred, M.D., physician and surgeon. Born township of London, Middlesex county, Ont., Dec. 23rd, 1864, a son of George B. and Alice S. (Hobbs): Patrick. Married Marion Griffith Byron, 1890, and has one son and three daughters, all graduates of Canadian universities. Dr. Patrick was edu-

 

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cated at Strathroy Collegiate and Western University of London. The Patrick family came to Canada from Ayrshire, Scotland. Dr. Patrick practised in Michigan, U.S., 1888; in N.W.T. and Saskatchewan since 1899. Contested Wallace constituency in 1891; elected by acclamation, 1897-99-1903, the latter terms for the constituency of Yorkton. Defeated in 1904 in the Dominion election for Yorkton; vice-president Canadian Medical Association, 1903-04; member Senate .of University of Saskatchewan, 1913; president Canadian: Club; --- director Enterprise Ptg. Co. Dr. Patrick is proud of the fact that his children are all graduates of Canada schools-Miss Mabel Patrick, B.A., M.A., hon. graduate Toronto University, now head of the Household Science and Economics, Saskatchewan University; Miss Edith Patrick, M.A., of Columbia University, New York, him. graduate, Toronto, is with the Dept. of Household Science, University of Alberta. He is a Progressive in politics. A Mason. Recreation, big game hunting.

 

ANDERSON: Percy M., K.C., barrister and solicitor (Anderson, Bayne & Co.) Born at Paisley, Ont., 1878. Graduated from Queen's University with honours (honour course in political science and history). Articled to Aikens & Robson, barristers, of Winnipeg. (Sir James Aikens and Hugh Robson, Deputy Attor. -General of the N.W.T.) Mr. Anderson came to. Regina in 1912, and joined the firm of MacKenzie, Brown & Co., afterwards forming a partnership of his own. From being a member of the junior bar only a few years ago, he has become one of the leading members of the profession, and has appeared with conspicuous success before the Privy Council.

 

   During the war, when the Saskatchewan Government were constrained to raise additional revenue, the Hudson's Bay Company put up a strenuous fight against a surtax being levied on their large land hold-

 

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ings in the Province. The corporation contended that under the terms of their grant from the Crown they were exempt from paying exceptional taxes, and they contended that the surtax came under that designation. Mr. Anderson appeared for the Provincial Government and won in the local courts. The case was carried to the Privy Council, and Mr. Anderson was associated with Frank Russell, K.C., the son of the famous jurist, the late Lord Russell, of Killowen. He has on other occasions appeared with success before the Privy Council, and on one occasion sat in on four cases with the Hon. Joseph Martin. Since 1914 he has appeared before the Supreme Court of Canada almost every year. He has been president of the Regina Board of Trade and of the Kiwanis Club. He is a member of the Assiniboia Club and of the Masonic fraternity, besides serving on many committees engaged in useful public work.

 

RANKIN: Lt.-Colonel James Sabiston, D.S.O., barrister, Regina. Born at Liberton, Lanarkshire, Scotland, a son of Alexander and Elizabeth. (Nimmo) Rankin. Married Miss Winnifred Styles in 1923, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Styles, of Regina. Educated at Glasgow High School and Glasgow University. Admitted to the bar as a solicitor, 1905; commissioned 8th Highland light infantry (T.F.) 1908. Admitted barrister at law, Saskatchewan, 1914; attached to the C.E.F., 1915, and appointed as captain with 46th (S. Sask.) battalion. Served continuously with this unit overseas during the European war. Promoted major and Lt.-colonel in the field, commanding his unit on returning to Canada for demobilization. Awarded D.S.O., 1917 (28th Batt.) Bar to D.S.O, 1918; in temporary command of 75th battalion at time of Armistice. Commands 1st battalion, South Sask. rgt. Member of the Masonic Order. Presbyterian. Member Assiniboia Club, Regina. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

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STORER: Mrs. Effie Laurie, journalist; Moose Jaw Daily Times. Daughter of Patrick Gamey and Mary (Carney) Laurie. Married John Henry Storer, originally of the North-west Mounted Police. Killed in action, France. Educated at the Winnipeg schools, Mrs. Storer rightly belongs to the pioneer period of  the North-west. Her father was the founder of the first paper in the Territories. Driving to Battleford, 650 miles, he founded the Battleford Herald in 1882. This trip was made in midwinter with pony and jumper, and took fifty days. This paper still survives and is still in the family, edited by Mrs. Storer's brother, Major Richard Laurie. Mrs. Storer was married at Battleford in 1889. Her husband, one of the original members of the R.N.W.M.P, carried dispatches in the Riel Rebellion, Battleford to Swift Current; promoted to sergeant. At the outbreak of the Great War enlisted Aug. 4th, 1914. Was a member of the 22nd light horse, recruited the 9th C.M.R.'s at Battleford and proceeded overseas Nov., 1915. France, June, 1916. Saw continuous service until March 5th, 1917. Was killed in action in a night trench raid and is buried at Come. Mrs. Storer has been in journalistic work for many years, in Battleford, in Regina (Post) and Moose Jaw (Times), being the editor of the society column for that paper. She has much historic and romantic material of the Old West which she hopes ere long to get in shape for publication. She is a charter member of the I.O.D.E. and the Canadian Women's Press, Club: Address, Moose Jaw Times.

 

WHITMORE: The late J. A., postmaster and pioneer. When the late J. A. Whitmore died in Regina, in 1904, the Government not only lost an able and efficient official, but Canada lost a citizen whose fine character, sterling rectitude and constructive abilities had written him a high place amongst the makers of the West. He belonged to one of those families which, originat-

 

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ing in England, settled in pro-revolutionary times in the Americl1n Colonies, and having "learned from their wistful mothers to call Old England home," they could not follow their fellow colonists in rebellion against the Crown which they had been brought up to revere. On the establishment of the United States they abandoned their own personal interests and came to Canada, where they formed an aristocracy of elements so pure that it was almost ideal. It was founded on honest pride of race, family achievement, rectitude of life, and on high ideals of public service.

 

  The Whitmore family originated in the English Midlands, but the ancestors of the subject of this sketch emigrated to what is now the State of New Jersey, long before the revolt of the thirteen colonies. In colonial days they were prominent in the public service, and one member of the family scaled the heights of Quebec with Wolfe, and on that long-gone historic day saw the flag of Britain displace the royal standard of France over a Canadian territory so vast that no man knew its uttermost confines. During the revolutionary wars the Whitmores, true to their loyal principles, refused to join the Continental army, as the forces of the rebellious colonies were called. When hostilities were over they remained quietly in the family homestead in the Mohawk Valley, giving offence to none. But a surge of animosity, engendered by the teaching of Thomas Jefferson and others of his school, against all the older forms of government, swept through the country. All those who were known to have been British in their sympathies were classed as Tories and subjected to persecution and outrage. At the close of hostilities bands of masterless men, who had fought as irregulars during the war, often joined with the Indians and, lurking in the forest, when occasion offered descended upon unprotected settlers leaving behind them a trail of murder and rapine. It was not unnatural that these miscreants should single out for their attacks those whose loyalty

 

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to their Mother Country had earned for them the stigma of "Tory." Thus befell the Whitmore tragedy. Peter Whitmore, with his wife and his young family, which consisted of a son growing into manhood, a younger boy, three daughters and a baby, was living in peace on the family homestead in the Mohawk Valley. A white ruffian, named O'Sullivan, who had been a general in the American army, had gathered together a band of lawless men, which, augmented by Onieda and Delaware Indians, swept down the valley with the avowed intention of pillaging the settlers of British sympathies. During the course of this foray a party of Indians, under a Chief named Decaignee, beset the Whitmore home. The family had observed painted savages lurking in the woods, but, believing them to be British Indians, were not alarmed. A party, however, approached the house, entered, and although hospitably received, commenced to ransack the place and insult the occupants. The young son, John, resented this conduct and was struck by a white ruffian with the Indians. He resisted and was set upon. His father interfered and a massacre commenced. The father, mother and eldest son were despatched with tomahawks, the place fired, and the marauders retired to the forest, taking the boy John Whitmore, his three sisters, and the baby with them as captives. The Indian who carried the baby, fearing that its cries might attract the attention of possible pursuers, dashed its brains out against a tree, and threw its body aside. John Whitmore was adopted by a kindly Indian woman and he remained in the tribe for many years. His ears and nose were pierced in the Indian fashion and until the day of his death he carried upon his body the scars which bore witness to the ordeal incidental to the making of an Indian warrior, through which he had passed. At the expiry of several years, when the vigilance of his captors was relaxed, he escaped and succeeded in making his way to Canada, where he was awarded the grant the Crown gave to the

 

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U. E. Loyalists in the Niagara Peninsula. He was a man of conscience and rectitude, but time never effaced the horrors of the massacre, and many years afterwards he made up his mind, that it would be an act of justice to kill the Indian Chief who had been responsible for the death of his parents. Accordingly, providing himself with the long rifle of the frontiersman of the period, Mr. Whitmore journeyed back to the Indian country and lay in ambush beside the path that was to be traversed by the Chief. Long he waited, but, warned perhaps by some subtle Indian sense of impending danger, Decaignee tarried in his coming and Mr. Whitmore began to ponder upon the act he contemplated. Misgivings assailed him that to kill a man from ambush was descending to the tactics of the Indians, and shouldering his weapon he hurried from the spot, leaving his vengeance to the hand of God.

 

    During the war of 1812 Mr. Whitmore took an active part on the British side. He was captured by American soldiers and whilst confined a prisoner in Fort Niagara met Decaignee, who expressed sorrow and contrition for his share in the massacre. John Whitmore lived to a grand old age on the homestead he had established on his land near Niagara. Seventy years after the tragedy he had news of one of his sisters, who had escaped from the Indians and had married a well-to-do white man in one of the New England States. He went to see her, and found her, although more than eighty years of age, in full possession of her health and faculties. Affecting must have been the meeting between the brother and sister who had parted for so long and under such tragic circumstances. The John Whitmore who figured in these adventures was the grandfather of J. A. Whitmore, the subject of this sketch, who was born on the family homestead, four miles from Niagara, in 1840. It is notable that this place which had been built upon and improved by the various generations of Whit-

 

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mores is still in the hands of members of the family.  At the age of fourteen he was bound apprentice to the dry goods trade, a fashion of those thorough-going days that obtained real efficiency, and after completing his indentures went into business for himself. He prospered, and during the construction of the Welland Canal he operated four stores to serve the people engaged in this important undertaking. In 1869 he married Miss Mary Ramsey, a daughter of one of the civil engineers employed on the canal, who was afterwards the superintendent. Four children were born whilst the Whitmores remained in Ontario; three sons, Frank, Albert E. and George, and one daughter, Annie. Mr. Whitmore took a keen interest in public life, and during the campaign of 1878 Was a strong supporter of Nicholas Flood Davin, who was making his first appearance in Canadian public life. Mr. Davin was making a strong attack on the Liberal citadel of East Haldimand, which had long been held by Andrew Thompson. He was not successful, but he greatly reduced the large Liberal majority which had grown habitual in that constituency. The friendship formed at that time between Mr. Whitmore and Mr. Davin was continued until the tragic death of the latter in 1901. In 1883 Mr. Whitmore was appointed postmaster of the town of Moose Jaw, and coming west with his family opened the office there on May 23rd

of the same year. In those days Moose Jaw had the usual disadvantages of a frontier town. It was the gateway of the ranching country; the C.P.R. had established a divisional point; and it was the headquarters of a considerable band of Sioux Indians who, under the Great Medicine Chief, Sitting Bull, had taken refuge in Canada after the defeat of Custer at the Little Big Horn. Practically the only domestic help to be had in Moose Jaw in those days was obtained from the Indians, and the young Whitmores obtained a knowledge of the Sioux language which they have been able to utilize on occasion during later

 

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years. The work of organizing the post office and mail work at Moose Jaw was so efficiently carried out that when the Regina post office became vacant through the death of the late Joseph Irvine, it was inevitable that Mr. Whitmore should get the appointment. Accordingly, in December, 1888, he took charge of the most important office in the North-west. It was no sinecure. The country was new, distances vast and even the outlying settlers had to be served. There was not a single office between Regina and Saskatoon. Off to the north-east and north-west were the little offices of Craven, Carsdale, Wascana, Pengarth, Marieton and Strassbourg, but they really were only rural agencies for the distribution of mail, and all the real work was done at the Regina office. And splendidly was it accomplished. Mr. Whitmore knew every one in the widely spaced territory, and his devotion to duty, his executive ability, and his fine, sterling rectitude of character, made him an outstanding figure in the community. He was ably assisted by his sons, and the work of the office proceeded efficiently and smoothly.

As a young man Mr. Whitmore took an active interest in all field sports-an interest which never abated until the day of his death-and was at one time a noted equestrian. He loved horses and always had a fine driver or saddle horse in his stable. He was always a votary of the breech-loader, and whenever he could spare time from the exacting duties of his office, the fall days would find him afield with dog and gun. In the early days in Ontario he took an interest in militia matters and saw active service during the Fenian Raid, serving with the Lincoln Militia. He was in charge of the detachment that took the Fenian General from Fort Erie to Brantford jail. The U.E. Loyalist families who were established on the Niagara Peninsula were notable in the records of Canada. The Secords were neighbours. The Servos family, which

 

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had lived a story of Indian wars and rapine similar to that of the Whitmores, were connections; and William Kirby, whose services as a chronicler have only been exceeded by Francis Parkman, and whose "Golden Dog" will always remain a great-if not the greatest Canadian classic, was a near relation. The Whitmores were reared in an atmosphere where loyalty was like religion, and where the old-fashioned designation of gentleman reached its truest significance.

 

J. A. Whitmore died in Regina, very suddenly, in 1904, and he left a name behind him that ranks high amongst the pioneers, and is well worthy of the line of splendid people from which he came. His three sons are carrying on the traditions of their line. Their work is too well known and too contemporary to require more than the briefest epitome here. Indeed, it requires a separate article, for it deals with different conditions and is of a different nature.

They are amongst the most constructive citizens of the new West. Frank, the eldest, was long his father's right hand in the post office, and time and again, when ¥r. Whitmore suffered from attacks of ill health, he broke his medical studies to take some of the burden of a large and growing business off his father's shoulders. He eventually graduated in medicine, but owing to the expanding business interests of hi,; brothers and himself he has never engaged in private practice. During the war he was very active in recruiting work, and went overseas as second in command of the 152nd Battalion, under Colonel Nelles, another member of a well-known U.E. Loyalist family. Unfortunately, however he suffered a severe accident during military maneuvres in Canada, the results of which forced him to return home, where he passed a considerable time in hospital, and incapacitated him from engaging in any business for many months.

A. E. Whitmore, the second son, was for a time engaged in ranching on the Rough Bark Creek, in what is now known as the Yellow Grass District. Like all

 

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his kindred, he was very popular with his neighbours, and at their solicitation entered the lists in a contest for a seat in the Legislature against the invincible J. A. Calder, then a member of the Provincial Cabinet. Political wiseacres wagged their heads at this stripling coming up against Goliath. But Mr. Whitmore came out of the conflict with Mr. Calder's scalp at his belt. He did useful work in the Legislature and would surely have been opposition leader, with an excellent possibility of the premiership, had not a severe attack of sickness forced him out of the political field for the time.

 

   George Whitmore, the youngest of the three brothers, has devoted himself most assiduously to business and has developed a remarkable executive gift which was utilized for the benefit of his country during the war, when, with the rank of major, he acted in various responsible military capacities at Canadian Military Headquarters in London. His work attracted the attention of Lord Beaverbrook, who had him attached to his own staff. Whilst acting as Canadian embarkation officer, he did splendid service, and many a Western soldier serving overseas has occasion to thank Major Whitmore for many a kind office.

 

   Early in the present century when these three brothers were only young men, they formed a combination that, starting well, has continued and grown in strength and stability until the present day. They acquired an extensive coal business in Regina and shortly afterwards obtained the general agency for the output of the C.P.R. mines, and prospered exceedingly. Since then they have become engaged in all sorts of constructive enterprises. They acquired property and built modern buildings; they farmed and ranched; they established the Regina Steam Laundry; and are interested in other similar enterprises. They also operate an up-to-date pharmacy. It would be impossible to give even an outline of the activities of Messrs. Whitmore Bros. in this sketch, nor it is our

 

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purpose. They represent the best sound conservative and aggressive business element of Saskatchewan. They have a fine family tradition behind them, and no history of the Province can be written without taking them into important consideration. They are worthy citizens.

 

SEYMOUR: Maurice MacDonald, M.D., Commissioner of Public Health, Government of Saskatchewan. Born in Goderich, Ont., 1857. Dr. Seymour comes from a military family in which public service has always been a high tradition. His father, Captain, Maurice Bain Seymour, on resigning his commission in the British army, left an honourable record of splendid service behind him. His mother was a daughter of Major Donald MacDonald, of the famous Glencoe branch of that clan, who was a veteran of Waterloo and was presented with a sword of honour for his exploits on that famous field. Dr. Seymour was educated at Sandwich College and McGill University Montreal graduating in medicine in 1879. Came to Winnipeg in 1881 and practised for two years. Dr. Seymour saw service In the Riel rebellion and was surgeon with the 95th Battalion throughout the rising. Practised for some years at Fort Qu' Appelle, and was president of the Medical Council of the North-west Territories for several years. Came to Regina, 1904. Organized the Saskatchewan Medical Association in 1906. Was a prime mover in the Anti-Tuberculosis League through whose movement the splendid sanitarium at Fort Qu'Appelle was made possible. In 1906 was appointed First Commissioner of Public Health for the province. Under his efficient direction the sanitation and health of the urban centres of the Province have gradually been improved and given Saskatchewan a foremost position among the Provinces of the Dominion. Educational campaigns have been inaugurated and instruction in the elements of hygiene has been given to the remote localities.  Dr. Seymour's Department

 

 

 

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has been active in its fight against venereal disease. Free clinics have been established, and to-day there are six free dispensaries in the Province where examination and treatment may be received for venereal disease. In 1920 the fellowship of the Royal English Health Institute was conferred upon Dr. Seymour.

   He is a past president of the Canadian Public Health Association; one of the governors and vice presidents of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Seymour's whole life in the N.W.T. and what is now Saskatchewan, has been a constructive one for the benefit of the country at large.

 

MILLS: Major. Richard Burkitt, M.C., LL.B., barrister (Panton & Mills), North Battleford. Born at Little Current, Ont., 1892, son of Watson J. and Christina (Watson) Mills. Educated at Little Current public school, Owen Sound Collegiate, Stratford Collegiate, University of Saskatchewan (LL.B:) Major Mills came west in 1909, and worked at clerical work, joined the C.E.F., 22nd Saskatchewan Light Horse, August 14th 1914. Valcartier, drafted to 6th Fort Garrys, 2nd Infantry Brigade Fort Garry Horse, Canadian Cavalry Depot, France, February, 1916, Canadian Cavalry Brigade, attached to Imperials, Somme, Bapaume trench, Ypres front, St. Quentin, Cambrai, Nov. 20th, when Lord Byng made advance, was in the counter attack, Nov. 30th., Wounded at St. Quentin; was in retreat of the 5th Army, Moreil Wood 29th March; Rifle Wood, April 1st. Awarded military cross. Was in the "Last Hundred Days," Amiens, Arras. Wounded at La Cateau, Oct. 9th. Invalided to England. Rose from private to captain with his unit. Attended the Inns of Court, London, July, 1918. Returned to Canada, August, 1919; discharged. Articled to Major Panton, barrister, of North Battleford graduated from University, 1922. Called to the bar, May, 1921. Is now second in command of  4th North Saskatchewan Rgt. Member of the Council.

 

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two years, member of the Masonic Order, Presbyterian. Independent. - Address, Panton & Mills, North Battleford.

 

 

 

MACKINNON: A. J., barrister, Regina. Early in the nineteenth century there was an exodus of Highland families from the Hebrides to the coast of Nova Scotia. They were members of the clans which had followed the fortunes of Bonnie Prince Charlie, and the ruthless reprisals which followed the extinction of the Stewart hopes on the stricken field of Culloden had changed the old patriarchal conditions in the Highlands. The chiefs were driven into exile; their estates forfeited, the national dress was proscribed; and the people themselves were ruled by alien landlords and officials who could not speak their language, understood them not at all, and oppressed them as contumacious rebels. With their allegiance to the King over the water, these clansmen had retained their ancient religious faith unimpaired, and they looked about for a new country where they would not be subjected to the restrictions and tyranny of foreigners and aliens. Many of them with their wives and families, moved to the shores of Nova Scotia. They were a strong, hardy people and, rooting themselves firmly, a community grew up which has preserved the language, customs and traditions of their ancient race.

