Saddleback Valley Trails

Saddleback Valley Trails

Vol 8 No 7 ...Editor: Gail Gilbert ...July 2001

South Orange County California Genealogical Society

 P. O. Box 4513, Mission Viejo, CA. 92690

Monthly meetings are held on the third Saturday of each month from 10:00 a.m. to Noon at the Mission Viejo Family History Center Institute Building, 27978 Marguerite Parkway, Mission Viejo, between Medical Center Drive and Hillcrest Drive. Membership is open to anyone wishing to join. Yearly membership fees are $20 per calendar year for individuals, $25 for joint membership. SOCCGS is not affiliated with the LDS Family History Center.

SOCCGS JULY MEETING

21 July 2001 Norma Keating will cover "Danish Research" for us.

OTHER CA EVENTS

7-12 July 2001 The City of Mission Viejo Heritage Committee will host a Pictorial Exhibit of the Mexican Americans of Orange County, "Fire in the Morning," created by Yolanda Alverez, at the Mission Vieho Library Gallery. Admission is free - for more information call 830-7100, x4013.

14 July 2001 The Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) will hold an Open House and Library Orientation from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Library in Burbank. For more information email scgs@earthlink.net or go to their web site at http://www.scgsgenealogy.com.

23-25 August 2001 The British Isles Family History Society -USA will present its 14th Annual British & Irish Genealogical Seminar, "Journey to the Past" on the Queen Mary in Long Beach with famous speakers from England, Ireland, Scotland & Wales. The cost for those who register before June 1 is $150 for members and $175 for non-members. For additional information visit their web site at: http://www.rootsweb.com/~bifhsusa or call Dorothy Losee at (310) 838-6085 or email her at <dotom2@aol.com>.

12-15 Sept 2001 The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) will hold its FGS/Quad Cities Conference, "Great River Bend Genealogy...Heartland Gathering." Brochures are available from the FGS Business Office, P.O. Box 200940, Austin, TX 787200-0940 or visit their website at http://www.fgs.org.

29 Sept 2001 The Genealogy Seminar 2001, "Tracing Your Family Tree in the 21st Century," will be sponsored by the Genealogical Society of North Orange County California (GSNOCC), Saturday from 8:30 - 3 PM at the Yorba Linda Community Center, Imperial Hwy & Casa Loma, Yorba Linda, CA. The featured speaker will be Barbara Renick, Professional Genealogist, known as the "Internet Queen of Genealogy." The cost is $35 if pre-registered by Sept. 10th or $40 at the door, free syllabus included. For more information contact Eileen Hunt (714) 528-3326.

20 Oct 2001 The North San Diego County Genealogical Society (NSDCGS) has scheduled their Annual Fall Seminar from 9 to4 on Saturday at the Dove Library in Carlsbad. The cost of this event will be $20.00 and lunch will be available from TOGO's for $6.

27 October 2001 The National Genealogical Society (NGS) Regional Conference, hosted by the California Genealogical Society, will be held in San Francisco at the Crown Plaza, San Francisco Mid Peninsula, Foster City, CA. The featured speakers will be Cyndi Howells of Cyndi's List and Curt Witcher, MLS, FUGA, of the Allen County Library. Information available at: Web site: http://www.ngsgenealogy.org E-mail: conference@ngsgenealogy.org Call: (800) 473-0060.

 

RECENT GUESTS

We were pleased to have the following guests at our June meeting:

Stuart R. Oudt, researching OUDT, KNABNER, SHASKA

Gary P. Waikle, researching WAIKLE, AUST, PITTSFORD

Tammy Morrical, researching GOODING, BERRY, PRESTON

If we have missed some of you in our past newsletters, please don't hesitate to send me your name with the list of surnames you are researching currently. Guests are always welcome at our meetings and we hope our guests will decide to become members of our society.

 

A Little Genealogical Humor

Reprinted from the SCGS newsletter "The Searcher", May/June 2001

Friends come and friends go, but relatives accumulate

Give me your tired, your poor. . . they're genealogists!

Laziness doesn't run in my family, it strolls.

Can a first cousin, once removed, ever return?

Cemetery: A marble orchard not to be taken for granite.

Genealogy: It's all relative in the end anyway.

Genealogy: Tracing yourself back to better people.

I trace my family history so I will know who to blame.

Life takes it's toll. Have exact change ready!

