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Last names beginning with "S"


Articles researched and written by Sheila D. Tindle, Annie H. Darracott Chapter President (click on name to read article)

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Pvt. Edward C. Sphaler Company H, 
20th Regiment South Carolina Infantry

Edward C. Sphaler

Edward C. Sphaler was born on June 14, 1840 in Lexington, South Carolina. He enlisted in Williams Mills, South Carolina as a private on January 10, 1862 in Company H, 20th Regiment South Carolina Infantry. He was captured in February 1865 and paroled on or about the 20th of June 1865, discharged at Point Lookout, Maryland.  Sphaler moved to Florida approximately May 15, 1904.

On the 10th of April, 1912 he applied for a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909 in Hillsborough County Florida . He stated I "was captured and was taken to prison Point Lookout, MD. Captured near Columbia on 1864 and prisoned at Point Lookout Md. That all the property owned by me or by my wife, jointly and separately in this or any other State: Real estate located at ten acre land in Polk County valued at $100, six head of cattle and one horse valued at $160, and personal property valued at $300." He lists his disabilities as "old age and ruptures." He was at the age of 71 years old. He endorses the application E. C. Sphaler.

Doctor L. H. Harrell stated in his Physician’s Affidavit "that he is incapacitated from earning a living by reason of his old age, and are inguinal hernia (rupture). This deponent further says that the said E. C. Sphaler is permanently disabled by reason of such rupture and age from earning a livelihood for himself by manual labor."

On April 24, 1912 comrades James H. Spires and Britton E. Hutto of Lexington County, South Carolina that attest:  "Enlisted in Lexington, in the State of South Carolina on the 9th day of December 1861 in Company H, 20th Regiment of the State of South Carolina which was organization was regularly musted into the service of the Confederate States of America; that he knows of his owner personal knowledge that E. C. Sphaler enlisted in Company H, 20th Regiment of the State of South Carolina at Hampton Race Count in South Carolina near Columbia on or about the 15th day of December, 1861; that he served faithfully in the said organization until the 30th of May, 1865 when he was honorably discharged on account of taken oath of allegiance at Point Lookout in the State of Maryland and did not desert the Confederate States service nor take the oath of allegiance to the United Sates before the close of War. Served regular service from the time I entered service until the close of war. I know personally of the above stated service, because I served with E. C. Sphaler.

A letter dated May 24, 1912 from the War Department, The Adjutant General’s Office, Washington to the Comptroller, State of Florida, Tallahassee reads:

The records show that Edward C. Sphalar, private, Company H, 20th South Carolina Infantry, Confederate States Army, enlisted December 30, 1861 (also shown as January 10, 1862), and that he was captured February 14, 1865, at Lexington Court House and paroled June 19, 1865, at Point Lookout, Maryland, upon taking the oath of allegiance. W. P. Hall, The Adjutant General

His pension was denied on June 4, 1912:

Mr. E. C. Sphaler,
Plant City, Fla.
Dear Sir:-
I am directed by the Board of Pensions to notify 
your that your claim for a pension was considered at a meeting 
held yesterday and was not allowed. The law requires soldiers 
who apply for pensions to show citizenship in Florida since 1895. 
Your claim shows that you have only resided in this state since 1904.
Yours very truly, 
Secretary (no name)


On October 5, 1914 he reapplied for a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1913 under certificate number 6558. He stated that he had been "captured in February 1865 Paroled on or about the 20th of June 1865. I was prisoner at Point Lookout. All he property owned by me or by my wife, jointly and separately in this or any other State: real estate, located or near Medulla, Florida valued at $100, cattle, horses and other live stock valued at $150, and personal property valued at $150. He stated that he "applied for a pension from the State of Florida" because he was "feeble from old age and rupture on both sides." He endorsed the application as Edward C. Sphaler.

Physicians’ Affidavit by T. C. Moyier and J. C. Knight, M.D. stated that Edward C. Sphaler has "double rupture and old age, 74 years of age, dated October 22, 1914.

Affidavit to be Made by Comrade, James. A. Spires and W. A. Spires of Gaston, Lexington County, South Carolina on the 7th of October, 1914 stated, "This man Edward C. Sphaler was captured there by Sherman’s army near Columbia South Carolina at Point Lookout and carried to Newbern, North Carolina and from there to Point Lookout and released at Point Lookout until taken oath of allegiance." 
.
The Adjutant General, H. L. McCain stated on November 12, 1914 that "The Union records of prisoners of war show him captured at Lexington Courthouse on February 14, 1865; sent to Point Lookout, Maryland, and released at the last-named place on June 19, 1865, on taking the oath of allegiance." 