 

   It was of this stock that Andrew MacKinnon was born, at Lennox, in Antigonish county, in 1882. He was of the pure Celtic strain, his father being Angus MacKinnon. and his mother Margaret MacGillvray. After attending school at Lennox he taught for a time, an1 then attended St. Francis Xavier University, from which he graduated in 1905. He was then appointed principal of the Antigonish Public School, in which position he continued for one year. He resigned to engage in the insurance business in Sydney, Cape Breton. In 1907 he adventured west, where he spent three years devoted almost entirely to insurance.  In

 

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1910 he entered upon the study of law, being articled to J. F. L. Embury, now a Judge of the Saskatchewan Court of King's Bench. He graduated In 1913, and became a member of the firm of Elwood, Embury, Scott MacKinnon. He practised law with that firm for seven years until in 1920 he formed the firm of MacKinnon, Rutherford, Taylor & Malone, of which he is at present the senior partner. He has always taken a keen interest in public matters, and is a lucid and effective platform speaker. He served two years as an alderman of the city of Regina and has been active in matters appertaining to education. He has held almost all the important, offices connected with the Knights of Columbus, and is the District Deputy of the Order with supervision over all Southern Saskatchewan. He was married in 1915 to Miss Lorretta McMaster, of Port Hood, N.S., and they have, three sons and one daughter. He is a Conservative and a Roman Catholic.

 

McARA: Colonel James, insurance (McAra Bros. & Wallace). Born at Edinburgh, Scotland, 17th Oct., 1876. - Married Grace, daughter of the late Captain , John Beattie of Fergus, Ont., and has one son and a daughter. Educated at the Yonge St. School, Edinburgh and High School, Regina., Came to Canada April 23rd, 1883. Vice-president British Western Trust Corporation vice-president Saskatchewan Under writers' alderman of the City of Regina (two years), captain of the Provincial Rifle Team to Dominion meet, at Ottawa (two years); captain 95th Regiment, 1912-13-14. Joined 28th battalion in 1914, and served with unit in France; returned to Canada late in 1917. O.C. Military Hospital Commission and 0.C., M.D., No. 12,  on formation of that unit. First president Provincial G.W.V.A., formed November, 1917, and elected by acclamation at each convention since, six in all. President Provincial Rifle Association, 1922. A Mason. Life member R.A.C. Presbyterian. Address, 2068 McIntyre St., Regina.

 

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Mac LACHLAN: Miss Ethel, Judge, Juvenile Court, Regina. Born at Lunenburg, N.S., a daughter of James and Lucy (Anderson) MacLachlan. Educated at Lunenburg Academy, Provincial Normal School, Federal Business College, Regina; teacher for several years at the Lunenburg Academy. On retiring from the teaching profession came to Saskatchewan in 1909; entered the Department of Neglected Children (1910) which at that time was composed of a Superintendent and herself. Owing to her success in this work was appointed Assistant Superintendent in 1913, often filling the Superintendent's position, and also his dual one of Clerk of the Legislative Assembly, during his absence. On the death of the latter, in 1916, she was appointed Acting Supt. and a few months later Supt., being the first lady in Canada to hold such a position. At the time she took over the direction of this department, as stated, it numbered only two members; the number of children under its control, thirty-five. At the time she left to assume the position of Juvenile Judge, the department had grown to nine members and the children under its control to 1,365. Miss MacLachlan was officially appointed as Juvenile Court Judge for Regina and its Judicial District in Sept. 1917. She has the honour to be the first and only lady Provincial Supt. of Neglected Children ever appointed in the Dominion of Canada, and the first lady Judge of Juvenile Courts in Saskatchewan. In addition to this she was appointed a special justice of the peace. In her travels throughout the Province she finds ample scope for a study of human nature, and meets with varied experiences, some of a humorous nature and others with a sadder side, but all interesting. Her court is held in many types of places, such as a humble sod shack, schoolroom, police court room (after it is cleared of adults), town hall, council chamber and at another time a community hall and a garage. In Regina a special court room is provided in the fine children's shelter. Miss MacLachlan's fine

 

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sense of humour, her grasp of the juvenile mind, has resulted in many a youth being rescued from a criminal life and his feet being placed on the right road toward useful citizenship. She is enthusiastic about her work and asserts herself "An Optimist." The keynote of her success may be summed up in the motto she has adopted, "Every boy has some good in him; trust him." She is an enthusiastic tennis player and finds relaxation from her work in this sport. Among the honours which have come to her as a result of her splendid community work in Regina has been election as a life member of the Local Council of Women, vice-president Saskatchewan Social Service Council, secretary-treasurer Canadian Association Child Protection Officers. She is a member of the Canadian Club, the Blue Cross Society, Orchestral Society, Regina Tennis Club, and is the holder of Provincial championships in ladies’ doubles in tennis, and Regina city ladies' doubles. In religion she is a Presbyterian. Address, Juvenile Court room. 611 McCallum-Hill Bldg., Regina.

 

HONEYMAN: J. R. C., librarian, Regina Public Library. Born Glasgow, Scotland, 1864, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Honeyman. Married Frederica Minnie Hales, 1893, and has one son and two daughters. Mr. Honeyman's father, Mr. John Honeyman, a well-known architect of Glasgow, fellow of the Royal Ins. of British Architects, an LL.D. of Glasgow University. and a Royal Scottish Academician. Mr. Honeyman came to Canada 1885, and homesteaded near Pense. Was in the Mounted Police five years; reporter and asst. editor Regina Leader, under Nicholas Flood Davin; worked in the Indian Dept. office, under Hayter Reed, Esq., and Amedee Forget, Esq., afterwards His Honour Governor Forget, until the office was abolished.  Edited Moosomin Spectator. On the formation of the Dept. of Agriculture was chief clerk under C. W. Peterson, Esq. Was in commission and warehouse

 

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business with Frank Haultain and John McLachlan. Appointed to present position 1908. He is a past master of Wascana Lodge A.F. and A.M. An Anglican. Independent. Address, Regina Public Library, Regina, Sask.

 

 

 

HAWKES: John, Provincial Librarian for Saskatchewan. Born at Aylesford, Kent, England, January 12th, 1851, son of William and Sarah Hawkes. He married, in 1872, Elizabeth Ellen Parsons, and has had ten children (nine surviving). Educated at Brunswick House, Kent. Articled to literary side of newspaper work on South-eastern Gazette, Maidstone Kent in 1865; came to Canada 1869; worked in Ontario and the States of Michigan, Illinois, Arkansas and Mississippi; returned to England and resumed newspaper work; was editor of Hereford Journal, Hereford Evening News, Maidstone and Kentish Journal and its four branch newspapers; correspondent for Times, Press Association, etc. Returned to Canada in 1885 homesteaded near Percival, Sask. After six or seven years on the farm, Mr. Hawkes moved into Whitewood, as there was no school; was first town clerk of Whitewood; lessee of Whitewood Herald; proprietor of Carnduff Gazette; magistrate, school trustee, secretary and president of various local bodies; candidate for Legislative Assembly; was well known for his active interest in politics and as a platform speaker for many years. Appointed first Legislative Librarian for Saskatchewan in 1907, which office he now holds.

 

HERMANSON: H. P. Albert, M.L.A., Buchanan, Sask. (notary public and real estate). Born at Hasjo Sweden, April 15th, 1881, a son of Herman and Ann~ Hermanson, of Buchanan, Sask. Married Ruby M. I.  Harmer, of Kingston, Ont., and has three children. Educated at Hasjo, Sweden. Was secretary-treasurer rural municipality of Buchanan, No. 304, and the village of Buchanan,  from 1910-1919 Member of the

 

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Masonic fraternity. Member Wa-Wa Temple, Mystic Shrine. Life member Saskatchewan Grain Growers' Assn. Came to Canada from Sweden, 1903, and took up a homestead near where the village of Buchanan is now situated; has resided in Buchanan since coming to Canada. Elected member of the Saskatchewan Legislative Assembly, June 26th, 1917, by largest majority in the Province. Re-elected 1921. He is a Protestant and a Liberal.

 

 

GLENN: Colonel Joseph, farmer, Indian Head. Born at Owen Sound, Grey Co., 1860, son of William and Nancy (Currie) Glenn. Married Christina Gordon, 1886, and has three sons and four daughters. Col. Glenn's son, Donald, joined the air force and served on coast defence. Was killed at Ramsgate.

 

   Co1. Glenn came west in 1879, to Winnipeg, where he worked with the railroad and at lumbering. Came to Indian Head in 1882, where he homesteaded. On the outbreak of the North-west Rebellion, in 1885, he enlisted as a teamster, with transport service. Transferred as dispatch rider and served throughout rebellion in this capacity, receiving medal and clasp, the only one issued for this branch of the service. Carried many important messages, riding through enemy's country; carried General Middleton's messages for eleven nights, Fish Creek to Clark's Crossing, nearest point of telegraph. Also carried messages the three nights of the Batoche engagement. It was for this service he was awarded medal and clasp.

 

 

    Mentioned in dispatches, Was dispatch rider at Fort Pitt, carrying messages from Loon Lake, where the enemy had assembled in large numbers. General Steele here engaged enemy and dispersed them. (Complimented by - General Steele for valuable services rendered.) After the Rebellion Colonel Glenn resumed farming, which he gradually increased until he has become one of the largest landowners in the district (16,00O acres). Co1. Glenn always took an active

 

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interest in militia affairs, and held the rank of major in the 16th Light Horse (Sask.) At the outbreak of the Great War he was given command, with rank of major, 10th C.M.H., C. Squadron, which he mobilized, When the 10th was sent overseas, as reinforcement, he was sent to Saskatoon to mobilize 96th Battalion, which he took overseas at full strength. On the 96th being broken up he was sent to France, attached to 73rd Black Watch. Co1. Glenn's knowledge of and former connection with the lumber business caused his transfer to the Forestry Corps. He was sent to Scotland to command fifteen companies of this arm of the service; employed 3,000 men and was also in command of a prison camp of 1,000 men. Was subsequently transferred to Windsor Base Depot.  It was while here that Col. Glenn had the honour of entertaining their Majesties King George and Queen Mary. Was also a guest at dinner at Windsor Castle. Was an invited guest at the wedding of H.R.H. Princess Patricia. Has as souvenirs of these occasions many signed photographs and letters from their Majesties. When H.R.H. the Prince of Wales was in Regina, Col. Glenn was invited to Government House and dined with His Highness, and was a member of his shooting party in the Qu'Appelle Valley. Co1. Glenn was a trustee when the present school was built and a trustee for many years, an ex-member of the council board of the municipality, ex-president of the Golf Club, member of the Saskatchewan Legislature (1911 to 1921), when he resigned. Member of the Assiniboia Club, Regina. (Prairie.) (Moose Jaw.) Address, Indian Head.

 

 

 

DARKE: F. N., Darke Block, Regina. F. N. Darke is a constructive pioneer of Saskatchewan, who is proud of being a native of the Province of Prince Edward Island, which its sons regard as the garden spot of Canada. He was born there in 1863, the son of Thomas Darke and Janet Harris: Thomas Darke was

 

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a Devon man and hailed from the picturesque and romantic town of Bideford, immortalized by Charles Kingsley in his heroic tale of "Westward, Ho" He came to Canada about 1840, and located on a bush farm about twelve miles from Charlottetown. The region was covered with forest and there were only footpaths through the hush. A house was elected, and, whilst the young family set to work to reclaim the land from the wilderness the father found employment at his trade as a Joiner in Charlottetown, walking out to the homestead each Saturday, bearing the weeks supplies with him and walking back to his work on Sunday. This was continued until the work of the three sons resulted in the evolution of a fine farm, which they named Brookfield. F. N. Darke, the subject of this sketch, spent the first twenty-eight years of his life farming in his native Province, but in 1891 he joined a party of neighbours who were making a journey to the North-west to spy out the land. They came west in July and, passing through Regina, went as far west as Red Deer, which at that time was the end of steel on the Calgary and Edmonton Railway, then under construction. The season of 1891 was probably the most favourable growing year the West has ever experienced, and the great stretches of fertile land about Regina attracted Mr. Darke, and he accordingly made up his mind that it was to be his future habitation. He returned home, and, making an alliance with the late Pope Balderson, arranged to move out there the following year. He sold his farm and on July 18 1892, married Miss Annie McKinnon, and ten days later arrived in Regina. Mr. Balderson had preceded him with a carload of horses, and had rented what was known as the Paul farm on the Eastern outskirts of Regina where a crop had been put in. They also leased 320 acres close by from Henry Lejeune, but 1892 was not nearly so good a year as 1891 and they just about broke even with expenses. Messrs. Darke and Balderson then bought the business of Joseph

 

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Jackson, who conducted a butcher shop on Scarth Street, where the King's Hotel now stands. Later they acquired the beef contracts for the Indian Industrial School and the Mounted Police Barracks, from W. H. Sinclair, of Battleford. In 1894 Mr. Darke bought out Mr. Balderson's interest in the business and exchanged the property acquired from Mr. Jackson with D. A. MacDonald for a lot farther north on Scarth Street, where he erected an up-to-date butcher shop. He became engaged at that time in the export cattle business, and during his buying trips through the country had some interesting experiences. About that time he made a record journey to Willow Bunch. There was then no settlement from ten miles south of Regina until the Willow Bunch settlement was reached, a distance of something over a hundred miles. There were neither roads nor trails, nor marks to guide, and leaving Regina at four o'clock in the morning he covered the entire distance in his buggy before midnight. The following day Mr. Darke drove out amongst the ranchers, bought 200 head of cattle, 300 head of sheep and after another night's rest set off on his return to Regina. In 1906 he sold out his business and bought the corner of Eleventh Ave. and  Cornwall, selling a portion of the property to the Masonic fraternity and, on the remainder building what was probably the first up-to-date office building in the prairie country. He then engaged in the buying and selling of property and is rated as one of  Saskatchewan's most substantial citizens.

 

Mr. Darke has served the community in a variety of public capacities.  He was for nine years an alderman of the city, and in 1899 was elected mayor; a member of the Regina Board of Trade, director of the Regina Industrial Exhibition, one of the Board of Governors of the Sanatorium at Qu'Appelle and a director of the Y.M.C.A. He is also on the Board of Management of the Regina (Methodist) College, to

 

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which he recently made a princely donation for the establishment of a School of Music and Arts. He has four sons. In politics a Liberal. Religion, Methodist.

 

DAVIS: His Worship Mayor, Thomas Clayton, barrister. Mayor of Prince Albert. Halliday, Davis & Company. Born Prince Albert, Sept. 6th, 1889, son of the late Senator Thomas O. and Mrs. Davis. Married Charlotte May Bryant, 1918. Educated public and high schools, Prince Albert, St. John's College, Winnipeg; Osgoode Hall, Toronto. Comes of Irish stock. Grandparents came to Canada and settled in Quebec. Farmed near Montreal where the late Senator was born. After leaving Osgoode Hall, Mayor Davis was articled to F. W. Halliday, Esq., Prince Albert; admitted to Sask. bar, 1914, and entered into partnership with Mr. Halliday. He is a member of City Council since 1916. Elected Mayor 1921-22-23-24. Solicitor for Royal and Imperial Banks, Cameron & Heap, Ltd., Codville Co., Ltd., North Star Lumber Co., Ltd., West Lumber and Supply Co., Ltd., North Canadian Lumber Co., Ltd. An Anglican. Liberal. Member of Rotary and Keewatin Club. Address, Prince Albert, Sask.

 

HARRIS: Ernest Walter Fairfax, barrister and solicitor, Arcola. Born Charlottetown, P.E.I., Dec. 5th,1873, son of Wm. H. and Sarah (Farwell) Harris. Is married and has one son and two daughters. Educated at Charlottetown public and high schools and St. Dunstan's College. Comes from English stock (Devonshire). Family has been in Prince Edward Island several generations. He was admitted to the Sask. bar, 1905; opened practice at Carlyle; was first agent of the Attorney-General in Arcola (resigned). Chairman Arcola High School Board; solicitor for the town of Arcola and for the municipality of Brock, R.M. No. 64. He is Past Master of Arcola Lodge, A.F. and A.M., No. 21; Past First Principal, Moose Moun-

 

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tain Chapter, No. 166; Past Grand Officer, Grand Chapter of Canada. An Anglican. Member Provincial and Canadian Bar Association. Recreations, curling, golf, tennis and motoring. Address, Arcola, Sask.

 

HANDBIDGE: John Murton, LL.B., barrister and solicitor, Kerrobert. Born at Southampton, Ont., 1885, son of Robert and Fanny (Murton) Handbidge. Married Elma Marion Vance, 1913, and has two sons and two daughters. Educated at the Southampton public school and high school, Port Elgin High School, and Owen Sound Collegiate. Articled in law to J. A. Cross, Esq., now the Honourable J. A. Cross, Attorney General of Saskatchewan. Called to the bar March 1911. Came to Kerrobert and established partnership with his brother, Mr. Robert Handbidge. Member of the executive of the Canadian Bar Association. Past Master of the Masonic Lodge, Royal Arch. Member of the School Board. Bencher, elected 1922. First Solicitor for the town of Kerrobert. Contested Kerrobert constituency 1912, Conservative interest. Defeat by George Watson. Anglican. Conservative. Recreations, curling and golf. Address, Kerrobert.

 

 

 

BROWN: Lt.-Colonel William, M.D., M.C., O.C. 10th Field Ambulance. Born at Aspatria, Cumberland county, England, 1869, a son of Richard and Ann (Armstrong) Brown. Married Mina Gordon 1897 and has one daughter. Educated at the High School of Port Perry, Ont., Trinity Medical School, University  of Toronto. After graduation in 1895 practised medicine at Heathcote, Grey Co., Ont. (three years). Came west in 1899 and practised at Wapella (eleven years). Coming to Moose Jaw, 1910, opened present practice. At the outbreak of the European war enlisted in C.A.M.C., Sept., 1914, proceeding overseas March 1915. Medical officer with 32nd Battalion; was later attached to No.1 Canadian General Hospital and went with this unit to France. After one month was attached to the

 

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5th Can. Batt., and served with this unit twenty seven months continuously. Wounded at Hill 60, April, 1916; remained on duty; returned to England Aug., 1917. Was Registrar of No.5 Can. Gen. Hosp., remaining until the hospital was demobilized. Returned to Canada and was discharged Jan., 1920; resumed practice. Colonel Brown was awarded the Military Cross for extreme bravery and gallantry. Fifty-eight hours continuous service (Somme). He is a member of the Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M. Member of the Prairie Club, United Service Club. Presbyterian. Address, Moose Jaw, Sask.

 

 

 

BURBIDGE: Captain (act. major) Geoffrey Cornwallis. Salesman, Canada Life Assurance Company, son of the Honourable Mr. Justice and Mrs. Burbidge of Ottawa. Educated Ottawa schools and Trinity College, Toronto. Entered service of the Bank of Montreal, 1907, at Ottawa. With C. H. Enderton, Esq., Winnipeg, in real estate, 1910, with Merchants' Bank in Winnipeg, 1912 (teller) on relief staff. Joined C.E.F. at the outbreak of the Great War in August, 1914; Fort Garry Horse in the ranks. Overseas with unit. France March, 1915; transferred Strathcona Horse; gazetted lieutenant July 15th, 1915; to 10th Battalion. Continuous service until Sept., 1917 (exception staff college course). Attached 2nd Brigade until 9th Oct., 1917;, attached 1st Div. Headquarters Staff Jan. 10th, 1918. Selected for the Dunsterforce Expedition, assembling Tower of London, Jan. 15th, 1918, for Southern Russia, proceeding via Southern France, Italy, Egypt, Mesopotamia and Persia. Administrative Commandant (Hamadan, Persia), June until September, 1918; returned to England November, 1918. Mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's dispatches July, 1917; awarded M.C., June, 1917, citation in Gazette Aug. 4th, 1917, reading:  "Lieut. (act. capt.) Geoffrey Burbidge. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in leading his

 

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company to the final objective, with great courage and determination under most trying circumstances. When the Battalion reached the final objective he was one of the only two officers who were not casualties. He selected the line and reported accurately upon it to Battalion H.Q. His gallantry and ability have been recommended for notice on three previous occasions.   Religion, Church of England. Recreations, curling, golf and rugby. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

BELL: George Melrose, Broker (Bell & Mitchell) Regina, Sask. Born at Brandon, Man., Sept. 6th; 1884, son of Hon. George and Elizabeth Bell. Married Edna May Parkin and has a son and two daughters. Educated at the Melita, Man., schools; held the following positions: Rly. mail clerk 1904-09; asst. postmaster, Regina, 1909-12. Present business since April, 1912. Mr. Bell is president of The Leader Publishing Co., Bell & Mitchell Co., Ltd., Sanitary Bakery, Ltd., Western Implements, Ltd., Canada West Electric, Ltd., Ronald Smith Cultivator Co., Ltd., Agricultural Insurance Co., Ltd. Is a director MacKenzie , Supply Co., Ltd., and several other companies. Member of the Terminal City Club, Vancouver; Carleton Club, Winnipeg; Assiniboia and Wascana Clubs, Regina.  Rotarian. Presbyterian. Address, 3,000 Victoria Avenue, Regina, Sask.

 

BALFOUR: James, R.C., barrister. Born at Mount Forest, Ontario, 1867, a son of William and Agnes Hayes, and has four sons and one daughter. Mr. Balfour belongs to the Balfour family of Scotland that has been prominent in Scottish history for many centuries; on his mother's side to the Martin family, long identified with Wellington county in Ontario. His mother, being left a widow with a young family, came west to the Territories in 1889, homesteaded on the south bank of the Qu' Appelle river; here, with the assistance of her elder sons James and John, com-

 

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menced farming operations. She kept the home together until the family were all grown and established in life, and still survives at a ripe old age and resides in Regina.