Searching for lost relatives? Win the lottery.

Floor: A place for storing your priceless genealogy records.

Genealogy: A hay stack full of needles. (And it's the threads we need.)

Genealogy: Where you confuse the dead and irritate the living.

Heredity: What everybody believes in until they have children.

Life is lived forwards, but understood backwards.

Research: What I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing.

Theory of relativity: If you go back far enough, we're all related.

 

CLASS SCHEDULES

1. Orange Coast College, Fall Semester, History 105, "Family History and Genealogy," begins Tuesday, August 27, meeting weekly through December 11. The class meets in the Social Sciences Blg. Rom. 109 from 6:30-9:40. This is a basic course, emphasizing post-1850 American research methods and sources, and local repositories. Contact Doug Mason, course instructor, at (714) 432-5038 or dmason@mail.occ.cccd.edu for more information OR call OCC at (714) 432-5072 to register. Class carries 3 units of lower division college credit.

2. Current classes at the Mission Viejo Family History Center, 27976 Marguerite Parkway, Mission Viejo: http://genweb.net/Family_History_Center/classes.htm or phone (949) 364-2742.

3. For information on classes held at the Orange FHC, 674 S. Yorba St., Orange, call Beth McCarty at (714) 998-3408. The spring-summer 2001 mini class schedule is as follows:

Tue Jul 10 7-8:30pm Preparing for Printing & Publishing Tom Underhill

Wed Jul 11 10-N Picturing Your Family History Barbara Renick

Fri Jul 13 10-11am How to Create a Family Newsletter Celia Christensen

Wed Jul 18 10-N File It, Find It Linda Newsom

Sat Jul 21 10-N Hungarian Research Vera Broyles

Tue Jul 24 7-8:30pm Photo Scanning & Retouching Tom Underhill

4. Classes for beginners and intermediates in Computer-assisted Genealogy are offered each month by the Orange County CA Genealogy Society in the General Meeting Room of the Huntington Beach Central Library, 7111 Talbert Ave., Huntington Beach, CA for a fee of $4 for non-members, payable at the door. See http://occgs.com for schedule.

5. For the latest NARA Schedule of Genealogical Workshops: call (949) 360-2641.

6. The British Isles Family History Society (BIFHS) holds classes monthly at the LA FHC of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 10741 Santa Monica Blvd., W. LA. Classes and parking are free. For information contact Dorothy Losee at (310) 838-6085 or e-mail: dotom2@aol.com.

7. Classes are offered monthly by the LA Family History Center, 10741 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles which offer a wide variety of topics, ranging from Beginning Genealogy to more specialized research of ethnic groups such as Cherokee Genealogy, African American Genealogy and even deciphering the old-style Script of German and records. To see the schedule for the current month, go to their website at http://www.lafhc.org or call (310) 474-9990.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Did you know that as of July 1st you will have to pay considerably more to obtain a copy of your ancestor's Social Scurity Number application? For the new rates, see http://www.ssa.gov/foia/foia guide.htm.

LIBRARY NEWS

The Mission Viejo Library has announced the following hours, effective July 1, 2001, the main change being that the library will now be closed on fridays. To check on main library news, see their web site at: http://www.cmvl.org or call (949) 830-7100.

Monday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Friday CLOSED

Tuesday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Wednesday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sunday 12 noon - 5 p.m.

Thursday 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Remember, you can sign up to be a volunteer at our genealogy desk by calling Janet Franks at (949)498-8438. She can also tell you which library the next Safari will go to. These trips are alwayw on the 4th Wed. of the month and depart at 9:30 a.m. from the LDS parking lot.

The following additions have been made during June, donated by Eugenia Gannon:

1. Norton: Illinois Census Returns 1820

2. Kirkham: Land Records of America

3. Kirkham: Military Records of America

4. Kirkham: Census Records of America

5. Finley" Pioneer Record Early Settlers of Ross County, Ohio

6. Smith: Federal Land Series, Vol. 1, 1788-1810; Vol. 2, 1799-1835; Vol. 3, 1810-1814

7. Ohio Archaeologtical & Historical Society Publications, Volumes I through XIX

8. Evans: A standard History of Ross County, Ohio, Volumes I & II

9. Gailbreath: History of Ohio, Volumes I, II, II & IV

10. Howe's: Historical Collections of Ohio, Volumes I & II

11. Randall: Ohio Centennial Collection

12. Clark: Tombsone Inscriptions of Grandview Cemetery (Chillicothe, Ross Co., OH)

13. Grabb: A History of the Chillicothe & Other Ross County, OH Post Offices 1799-1987

14. 1830 Census of Ross County, OH

15. 1850 Census of Ross County, OH, Part I & II

16. 1870 Census of Ross County, OH

17. Tombstone Inscriptions of Colerain Township, Ross Co., OH

18. Tombstone Inscriptions of Union Township & Deerfield Township, Ross Co., OH

 