A letter written by S. M. Roof states:

Lexington, S.C., November 20, 1914
Mr. Wm V. Knott, Com Gen Tallahassee FLA

My Dear Sir:

This is to inform you that Mr. E. C. Sphaler formerly of Lexington Co, South Carolina served through the Confederate War in my company and is fully entitled to a pension. Company "H" 20th South Carolina Regiment. 
Respectfully 
S. M. Roof, Captain of Co. H., 20th South Carolina


He was granted a pension on November 24, 1914 with pay from November 9, 1914 at the rate of $150 per annum, under certificate number 6558.

Edward passed away on the 29th of September, 1916 and was laid to rest at Fitzgerald Cemetery, Fitzgerald Road, in South Lakeland. His grave laid unmarked for 86 years.

On October 7, 1916 Mrs. S. E. McClelland Sphaler applied for a Widow’s Pension Claim Under the Act of 1915 in the County of Hillsborough, Florida. She stated she "was a residence of Polk County since February 28, 1905 and my address is Route 1, Box 76, in Lakeland." Also, she stated she "married Edward on the 28th of February, 1905 and that she was not divorced from him, and that she had not remarried since his death, which occurred on the 29th day of September, 1916, in Polk County, Florida." She owned ten acres valued at $100 and one horse and 6 head of cattle valued at $150. She endorsed the application S. E. Sphaler. That pension was granted from the State of Florida under Certificate number 6558. 

A letter written by J. A. Pearce, The Quality Store, Plant City, Florida states,

October 9, 1918

Charman (Chairman) Co. Com.,
Bartow, Fla.

Dear Sirs:--
Please sign the claim for pension of Mrs. S. E. Sphaler the widow of the late E. C. Sphaler and forward same to the Comptrooler (Comptroller) Tallahassee, Fla.
Yours very truly, J. A. Pearce


Her pension was approved on December 18, 1916 with pay from November 13, 1916 at the rate of $150 per annum, certificate number 4320.

In 2003 when Sheila Tindle, member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott #791, Lakeland chapter was conducted a cemetery survey of Confederate Veterans interred at Fitzgerald, an elderly gentlemen by the name of Julian H. Baggett came up to her and asked what she was doing. He was told him that she was a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and was logging the names of Confederate Veterans buried in the cemetery. Mr. Baggett was asked if he had an ancestor who was buried here. He stated yes, Edward C. Sphaler. A survey of the list of Confederate Veterans was checked for his name and noted that he was buried at the cemetery in and unmarked grave at an undetermined location. Baggett proceeded to his grandfather’s unmarked grave and confirmed where he was buried. 

He said that he remembered his grandmother coming to visit his grandfather’s grave but did not understand why she never marked his grave with a headstone. He was told him that a headstone would be ordered and a marker dedication ceremony would be schedule and he would be notified.

Annie H. Darracott, No. 791, Lakeland chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held a Memorial Service and 4 marker Dedication on Saturday, June 5, 2004 at Fitzgerald Cemetery. A search for descendants living in the area was unsuccessful. A total of 60 members and guests were present for the ceremony, however, Mr. Baggett was unable to attend.   

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Clayton Cletus/Clatus Sherouse
Veteran 
The First Sherouse/Sherrouse in Polk County, 1865-1870
Submitted by Lois Sherrouse Murphy
Clayton CletusC. Sherouse

Clayton Cletus/Clatus (the son of Gottlieb, Jr.) was born September 22, 1826 in either Georgia or South Carolina.

Federal Census records have indicated both locations as his birth place.  By July 1843, he had applied for a land patent for property in Marion County, Florida. At the age of 22, he married Mary Grantham on November 30, 1848, in Irwin County, Georgia, and they had six children together between 1849 and 1866. 

It is interesting to note that 5 years passed between the time Clayton Cletus applied for the land patent (July 1843) and the date of his marriage (November 1848).  The federal lands legislation which authorized the land patent (Armed Occupation and Settlement Act of 1842) required that a prospective settler live on the land for 5 years before becoming eligible for the actual land patent to be issued, and that “a house fit for the habitation of man” be erected.  It would appear that once

Clayton Cletus satisfied those requirements, he was eager to return to Georgia, and claim himself a wife to share the homestead with.