 

    Mr. James Balfour taught school in early life. Obtaining his first class certificate, he was engaged by the Territorial Capital (Battleford). Made the journey on: the old Swift Current - Battleford trail travelling by sleigh, the post stations being forty mile~ apart. After some years in Battleford he returned to Regina and was articled in law to D. L. Scott, who is now Mr. Justice Scott, of Alberta. Called to the bar of the N.W.T., he entered into partnership with the late John Secord, Q.C. Has been an alderman of the City; Mayor of Regina (1902-05) ; president of the Regina Hospital Board; President of the Y.M.C.A. ; member of the Regina Collegiate Board since its inception (chairman for some years). Appointed a King's Counsel in 1914. Contested Regina for the Legislature (defeated by small majority). Elder of Knox Church. A keen public-spirited citizen, with the city's welfare at heart. Address, Regina.

 

MAILLARD: Reverend Charles,. V.F., parish priest, Gravelbourg. Born at Montreuil, Sur-Mer, France, March 13th, 1873, son of Jules and Clemence (Vidier) Maillard. Educated at Lille University (France) Ottawa University. Parish priest of St. Lazare, Man.; 1904; Wolseley, Sask., 1907. Promoted to Gravelbourg parish, 1917.

 

BRYANT : James Fraser, B.A., M.A., LL.B., barrister (Bryant and Burrows). Born Glen Allan, Ont., May 19th, 1877, son of the Rev. James and Dora Stewart.  (McGill) Bryant. Married Mabel Myra Boyd, Aug. 4th, 1908. Educated at the public schools of Bradford and Toronto, St. Catharines Collegiate, Upper Canada College, Queen's University, Manitoba College. Came to Northwest Territories 1901. Taught

 

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English, history, and languages, Strathcona High School, 1901, 1902. Read law with Judge Johnson, 1902. Called to the bar, partner with Jones, Gordon & Bryant, 1906. Allan, Gordon, Bryant & Gordon, 1906-1914. Secretary Provincial Conservative Association, 1911, 1912. President Regina Conservative Association, 1914. Secretary Regina County Conservative Association. Chairman Regina Public School Board, 1917-18. Grand Master of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, Canadian North-west, 1914-1915. President Regina Canadian Club, 1916-17. President Saskatchewan School Trustees' Association 1917 to 1924. President Saskatchewan Provincial Conservative Association, 1921 to 1923. President Regina Vacant Lots and Gardens Association, 1915 to 1917. Elder of Knox Church, Regina. Presbyterian. Address, Albert St., Regina, Sask.

 

THOMSON: Harold Francis, born at Wolseley, Saskatchewan, May 22nd, 1885, a son of Levi Thomson, KC., of Wolseley, and his wife, Mabel Maud (Perley) Thomson. Married Ethel May Martin, daughter of Charles Martin and Eliza Anne (Wardell) Martin, of Regina, 19th of August, 1914, and has two daughters. Educated at public school, Wolseley, Collegiate Institute, Portage la Prairie, and Wesley College, Man. Articled as a student-at-law to Levi Thomson, K.C., of Thomson & Kennedy, June, 1903, in the Law Society of the North-west Territories. Called to the bar of  the North-west Territories on the 30th of September, 1908. Practised as junior member of the firm of Balfour, Martin, Casey, Brown & Thomson, at Regina. Formed a partnership with T. D. Brown, K.C., present Director of Prosecutions under the Saskatchewan Temperance Act, at Regina, present style of firm being Brown, Thomson, McLean, Graham & Brown. Kiwanian. Methodist; chairman of the Finance Board of the Metropolitan Church, Regina. A director of the Y.M.C.A. Member of the Assiniboia Club, Wascana

 

 

 

 

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County Club, Regina Golf Club. An ardent golfer and amateur horticulturist. Address, 281 Leopold Crescent, Regina.

 

CREPEAU: Jean Batiste, B.A., barrister (Crepeau & Bonneau), Gravelbourg. Born at Waverley, Minn., U.S.A., son of Jeremie and Marie (Gagnon) Crepeau. Married Blanche Provenchar, of Plessisville, Que., 1918, and has two sons and two daughters. Educated at Waverley Public School, Argyle, Minn., High School, St. Boniface College, Manitoba Law School. Comes of old Quebec family. Father went to the~ United States during the Civil War and served with the 4th Minnesota Infantry. Was with Sherman on his famous "March to the Sea." Mother's people from Brittany; related to the family of the late Cardinal Taschereau. Mr. Crepeau came to Winnipeg and, was articled in law to the late Hon. Colin Campbell, Attorney-General of Manitoba. Called to the bar 1911, came to Gravelbourg 1917, and opened present practice, in which he was joined by his present partner (1919). Secretary of the Catholic Club of Winnipeg. Takes a keen interest in all sports and played baseball with, the Winnipeg Seniors, Amateur Champions of Man. Member and former secretary of the Knights of Columbus. In politics a Progressive. Recreations, hockey, baseball, tennis, rugby. Address, Crepeau & Banneau, Gravelbourg, Sask.

 

 

ARMITAGE: Captain Alex. Howard, M.D., C.M., physician. Saskatoon. Born at Ottawa 1883, a son of John and Martha (Wilson) Armitage. Educated at Manitou, Man., Winnipeg Collegiate; Manitoba University. Family came to Canada from Ireland; settled in Carleton County, Ont. Father came to Manitoba in 1883; settled on land near where the town of Manitou is today. Dr. Armitage graduated; from Manitoba College in 1907 and after a year in the Winnipeg hospitals started to practise at Tessier,

 

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Sask. Came to Saskatoon in 1912. Joined C.A.M.C. in March, 1915, No.8 Canadian Stationary Hosp. Unit. Overseas, Moore Barracks, Shorncliffe ; France, August, 1917, with No.2 Stationary Hospital at Outre. No.8 Fld. Ambulance (Paschendaele). Was in the "Last Hundred Days," transferred to 9th Fld. Ambulance. M.O. with 3rd Divisional Engineers, 8th Battalion of Engineers; returned to his unit at Charmes; was officer in charge of Hospital at Courbon. Was at Dunkirk with No.8 Stationary Hosp.; England in May, 191R Engaged on Board work (Bramshott). Returned to Canada and resumed. practice. An Anglican. Independent. Recreations, golf, curling and tennis.

 

 

CREIGHTON: Captain Douglass St. Clair, M.D.,  M.C., physician. Medical officer, Treatment Branch, D.S.C.R., Saskatoon. Born at Cypress River, Manitoba, 1889, son of Arthur and Ida (Douglass) Creighton. Married Miss Swanton, 1916. Was educated at Manitoba schools, St. Johns College, University of Manitoba. North of Ireland stock. Grandfather settled in Ontario. Father came west and homesteaded in the Cypress River district. Dr. Creighton graduated from Manitoba College, 1914, and had post-graduate work at Winnipeg General Hospital. Joined the Royal Army. Medical Corps, 1915; France Jan., 1916, with 104th Field Ambulance, 34 Division (Imperials). Saw service with. R.F.A.. Wounded July, 1916 (Somme). Invalided to England, convalescent, Canada. Returned to France; Oct. 1916, with No.9 Stationary Hospital at Wimmereux, 24th Field Ambulance, 8th Division, Middlesex Battalion; Continuous service, Ypres, Paschendaele. Awarded the Military Cross; Trench fever. Invalided. Returned to Canada, . Sept., 1917, C.A.M.C. Carried on Military Hospital Commission; Invalided Soldiers Com., D.S.C.R., a position he still holds. An Anglican. Recreation. golf. Military Gazette: "Military Cross. Captain D.

 

 

 

 

 

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St. Clair Creighton, R.A.M.C. The conduct for which this decoration is awarded is as follows:

 

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in going forward to most exposed positions, to dress and attend wounded, showing a total disregard for his own personal safety. After he had cleared a very large area in this manner he established a first aid post in a forward position and from there gave great assistance to the wounded of two or three other regiments as well as his own. His gallant conduct and fearless devotion to duty saved the lives of many wounded."

 

CLANCY: Captain, G. S., M.D., L.R.C.P., London. Member College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. Born at Newburgh, Ont., 1884, a son of Cornelius and Matilda (Paul) Clancy. Educated at Newburgh High School and Queen's University. Dr. Clancy's great-grandfather came to Canada and was the first settler north of the Napanee River in Addington county, near Newburgh. Grandmother's people came to Canada in 1800, pioneer settlers of that district. Dr. Clancy taught school between college courses, and after graduation came to Semans and opened practice with his brother, Dr. J. P. 1. Clancy (Queen's). Enlisted Dec. 1st, 1914, and went overseas December, IM5, and transferred [sic] to the R.A.M.C., France February, 1916, 11th Fld. Ambulance, 4th Imperial Division. 3rd Division, 13th Battalion, King's Liverpool Regiment, until the end of 1917: Invalided to  England, returned to France, 6lst Division, 26th Warwicks gassed in advance In front of St. Quentin . (Hospital). Returned to France 30th Div. 6th Cheshires. Returned to Canada and resumed practice. Dr. Clancy is a member of the Masonic Lodge A.F. and A.M. Methodist. Conservative. Address, Semans.

 

CLANCY: Paul Irwin, M.D., C.M., physician and surgeon. Born at Newburgh, Ont., 1878, son of Cornelius and Matilda (Paul) Clancy. Married Edith Wiggins,

 

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1910, and has three sons. Educated at the Newburgh schools, Queen's University. Came to Saskatchewan. in 1908, and has practised at Semans since then. Member of the School Board (12 years). Mason. Methodist. Conservative.

 

 

 

 

CUMMING: James George, Mayor of Whitewood (1922), general merchant. Born at Hulett township, Huron county, Ont., July 10th, 1873. His parents came from Devonshire, England; lifelong farmers, specializing in Clydesdale horses, shorthorn cattle and Cotswold sheep. Married Mary Nichol, of Blyth, Ont., May 15th, 1901, and has two sons and a daughter. Came West in 1892 and farmed until 1898, when he purchased a confectionery business at Whitewood.  Afterwards in the retail meat trade. Purchased present business in 1916, which he has greatly enlarged, until to-day he carries a large and well-assorted stock of general merchandise. Is also interested in the coal business. Has been a member of the Whitewood School Board for ten years; member Town Council for four years; Mayor of Whitewood, 1922; member of the Whitewood Band: Knox Church choir.  Has always taken a keen interest in municipal and educational affairs. Mayor Cumming's chief hobby, if it may be called such, is the breeding of fine stock, and on his farm may be found many fine specimens of Clydesdale horses and shorthorn. cattle. Address, Whitewood.

 

 

COOPER: William Wesley, merchant president Board of Trade, Swift Current. (W. W. Cooper Dept. Stores.) Born Victoria County, Ont., Aug. 31st, 1873, son of John and Ellen (McNeely) Cooper. Married Sadie Argue, July 23rd, 1902, and has two sons, Alfred Gordon, who is engaged in the study of law, and a younger son, studying for his senior matriculation in the Swift Current Collegiate. Mr. Cooper was educated at public schools of Victoria

 

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County and Medicine Hat Collegiate. Comes of Irish stock-family came to Canada, from Armagh, Ireland, settling in Frontenac County, where they experienced all the hardships of early pioneer life, moving to Victoria county, where they developed a farm from the then wilderness, moving to Winnipeg in 1882, taking up land at Oxbow. Returned to Ontario and moved family to Medicine Hat; six sons and two daughters. Ranched in the Cypress Hills. Died in 1901. Mr. W. W. Cooper, the subject of this sketch, after leaving school traded with the Indians and conducted a bakery and grocery business; afterwards agent for the Galt Coal Co.; ranched for several years. Came to Swift Current, 1903, opened present business in a small way (partnership Cooper & Argue), purchasing partner's interest in 1912. Business has grown until to-day it is the largest retail and mail order house west of Regina. In 1922 the business turnover was half a million dollars, carrying a stock to-day of over $175,000. The business is capitalized at $225,000. Mr. Cooper is a member of the Retail Merchants' Association; president Swift Current Board of Trade first president Rotary Club; District Commander Boy Scouts; Canadian Representative Trade ; Interstate Merchants' Council, Chicago; member of the Town Council; chairman of the School Board; member of the Masonic Lodge; a Shriner; Odd-fellow, Knight of Pythias. Mrs. Cooper shares with her husband the interest in civic and community affairs, member of the Local Council of Women, I.O.D.E., and was president of the Red Cross. Mr. Cooper is a Liberal. Methodist. Recreation, curling, golf, fishing. Address, 129 Dufferin St., Swift Current.

 

CAULDER: Joseph, president Saskatchewan Creamery Co., Moose Jaw. Born at Bristol, Que., 1884, a Son of Hugh and Margaret (Switzer) Caulder. Married Margaret Harrington, April 26th, 1904. Educated at the Morrisburg schools. Mr. Caulder's family came to Canada from Edinburgh, Scotland, in

 

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1850. Grandfather and father in the tailoring business at Ottawa. Afterwards farmed at Bristol, Que.; afterwards at Moorewood, Ont. Mr. Caulder after leaving school travelled for various concerns in Canada and the U.S.A. Came west in 1906, to Winnipeg; Moose Jaw, 1907 (farmed). Started present business [sic] in 1909. Oldest creamery in Saskatchewan. Developed and built up until to-day it has eleven branches in Southern Saskatchewan. Mr. Caulder is president Saskatchewan Dairy Association, member of the National Dairy Council, director National Ice, Cream Manufacturers, ex-member, Moose Jaw Council, 1919-20-21. Member of the Rotary Club. Past president and governor 19th Rotary District, 1921-22. Member Prairie Club (Moose Jaw), Assiniboia (Regina). Member of the Masonic Lodge, .A.F. and A.M. ; I.O.O.F.; Shriner (Wa Wa Temple). Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, 1211 Redland Ave., Moose Jaw.

 

 

 

CUXWORTH : Morley Wilson, B.A., barrister and solicitor. Davidson.  (MacKinnon, Rutherford & Cuxworth, Regina and Davidson). Born at Claremont,  Ont., 1891, son of Sidney and Sarah (Burgess) Cuxworth. Educated at the Dauphin, Man., schools. Graduated from Manitoba University with degree of B.A., 1912. Articled to J.F.L. Embury, afterwards Mr. Justice Embury of the Court of Appeal. Called to the bar 1916, enlisted in C.E.F. Jan., 1916, 4th Divisional Train. France August, 1916, and served until the end of the war. After the Armistice studied law at Lincolns Inn, London. Returned to Canada and opened present practice at Davidson. Solicitor for the Bank of Montreal Royal Bank of Canada.  Member of the Masonic Order. Member of the Curling Club.  Address, Davidson.

 

CROSBY: Percy Clayton, M.D., C.M., physician and surgeon. Born at Marshfield, P.E.I., 1876, son of Isaac and Susan Maude (Scott) . Crosby. Married

 

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Nellie Shane. 1909; and has two sons. Educated at the P.E.I. schools, Prince of Wales College and McGill University. Irish stock; ancestors came from the North of Ireland; mother's people from Perth shire, Scotland. Dr. Crosby graduated from McGill in 1904, joined Canadian Northern construction work, Kamsack to Edmonton; was two years medical officer with Winnipeg Street Railway, three years with Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, as doctor in construction work. Melville, February, 1909, where he has practised continuously. Six years member of the School Board. Member of the Town Council. Mayor, 1922-23. Played on the Rugby team at McGill, 1900-1904. Member Saskatchewan Medical Association, past master of the Masonic Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter, member of the I.O.Q.F., Knights of Pythias. Methodist. Independent. Address, Melville.

 

CONN: James, Indian Head. Born near St. Mary's, Perth county, Ont., 1856, son of James and Margaret (Radcliffe) Conn. Married Margaret Dixon 1882, and has six surviving children. Educated at the county schools of Perth county. After leaving school, served an apprenticeship with E. J. Brooks, carpentering and cabinet-making. Mr. Brooks came West in 1882; worked at his trade in Winnipeg. Came to Indian Head in 1883, where he carried on constructing and house building. In 1889 he embarked, in the lumber business, which he has continued throughout. the years. Was the owner of the first hardware store in Indian Head. Mr. Conn has served on the School Board for many years: Member of the first Town Council; elected several times since; is an ex-member of the Board of the Presbyterian Church. Conservative. Address, Indian Head.

 

CAIRNS:  Albert Edward, barrister and solicitor, Melfort (Hill & Cairns). Born at Camlachie, Lambton county, Ont., 1883, son of James K. and Dorothy

 

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(Benson) Cairns. Married Isabella Marshall, 1916. Scotch ancestry. Grandparents came to Canada from Ayrshire, Scotland; settled in Lambton county. Mr. Cairns, after leaving the Model School, engaged in the school-teaching profession and was principal of several Ontario schools before coming west in 1904. Attended the Normal School in Regina and taught in the Prince Albert District; principal of the Melfort Public School. Homesteaded near Pathlow, 1906; articled in law to A. MacNaughton Stewart, Esq., Melfort, also to John Milden, of Saskatoon; O. D. Hill, of Melfort. Called to the bar June, 1919, and entered into partnership (firm name of Hill & Stewart). Member and chairman of the Public School Board for six years. Member and on the Executive of the Saskatchewan School Trustees' Association. Solicitor for the Canadian Bank of Commerce, rural municipality of Carrott [sic] River, Beaver Lumber Co., Fritz Stormont Lumber ,co., past master of the Masonic Lodge; P.D.D.G.M., District No. 1. Delegate to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. Port Arthur. Conservative. Address, Melfort.

 

CLELAND: Clarence Eugene, funeral director, Weyburn. Born at South Mountain, Ont., 1872, son of Alexander and Martha (Berry) Cleland. Married Elizabeth Baldwin, 1897, and has two sons. United Empire Loyalist stock. Family came to Canada from the U.S. after the Revolution. The town of Cornwall is built on part of the original farm grant. This deed from the Crown in the shape of a grant of land is in the family possession. Great-grandfather travelled to York (Toronto) by horseback, drowned in crossing the river, body dragged ashore by horse and was buried in the bush. Spot never was identified. Mr. Cleland came West in 1904, to Oak River; worked at the carpentering trade for some years. Came to Weyburn March, 1910, purchased the Red Tag Furniture Co. (Smith & Knox). Also purchased the undertaking

 

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business of Bracken Co. (1912 started the present Cleland Funeral House, which is easily one of the finest in the Province, surrounded by wide lawns and beautiful gardens) Mr. Cleland is a member of the Weyburn School Board, member of the Rotary Club, member of the Methodist Church Board, member of the I.O.O.F. Liberal. Address, Weyburn.

 

 

CUMMING: Robert W., B.A., barrister and solicitor, Yorkton. Born at Lyn, Ont., 1874, son of William and Margaret (Miller) Cumming. Married Stella Abbott 1907, and has a son and a daughter. Educated at Lyn public schools, Brockville Collegiate, and Wesley College, Winnipeg. Father came to Canada from Dublin, Ireland and settled in Leeds county. Mother's people Pennsylvania Dutch stock. The family moved from the East in 1879 and settled near Morden, Man. ; homesteaded (this farm still in the possession of the family). Mr. Cumming taught school in Manitoba, Graduated from Wesley College, 1897 (B.A.), worked for the Massey-Harris Co. for three years, articled in law to J. S. Mudie, of Canora, Sask., called to the bar 1913 practised in Canora until 1917. Councillor and first mayor of Canora member of the Yorkton Board of Trade; member of the Masonic Lodge, Royal Arch; played hockey with the Wesley College team, keen interest in all sports. Methodist. Liberal. Wm. Boland, his partner in the firm, is solicitor for the city of Yorkton.

 

CHANT: Russell Havelock, D.D.S., mayor of Foam Lake. Born at Blackwater, Ont., 1888, son of Joseph and Elizabeth McGrath. Married Vilda Wunder, 1917, and has one son and two daughters. Educated at county schools, Markham High School, Toronto College of Dentistry;  post-graduate at Chicago. Dr. Chant graduated from college in 1910, and opened practice in Regina; came to Foam Lake in 1911, has served on the Town Council for many years. Mayor

 

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1917, 18-21-22-23; member of the School Board ; vice-president Board of Trade. Member of and on the Examining Board of Saskatchewan University, 1911-1921. Past master of the Masonic Order; officer of the Grand Lodge, A.F. and A.M., Saskatchewan. Member of the Illinois Association of Dentists. Takes a keen interest in poultry and exhibits at the Royal Winter Fair Toronto. Holds certificate of services rendered to Agriculture. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Foam Lake.

 

CARASS: W. Balfour; B.A., barrister. Born at Lumsden, Sask., 1892, a son of W. F. G. and Jean (Balfour) Carass. Married Ethel Blewett, 1922, and has one daughter. Comes of an old pioneer family in the Lumsden District, originally from Orillia, Ont. Mr. Carass was articled to A. L. Gordon, of Regina, afterwards to D. Buckles, K.C., of Swift Current; called to the bar in 19,17. Joined C.E.F. 1917, 77th Battery in the ranks France with 23rd Battery and saw service "Last Hundred Days," Arras and Amiens. Discharged June, 1919, and opened present practice. Member of the Town Council of Kamsack; member Saskatchewan Bar Association; solicitor for Bank of Commerce; agent for Bonded Attorney; American Fidelity and Guaranty Co., R. G. Dun and Co. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity. Presbyterian. Liberal. Recreations, baseball, hunting and tennis.

