Cambridgeshire - Horseheath

HORSEHEATH is a village and parish, pleasantly seated on the Cambridge old road, 4½ miles east from Linton station on the Cambridge and Sudbury line of the London and North Eastern railway, 4 west from Haverhill and 14 south-east from Cambridge, in the hundred of Chilford, petty sessional division and union of Linton, county court district of Haverhill, rural deanery of Camps and archdeaconry and diocese Ely.

The church of All Saints is an ancient edifice of flint and rubble in the Gothic style of the 15th century, consisting of chancel, nave, north and south porches and an embattled western tower containing 4 bells: in the chancel is a 14th century brass of a knight in full armour, but the inscription is lost: on the south side of the chancel are monuments with effigies to Sir Giles Alington knt. master of the Ordnance, temp. Henry VIII. ob. 1586, and his son Gyles, both clad in armour; and on the north side a monument with effigies to Sir Giles Alington, ob. 1613, his wife Dorothy, and their in children, figures of whom surround the monument: there is also a tablet to one of the Bromleys, Barons Montfort of Horseheath, a title which became extinct on the death of Henry (Bromley); 3rd baron, April 30, 1851; a brass with mutilate effigy to Robert, son of Sir Giles Alington, ob. 1552 and Margaret (Coningsbie) his wife, and inscribed brasses to Joan Alyngton, sister and heir of John Argentein, ob. 1429, and to Mary (Cheyne), wife of John Alington, circa 1470: the church was restored and reseated in 1880-91, at a cost of £1,000: in 1911 six of the nave windows were completely restored at a cost of £166: there is a stone in the churchyard wall with the following inscription:-

"George V. R.I. our King, in mellow autumn tide
Here viewed a bloodless fray;
May duty, love and peace abide
To bless him day by day
Army Manoeuvres, Sep. 18, 1912."

The church affords 190 sittings. The register dates from the year 1558.

There is a Primitive Methodist chapel here.

Horseheath Hall, a magnificent mansion, erected here in 1665 by William, Baron Alington, was sold about a century later for the value of the materials: the park which consisted of above 870 acres, has been disparked. T. Wayman Parsons esq. is lord of the manor and principal landowner. The soil is clay; subsoil chalk. The chief crops are wheat, oats and barley. The area is 1,922 acres; the population in 1921 was 369.

[Extracts from Kelly's Directory - Cambridgeshire - 1929]


Horseheath Post Office Early 20th Century
[Photographs courtesy of the Cambridgeshire Collection,
Central Library, Lion Yard, Cambridge]

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Last Updated on: 22 October 2002
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