NOTE: Did you know that the Ohio Genealogical Society is the largest state genealogical society in the country? It has more than 6000 members in more than 100 chapters. To celebrate the 200th Anniversary of Ohio Statehood in 2003, the Society has taken on three projects: "Lost and Forgotten Cemeteries", "Residents of Ohio in 1803" - a recreation of an 1803 census, and a publication that will highlight all of the towns and townships ever to have existed in Ohio. These should make wonderful sources of information for genealogists researching the Ohio area. (Excerpted from Buckeye Californian, 19:2, March 2001, p. 15)

CENSUS REVIEW

Since census records are our main resource for locating and documenting an ancestor, we can use all the help we can get as to how to use them. We are fortunate to be very close to the Western Archives at NARA in Laguna Niguel where we can find so much assistance. I would recommend that anyone who hasn't done so yet, attend a workshop at NARA to get advice and clues on how to get the most out of the census records. These notes came from a NARA workshop.

1790 Content: Name of family head; free white males of 16 years and up, free white males under 16; free white females; slaves; other persons. The first federal census was taken in 1790 to determine the apportionment of taxes among the states and the process has been repeated every ten years ever since. The following letter written by a 1790 census taker shows that the job was not easy even then. (Reprinted from the WAGS newsletter Vol. 19, no. 12, May 2000):

"Sirs, I beg to report that I have been dog-bit, goose-pecked, cow-kicked, briar-scratched, shot at, and called every 'fowel' name that can be tho't of. I have worked twelve days and have made $2. I have had enough and I beg to resign my posiion as a census taker for Crittden Township?"

1800 Content: Name of family head; if white, age and sex; race; slaves.

1810 Content: Name of family head; if white, age and sex; race; slaves. I personally have had many ancestors who migrated from Virginia to Kentucky and Tennessee between 1790 and 1810, so this census can be critical for finding them.

1820 Content: Name of family head; age; sex; race; foreigners not naturalized; slaves; industry (agriculture, commerce, and manufactures). We now can find out the occupation.

1830 Content: Name of family head; age; sex; race; slaves; deaf and dumb; blind; foreigners not naturalized.

1840 Content: Name of family head; age; sex; race; slaves; number of deaf and dumb; number of blind; number of insane and idiotic and whether in public or private charge; number of persons in each family employed in each of six classes of industry and one of occupation; literacy; pensioners for Revolutionary or military service. Another wave of migration further westward during the 1830s makes this census very useful. Mine went on to Missouri.

1850 Content: Name; age; sex; race; whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, or idiotic; value of real estate; occupation; birthplace; whether married within the year; school attendance; literacy; whether a pauper or convict. Supplemental schedules for slaves; public paupers and criminals; persons who died during the year. Notice, for the first time, the census records the person's age, place of birth and whether he married within the year (between June 1, 1849 and May 31 1851), - some really helpful data for genealogists.

1860 Content: Name; age; sex; race; value of real estate; value of personal estate; occupation; birthplace; whether married within the year; school attendance; literacy; whether deaf and dumb; blind, insane, idiotic, pauper, or convict; number of slave houses. Supplemental schedules for slaves; public paupers and criminals; persons who died during the year.

1870 Content: Name; age; race; occupation; value of real estate; value of personal estate; birthplace; whether parents were foreign born; month of birth if born within the year; month of marriage if married within the year; school attendance; literacy; whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, or idiotic; male citizens 21 and over, and number of such persons denied the right to vote for other than rebellion. Supplemental schedules for persons who died during the year; paupers; prisoners. Of course, following the Emancipation Proclamation, slaves are no longer mentioned. Heritage Quest announced in their April 2001 "Update" newsletter that you can now purchase a custom CD-ROM index for the surname of your choice for searching the 1870 Federal Census. The Surname Series can be ordered, for $19.95 per surname, online at http://www.HeritageQuest.com or by calling 1-800-760-2455.