Address, Kamsack, Sask.

 

 

 

CLEAR: Lieutenant Stanley G., manager Sintaluta Grain Growers' Co-operative. Store. Born Althorne, Essex Co., England, 1893, son of George E. and Sophia (Burrows) Clear. Married Elizabeth Haydock, 1919. Educated at Lutchindon School. Came to Canada 1912. In the employ of Stone & Wellington. War services:

In England was a member 4th Essex. Territorials. Gen. Lord Byng's Brigade. Joined Canadian Militia,

 

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44th Welland Bn. Came to Saskatchewan autumn of 1912. Farmed. Joined C.E.F. Feb., 1915; 10th. C.M.R.'s., "C" Squadron, Indian Head. Overseas Jan. 17th, 1916;. France April 2nd, 1916, 3rd Divisional Cavalry, C.L.H. In action 2nd of June, 1916, Somme. Wounded at Courcellette, Vimy Ridge, Paschendaele. Sent to England for commission. Qualified at No.2 Cavalry Cadet School, Hildare, Ireland. Returned to France. Rejoined unit Oct., 1918; Mons; German army of occupation. Discharged May, 1919. Was with Soldier Settlement Board; later farmed. Present position since 1920. Was secretary-treasurer G.W.V.A. Anglican.

 

CURRIE: John Joseph, Mayor of Milestone, born at Port Elgin, Ont., Feb. 26th, 1868, son of Duncan and Mary (Falconer) Currie. Married Mary Jane Peterkin, Aug. 3rd, 1898, and has one daughter. Educated at the Port Elgin public school, Walker High Schools, Owen Sound Collegiate. Was early engaged in the teaching profession. Came west in 1897 to Indian Head, as principal of the Public School, 1898-1903. Came to Milestone 1903, and purchased the furniture business of R. B. Ferguson, which he still continues. Has always taken a keen interest in civic affairs, and  was elected the town's first Mayor, in 1906-07. Member of the School Board, member of the I.O.O.F. (25 years; holds veteran's jewel). Mrs. Currie was chairman of the Milestone Public School Board, 1920, the first woman in the Province to hold such a position. Mr. Currie farms over 1,100 acres of land, and takes a keen interest in agriculture. Is a notary public. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Milestone.

 

CARSON: Captain Harold G., D.M.D., L.D.S., dental surgeon. Born at Shelbourne, Ont., 1893, son of Hugh and Alice (Brash) Carson. Married Ruth Annunsen 1920, and has one son and a daughter. Educated at Shelbourne Public and High Schools; North

 

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Pacific Dental College, Portland, Oregon. Dr. Carson was apprenticed to Dr. F. C. Frank, of Shelbourne, for three years. Coming to Winnipeg in 1910, in dental work with Dr. D. N. Ross; Nelson, B.C., with Dr. F.E. Morrison. Entered Pacific Dental College 1914, graduating 1917, D.M.D. Came to Weyburn, Sask., opened practice, in partnership with Dr. McKee. Joined C.A.D., C.E.F., 1918, and carried on with the forces at Regina and, Saskatoon. Discharged Xmas, 1919. Came to Saskatoon and opened his present practice. Member Saskatoon Dental Assoc. Member of the Masonic Order. Methodist. Conservative. Recreations, tennis and gardening. Address, Weyburn.

 

CLEAL : Lieutenant Kenneth Francis,. B.A., LL.B., barrister, Unity. Born at Selby, Lennox and Addington Co., 1891, son of George and Annie (Reed) Cleal. Married Myrtle Street, of Scott, Sask., 1918, and has one son and three daughters. Educated at the country public schools and Napanee Collegiate, Toronto University. Family came to Canada from Dorset county, in England, settled in Hastings county, Ont., moving to Lennox, where they engaged in cheese business. Mr. Cleal taught school in Saskatchewan, 1912 to 1915, homesteaded south of Unity and still farms. Graduated in law 1917; was articled to Ferguson & MacDermid, barristers, of Saskatoon. Called to the Bar May, 1919. Joined the Royal Flying Corps in the autumn of 1917, and after attending the Flying School in Toronto, was commissioned (lieutenant). England, September, 1918, Cadet Training Corps. Armistice being signed, he returned to Canada and was discharged May 7th, 1919. Opened practice at Unity, July, 1919. Member Saskatchewan Bar Assoc., solicitor for the G.W.V.A. Imperial Lumber 00. Secretary of the School Board, 1920. On the reserve of the Royal Air Force. Member of the Oddfellows, Sons of England. An Anglican Liberal. Recreations, golf and tennis.

 

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COOK: Major John Thomas, wholesale meat dealer, Moosomin. Born at Macclesfield, Cheshire, England; son of Phillip and Ellen (Booth) Cook. Married Annie Owen, of Sheffield, England, matron of the Moosomin Hospital, and has one son and two daughters. Educated in Macclesfield and Moosomin schools. Winnipeg Business College. Came to Canada in 1883 and settled at Moosomin. Father was in mercantile business at Moosomin; afterwards farmed at Cannington Manor. At the outbreak of the South African war Mr. Cook enlisted with the Strathcona: Horse and served with them during the period they were in action. Returned to Canada and attended business college in Winnipeg. Entered business in 1902 with. Stewart & Company, and is to-day the sole owner of the establishment. At the outbreak of the European war Mr.. Cook, who was then Mayor of Moosomin, took the officer's course and was placed in charge of recruiting on. the unit scheme favored by. General Sam Hughes (Moosomin District). Went into camp in the spring of 1916, with 250 men, rank of Major. Overseas. After Battalion was broken up at Bramshott, returned to Canada and resumed business. Elected to Council of Moosomin; and has been its Mayor on nine different occasions. Director of Hospital Board; ex-president of the G.W.V.A.; past master of the Masonic Lodge. Anglican. Liberal. Address, Moosomin.

 

 

CAMERON: His Worship Mayor W. L.,. Mayor of Lloydminster (1923). Born at Norwood, Ont.; 1873, a son of Ewen and Elizabeth (MacNaughton) Cameron. Married Annie Myrtle Lawrie, 1910, and has four sons and three daughters. Educated at the Norwood schools. Came West in 1905, and entered the mercantile business in Lloydminster (purchased from Miller Bros.) This he has enlarged and it is to-day, with its various departments, one of the largest general stores in Northern Saskatchewan. Has served on the Town Council thirteen years; elected Mayor in

 

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1922; Member of the Retail Merchants' Association, Board of Trade, director of the Agricultural Society; president of the local Liberal Association, past master of Britannia Lodge, 23, A.F. and A.M. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Lloydminster.

 

COOKE: Robert Judson, M.D., physician and surgeon, Wolseley. Born near Merrickville, Ont., 1870,a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Grey) Cooke. Married Ellen Sunter of Meaford, and has two sons and two daughters. Educated at Merrickville public school, Winnipeg Collegiate, Wesley College in arts, and Manitoba University in medicine. Came west in 1886 with his father's family and settled at Boissevain, Man. After leaving the Collegiate, taught school and was the principal of the Melita High School for three years. Graduated from Manitoba College. in 1902. Was house surgeon Winnipeg Hospital for a year, and came to Wolseley in 1903, and purchased the practice of the Hon. Dr. Elliott, afterwards forming a partnership with him. To-day practises alone and has a large and increasing practice in Wolseley and neighborhood. Is a member of the Saskatchewan Medical Association, has been a member of the local School Board for ten years, member of the Town Council for four years, and was elected Mayor twice. Member of the Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M., Royal Arch; Oddfellows. President of the Wolseley Chess Club. Attended the Polyclinic in 1906 at Rochester. Farms on a large scale. In politics is an Independent. Member of the Union Church. Address, Wolseley, Sask.

 

 

 

 

ESTEY: James Wilfred, B.A LL.B., Crown Prosecutor, Saskatoon, barrister and solicitor (Gilchrist, Hogarth & Estey). Born at Frederickton, N.H., 1889, son of Byron L. and Sarah A. (Kee) Estey. Married Muriel. Baldwin, of N.H., 1916, and has two sons. Educated at the Fredericton public and high schools,  University of N.H., Harvard University (1915, LL.B.).

 

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Mr. Estey comes of United Empire. Loyalist stock; family came to N.B after the American Revolution. Mr. Estey graduated from U.N.B, 1910 (B.A.), Harvard (1915, LL.B), and was articled to the late J. D. Spinney, K.C., Fredericton, later to C. D. Richards, of that city. Came West in 1915. Lectured in the University of Sask. in economics and law, 1915-16. Called to the Saskatchewan bar, 1917, and was associated with the firm of McCraney, MacKenzie & Hutchinson. Entered present firm 1921. Appointed agent of the Attorney-General 1921. Lectures still at University of Saskatchewan, in law. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Baptist. Liberal. Address, 1032 Aird St., Saskatoon, Sask.

 

ELLIOTT: Captain Percival S., RA., LL.R, barrister (Elliott & Collins). Born at Middleton, N.S., 1881, son of Rufus W. and Susan (Ritchie) Elliott. Married- Minerva Morris 1907. Educated at Laurencetown and Middleton public schools, Acadia College, Dalhousie University. United Empire Loyalist stock on both sides of the family. Mother belonged to the well-known Ritchie family, that has given to the Nova Scotia bar several members, notably Chief Justice Ritchie and the present Judge Ritchie of Halifax. Captain Elliott taught school in early life and was principal of MacDonald school, Middleton (1903). Graduated from Acadia College 1902 (B.A.); Dalhousie Law School,~1905 (LL.R). Articled to A. L. Davidson, Esq., barrister, of Middleton. Called to the N.S. bar, Jan., 1907; practised in partnership with Mr. Davidson. Came West, opened practice at Humboldt Watrous, 1911; afterwards forming a partnership with his brother and latterly with F. P. Collins. Solicitor for the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Union Trust Company; solicitor for the town of Watrous; solicitor for the village of Manitou Beach. Contested Humboldt constituency against Hon. Wm. Motherwell in 1910; Mayor of Watrous 1914-15-16. Chairman of

 

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the School Board; member of the Board of Trade; member of the Masonic Order. Baptist. Conservative. Joined C.E.F., 214th Battalion (Rank of Captain); overseas and transferred to 243rd Battalion. Address, Watrous.

 

EGGERTSON: Arni G., barrister and solicitor, Wynyard. Born at Winnipeg, . Man., 1896, a son of Ami and Oddney Oddson. Married Maja Laxdal, 1920, and has one son. Educated at the Winnipeg public school, Central Collegiate, Kelvin Technical, Manitoba University. Family came to Canada from Iceland. Mr. Eggertson's father settled near Lake Winnipeg and farmed for some years; was in the real estate business and represented the Icelandic Government at Washington, 1916-17-18. Alderman of the City of Winnipeg for Ward 4 in 1906-07, 17. Contested Winnipeg in the Liberal interests in election of 1922. The subject of this sketch was in his second year in arts at Manitoba College when he joined the Royal Air Force at Winnipeg, September, 1917. At Toronto his machine, crashed and he was invalided and discharged, Sept., 1918; ret1frned to college and graduated in 1921; articled to H. A. Bergman, K.O., of Rathwell, Johnson, Bergman & McGhee, Winnipeg. Called to the bar of Manitoba, December 24th, 1921; Saskatchewan, Aug. 29th, 1922, and opened practice at Wynyard. Played hockey with his University team. Lutheran. Liberal. Address, Wynyard.

 

DENNISON: William Edward, merchant, vice-president Provincial Boards of Trade, of the firm of Ross & Dennison, Assiniboia. Born Westport, Leeds county, Ont., 1873, a son of Robert and Catherine (Percell) Dennison. Married Dora Stewart, daughter of. John Stewart, Wales, Ont. Has one daughter. Educated at ,Bedford Mills, Que., and Westport schools. Mr. Dennison was born on a farm in Leeds Co. His father

 

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was a wood ranger in Frontenac and Leeds counties in, early life. Mr. Dennison served an apprenticeship with R. Jenson Co., Westport, for four years, afterwards was manager for Kerr Bros. of a general store at Wales, Ontario. Travelled for the firm of E. B. Shuttleworth (chemicals) at Wales, Ont., for fourteen years, coming to the West in autumn of 1912. He was first overseer of the Village of Assiniboia, first Mayor of the incorporated town, and elected four successive terms. Established his present business, which he has carried on continuously. President Board of Trade and a member since it was organized. Vice-pres. Provincial Assn. of Boards of Trade. Member Prov. Good Roads Assn.; vice-pres. Sask. Motor League. Delegate appointed by Sask. Government to Canadian Good Roads Convention at Halifax, 1920. President Masonic Temple Building. Charter member St. John Lodge, A.F, and A.M. Liberal. Presbyterian.

 

DRINNAN: Captain Angus Alexander M.C., physician and surgeon. Born at Penetanguishene, Ont., 1865, a son of Wm. C. and Isabella (Keith) Drinnan. Married Sarah Cranfield Aitkin, 1909, and has two sons. Educated at the Penetang public school, Sarnia Collegiate, Trinity College, Toronto. Family came to Canada from Scotland, 1856; settled at Penetanguishene, where Mr. Drinnan, Sir., was a farm instructor. Coming west in 1882, settled in southern part of what is now Saskatchewan. Dr. Drinnan saw service in the North-west Rebellion of '85, with the transport service. Graduated from Trinity College, 1900, and opened practice at Ponoka also practised at Moose Jaw. Came to Outlook 1908. He joined the C.E.F. In February, 1915 (C.A.M.C.), and went overseas at once; arrived in France April, 1916, seeing considerable service--Ypres, Sanctuary Wood, Hooge; Somme, Vimy Ridge and Paschendaele, with the 5th C.M.R.s; 47th Casualty Clearing Station. Returned

 

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to Canada June, 1918. Was O. C. Military Hospital at Ogden. Resumed. practice. Mayor of Outlook, 191920. Member of the School Board. Member Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M. Presbyterian. Liberal. Recreation, hunting. Address, Outlook, Sask.

 

DRIVER: Major William, born at Keightly, Yorkshire, England, May 6th, 1870, son of Reuben and Alice (Wright) Driver. Married Ada Bell Metcalfe, and has two sons and a daughter. Educated at the Keightly schools. Contractor at Keightly, 1886 Moved to Burnley, Lancashire, 1890; London, 1894; Humphrey's, Ltd..; as travelling representative and superintendent of buildings. During the. South African War, 1899-1903, was selected by the war office to supervise the shipping of materials from the London, district. Was highly complimented for his efforts in this regard. Came to Humboldt, 1006, engaged in farming and contracting; employed by Federal Government as Inspector at the post office and land titles office, and court house. Enlisted in 1915 and assigned as recruiting officer at Humboldt, 188th Battalion; overseas, drafted into the Canadian Forestry Corps and assigned to No. 56 Company as Lieutenant; captain and second in command of 28th Company. Major command of this. company until the Armistice. Employed on special demobilization work in England until May, 1919. Canada; discharged. Moved to Los Angeles. Member British League (Overseas) of Los Angeles, California; I.O.O.F.; C.O.F. Anglican.

 

DAWSON: Frederick Bruce, M.D., physician and surgeon, Maple Creek. Born in Northumberland county, Ont., 1884, son of Alfred and Letitia (Fisher) Dawson. Married Honora Smith 1913. Educated at Albert College, Belleville, Toronto University. Comes of a pioneer family in Northumberland county, family coming to Canada from England. After graduation from Toronto, Dr. Dawson was engaged with the Toronto

 

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hospitals for two years. Came to Maple Creek in 1908, where he enjoys a large and increasing practice., Chairman of the School Board for four years; member of the Town Council; member of the Saskatchewan and Ontario Medical Associations; member of the Masonic Order. Methodist. Progressive. Address, Maple Creek.

 

DUNBAR: Donald Culloden, proprietor and publisher Estevan Mercury. Born at Orangeville, Ont., 1865, son of Francis Grant and Matilda (Culloden) Dunbar. Married Jean Sewell 1905, . and has three children. Educated at the Orangeville public and high schools; father came to Canada from Murrayshire, Scotland; settled in Dufferin County. Architect in early life and was afterwards Division Court Clerk at Shelbourne. Mr. Dunbar in early life was engaged in the banking business with several banks, latterly with the Traders' Bank. Came west to N.W.T. in 1903, where he became Homestead Inspector at Oxbow. In 1905 purchased the Mercury plant which he has enlarged and improved until to-day it is one of the most up-to-date printing plants in Southern Saskatchewan (linotype and motor power). The paper has a large circulation and exercises a great moral influence in the community. Mr. Dunbar is president of the Federal Assiniboia Liberal Association; president St. Andrew's Society; member of the Dominion and Saskatchewan Press Assoc.; member and chairman High School Board; member of the I.O.O.F. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Estevan.

 

DOUGLAS: Lieutenant David, Asst. Insp. of Taxation, Saskatoon. Born at Dundee, Scotland, 1871, son of David and Amelia (Downing) Douglas. Married Susie May Snider, 1904, and has one daughter. Educated at the Blackheath schools. In early life in the theatrical profession, with D'Oyley Carte Opera Com. p3;nies (Gilbert and Sullivan Operas), with Henry

 

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Irving, and other companies. Manager Grand Princess Theatre, Glasgow. Popularity envinced by thirteen consecutive benefits. Came to Canada 1903; manager C. P. Walker's Canadian Companies; manager Dominion Theatre, Winnipeg. Came to Saskatoon as manager of the Saskatoon Exhibition, 1907. Joined C.E.F. 1915, 96th Battalion, as private. Overseas Sept., 1916. Drafted to France and attached to 16th Battalion' rank of lieutenant. Joined at Souchez, Nov. 1st, 1916; service until June, 1917. Organized 1st Divisional Concert Party; Paschendaele; trench fever. Invalided to England. Quartermaster Maple Leaf Club, London. Returned to Canada after the war and was appointed to present position 28th of November. Member of the Masonic Order, Royal Arch, Shriner. Secretary-treasurer Saskatoon Kennel Club. Held the amateur boxing championship of Scotland' lieutenant Douglas is Quartermaster of 1st Northern Saskatchewan? Regiment. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address 1221, 8th Ave., North, Saskatoon.

 

 

DICKSON: Andrew, Mayor of Indian Head (1920, 21-22), (Broke~). Born at Pakenham, Lanark County, Ont., Sept. 26th, 1873, a son of William and Eliza (Drummond) Dickson. Married Bessie May, Dec. 29,th, 1897, and has. one son and a daughter. After leaving school. (Ottawa Normal) was employed with J. B. Wylie, Almonte, Ont. Came West in 1899 to Indian Head and engaged in farming until 1907 when he entered the implement. business. In 1912 he opened his present brokerage office, which he still carries on. Member of the School Board eight years; chairman four years. Member of the Council four years. Has been elected Mayor several terms. Member of the Hospital Board, Secretary Agricultural Society Sec.Treas. Municipality since 1912. Takes an interest in sports and is an ardent curler. Member of the Golf Club. Presbyterian; chairman of the Board of Managers. Liberal. Residence, Indian head.

 

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DE ROCHE; Hammel Madden, barrister, Crown Prosecutor, Jud. Dist. of Melville. Born at Napanee, Ont., 1878, son of Hammel M. de Roche, K.C., and Sarah Ann Christian (Pile). (Mr. de Roche's father was County Crown Attorney for many years, also member of the Ontario Legislature). Married Marion Selena Taylor, 1905, and has one son and a daughter. Family is of French extraction, formerly from Three Rivers, Que. Mr. de Roche, after leaving college, was articled to the late Walter Barwick, of Toronto. Called to the Ontario bar 1904. Came west to Moose Jaw 1908, and opened present practice. Appointed agent for the Attorney-General in 1913 (on the opening of the judicial district. Solicitor for~ the Royal Bank. Member of the School Board for four years; ex-member of Board of the Diocese of Qu'Appelle; secretary of the local company of Boy Scouts; member of the Masonic fraternity, first principal Chapter of Royal Arch. An Anglican. Liberal. Recreations, golf and curling.

 

DAWSON: L. L. So many of the prominent people of Saskatchewan in general, and Regina in particular, seem. to have originated in Mount Forest in Ontario, that one is inclined to wonder what extraordinary efficacy exists in the air of that portion of Wellington county for producing aggressive and enterprising citizens. L. Lorne Dawson was born on a farm in that honoured vicinity in the year 1877, the son of Joseph Dawson, of English ancestry, and of Sarah McFarlen, his wife. He spent his childhood on the paternal farm and attended first public and then High school at Mount Forest. He journeyed to Regina in 1899, perhaps influenced in his choice of a Western location by the fact that some cousins of his mother's side were well-known and successful farmers on the Regina plains. He completed his Collegiate course in the Western city, and in 1900 attended Normal during the last year of the regime of Dr. Goggin.

 

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On graduating from Normal School Mr. Dawson went to Rathwell, Man., where he was principal of the Intermediate School. He returned to Regina in 1906, and became articled to William Trant as a student-at-law. Subsequently he transferred his articles to the late J. A. Allan, then of the firm of Lamont, Allan & Turgeon. He was with that firm for two years; then he went with Avery Casey, K.C. On graduating he joined the firm of Balfour, Martin & Casey. In 1917 he formed the partnership with Mr. Casey, under which the firm is carrying on a large and constantly extending practice.  As a young man Mr. Dawson was a notable soccer player, and to-day is no mean performer on the tennis courts. He is an enthusiastic sportsman and the fall days often see him afield with dog and gun. He was married in 1912 to Miss Eleanor Emmonds of Treherne, Man., and has three sons. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Regina.

 

DRIVER; Lieutenant Arthur, Land Titles Office, Humboldt. Born at Morcambe, Lancashire, England, 1891, son of Major William and Mrs. Ada Bell (Metcalfe) Driver. Married Ina Celesta Leaper, 1921, and has one daughter. Educated at the Humboldt schools. Family came to Canada in 1903, to Winnipeg; to Saskatchewan in 1904, where they farmed in the Humboldt district. Lieutenant Driver joined the C.K.F. January 1st, 1915, 53rd Battalion overseas, drafted to the 28th Bn. Jan. 1916; France, Hooge, Ypres, St. Julien, Somme, Vimy Ridge, Paschendaele, Arras, Amiens, Canal du Nord (won Commission at Canal du Nord). Canada and discharged Jan 31,1919. Entered Land Titles Office at Humboldt; member of the G.W.V.A., secretary-treasurer three years; member of the I.O.O.F. Presbyterian. Liberal Address, Land Titles Office, Humboldt.

 

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DIXON: Percy John, B.A., barrister. Born Pilot Mound, Man., 1888, a son of John J. and Grace Mary (McGreggor) Dixon. Married Marion L. Scarth, 1916, and has one son and one daughter. Educated Londesboro school, Wesley College, Manitoba University. United Empire Loyalist Stock; Scotch and Pennsylvania Dutch stock. Family pioneers of Dundas Co., Ont.; Father came west in 1877. Pioneers of Winnipeg, Brandon and Pilot Mound Districts. Mr. Dixon graduated from Manitoba University 1911; articled in law to W. J. Finklestein, and Bailey, Fisher & Co.; called to Manitoba bar 1914. Came to Moose Jaw, 1914; partnership with J.E. Chisholm, Esq., remaining a year and a half, when he came to Kindersley and opened present practice. Member Manitoba and Sask. Bar Assoc. Solicitor for Union Bank, Rural Municipality of Kindersley, Canadian Bonded Attorney. Member of the Agricultural Society; member of the Board of Trade; member of the Town Council since 1917. Mason. Presbyterian. In politics an Independent. Recreations, golf, curling and hunting.

 

 

 

DREEVER: William, proprietor Empress Hotel, Swift Current. Born in the Orkney Islands, Scotland, 1859, son of Edward and Jean Dreever. Married Mary Clouston, 1881, (connected with the family of the late Sir Edward Clouston, Bart.) Educated at the Orkney Island school. Mr. Dreever was apprenticed to

and learned the engineering trade, went to sea and followed that work, as his father and grandfather had before him. Came to Canada 1881, to Hamilton, Ont., coming west in the winter of 1881 and worked as. engineer for the Keewatin Lumber Co., Lake of the Woods. Regina in 1885, during Rebellion, Mounted Police and Government work. Vancouver summer of 1886. Regina in the contracting business; partnership with Daniel Murphy (partnership lasting twenty years) Rossland, B.C., during the gold boom; mining and mechanical engineering. Moved to Swift Current

 

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1911, and erected the Empress Hotel. This hostelry, under his genial management, has just become one of the best-known and most popular hotels of the west. It is the home of the Swift Current Rotary Club. Member of the Masonic fraternity; Oddfellows. Presbyterian. Independent. Member of the Rotary Club. Address, Empress Hotel, Swift Current.

 

DEANE: Harold John, B.A., barrister and solicitor, Lloydminster. Born near London, Ont., 1891, son of Edward and Jennie (Keating) Deane. Married Margaret Lester Miller, 1917, and has a son and a daughter. Educated at the Edmonton public school and the University of Alberta. Came west in. 1893, to Edmonton. Graduated from the University 1913, and was articled in law to George B. Henwood, of Wallbridge, Henwood & Co. Called to the Alberta bar 1916; Saskatchewan bar, 1919. Member of the Alberta Bar Association. - Solicitor for the town of Lloydminster; solicitor for the Royal Bank of Canada. Member of the Board of Trade; member of the School Board. Methodist. Conservative. Recreations, curling and hunting. Address, Lloydminster.

 

DITSON: Albert Amos, publisher of the Kindersley Clarion. Born at Collingwood, Ont., 1889, son of John and Margaret (Graban) Ditson. Married Irene May Humphrey 1914, and has four sons. Was educated at the Collingwood schools. Learned the printing trade with the Clarion; purchased the plant in 1914; disposed of a half interest to T. H. Keays, 1918. Has enlarged office and plant. Linotype; power plant; eight-page home-print weekly. Member of the Dominion and Saskatchewan Press Associations. Director and member of the Agricultural Society; member of the Board of Trade. Member of the I.O.A.F.; Orange Lodge. Methodist. Independent. Address; Kindersley.

 

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CALDER: Leonard G., Sheriff of the Judicial Dist. of Saskatoon. Born in Tennessee, U.S.A., 1880, son of Lewis and Emma Calder. Married Flossie McKittrick, of Petrolia, and has two children, daughters. Educated at Bathgate, N.D. Lived in Seaforth, Ont., in 1872; Oshawa, 1878; Bathgate, N.D., 1881. Came to Winnipeg 1891-93. Worked as locomotive engineer with the Canadian Pacific Railway; retired from that company and came to Saskatoon in 1905; helped to organize electoral district after Province was formed, in the service of W. C. Sutherland, Esq., Speaker of the Legislature; organized district for the Federal members, Geo. E. McCraney and Hon. Wm. E. Knowles. Elected alderman by acclamation, 1906; appointed chairman License and Police Committee; member Board of Works. Until appointed Sheriff was a member Saskatoon Police Commission. In 1910 vice-pres. International Sheriff's Assoc. During his office with Police Commission was instrumental in putting the Saskatoon police in uniform. His office has been quoted as "The Model Sheriff's Office of the Province." President Exhibition Board; director Motor Club; member of the Board of Trade; Chamber of Commerce; ex-president of the Rotary Club. A popular after-dinner speaker. Mason and Shriner (Wa Wa Temple); member of the Knights of Pythias. A Liberal. Methodist. Director Commercial Life Assurance Co. Address, Court House, Saskatoon, Sask.

 

CAMERON: Major George Lynch, M.D.S.,. D.D.S., D.S.O., .dental surgeon. Born at Nelson, Man., May 7th, 1884, a son of the Reverend D. G. and Willimena Cameron, both surviving and living in Swift Current. Educated Strabane Public School, Hamilton. Collegiate, McGill University. Member City Council Swift Current,. 1911-1914. Joined C.E.F., .9th Mounted Rifles, Jan., 1915. England, Cavalry Reserve Regt.; France; 1st Battalion Can. Inf., Major 2nd in Command.  Wounded
April, 1918.  Mentioned in dis-

 

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patches and awarded the D.S.O. Acted as A.D.D.S. Military Dist. No. 10, 1918-20. Grand Master Saskatchewan I.O.O.F. 1916-17 (by special dispensation while in France) ; member Swift Current Lodge, 28, A.F. and A.M. President Swift Current Rotary Club, 1922; member of the Council of College of Dental Surgeons, Sask. Elder of the Presbyterian Church. Address, Box 383, Swift Current.

 

CLARK: Lieut. Willis. Longair, M.M., clergyman and journalist. Born at Brampton,. Ont., Dec. 11th, 1897, son of the Reverend Wylie Cable and Agnes (Thompson) Clark. Educated at Brampton public school, Quebec High School and University of Saskatchewan; B.A., 1920; theology, 1922. Family came west in 1910; settled in Saskatoon, where Lieutenant Clark's father was called as pastor of Knox Church; attended Collegiate there. Joined C.E.F. in 1st University Co., attached to P.P.C.L.I. Shortly after mobilization proceeded overseas and went to France July, 1915; attached to P.P.C.L.I. as. reinforcement at Armentieres. Saw service with this Battalion until June, 1916, when he was wounded at Sanctuary Wood. Invalided to England and awarded the Military Medal. After recovery was commissioned and returned to Battalion with rank of lieutenant; served until completion of the war and returned to Canada with them; resumed university course. Graduated in arts, 1920 (B.A.); theology, 1922; was ordained 1922 (July), and appointed as assistant pastor St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Moose Jaw. Has since resigned this pastorate and is engaged in journalistic work on the Border City Times, Windsor, Ont. Member United Service Club (Moose Jaw). Recreation, golf.

 

GARRET: Edmund, editor and publisher Watrous Signal. Born in Hampshire,. England, 1854, son of Richard and Elizabeth (Blondin) Garrett. Married Susannah Maria Goodfellow, 1882, and has five sons and five daughters. Four of his sons are in the printing

 

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trade; Educated in the Bradford, Ont., schools. Came to Canada in 1855. Mr. Garrett learned the printing trade with Bradford Witness; South Simcoe News. Came west in 1910 and purchased the Watrous Signal, which he still publishes. His family of sons, all in the printing business, learned their trade in: the home office. Mr. Harold F., editor of the Davidson Leader; E. Leon, editor Indian Head News; others sons ill different offices. Brother-in-law editor of the Whitby Gazette; his daughter the wife of the Editor of the Herbert paper. Member of the Town Council (Mayor two terms) ; ex-member of the Bradford School Board; ex-reeve of Bradford. Member of the Canadian and Saskatchewan Press Association; secretary-treasurer Agricultural Society. Presbyterian. Independent. Address, Watrous.

 

GAMBLE: Harold, editor and publisher, Gull Lake Advance. Born in the Lake District, Cumberland county, England, 1885, son of John and Mary (Chambers) Gamble. Married Ida Ford, Milton, Ont., 1913, and has one son and a daughter. Educated at the English schools; apprenticed with W. H. Moss & Sons, Whitehaven and Workington, England (7 years). Came to Canada 1898 to Outlook, and farmed at Milden. Worked at the newspaper business in Outlook for five years, coming to Gull Lake; worked on the Advertiser. Purchased Advance in 1919, which he still edits and publishes, and which under his management has become one the Province's leading weeklies. The office machinery is thoroughly up-to-date, with linotype and motor power. Mr. Gamble is a member of the Canadian Press Association. Member of the Cypress Lodge, A.F. and A.M.; I.O.O.F. Anglican. Independent. Address, Gull Lake.

 

GORDON: Captain Arthur Douglass, M.B.E., journalist, Prince Albert. Born at Derby, England, 1868, son of William and Harriett (Randal) Gordon. Married

 

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Mary Ellen Harrison, 1891. Has three daughters. Educated at the Derby-schools. Comes from an army family. Grandfather fought at Waterloo ; father a veteran of the Indian Campaigns (22nd Battalion, Imperials). Captain Gordon came to Canada in 1912 and was sec.-treas. of the Recruiting area C. 188th Batt. Overseas, was on Quartermaster-General's Board of Officers, London. Was Quartermaster Canadian Discharge Depot, Buxton; wounded in an air raid, London, Feb., 1918. Handed discharge depot over to Imperials, 1920. Returned to Canada. Joined editorial staff Daily Herald Prince Albert. Was awarded the M.B.E. and decorated by the King at Buckingham Palace. Captain Gordon is at present Quartermaster 53rd North Saskatchewan Battalion. Captain Gordon's daughter (Mrs. Major Harradence) served overseas; "Nursing Sister," Bramshott Hospital. Member of the B.P.O.E. Anglican. Address, 799 15th St. West, Prince Albert.

 

GUNN: Major J. D., Manager National Trust Company, Saskatoon. Born at Kildonan,
Man.
, 1880, a son of Robert and Barbara (McKay) Gunn. Married Florence Rourke, 1911. Educated Winnipeg Collegiate. Grandfather one of the Selkirk Colony; came from Sutherlandshire, Scotland. Major Gunn was horn on a farm at Springfield, Man. Taught school for two years and then joined the staff of the National Trust Company at Winnipeg, in 1906; three years in Edmonton as accountant; manager at Saskatoon Branch, 1906. Joined C.E.F. 1915, 65th Batt., second in command; overseas 1916; France, August that year; 67th Batt., Somme, Vimy Ridge (wounded); invalided to England; administrative duty, Canadian Engineers, until Armistice; Canada. Discharged March 1919. Resumed position with National Trust. President Board of Trade, Saskatoon, 1923; member of the executive of Canadian Club, Country Club. President

 

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Kennel Club. Member of the Masonic  fraternity. Presbyterian. Independent.
Recreation, golf. Address, Saskatoon.

 

GODFREY: Oswald Julius, F.C.A., B.A.C.C., chartered accountant; treasurer town of Indian Head. Born at Sedbergh, Yorkshire, England, 1875, a son of Robert and Margaret (Green) Godfrey. Married Cecile Maude Challoner and has two sons and two daughters. Educated at the King Edward Grammar School, Brighton, England. An old Yorkshire family. Father a civil engineer. Mr. Godfrey came to Canada 1902,
to Qu' Appelle; Indian Head, 1904. Appointed to present position and opened an office as chartered accountant; specialized in municipal work and has worked up a large connection throughout Saskatchewan and Alberta.  He is a contributor to magazines and periodicals; author of "Municipal Bookkeeping a1,ld Auditing," used as a text-book in universities and schools in Canada and U.S. President Sask. Union of Municipalities, 1916; past, president of Dom. and Sask. Chartered Accountants; first chairman Indian Head High School Board. Military Representative after conscription. Chairman National Service Com. A Mason. Anglican. Conservative. Recreations, cricket and golf. Address, Indian Head.

 

GIBBARD: Alexander H., B.A., librarian, Moose Jaw Public Library. Born Napanee, Lennox county, Ont., 1863, son of Charles A. and Content Wells (Hawley) Gibbard. Married Margaret Ham, 1890, and has one son and one daughter. Educated at the Orono public school, Bowmanville High School, Toronto University. Family came to the United States in 1650, from Derbyshire, England. An ancestor, Joseph Hawley, was Town Recorder in Stratford, Conn.; other members in official positions in Vermont and Eastern States. Belongs to the Bay of Quinte United Empire Loyalists, the family having settled therein 1783. After gradua-

 

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tion from the university in 1887, entered the teaching profession at Georgetown, Ont., High School; principal of Niagara Falls South High School; principal at Whitby and Brantford. Came west in 1906 principal of Grenfell High School for four years; Moose Jaw Collegiate for three years. Appointed to present position 1913. Member of the Canadian Club Masonic Fraternity. Methodist. Moose Jaw library under his efficient charge has grown into one of the best-equipped libraries in the West (19,000 volumes) and loaned out 128,581 books. in 1922, and has a most efficient and courteous staff. Address, Moose Jaw, Public Library.

 

GABB: Captain Joseph, Chief Clerk of the Customs, Moose Jaw.  Son of Frederick and Lydia (Marsh) Gabb. Born in Bristol, England, 1882. Married Elaine Sonia Patterson, 1900. Educated at the Bristol schools. Came to Canada in 1900, to Toronto, and was employed by Grand Trunk Ry. Entered Government service in 1903 (Customs); original port officer in Moose Jaw. Is the only remaining one of the staff or those days. Joined C.E.F. Dec. 1st 1915 with 128th Battalion; overseas Aug., 1916; attached to Headquarters, special services, investigations and courts-martial; August, 1918, adjutant in command of Musketry Camp at Mitchett, 18,000 draftees passing through camp; 50,000 in all during his command. On Board of Inquiries; finished service; demobilization work Kemmall Park. Returned to Canada Sept. 21st ~919, and resumed position in customs. Captain Gabb is one of the old members of the Moose Jaw Board of Trade. Vestryman for years of St. John's Church. Member of the Canadian Club; United Service Club; G.W.V.A. Member of the Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M.; Past Patron Order of Eastern Star. Address Moose Jaw.

 

 

GERRAND: Ernest Walter, LL.B., barrister (McKim Gerrand &McKay), Melville. Born at Miniota, Man.; 1889, son of David and Alice (Cole) Gerrand. Mar-

 

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ried Edith Shields 1913, and has two sons and two daughters. Educated at Miniota and Brandon schools, Manitoba University. Mr. Gerrand graduated from the law school of Manitoba with the legal degree of LL.B., and was articled in law to Arch. Smith, of Virden, Man., afterwards to Isaac Campbell, K.C., of Winnipeg. Called to the bar, 1913. Opened practice in partnership with L.T. McKim, Esq.:, of Melville. Firm now includes H. McKay, Esq. Solicitors for town of Melville Bank of Montreal, North American Lumber Co., North American Lumber Co. (for Province). Member of the School Board for three years. Member of the Union Church Board. Liberal. Recreations, curling and golf. Address, Melville, Sask.

 

GREEN: Hugh Alexander, Mayor of Watson (1923). Born at Wingham, Ont., 1873, son of John and Jean (Lawson) Green. Married Maud Fitz, 1901, and has one son and two daughters. Educated at the county schools of Huron County (School District No.9). Father Mr. John Green, born in Cork, Ireland, the family coming to Canada from Ayrshire, Scotland. Mr. Green, senior, still survives at the ripe old age of eighty-nine. The subject of this sketch came to the Canadian West in 1891 and farmed for some years at Neepawa, Man.; learned the tailoring trade at Yorkton and was in business there until 1903, when he purchased the Balmoral Hotel in that city and ran it for two years. Came to Watson and was the proprietor of the King George Hotel for three years. Went to Vancouver; returned to Watson in 1913 and entered the automobile business. Sold the King George in 1920. Has served on the Town Council and School Board. Mayor of Watson, 1920-21-22-23. Takes a keen interest in sports and was manager of the Baseball Club for some years. One of the promoters and president of the Chautauqua Board. P.D.D.G.M. Masonic Lodge; member of the I.O.O.F.; Shriner. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Watson.

 

 

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GRASSICK: James, president Capital Ice Co., Regina. Born Fergus, Wellington county, Ont., March 2nd, 1868, a son of George and Annie Jane (Bell) Grassick. Married Jessie Beattie 1897, and has one son and two daughters. Educated public schools of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Mr. Grassick is justly entitled to be counted among the pioneers of Saskatchewan. It was in 1882 that the Grassick family located a homestead within a short distance from the present centre of Regina, where James was engaged in farming and ranching with his father. When about seventeen years old the Rebellion of '85 broke out, and Mr. Grassick volunteered and served throughout the hostilities; in the transport division. In 1889 Mr. Grassick entered business for himself, establishing a cartage and transfer business in Regina, which he carried on until 1906. Disposing of this business, he organized the Capital Ice Co., Ltd., of which company he has always been the principal factor. He was a member of the Town Council from 1889 to 1903; an Alderman of the City Council from 1915 to 1915, and was elected Mayor of the City of Regina for 1920-21-22. He is associated with practically all the business bodies in the city, such as the Regina Agricultural and Industrial Exhibition Association, Board of Trade, Library, Hospital Boards. He holds office in a number of fraternal associations. Takes a keen interest in all sports. Presbyterian, and for many years on the Board of Managers of Knox Church. Address, 1604 Sixteenth Avenue.

 

GREENWOOD: Maude M. A., wife of Walter Greenwood, president and managing director Regina Florist Co., Ltd. Born at Northampton, England, daughter of Thomas and Anne Gornall. Educated private schools and Clarke's College, London, England. Early life was passed in Australia, and upon arrival in England, attended private schools and Clarke's Business College. Held the temporary appointment as secretary to the

 

 

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Hon. Curden, Consul of Central America, and upon reaching Canada; in 1910,. decided upon a business career and established the Regina Florist Co., in which

Business she was eminently successful. Married in 1923. Religion, Methodist. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

FRASER: Captain Harold John, barrister (Halliday & Davis) Prince Albert. Born at Ottawa, 1894, son of John and Mary J. (Atchison) Fraser. Married Miss Dorothy Strong 1923. Educated at Ottawa Collegiate, Osgoode Hall Law School. Old Glengarry County family. Father, Mr. John Fraser, Auditor-General of Canada. Lieutenant Fraser was articled to Perkins, Fraser & McCormick, Ottawa. Graduated from Osgoode Hall 1920. Came west in 1921 and entered the firm of Halliday &
Davis, Prince Albert. Joined C.E.F. in the ranks with 8th C.M.R, Dec. 28th, 1914. Overseas Oct., 1915. France with 1st Motor Machine Gun Bde.; Ypres, Somme; (wounded at Courcelette). Commissioned Lieut. Canadian Cavalry Machine Gun Squadron, under Col., now General, Patterson, Cambrai (1917). Trench duty Amiens,. Le Cateau; German army of occupation; returned to Canada, May, 1919, discharged. Member Phi Delta Phi fraternity, Kiwanis Club member Saskatchewan Bar Association Captain A Company, 2nd Battalion. North Saskatchewan Regiment. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Prince Albert.