1880 Content: Name; relationship to family head; sex; race; age; marital status; month of birth if born within the census year; occupation; months unemployed during the year; sickness or temporary disability; whether blind, deaf and dumb, idiotic, insane, maimed, crippled, bedridden, or otherwise disabled; school attendance; literacy; birthplace of person and parents. Supplemental schedules for the Indian population; for persons who died during the year; insane; idiots; deaf-mutes; blind; homeless children; prisoners; paupers and indigent persons. Here we see the first mention of unemployment, disability records and the Indian population.

1890 Schedule destroyed!

1900 Content: Address; name; relationship to family head; sex; race; age; marital status; number of years married; for women, number of children born and number now living; birthplace of person and parents; if foreign born, year of immigration and whether naturalized; occupation; months not employed; school attendance; literacy; ability to speak English; whether on a farm; home owned or rented and if owned, whether mortgaged. Supplemental schedules for the blind and for the deaf. The actual images of the 1900 U.S. Census are available and fully searchable over the Internet from Genealogy.com http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/1900census.html?Welcome=993856649. There are a number of things that make this census unique and valuable to genealogists:

1.This census attempts to list everyone living in America in 1900, and all family members are listed by name which is extremely helpful in linking an ancestor to his particular family . It is fully Soundexed for all states.

2. For the first time, the month and year of birth is given for every person listed which helps genealogists to make connections across multiple generations.

3. Also a first, it gives the length of the marriage, how many children a woman had borne and how many of those children were still living.

4. The information on immigration in this census is vital as the turn of the century brought with it new technology and, with the increase in industrialization, there was a major influx of workers into the country, including many of our ancestors.

5. Also this was a period of great personal advancement and this census attempts to measure the wealth of the people, i.e. whether the farm or home was rented, owned or mortgaged.

6. The 1900 census provides a crucial bridge from the 19th century because the 1890 census was almost entirely destroyed by fire before it could be copied and preserved.

1910 Contents: Address; name; relationship to family head; sex; race; age; marital status; number of years of present marriage; for women, number of children born and number now living; birthplace and mother tongue of person and parents; if foreign born, year of immigration, whether naturalized and whether able to speak English, or if not, language spoken; occupation, industry, and class of worker; if an employee, whether out of work during year; literacy; school attendance; home owned or rented; if owned, whether mortgaged; whether farm or house; whether a survivor of Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind or deaf and dumb.

1920 Contents: Address; name; relationship to family head; sex; marital status; if foreign born, year of immigration to the U.S., whether naturalized, and year of naturalization; school attendance; literacy; birthplace of person and parents; mother tongue of foreigh born; ability to speak English; occupation, industry, and class of worker; home owned or rented; if owned, whether mortgaged; for nonfarm mortgaged, market value, original amount of mortgage, balance due, interest rate. The 1900, 1910 and 1920 census immigration and naturalization data offer clues to establishing an ancestors arrival in America and help pinpoint the ship passenger list to look at.

1930 Contents: Address; name; relationship to family head; home owned or rented; value or monthly rental; radio set; whether on a farm; sex; race; age; marital status; age at first marriage; school attendance; literacy; birthplace of person and parents; if foreign born, language spoken in home before coming to U.S., year of immigration, whether naturalized, and ability to speak English; occupation, industry, and class of worker; whether at work previous day (for last regular working day); veteran status; for Indians, whether of full or mixed blood, and tribal affiliation.

Since, for privacy of living citizens, the government restricts the use of the census for 72 years, the 1930 census will soon become available to us (April 2002). NARA offers a workshop on "Preparing for the 1930 Census" and you call them at (949 360-2641 to see when the next class is scheduled and register.

 

South Orange County California Genealogical Society

Membership/Renewal Application

( ) New 1 Year ( ) Individual, $20 ( ) Jt. Members, same address $25

( ) Renewal Membership Number(s)______________ _______________

Name (s) ________________________________________________________

Address__________________________________________________________

City _______________________________State_______Zip________Phone___________

Make check payable to: SOCCGS (South Orange County Genealogical Society) Check No._____________

Mail with application to: SOCCGS, P.O. Box 4513, Mission Viejo, CA 92690-4513 Date Rec'd______________

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