 

FERGUSON: Captain William, merchant, Weyburn, Born in Peterboro county, Ont., 1894, a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Ferguson. Married Elizabeth Stivens, 1921. Educated at the St. Catharines schools. Captain Ferguson came west in 1911, to Weyburn, and worked with William Snelgrove, baker and confectioner. Joined C.E.F.1916, 152nd Battalion. Overseas Sept., 1916; France, November.  Attached to 5th Battalion; continuous service until Feb., 1918. Vimy Ridge; Arleux, Fresnoy, Hill 70, Paschendaele. Sent

 

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to England to take officer's training course; rejoined until September. Was in the "Last Hundred Days," Amiens, Arras, Canal du Nord, Mons, Valenciennes; German army of occupation. Returned to Canada with battalion. and was discharged April 25th, 1919. On Reserve list of officers Canadian Militia, rank of captain (prov. major). Has established a growing and prosperous business in the confectionery line. Appointed to command A Co., 3rd Sask. Battalion now provisional major, 2nd in command. Member of the Young Men's Business Club. Mason. Methodist. Address, Weyburn.

 

FRASER: James Raymond, B.A., principal high school, Kerrobert. Born at Hampton, N.B., son of Thomas James and Ida May (Wright) Fraser. Married Ethel Jean Coulter, 1922. Educated at the Hampton Consolidated School, University of N.B. United Empire Loyalist stock. Family came to New Glasgow after the American Revolution, moving to New Brunswick. After graduation Mr. Fraser joined the C.E.F., 9th Siege Battery of Artillery. Overseas Sept., 1917; France, May, 1918; 12th Siege Battery. Was in action all the summer of 1918 and in the "Last Hundred Days," Arras, Amiens, Canal du Nord, Valenciennes, Mons, Armistice. Canada, June, 1919. Came west to Rush Lake; Sask., where he taught school for one year, Kerrobert, August, 1920. Member of the Teachers' Alliance. President of the Kerrobert G.W.V.A. Member of the I.O.O.F. Baptist. Conservative. Address

Kerrobert.

 

 

FRENCH.: Captain Edwin Thomas, M.D., physician and surgeon; Estevan. Born at Boissevain, Man., 1~85, son of Henry and Jane(Cowan) French. Married Bertha E. McCallum and has one son and a daughter. . Educated at Boissevain public and high schools, Manitoba University.  Dr. French graduated from Manitoba University in 1908; practised at Belmont,

 

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Gainsboro, Oxbow. Came to Estevan in 1913; joined C.E.F., C.A.M.C., June, 1917. Overseas Aug., 1917. Attached Training Depot, Reserve Artillery at Witley Camp. Transport work to Canada March, 1919. England in June, Perfleet, railway troops; France October, 1918; transferred back to Canadians. Etaples. (board work). invalided to England. After recovery, board work at Matlock, Bath Hospital, Liverpool Hospital. Returned to Canada May, 1919. Member of the Town Council, 1921. . Member of the Golf Club; member of the Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M.; member of the I.O.O.F.; member of the C.O.F. Local golf and curling champion, 1921. Anglican. Independent. Is at present taking studies abroad.

 

FULLER: George Oliver, general manager Reliance Lumber Co. Born at LaCrosse, Wis., U.S.A., 1877, son of George David and Mary Westlund Fuller. Married Mary Wadsworth, has one son and a daughter. Educated at LaCrosse public schools, Wisconsin Business College. English. and Swedish stock. Grandfather came from England in the early part of the nineteenth century, settling near Albany, N.Y. Worked as book-keeper for various concerns; Minneapolis, 1900, Lamb Lumber Co. General manager for McCall Webster Co., elevators and lumber; increased their business from one yard to forty-five. Came to Saskatchewan in 1909,

organized Reliance Lumber Company and it has increased from five yards to thirty-two. Under his efficient management this company has become one of the strongest in the West. Assumed citizenship and became a naturalized subject in 1912. Mr. Fuller 1S an optimist and a firm believer in the future of Western Canada. Member of the Rotary Club . Director of the Western Retail Lumbermen's Association. Presbyterian. Recreation, motoring. Address, Saskatoon.

 

FERG: (Capt.) Edwin James, M.D:, L.R.C.P.S., London, physician and surgeon, Moosomin. Born at Arden, Man., March 5th, 1888, a son of Mr. and Mrs. William

 

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D. Ferg. Married Miss Mossie Nay April, 1916, and has three daughters. Graduated in medicine University of Manitoba, 1913. Practised medicine at Ninga, Man., three years. April of that year commissioned as Capt., C.A.M.C. and went overseas with 90th Batt. (Little Black Devils), of Winnipeg, as Batt. M.O. Served in France as M.O. with R.C.H.A., and later on surgical staff No. 12, Canadian General Hospital, at Bramshott, returning to civil practice at Moosomin in July, 1919. Methodist. Address, Moosomin, Sask.

 

 

 

FLEMMING: Harry Raymond, M.A., M.D.C.M., physician and surgeon. Born at Amherst Island Lennox County, Ont., 1885, son of William James and Lena (Gibson) Flemming. Educated at the public school of Amherst Island, Saskatoon Normal, Regiopolis College, Queen's University, and post-graduate at Manitoba College. Great-grandfather came to Canada from Limerick, Ireland; pioneers of eastern Ontario. Dr. Flemming graduated from Queen's (M.A.), 1916. Came west 1912, and taught school in the Humboldt district, 1912-1917. Graduated in medicine 1922 . opened practice in. Humboldt, 1922 (September)  Winner of the Knights of Columbus scholarship Catholic University of America. Coroner for Saskatchewan; ex-principal of the Humboldt High School. Dr. Flemming is a District Deputy for the Knights of Columbus, Northern Saskatchewan; Roman Catholic and Liberal. Address, Humboldt.

 

FEAREY: Edgar Atheling, clerk of the town of Morse. Born in Hull, England, 1882, son of Charles Andrew and Elizabeth Annie (Doughty) Fearey. Married Lillian Neal, 1902, and has one son and a daughter. Educated at Hull. Worked with his father in the general carrier and carting agency for Arthur Monson. Agent for Thos. Robinson Brewing Co. Came to Canada 1906 and worked in Thorold, Ont. Came west in Sept.,

 

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1907, to Morse; worked with C.P.R. Joined C.E.F. February 2nd, 1916, 209 Batt. Served in France and Belgium with 1st Can. Div. Signal Corps; Vimy Ridge, Arleux, Fresnoy, Paschendaele, "Last 'Hundred Days," Amiens, Arras, Valenciennes, Mons, and was with the Germany army of occupation. Returned to Canada and was discharged May 19th, 1919. Appointed town clerk of Morse, Nov. of that year. He is secretary of the local lodge, A.F. and A.M.; treasurer of the Board of Trade; member of the Masonic Fraternity. An Anglican. Conservative. Recreations, Golf and curling. Address, Morse.

 

FERGUSON: :Major George Alexander,, LL.B., barrister (Ferguson & Hardie). Born at Cornwall, Ont., 1892, son of Alexander and Mary (McLeod) Ferguson. Cornwall High School, University of Saskatchewan. United Empire Loyalist stock. Family came from Maryland and settled in Stormont Co. (pioneers). Father still lives in the old homestead. Major Ferguson came west in 1909, to Saskatoon; entered the University; articled to J. D. Ferguson, K.C. Admitted to Saskatchewan bar 1916., Joined C.E.F., 1914, and went overseas with 10th Battalion; was on the staff of Brig. Gen. McDougall; Gen. Turner and Gen. Grisbach; wounded at Paschendaele. After the armistice spent six months in the study of law at the Inns of Court, London. Degree of LL.B. in 1915 (granted in absentia). Resumed the law. Member of the Riverside Country Club. Presbyterian., Liberal. Member of the Golf Club~ Address, Saskatoon.

 

FORSYTH: Andrew, Mayor of Sintaluta (1923). Born at Whitby, Ont., Dec. 13th, 1863, son of Andrew and Martha (Donnelly) Forsyth. Married Emily Ham, 1884, and had two sons and two daughters. Mayor Forsyth was educated at the Whitby schools. Comes of Ontario farming stock, the family having famed in Pickering township for years. Came west in 1907 and farmed a section and a half near Sintaluta. At

 

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the outbreak of the war Mr. Forsyth's two sons caught the spirit of the war, and in 1915 enlisted joining the 68th Battalion. Charles went to France with the 5th Battalion and became a sergeant. Norman with the 28th; Charles died at Havre. Sergeant Norman Forsyth returned to Canada in the autumn of 1918 for officers' training class. The Armistice being signed he was demobilized and resumed civilian life. Met with a tragic death the following year through being burnt

to death in a fire. In the beautiful Memorial Hall erected by the citizens of Sintaluta is, a tablet to their glorious dead, and on it the name of Charles Forsyth. The sympathy of the whole community has gone out to Mayor Forsyth in the loss of these two splendid and promising citizens. Mayor Forsyth has served four years on the School Board. Mayor of Sintaluta. Member of the Masonic Order; L.O.L. Methodist. Conservative. Address, Sintaluta.

 

ELLARD: Howard Hugh, Mayor of Mortlach (1923). Born at Cascades, Que., 1891, son of Henry and Isabella (McKelvie) Ellard. Married Mary Ellen Lockhart 1918, and has three daughters. Irish stock. Grandfather came from Cork; settled in the Ottawa district Mayor Ellard, came west in 1908, to Mortlach, where he farmed. Homesteaded at Gravelbourg. Joined 128th Batt., February 18th, 1916. Overseas August 1916 France Nov., 1916; attached 50th Battalion wounded at Vimy Ridge; invalided to England; Canada November, 1917 (Ross Hospital, Moose Jaw). Discharged; came to Mortlach as grain buyer; for two years (deputy mayor) . Elected, 1922, by acclamation. Member of the Agricultural Society. Member of
the Masonic Order. Member of the I.O.O.F. Anglican. Progressive. Recreation, curling.  Address, Mortlach.

 

GALLANT: Thomas, barrister, acting Crown Prosecutor, Gravelbourg (Gravel & Gallant). Born Margaree,. Cape Breton, N.S., 1877, son of Timothy and Adelalde Le Blanc Gallant. Married Mary Deveau

 

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and has four sons and two daughters. Educated at the Margaree School and St. Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia Normal School. Acadian stock. Taught school in Inverness and other Cape Breton places. Articled in law to J. H. Jamieson, Esq., Port Hood, and A. J. MacDonald, Esq., Baddeck. Called to the N.S. bar 1909. Practised at Inverness 1910-18. Came west that year and was employed by Buckles & Co., Swift Current; afterwards with H. J. Coutu, Esq., . Gravelbourg. Called to Sask. bar 1922; partnership with Monsieur Gravel, Avocat. Member of and legal adviser to Knights of Columbus. (Gravelbourg Council). Acting Crown Prosecutor. A Roman Catholic. Address, Gravelbourg, Sask.

 

GREER: Captain A. B., M.D., physician and surgeon, Craik. Born at Priceville, Grey county, Ont., May, 1880, son of Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Jane) (Brown) Greer. Educated at Priceville public, Owen Sound High Schools, Toronto University. In early life was engaged in mercantile business with J. D. Brown of Dundalk. After leaving the university, practised for a year at Joe Betts Arm, in Newfoundland. Came west in 1909 and practised at Creelman, 8ask. Hospital work in Scranton, Pennsylvania; Indian Head, 1914-16. Joined C.E.F Oct. 3rd, 1916, overseas A.D.M.S., London (attached) C.A.M.C. Training School. France, Nov., 1917. Attached to No.1 Canadian General Hospital. At the front with the 3rd Can. Div. Train, 2nd Can. Stationary Hospital, 16th Can. Gen. Hosp. (England), 12th Dist. Depot. Returned to Canada, Saskatchewan Military Hospital, Moose Jaw. Member of the Masonic Order. Presbyterian. Conservative. Address,  Craik.

 

GRAHAM: Captain John Robert Baird, barrister (Ross & Graham). Born in Glasgow, Scotland, Aug. 23rd, 1888, son of James and Jessie Baird Graham. Married Molly Welsh in 1911 and has a son and a

 

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daughter. Educated at the Oppingham School in Rutlandshire, Glasgow University. Came to Canada in 1911, to Davidson, Sask., worked in the Bank of British North America. In April, 1912, was articled in law to Seaborn, Taylor, Pope & Co., of Moose Jaw. At the outbreak of the European war joined the C.E.F., 28th Battalion, with the rank of lieutenant; proceeded overseas. May, 1915; invalided from July, 1915, until May, 1916. Attached to Pay Corps and after Overseas Pay Corps was organized was transferred to it, serving in London until 1918. Transferred to Borden Camp until Jan., 1919; Reserve Brigade, C.F.A. Assistant Paymaster (Witley Camp).. Returned to Canada March, 1918; resumed the study of law. Called to the Saskatchewan bar 1920. Formed partnership Collins & Graham; formed present partnership (Ross & Graham). Member United Service Club. Presbyterian. Address, Ross & Graham, Moose Jaw, Sask.

 

GARVIN: Captain Frederick. P., D.D.S., L.D.S., Canora. Born at Saltcoats, Saskatchewan, 1891, son of Robert and Ella (Tracy) Garvin. Married Malvine Caye, 1920, and has one son. Educated at Saltcoats public, Melville High Schools, Wesley College, Winnipeg; Toronto University. Irish descent. Family came from Carrickfergus, Ireland. Grandfather came to Canada; settled in Carleton County, Ont., near Richmond. Father came west in 1885 and served in the North-west Rebellion. Homesteaded in the Wallace district. Was engaged in the blacksmithing business in Saltcoats for twelve years; hardware-lumber business at Melville. Now resides at San Diego, California. Dr. Garvin worked in the hardware trade at Melville. 1904-06. Graduated from Toronto University 1918; with the degrees ,of D.D.S. and L.D.S. Joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1917, Kingston, C.A.D.C. Overseas May, 1917. Served at Sandling, Epsom and Ramsgate Hospitals. Returned to Canada 1919 and opened practice at Canora. Member of the Canora

 

 

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School Board. Member of the Masonic Lodge, A.F. and A.M.; Royal Arch.; C.O.F. Takes a keen interest in sports and boys work and is associated with the local Tuxis Boys' Movement. Liberal. Recreations, curling and shooting. Address, Canora.

 

GARRETT: E. Leon, editor Indian Head News. Born at Bradford, Ont., Jan. 20th, 1896, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Garrett, of Watrous, Bask. Educated at the Ontario and Sask. schools. Came west in 1910, worked on the Watrous Signal) Saskatchewan Phoenix), Indian Head News, 1919-23. Served in the Great War with the Motor Transport, 6th Canadian Railway Troops; France with this unit two years. Elected vice-pres. Indian Head G.W.V.A. 1921; president, 1922-23. Noble Grand of the I.O.O.F. Address, Indian Head.

 

GARRETT: Harold Francis, editor and publisher, Davidson Leader. Born at Bradford, Simcoe, county, Ont., 1883, son of Edmund and Susan (Goodfellow) Garrett. Married Elsie E. Thompson, 1909, and has one son and a daughter. Educated at Bradford Public and High Schools. Was early apprenticed to the printing trade with his father, Edmund Garrett, a pioneer printer, and sometime editor of the Bradford Witness. Worked on Newmarket Era for a year and a half; Toronto (Bryant Press). Came west 1906, to Saskatoon, and worked as linotype operator on Daily Phoenix. Was linotype machinist and operator on Regina Standard (1907-08). Purchased the Davidson Leader in 1909, from J. C. Knox, and has edited and issued it ever since. Has built it up, doubled its size, and possesses one of the most up-to-date plants in Saskatchewan-modern type-setting machines (Linotype). Mr. Garrett was chairman of the Hospital Board, 1920-21. Takes a keen interest in sport and has played on the hockey and lacrosse clubs in Saskatoon. Is an ardent curler. Member of the Masonic Order, Protestant. Takes a keen interest in municipal and civic affairs. Address, Davidson, Sask. .

 

 

 

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GERMAINE: Lieut.-Colonel M.' A., officer commanding 2nd Sask. Battalion (merchant). Born at Omemee Victoria county, Ont., December 6th, 1884,. a son of Alfred and Ellen (Lowes) Germaine. Married Annie Parsons, July 14th, 1919, and has a son and a daughter. Educated at the Public and High Schools Omemee. Col. Germaine in early life worked in the mining and construction business at Cobalt. Coming to the west Ii 1912, settled at Moose Jaw and was employed by the Parker Elevator Co. At the outbreak of the European war, Col. Germaine, who then held the rank of Captain in the Canadian Militia, was ordered to join the nearest militia unit. This he did, becoming Lieutenant with the 60th Rifles; transferred to 28th Battalion (lieut.); proceeded overseas May, 1915 (duty with Battalion on Shorncliffe area); France Sept., 1915; (promoted captain) ; 28th Battalion into action on the Kemmel front (wounded). In the spring, 1916 (St. Eloi), engagement; Invalided to England (reserve battalion). Rejoined unit France, Sept., 1916; Somme; was promoted major Oct. 19th, 1916; all engagements, on the Arras front, Vimy Ridge; Arleux, Fresnoy;  Hill 70. Went to 2nd Division wing for instructional duties Sept., 1917;. remained here until Armistice; England Demobilization work; promoted lieutenant-colonel Dec., 1918. Mentioned twice in dispatches. Holds 1ong service medal in Canadian Militia. Returned to Canada and opened present business. Col. Germaine is officer commanding 2nd Battalion, Saskatchewan. Member of the United Service Club. Presbyterian. Conservative. Address, Moose Jaw.

 

 

GRAHAM: Reverend Angus A., B.A., M.A., B.D., D.D. Principal Moose Jaw College. Born at Glencoe, Middlesex county, Ont., 1867, a son of Captain Duncan and Ann (Graham) Graham. Married Jennie Graham Stephen in 1898, and has three daughters. Educated at Wardsville High School Glencoe High

 

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School, McGill University, 1894. Taught school, in early life at Glencoe and Newbury. Winner of the Prince of Wales' Gold Medal at McGill (1st rank honours in mental and moral philosophy). Graduated from Presbyterian College, Montreal, in 1897, winner of the Calvin gold medal and highest honours. 0rdained and inducted at Petrolia, Lambton County, Ont. 1897-1904. Pastor St. David's Church, St. John, N.B: In 1911 was appointed principal of the newly organized Moose Jaw College for Boys. This school under his management and charge has become one of the leading educational institutions of the West. He is a member of the Synod of the Presbyterian Church; member of the Moose Jaw Library Board; member of the Rotary Club, and was honoured by his Alma Mater, in 1921, with the degree of doctor of divinity. Address, Moose Jaw College.

 

GOODWIN: Captain Guy Stewart, M.C., C.M., physician and surgeon. Born at Halifax, N.S., 1891, son of Dr. and Mrs. Frederick J. Goodwin. Married Mary Larken, 1919. Educated at the Halifax Public and High Schools, Dalhousie University. Family came to the United States in 1650, and settled in Massachusetts, and came to Nova Scotia with General Moncton's army. Mother's people United Empire Loyalists. Father, Dr. Frederick Goodwin, practised in Halifax for many years. Dr. Goodwin, after graduating from Dalhousie served at Gallipoli with 26th C.C.S., Mesopotamia i3th Division; ambulance work. India, with Station Hospital at Poona. France, with the 9th Division (Imperials), 2nd 1st East Lancashire Ambulance. Germany army of occupation. Returned to Canada in 1919. Came to Saskatchewan, Briercrest, Moose Jaw, 1922. Member United Service Club; Prairie Club. Member of the British, Canadian and Saskatchewan Medical Associations. Masonic Order. Presbyterian. Address, Moose Jaw.

 

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GOLD: William James, Barrister (Gold, Stockan, & Co.), Langham and Radisson. Born at Edinburgh, Scotland, 1883, son of James and Margaret (Ellis) Gold. Married Helen Rae, 1907, and has one son and, two daughters. Educated at Dundee, St. Andrew's University, Edinburgh University. Father, Mr. James Gold, a Dundee solicitor. Mr. Gold was articled to Sir Thomas Thornton, solicitor, of Dundee; called to the Scottish bar, 1906, came to Radisson, Saskatchewan, 1906, and opened practice; formed partnership with G. J. Stockan in 1913. Member of the Canadian Bar Association; chairman of the School Board; secretary-treasurer and town clerk for the town of Radisson, solicitor for, the Bank of Commerce; solicitor, for the town of Radisson.  Past Master Ispheming Lodge, A.F. and A.M., P.D.D.G.M., No.7 District. Member of the Royal Arch Preceptory. Presbyterian. Liberal. Recreations, curling and motoring. Address, Radisson.

 

GARDINER: Ernest, barrister, crown prosecutor, Jud. Dist. Humboldt, agent of the Minister of Justice at Ottawa. Born at Crawley in Surrey, England, 1873. son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Crawley Gardiner. Married Marie Peters and has one daughter. Was educated by private tuition. Mr. Gardiner comes from a legal family. His father was clerk in Chancery for many years in London. Mr. Gardiner read law under his father and the present Mr. Justice Eve. Called to Lincolns Inn bar in 1895, and practised in London until 1918. Came to Canada 1912, and was with Russell Hartney of Saskatoon. Called to the bar of Saskatchewan in 1913; practised at Vonda, coming to Humboldt, 1913, where he is now engaged in a large and growing practice.  Appointed agent for the Attorney-General in 1917; agent of the Minister of Justice at Ottawa 1923 member of the bar of England; member of the Saskatchewan bar. Solicitor for the Bank of Montreal. Member of the Knights of Columbus. Roman Catholic. Liberal. Address, Humboldt.

 

 

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GARNER: Lt.-Colonel Albert Coleman, D.S.O., D.L.S., M.E.I.C., F.R.G.S. Son of Albert Edward Garner and Susan Garner (formerly Coleman); both of Warwick~ shire, England.  Born Maxstoke Hall, Warwickshire, England, September 6th,
1878
. Married Margaret Blyth Tait, of Montreal, October 31st, 1905. Children -Grace Eleanor Coleman Garner, Lucile Margaret Coleman Garner, Henry Lawrence Coleman Garner, Donald Alexander Coleman Garner. Education - public and private schools and tuition, England and Canada. Religion, Anglican. Residence in North-west Territories (now Saskatchewan) since July, 1888. This includes three years in British Columbia and six and one half years absence on active military service in the field. Commissioned as Dominion Land Surveyor in 1907; as Saskatchewan Land Surveyor in 1910; as Alberta Land Surveyor in 1912. Admitted as student Engineering Institute of Canada in. 1904; elected associate member in 1908 and member in 1916. District Surveyor and Engineer, Saskatchewan Government, 1907-10. Private practice in surveying and municipal engineering, 1910-12. Appointed Surveyor to Land Titles Office, Regina, in. April, 1912; and made Chief Surveyor of Land Titles Offices, Saskatchewan, in January, 1913, and organized the Department, holding this appointment to date. Special exploration

work for Saskatchewan Government, and in charge of exploratory party of 1920 and
1921. Work commenced by Legislature. Fourth session, page 41, of Sessional
Papers, 1920. Town Councillor, town of Qu' Appelle, 1911 and 1912. President Saskatchewan Land Surveyors' Association, 1913 and 1914; resigning to leave on active military service. Member of Executive Council, Saskatchewan Good Roads Association, 1922 and 1923. President Regina Town Planning Association for 1923. Member of Executive (Regina Branch) Engineering Institute of Canada, J922, and elected chairman of Branch, March, 1923, for year 1923-1924. Elected fellow of "Royal Colonial Insti-

 

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tute," London, England, 1916; elected fellow ,of Royal Geographical Society, London, England, June, 1922. Member of Canadian Club, Regina; member of United Service Institute, Regina, and other local organizations. Special scout; Lord Strathcona's Horse (Boer War), 1900-01. "Severely wounded," "Special mention in despatches," London Gazette, February, 1901. Awarded Queen's Medal and four clasps, medal being presented by H.M. the King, Edward VII, February 10th, 1901. Lieutenant 16th Light Horse, 1908-1911; captain, 1911.13; adjutant, 1912 and 1913; transferred as captain Corp of Guides, 1913. Appointed to command 12th Cyclist Company, Corp of Guides, 1920, retaining command to date. District Military Intelligence Officer, Military District No. 12, May, 1920, to August, 1922. Resigned on duties being taken over by Permanent Force. Qualified in cavalry, infantry, horse and field artillery, engineering, signalling and army service corp during period 1908-15. Appointed captain and adjutant, 32nd Battalion, C.E.F., November 15th, 1914; promoted major, December 26th, 1914; prompted Lt.-Colonel, August 13th, 1915; appointed Assistant Director of Supply and Transport (Over-seas Canadians), England, August 13th, 1915. Special observation duty (for War Office "Transportation" in France and Belgium), December, 1915, and January, 1916. . Appointed to recruit, organize and command 195th (city of Regina) Battalion, C.E.F., February 2nd, 1916. Appointed to organize and command 2nd Canadian Labour Battalion, Seaford, England, December 20th, 1916, taking this command to France in February, 1917. Appointed to organize and command 12th Battalion Canadian Railways Troops in France, October, 1917; retained this command till final demobilization at Regina, April 23rd, 1919, and placed on active list. Reserve of officers, O.E.F., on same date, with rank of Lt.-Colonel. Operations: Engaged on front, Arras to opposite St. Quentin, March, 1917 to January, 1919. Actions: With 3rd Army, Arras and locality,

 

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April 9th, to May 3rd, 1917; November 21st to December, 1917, advance on Cambrai with 3rd Army; retirement 5th army on Amiens, March 21st to April, 1918, general advance Amiens front, with 3rd and 4th Armies, August, 1918, to Armistice, November, 1918. Mentioned in despatches Commander-in-Chief London Gazette, 28-12-17; mentioned in despatches, Commander-in-Chief, London Gazette, 31-12-18. Awarded Distinguished Service Order, January 1st, 1919, and decorated by H. M. King George V, February 13th, 1919. Secretary Saskatchewan Provincial Rifle Association, 1913-19 and president, 1920-1922. Retired and made life member. Member Dominion of Canada Rifle Association, 1913 to date, and has represented Saskatchewan on Council from 1914 to date. Secretary of Regina Garrison from organization, 1912; resigning for active military service in 1914. Member South African Veterans' Association from organization, 1912. Member Imperial Veterans' Association, !1912 ,and 1914, and honorary assistant organizer for Saskatchewan, 1913-1914. Member Army and Navy Veterans' Association for several years. Member Great War Veterans' Association (Regina Branch), being 1st vice president 1920 and 1921, and president November, 1921, to March 15th, 1923; retired and awarded gold badge of the Association. Made hon. president 1923, also member of executive.

 

GUEST: Colonel Frederick, M.D., physician and surgeon. Born London, Ont., Nov. 29th, 1866, son of Richard W. and Margaret (Fitzgerald) Guest. Married Alice Silcox, 1895, and has one son and a daughter. Educated at London Collegiate, Western University. Born on a farm in London township. Began the practice of medicine at Shedden, Ont., 1890; removed to St. Thomas in 1900; served as Alderman continuously, 1903-10; elected Mayor 1910 re-elected 1911. Held commission in 15th Fld. Amb. (Colonel), Canadian Militia. Joined C.A.M.C. Feb. 17th, 1915;

 

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overseas with No.3, Can. Stationary Hospital, and was attached to A.D.M.S. Staff, Shorncliffe. Transferred to the Dardenelles; saw much service at. Lemnos Island; returned to England and was given command at the opening of the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Buxton, June 1916; was here promoted Lt.-Col.; remained until Nov., 1917, when he was attached to Headquarters Staff, London, and visited Canadian patients in Imperial hospitals; Western Command; transferred and took command Epsom Hosp., June, 1918 (4,200 beds); remained here until hospital closed, Sept., 1919. Returned to Canada Sept., and was appointed Medical Health Officer, No.1 Health District; resigned and was appointed Medical Director for the Provincial Saskatchewan Health Quarters, Regina. Held this until June, 1922; resumed private practice. Col. Guest is Past Deputy Grand Master, Masonic Lodge, No.3 Dist.; past president of the Alumni of the Western University; past president Medical Assn., St. Thomas; member Knights of Pythias; Oddfellows; member Wascana Country Club. Address, Regina, Sask.

 

GIBBS: James, president Board of Trade, Melfort, merchant (Crawford, Gibbs, Ltd.) Born at Dunlop in Ayrshire, Scotland, 1890, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Motherwell) Gibbs. Married Margaret Doran, 1912 and' has one son. Educated Dunlop and Kilmarnock schools. Father, Mr. Robert Gibbs, in the meat-packing business in Dunlop for many years. Mr. Gibbs was apprenticed to the dry goods business (Ross & Co.), Kilmarnock. Came to Canada, 1911, to Winnipeg; with Gaults, Ltd., five and a half years, as buyer. Opened business in Innisfail, Alberta, with present partner, F. G. Crawford, Esq. Came to Melfort, 1917, and opened present business, which they have enlarged and built up until to-day it is one of the largest houses in the north. Mr. Gibbs takes a keen interest in civic and community affairs; is a director of the

 

 

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Agricultural Society; president Board of Trade. A member of the Masonic Lodge. A Presbyterian. Liberal. Recreations, curling and golf.

 

 

 

GILMOUR: Captain Lionel C., chemist and druggist, Moose Jaw. Born in Moose Jaw, Sask., 1891, son of James and Margaret Jane (Powell) Gilmour. Married Dorothy Haw, of Winnipeg), 1,921. Educated at the Moose Jaw schools and Ontario School of Pharmacy. Captain Gilmour's family came to Canada from Stirlingshire, Scotland, and were pioneers in Bruce county, Ont. His father came west in 1882 and, was one of the real pioneers of the Moose Jaw district. Captain Gilmour graduated from the Ontario School of Pharmacy in May, 1912, and opened business in Moose Jaw that year. Disposed of business and joined the C.E.F., "D" Co., 229th Battalion (Colonel Pickett). Overseas April 17th; transferred to the Royal Air Force; France Jan. 3rd, 1918; continuous service until July 31st. Shot down. Prisoner in Germany; Lille, Karlshrue, Landshutt, Englestadt, Kamstigall; England December, 1918. Returned to Canada Feb., 1918; discharged and re-entered business, at Moose Jaw. Member Prairie Club (Moose Jaw); United Service Club (Moose Jaw).; Moose Jaw Golf Club. Member Saskatchewan Pharmaceutical Association. Member of the Masonic Order. Methodist. Conservative. Now living on the Pacific Coast.

 

HANDBIDGE: Robert L., barrister and solicitor, Kerrobert. Born at Southampton, Ont., 1891, son of Robert and Fanny (Murton) Handbidge. Married Jane Mitchell, of Francis, Sask., in 1915, and has one son and four daughters. Educated at the Southampton Public School, Port Elgin High School, Owen Sound Collegiate. Irish stock. Grandfather, John Handbidge came to Canada from Wicklow, Ireland, and settled in Dummer township, Peterboro, Ont. Mr. Handbidge's father was engaged in carriage-making

 

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business in Southampton (Bruce county). After leaving school came west in 1908; articled in law to J. A. Cross, K.C.; cal1ed to, the bar Jan., 1915; opened practice in partnership with his brother, J. M. Handbidge. Member of the Canadian and Saskatchewan Law Associations.  Solicitors for the Bank of Commerce, Excelsior Life Insurance Company, Union Trust Company, Rural Municipality of Hearts Hill; R M. of Oakdale; RM. of Prairie Dale. Solicitor for Canada Bonded Attorney, U. S. Guaranty and Fidelity Co. Member of the Town Council for the years 1921-22-23; ex-member of the School Board. Past master of the Masonic Lodge, No. 90; Scottish Rite. I.O.O.F. Methodist. Conservative. Address, Kerrobert.

 

HALL: Herbert Botsford, merchant, Lloydminster (H. B. Hall & Son, Ltd.) Born at Rothesay, N.B., 1866, a son of Stephen S. and Havilah Shaw (Fellows) Hall. Married Laura Parks in 1890 and has one son and two daughters. His son, Lieut. Hall, served overseas with distinction and was awarded the Military Cross. Mr. Hall was educated at the Rothesay Collegiate School.  Comes of United Empire Loyalist stock. His ancestors came to New Brunswick after the American Revolution. His great-grandfather Stephen Snedden was Governor of Annapolis Royal: Nova Scotia his father, Stephen S. Hall, a prominent merchant of St. John for many years. Mr. Hall in early life farmed at Gagetown, N.B. Came west in 1903 with the celebrated Barr Colony. Drove to Lloydminster from Saskatoon (200 miles), farm wagon and horses taking two weeks in transit with his household effects. Started the first general store in Lloydminster. This he conducted the first winter in a large tent, his goods having been brought from Montreal to Edmonton, via Calgary, floated down the Saskatchewan by barges. The lumber which he used the following spring to erect his store which was, with his own home the first building erected in the village, had to be hauled

 

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by teams from Fort Pitt to the village, a distance of over twenty miles. His business prospered with the years and developed until he carries one of the most complete and up-to-date assortment of stocks in northern Saskatchewan. He was first Mayor Of the town and subsequently elected three terms. Is at present a member of the School Board. Was one of the prime movers in the organization of the Lloydminster Municipal Hospital, first of its kind in Western Canada. Member of the Board of Trade, of the Agricultural Society. Member of the Masonic Order. Anglican. Conservative. Address, Lloydminster.

 

HAMBLIN~ James Herbert, Mayor of  Qu'Appelle, 1923 merchant and farmer (Hamblin Bros.) Born at McGregor, Man., 1893. A son of Ernest and Jennie Hamblin. Educated at the Public and High Schools, of Edrans and McGreggor, Man. Came to Saskatchewan in 1912; clerked in a general store at Fillmore; afterwards at Biggar and Elstow in mercantile business. Came to Qu'Appelle, 1914. Took a very prominent part in war work and town activities. Member of the town council, 1919-20-21; ,Mayor, 1922. A staunch supporter of the Anglican Church; a member and Clerk of the Vestry of St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral. Provincial Chairman of the Confectioners', Bakers' and Fruiterers' trade section of the Saskatchewan Retail Merchants' Assn., and Saskatchewan representative on the Dominion Board at Ottawa. Interested in the Boy Scout movement, being District Commissioner for the riding of South Qu'Appelle, as well as scoutmaster of the 1st Qu' Appelle troop. Interested in all kinds of sport, and has been secretary of many sporting societies in Qu'Appelle. An Anglican. Address, Qu' Appelle.

 

HART: Frederick William, M.D., Mayor of Indian Head. Born Pugwash, N.S., 1877, son of Rev. Thos. D. and Charlotte (Dixon) Hart. Married Minnie

 

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Louise Hance, of London, Ont., 1909, and has three sons and two daughters. Educated at Nova Scotia Schools, Mt. Allison Academy, McGill University. United Empire Loyalist stock. Father, Rev. Thos. Hart, a prominent Methodist clergyman of the Maritime Conference. Dr. Hart graduated from McGill University in 1902, and was assistant to Dr. Price, of St. John, until 1905. Came west to Indian Head and has practised there continuously. Joined C.A.M.C. July, 1915, reporting to War Office; when he was transferred to R.A.M.C. Served with Hospital in Cairo Egypt; remained here during the Gallipoli campaign; returned to Canada, 1916; resumed practice. Member of the High School Board for, many years; member of the Town Council for four years, where his splendid work was rewarded by election to the Mayor's chair. President Board of Trade; president Canadian Club. Represents Saskatchewan on the Canadian Medical Board. A fellow of the American College of Surgeons. A past master of Indian Head Lodge, A.F. and A.M; Member of the Scottish Rite, Regina. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Indian Head.

 

 

 

HOLMAN: William Henry, B.A., barrister and solicitor, Outlook.  Born at Cheltenham, Glos., England, 1883, son of Thomas Walter and Jane (Weaver) Holman. Married Martha Georgina Stewart and has one daughter. Educated at the Normal School Regina McMaster University, University of Toronto.  Family came to Canada in 1891. Mr. Holman was principal of the Rosthern High School; graduated from the University of Toronto in 1908, and articled in law to Alexander W. Hutchinson, of McCraney (MacKenzie & Hutchinson), Saskatoon; afterwards to MacLean, Hollenrake & Moxen. Called to the bar, July, 1919. Came to Outlook and took over the practice of E..W. Hume. He is member of the Dominion and Saskatchewan Bar Associations. Solicitor for the Union Bank of Canada; ex-member of the School Board; member

 

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of the Town Council Solicitor for the Canada Bonded Attorney, and Western Debentures Co., Ltd., Past Noble Grand of the I.O.O.F. Has always taken a lively interest in sports and was a member of the 1908 Provincial Champion Football Club. Is a brother of the Reverend C. T. Holman, M.A., B.D., professor in the University of Chicago. Presbyterian. Liberal. Address, Outlook.

 

HENDERSON: James, artist, of Fort Qu' Appelle, Saskatchewan, was born in the city of Glasgow, Scotland, in the year 1871, the only son in a family of four, born to James Henderson and Christian McAinst. His education was received in the schools of his native city, where his boyhood days were spent. He commenced his business life when he was apprenticed to a Glasgow lithographic artist, which apprenticeship he served for the full term, when he went to London to follow his chosen profession. Here, in the larger field. he continued to develop himself and to take advantage of early desires to express himself in paint. Devoting all his spare hours to the study of painting and drawing, and by using the great art galleries and museums of London to the fullest extent, he took a full measure of instruction and inspiration from the treasures that lay at hand. Painting and drawing were now the chief aims of his life; yet it was not for some time that he left the commercial art for painting. An event that had a far-reaching effect in his life and career took place in 1909, when he decided to make a trip to Canada. While only intended as a visit, yet, so impressed was he with what he saw, that he decided to  stay and seek his fortune in the land where so many of his "brothers" had found opportunity and success. After a short residence in Winnipeg, he again "trekked" farther west, this time going to the growing city of Regina, capital of Saskatchewan. Here he continued to live until 1916, when he moved to the Valley of the Qu' Appelle to make his home in the historic old

 

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town of Fort Qu' Appelle, where he now resides. The move to the Fort was the result of a decision to live in close  proximity to his "raw material," for the beauty of this lovely valley had cast its spell over him and he desired to paint it in all its moods and seasons. Landscape painting has been to Mr. Henderson a particularly ,happy field to labour in, for, first and foremost, he is a true lover of nature, and his success as a landscape painter has doubtless sprung from a gift to see nature with the understanding and sympathy of the poet and to express himself in colour harmony that is masterly in composition and technique. But while Mr. Henderson has enjoyed many happy hours in painting the broad prairies and glorious sunsets of Saskatchewan, in winter and summer seasons, yet, it is his Indian portraiture that has given him his greatest satisfaction. Taking the Indians of Western Canada for his subjects, he has painted representative types from the Reserves of Saskatchewan and Alberta giving us interpretations of these people that are at once living portraits and decorative works of art. He has lived on' the Reserves with "his subjects" and has learned to know them and their ways and to appreciate the many fine qualities - and indiosyncrasies - of the  red man. The Indians of the Standing Buffalo Reservation, the Sioux, soon found a name for their artist friend, and thus they greet him in their own tongue as "Wicite-owa-wicasa," which, being interpreted means "the man who paints the old men's pictures." His painting is always sincere, for his canvases must first satisfy his own searching criticism for truth and expression. His landscape painting is a considerable contribution to the art of Western Canada where his pictures continue to exhale their charm in the homes of many Canadian art lovers. But the people of Canada will possibly chiefly remember the art of James Henderson for his greater contribution to posterity in preserving for generations of Canadians such magnificent studies of the original inhabitants of these Do-

 

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minions - the Indians of Western Canada. A Scotsman by birth, he has become a Canadian. by choice, and although fate has beckoned to him from afar, he has remained true to his desire to express in paint the life and beauties of his adopted land.  He was married in 1900 to Miss Jean Lang, youngest daughter of John Lang of Glasgow. Golf and rowing are his chief recreations and, being an artist, politics do not interest him.

 

Hysop: George H., barrister, son of George and Christina (Mannahan) Hysop. Was educated at the Moose Jaw schools; articled in law to Colonel Walter E. Seaborn (Seaborn & Taylor), and to the firm of Hutcheson & Buckles, now his Honour Judge Hutcheson, of Shaunavon. Called to the Saskatchewan bar 1914; joined R.A.N. Dec., 1916; proceeded overseas, Jan., 1917. Duty on mine sweepers; escort duty; saw service until Armistice; returned to Canada, Oct., 1918; demobilized March, 1919. Assisted in organizing legal department of the Soldier's Settlement Board, Regina; assistant solicitor, latterly district solicitor. In July, 1921, came to Aneroid and opened present practice.. Solicitor for the rural municipality of Auvergne; Glen MacPherson; solicitor for the village of Aneroid; solicitor for the Royal Bank of Canada. Member of the Knights of Pythias. Presbyterian. Conservative. Keen interest in sports-curling, baseball, hockey. Was discharged with the rank of "Skipper's Rank," equivalent of captain. Address, Aneroid.

 

HYNDS: Charles, editor and pub. Lumsden News Record, one of Saskatchewan's pioneer papers. Mr. Hynds was born in Guelph, Ont., 1860, a son of Samuel and Anne (Goggins) Hynds. Married Ada Armstrong, daughter of the late John S. Armstrong. Educated at Guelph and Fergus. Learned the printing business with Craig Bros. of the Fergus, Ont., News-Record, 1871; remained seven years. The paper was printed

 

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at that time on the old fashioned Washington press. Worked with Arthur Palmerston, Toronto Telegram. Came west in 1904; established Lumsden News-Record which he has improved and which to-day occupies one of the handsomest office plants in the province. Ex - member of the Lumsden Council; ex-member of the School Board; president of the Liberal Assn. of Lumsden. Keen interest in education and music and sports. Represented the Musicians' Union on the Trades and Labour Council of Toronto. In his youth played on the old Fergus Thistle Lacrosse Club. Member of the Masonic Order. Anglican., Liberal. Address, Lumsden, Sask.

 

HUMPHREY: Gerald Thomas, editor and publisher (If the Nokomis Times. Born at London, England, 1889, son of Alfred and Henrietta (Judd) Humphrey. Married Marguerite Carbonn, 1919, and has two sons. Educated at the Kent County Schools, England. Father came to Canada in 1880. He had travelled extensively and was in the Australian gold rush; Klondyke in 1898. Family settled in Canada in 1906, near Kingston, Ont. Came west in 1908, to Cupar, Sask. where he farmed. Served in the Great War with the 96th Canadian Scottish. Mr. Humphrey learned the printing trade with the Cupar Herald; worked afterwards in Strasbourg; Balcarres. Joined C.E.F. Aug. 22nd, 1914; 22nd Saskatchewan Light Horse; transferred to 6th Battalion at Valcartier; France, 1915' signal troop Canadian Cavalry Brigade; Ypres, Somme with the Imperials at Messienes, Cambrai, Le Cateau five years in France; "Last Hundred Days" with the Canadians, Arras, Amiens, St. Quentin; Canadian army of occupation in Germany. Discharged August, 1919. Came to Nokomis and purchased the plant of the Weekly Times. Member of the Saskatchewan Press Association. Scoutmaster, Saskatchewan Boy Scouts (Nokomis Branch). Secretary baseball and hockey clubs. Member of the Union Church. Independent. Address, Nokomis.

 

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HAMELIN: Captain Joseph Jules, M.D., C.M., B.L., physician (Hamelin, Ponton & Hurlburt). Born at St. Polycarpe, Que., 1882, son of Oliver and Eleanor (Martin) Hamelin. Married Stella Dennis, and has one daughter. Comes from old French family in Quebec. Ancestors came to Quebec In 1623; Seigniory of Grandiennes near Trois Riviere. Father in the Californian gold rush of 1859. Returned to Canada and farmed at Soulanges. Dr. Hamelin graduated from. Laval in 1905. chief house surgeon Hotel Dleu Hospital, three years; assistant to Sir William Hingston.; practice at Montmartre, Sask. 1908; North Battleford, 1911. Joined C.E.F. Nov., 19I5; France, 1916; Somme, Royal Naval Division; Beaucourt; Beaumont-Hammel; was with 13th Stationary Hospital in X-ray work. Returned to Canada. Officer in charge of Standing Board for Recruiting. Formed present partnership December, 1919. Member of the Knights of Columbus; ex-member of the Knights of Columbus; ex-member of the Separate School Board. Member of the Radiological Society of America. Roman Catholic. Liberal. Address, North Battleford.

 

 

HUTCHINSON: George Ogilvie, Postmaster, Morse, Sask. Born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 1889, son of William and Margaret (Ogilvie) Hutchinson. Educated at the Aberdeenshire schools. Worked in early life in the postal service of Scotland. Came to Canada, 1913; in the employ of the city of Toronto. Coming west in the spring of 1914 to Morse; worked a: various occupations until 1916, when he joined the C.E.F., 209th Battalion. France with the 102nd, Dec., 1916. Vimy Ridge, wounded, invalided to England. Chatham Military Hospital. Returned to Canada Dec., 1917; Moose Jaw Military Hospital. Discharged April, 1918: Took up quarter section of land under S.S.B..; proved it and farmed it. Appointed Postmaster April 5th, 1923. Member Postmasters' Assn. Member of the Masonic Order. Presbyterian. Liberal. Recreations, golf, football, curling. Address, Morse, Sask. 186

 

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HEIDE: Jas. Abraham, editor, Herbert Herald. Born in the Batoche District, Saskatchewan, 1899, son of J. M. and Edith. (Classen) Heide. Educated at the county schools and Vonda High School. Mennonite extraction; ancestors came from Holland, settled in Manitoba. Father moved to Saskatchewan, N.W.T., 1896; settled at Batoche. After leaving the Vonda High School, where he took second-class certificate honours, Mr. Heide enlisted with 188th Battalion at Humboldt, at the "age of sixteen, went into camp, and was discharged as under age. Re-enlisted in Flying Corps, 1918; passed preliminary examination; Armistice precluding active service. Worked on the Humboldt Journal two years, Watrous Signal one year, Prince Albert Daily Herald; editor and manager Delisle Advocate, Wynyard Advance. Purchased Herbert Herald 1922. Married Miss Minnetta Garrett, of the well known journalistic family, who are connected with so many of the papers of this Province, and has one son. Member of the Board of Trade; member of the Canadian and Saskatchewan Press Associations; secretary of the Agricultural Society. Presbyterian. Independent. Address, Herbert.

 

HOPKINS: George Lionel, Provincial Auditor, born at London, England, April 13th, 1874, the son of George Hopkins and Sarah Fanny (Fairall) Hopkins. Educated at City of Westminster School and King's College, London. Married Dorcas Winnifred Copley, May 17th, 1922. Was employed in the British Civil Service from 1890 to 1906. Came to Western Canada and engaged in farming. Took up a homestead from 1906 to 1909. Entered Saskatchewan Government Civil Service in 1909 and subsequently became Provincial Auditor. Has been actively identified with
all forms of athletics, principally cycling, cross-country running, tennis,
rowing, motoring, and swimming. Formerly a member of the Blackheath (England) Harriers, and captain for one year. With his brother, O.

 

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J, Hopkins, is the holder of the 100 miles tandem cycling record of England, under the colours of the Ansley Bicycle Club. At present an active member of the Regina Boat Club, and Civil Service Tennis Club. Prominently identified with musical organizations.  Master Wascana, No.2, G.R.S., A.F. and A.M. Religion, Anglican. Address, 3212 Victoria Avenue, Regina, Saskatchewan.

 

HALE: Mrs. Ida C. (Ruttan), proprietrix, Empress Hotel, Moose Jaw. Born at Peterboro, Ont., February 28th, 1874, a daughter of Michael and Mary (Stone) Ruttan. Married Robert Hale, 31st May, 1891, and has two sons and one daughter (son deceased). Educated county schools of Muskoka and by constant self-teaching. Mrs. Hale's life and career in the Province of Saskatchewan is an example of what perseverance and character may achieve in a new country. After a residence of twenty years she may justly be described as its most outstanding and successful business woman. Her parents, pioneer people in the Muskoka district, faced and encountered all the disadvantages of early pioneer life; gradually won from the forest a home and a place in the community. The children had what schooling the district afforded. The family grew to age and Mrs. Hale married and lived for a number of years in Muskoka. Having to provide for her family, in 1901 she determined to come west and improve their condition. This she did in 1903, locating at Estevan. After a residence here for some time, she came to Moose Jaw. Here she opened and operated La Hale Lodge, the first apartment block in the city. Here she was very successful in an enterprise she started largely with only her character as an asset and her known ability to manage and willingness to work as a line of credit, that stood her well in time of necessity. In 1915 she was urged to take over the management of the Empress Hotel, which she has run continuously ever since, and which, under her

 

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efficient management, has become one of the leading transient and commercial homes of the West. Only a woman of strong personality and character. could have surmounted the many difficulties that lay in her path. Mrs. Hale has met them and won out, and she holds the respect and esteem of her community. She may well be classed as one of the Province's successful citizens. Her son, Robert Hale, served with the 46th Batt. overseas, and was wounded at Vimy Ridge. She is a life member of the Daughters of the Empire. Member of the Canadian Club. A Presbyterian. A Liberal. Address, Empress Hotel, Moose Jaw.

 

HOPKINS: Edward L., editor and publisher Star City Echo. Born in Hampshire, England 1867 a son of William and Julia (Peckham) Hopkins. Married Jemima Wood Stanton, 1904, and has one daughter. Educated at Christchurch, Hampshire. Apprenticed to the printing trade, Sydenham & MacDonald commercial printers, BO'l1rnemouth. Afterwards to Robert Banks, Racquet Court, London. Was foreman for William Majoribanks, Battersea; 1895 was in business for himself at Bournemouth. Came to Canada (Prince Albert), Ingles, Wardle & Brown; in charge of their plant. Took over this plant in 1914 and moved it to Star City and founded the Echo. This journal, under his management, has a growing circulation is a good advertising medium, covers the district in which it is issued. Member of the Saskatchewan Press Association; member of the Board of Trade; ex-member of the Board of Managers of the Baptist Church. Now a member of the Union Church. Baptist. Liberal. Address, Star City.

 

 

 

HOGLE; Perl Clayton, Mayor of Radisson (1923). Born at Cincinnati, Ohio, 1889, son of the Reverend P. C. and Mary (Harper) Hogle. Married Edna Taylor, of Dundurn, 1913. Educated at the Burlington, Ia., schools, and Mt. Pleasant, Ia. Scotch-Irish descent.

 

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Great-grandfather came from Scotland and settled in U.S.A. Family moved to Iowa. Father taught school and was afterwards a minister of the Methodist Church. Mayor Hogle came to Canada, 1910, to Dundurn, and engaged in the lumber business (Home Lumber Co.), until 1913. General merchandise business at Dundurn. 1916, came to Radisson for the Monarch Lumber Co. In 1918 he became manager for Boyd Bros., lumber, autos. Mr. Hogle is a naturalized British subject and citizen of Canada. Member of the Town Council, and Mayor, 1922-23;. member, and sec.treas. of the School Board ; .sec.-treas. of the Agricultural Society. Past Noble Grand of the I.O.O.F; Member of the Union Church. Address, Radisson.

 

HOPEWELL: Sherman Jay. Born at South March, Ont., 1888, son of John A. and Ruth (Shaw) Hopewell. Married Pearl Hale, 1919, and has one son educated at Arnprior schools. Came to Saskatchewan in 1906, and was with Foley, Welch & Stewart (construction work). Entered the service of the Union Bank at Perdue (1909); teller, 1910; accountant, 1911; transferred to Vancouver, 1913; Lilloett, Winnipeg; accountant department, Gull Lake, Swift Current, Moose Jaw manager at Strongfield; Vidora, Luseland; resigned to become manager Empress. Hotel,  Moose Jaw; resigned and is now connected with. banking interests in Los Angeles. Member of the Kiwanis Club. Mason. Shriner. Well-known hockey player. Address, 4713 Clinton Ave., Hollywood, California.

 

 

 

 

HODSON: Edward St. George, Collector of Customs, Rosthern. Born at Athlone, Westmeath County, Ireland 1869 son of John and Louisa Maria (Gray) Hodson. Married Hilda Nivanus (deceased). Married Eleanor Grace Hoig. Has two sons and a daughter. Educated at the Galway Grammar School, Trinity College, Dublin. Hodson family in Ireland since Cromwell's time. Emigrated from Staffordshire, England.

 

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Lived in Goldsmith's district. One of Mr. Hodson's ancestors-the Bishop of Elphin, County of Roscommon-the Bishop, a staunch Royalist, once concealed

Charles I when a fugitive in Ireland. Father, Mr. John Hodson, farmed on a large scale in County Westmeath. Mr. Hodson joined 2nd Company of the 61st Dublin Yoemanry, and saw service with them in South African War (Rhodesia). (King and Queen's Medal) Invalided with enteric fever to England. Returned to South Africa with the Irish Horse, under Longford. Service until the end of the war. Came to Canada March, 1903, with the Barr Colony. Homesteaded north of Radisson, and was afterwards in the implement business at Rosthern.  Appointed Collector of Customs and Dominion Land Agent, 1912. Joined C.E.F., October, 1915, 65th Battalion (in the ranks). Overseas as quartermaster sergeant. England. Transferred to 72nd Seaforth Highlanders. Discharged and returned to Canada. Resumed position in Customs. Ex-member of the Town Council; Mayor four terms. Past Master Masonic Lodge. First lawn Tennis Champion, 1907. Anglican. Independent. Address, Rosthern.

 

HAWTHORNE: Robert John, Crown Prosecutor Assiniboia (Hawthorne & Rappell) . Born at Tyneside Ont., 1885, a son of Samuel and Syrena (Cook) Hawthorne. Married Margaret Jessie Cascaden, 1912, and has two sons and a daughter. Educated at Caledonia High School. North of Ireland stock. Grandfather came to Canada and settled' in Haldimand county. Mr. Hawthorne came west in 1906 to Moose Jaw, and  was articled in law to W. B., now Senator, Willoughby. Called to the bar Nov. 22nd, 1912. Practised at Elbow until May 1st, 1916. Joined 210th Battalion with rank of captain and served until December 1916. Came to Assiniboia that month and opened d practice in which he was joined, Jan. 1st, 1921, by Mr. Kenneth Rappell. Appointed Crown Prosecutor May,

 

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1922. Member of the Town Council 1919-20-22; member of the Board of Trade; member of the Executive of the Saskatchewan Board of Trade. Honorary President of the Tennis Club; president of the Golf Club. Senior Warden Elbow Lodge, A.F. and A.M.; at present Worthy Patron Eastern Star Lodge. Liberal. Address, Assiniboia.

 

HICKS: Captain William Harry, M.C., C.M., physician and surgeon. Born at Cayuga, Ont., 1888, son of William H. and Helen (Elder) Hicks. Married Lillian May Killens, 1916, and has a son and a daughter. Educated at the public school, Ancaster, Regina High School Queen's University. Captain Hicks comes from a family that came to Haldimand connty as pioneers. His grandfather, Captain John Hicks. Dr. Hicks taught school in Saskatchewan for five years; graduated from Queen's in 1916. Joined the C.E.F. (C.A. M.C.), as a third-year medical student (in the ranks); service Taplow Hospital. Returned and finished medical course 1916. Commissioned as captain; Joined Queen's Unit 15th Fld. Amb. (Col. Filson); overseas March, 1917.  France Aug. 5th, 1918. Served with the, 12th Field Ambulance; returned to Canada and served at Kingston Board Work, under Colonel Gardiner. Came to Strasbourg, 1920; M.H.O. for the town of Strasbourg. Mrs. Hicks (Lillian May Killens) was a graduate nurse of Kingston General Hospital; served overseas as nursing sister, Basingstoke, Bramshott. Dr. Hicks is a member of the Masonic. fraternity. Methodist Conservative. Address, Strasbourg.

 

HOSSIE: Joseph Carlyle, barrister (Gee & Hossie). Born at Sarnia, Ont., 1897, son of David W. and Sarah (Crone) Hossie. Married Violet Watson, of Victoria, Dec., 1921. Educated at the Moose Jaw Public and High Schools. Family came west in 1900, settling at Moose Jaw. After leaving school was articled in law to Hon. Wm. E. Knowles, K.C. Admitted to bar 1920.

 

 

 

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Came to Shaunavon and formed partnership with Ephraim Gee, Esq., Crown Prosecutor for the judicial district of Shaunavon. Joined C.E.F., 1916; 77th Batt., C.F.A. Overseas Jan., 1917, 2nd Siege Batt. (B.E.I. Batt.) Invalided Dec., 1917, to England. Canada March, 1918, to Victoria, where he continued in Casualty Unit C3 No.5, Siege Batt. Esquimault Headquarters Dist. (Office) No. 11; discharged Aug. 21st, 1919. Returned to Moose Jaw, where he resumed study of law. Member G.W.V.A., Golf Club. Liberal. Presbyterian. Address, Gee & Hossie, Shaunavon.

 

HEANE: Richard Henry, barrister, Elbow, Sask. Born at Newport, Shropshire, England, Sept. 8th 1885 a son of Richard and Hilda M. (Harrison) Heane: Married Edith Mary Inglis, June 1st, 1919. Educated at English schools (Shrewsbury). Comes of a legal family, father and grandfather practising in Newport. Mr. Heane was articled to his father and admitted to the bar as a solicitor before the Supreme Court in 1908; worked in London, England, and came to Canada 1910. Regina, with Mackenzie, Brown & Company, until 1916. Called to Saskatchewan bar May, 1916, and opened practice at Elbow, Sask. Chairman of the School Board. Solicitor for the town of Elbow. Has always taken a keen interest in educational matters. Anglican. Conservative. An enthusiastic promoter of Chautauqua. Visited Alaska 1919 as manager for Dominion Chautauquas.

 

HOPKINS: Edward Nicholas, M.P. for the Moose Jaw Constituency. Born in the County of Oxford, Oct. 3rd, 1854, a son of Benjamin and Margaret (Loucks) Hopkins. Married Minnie Latham, 1889, and has one son, Edward Russell Hopkins, and Mrs. Norman Bellamy. Mr. Hopkins was educated at the Oxford county schools and the Commercial College, London. North of Ireland stock. Mother's people United Empire Loyalists. Father was pioneer; Reeve of Durham

 

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township for over twenty-five years. Mr. Hopkins was engaged in the cheese-making business in early life, at Innerkip Zorra Township. Came west in 1882, to Moose Jaw district, driving from Brandon, Man. At that time there was not a foot of railway in the Territories and few settlements. The Canadian Pacific Railway completed over five hundred miles of road that year, coupling Swift Current with the East. Mr. Hopkins homesteaded, or rather squatted, for it was not until 1884 that "entry" could be filed on land in the district; pre-empted and homesteaded and pre-empted a second Portion of land; farmed and has continued to farm in the locality ever since.  Moved to Moose Jaw in 1907. Was President of the N.W.T. Dairymen's Association travelled extensively as far west as Fort MacLeod, advocating Government creameries; was successful in having many started. Was an early Director in Grain Growers Assn. When the Hon. Wm. Motherwell entered the Cabinet, became president; resigned the presidency and has been honorary president for five years. Organized Moose Jaw Hospital president, and built many additions, and cleared it of all debt, handing it over to the City, in 1911 free of debt. Was chosen candidate of Progressive party at Convention held in Moose Jaw, March 9th, 1923 (first bal1ot). Contested. election, running against Hon. Will. E. Knowles, Whom he defeated by the largest majority ever polled in the riding. Member of the Board of the Methodist-Church. Mr. Hopkins, Mr. William Grayson and John Bellamy, Esq., were the pioneer organizers of the Methodist Church m Moose Jaw. Address, 65 Athabaska Street, Moose Jaw.

 

Hope: John Walter, Mayor of Yellow Grass (1922-23) implement dealer (Hope & Pagan). Born at Kelso, Roxboroughshire, Scotland, 1876, a son of George and Margaret Hope. Married Florence Dobbyn, 1912, and has one son and five daughters. Educated at Kelso schools. Worked with his father in Roxboroughshire

 

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and was engaged in woollen trade (Wooden Mills). Apprenticed and served time as machinist, Kelso (eight years). Came to Canada in 1905, to Souris, Man.; afterwards to Melita, Man., and worked at his trade. Came to Yellow Grass, 1911, and purchased present business. Member of Town Council since 1913 ; Mayor, 1922-23. Member Oddfellows Lodge. Member of the Yellow Grass Curling Club. Address, Yellow Grass, Sask.

 

HURLBUT: Frederick Heman, M.D., physician and surgeon, North Battleford. Born at Mitchell, Perth county, Ont., 1874, son of Thomas George and Jane (Honey) Hurlbut. Married Asher Beatrix Buckingham, 1911, and has a son and a daughter. Educated at. Mitchell Public School and Toronto University. United Empire Loyalist stock. Great-grandfather came to Canada from Pennsylvania after the American Revolution; settled at Prescott, Grenville county, Ont. Moved to Port Hope and finally settled in Perth county. After graduating from Toronto University, 1907, he came west and opened practice at Lashburn, Battleford (1912). February, 1916, he joined the C.E.F. and was transferred to R.A.M.C., and saw service in Mesopotamia; returned to. Canada. Coming to North Battleford he formed the partnership with Drs. Hamelin and Panton. He is a member of the Canadian and Saskatchewan Medical Societies; member of the Rotary Club, ex-member of the High School  Board of Old Battleford; chairman of the High School Board of North Battleford; member of the Masonic Order. Anglican. Liberal. Recreations, curling and hunting. Address, North Battleford.

 

KEOWN: Major Herbert Elwood, barrister and solicitor, Melfort. Born at Moosomin, Saskatchewan, 1890, son of Doctor L. D. and Helen (McNight) Keown. Educated at the Moosomin. schools, University of Saskatchewan Law School. Irish Stock.  Grandpar-

 

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ents came from Ireland and settled in Simcoe county, Ont. Father came west in 1885, to Regina ; moved to Moosomin, N.W.T. Father, Dr. Keown, still practises in that town. Major Keown was articled in law to E. R. Wylie, Esq. (now Judge Wylie, of the Judicial District of Estevan). Called to the bar 1914. Joined the C.E.F., April, 1915; lieutenant 16th Saskatchewan Light Horse; overseas, transferred to 48th Battalion, winning his captaincy in the field (Ypres); Somme (company commander),. Vimy Ridge.. Returned to Canada, Regina. Camp field office: British War Mission, Chicago, under Lord Northcliffe. Consolidation of all War Missions. Overseas, England;. Salisbury, draft conducting officer. Canada; demobilized Oct., 1918. Practised at Regina with Allan, Gordon & Gordon, afterwards Gordon, Gordon, Keown & Collins. Member of Saskatchewan bar. Member Assiniboia Club (Regina) Melfort Golf Club. Solicitor for the Union Bank of Canada, Bank of Hamilton (Ridgedale). Mason. Methodist. Conservative. Address, Melfort.

 

JOHNSON: Walter Palmer, Chief of Police, Moose Jaw. Born at Honeywell, Prince Edward county, Ont., 1865 a son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Henry Johnson. Married Phoebe Jane Williamston Dec. 28th, 1887. Educated at county schools of Prince Edward county. Comes of Bay of