Clayton Cletus/Clatus Sherouse enlisted in the Confederate Florida Infantry, Company F on February 16, 1863 as a Corporal at Orange Springs, Marion County, Florida.  Records indicate that he was “slightly wounded” in the Battle of Olustee, near Lake City, Florida on February 20, 1864.  His brother, Private Israel Sherouse, also served in Company F of the 9th Florida Infantry at the same time. 

Sometime between the end of the war in April 1865 and February 1870, the family migrated to Polk County, Florida from North Florida.  Clayton Cletus’ name appears on the 1860 Putnam County, Florida Federal Census, but on February 4, 1870, public records in Bartow indicate that Clayton Clatus and his wife, Mary, purchased 40 acres of land in the Kathleen area of Polk County near Ross Creek.  The property was purchased from Samuel and Margret Ann Rogers for $500.  Clayton Cletus would have been about 44 years old at that time.

Clayton Clatus sold this property in 1878 to James Lanier and purchased another 40 acres of land the same year from Berrien and Dorian Platt for $1,000 on what is now Sherrouse Road.  Clayton Cletus/Clatus lived there until his death on December 18, 1903 at the age of 77.  His oldest son, Israel E, married Mary Ann Vickers in 1870 and built a log house in this same area, where Israel lived until his death in 1928.
Roan Sapp
Farmer and Veteran
Roan Sapp

Roan Sapp was born on June 17, 1843 in Columbia County, Florida. He was the son of Shadrick Sapp, Jr. and Nancy Anna Parker Sapp. They married February 26, 1823. Shadrick was born 1793 in Burke County, Georgia and passed away after 1872 in Turkey Creek, Hillsborough County, Florida.  Nancy was born 1802 in Liberty County, Georgia and died after 1860 Alachua County, Florida.
   
In 1860 the Sapps resided in the 17th Division in Alachua County.  At the age of 13, Roan worked as a farm laborer.
   
Florida seceded from the union on January 10, 1861.  At 19 Sapp enlisted in Levyville in 1862 with Captain Edward J. Lutterloh’s Cavalry, Dickinson Company, 1st Battalion Special, Confederate States Army. 
   
Sapp served under command of Captain J. J. Dickerson and did such service in the State as his orders contemplated. He was never wounded. 
   
He was discharged at Bronson, Levy County in May 1865 due to the surrender.
   
Sapp met and fell in love with Miss Emiley Tomlinson. They married July 4, 1867 in Marion County, Florida.
   
In 1870 Roan, now 22 years old, was living with his parents in Hillsborough County, Florida. 
   
Sapp met and fell in love with Miss Harriet Brown on December 1, 1870 in Tampa, Hillsborough County, Florida.  Harriet was born January 15, 1854. Their child from this union:
    Missouri “Ella”, born September 1874, married John W. Lanier on  February 3, 1903 in Polk County, Florida
   
In 1880 Roan, 35 and Harriet, 30, resided in Sumter County.  He farmed while Harriett took care of their daughter Ella.
   
By 1900 the family had relocated to Precinct #5 in Lakeland, Polk County.  They had been married for 27 years and had only one child, Ella.
   
On October 11, 1904 Sapp, a resident of Kathleen, Polk County, filed a Soldier’s Application for Pension.  He stated that “…The exposure and hardship incident to the serve gave me Rheumatism which I have suffered from for many years and in recent years in acute chronic form to the extent that I am unable to provide for my family.” He signed his application with an “x.”  W. L. Finger, Adjutant of Camp,  No. 1543 of United Confederate Veterans of Lakeland gave sworn testimony that Sapp was an active member of good standing in the camp.  Physicians L. F. Henley and Joseph Korbus (?) examined the applicant and reported, “him suffering from chronic Rheumatism and not able to make a living by manual labor or otherwise.”  His claim for pension, number 3684, was approved on February 10, 1906 pay for $96 per annum and increased to $120 per annum. A notation on the claim states “pay to June 30, 1909 and require new application.”
   
On January 25, 1906 the Comptroller, C. H. Dickerson wrote to Hon. H. J. Drane of Lakeland,
“Friend Drane:
    I am this day returning you the pension application according to promise of Roan Sapp, with the request that you make the several corrections and return the same to me as quickly as possible, as I do not like the records to be incomplete.
    I wrote Mess Perry and Fields this morning in the name of Comptroller and sent them blanks for them to make their returns to this office upon. Whenever I can serve you command me.  Yours truly.” 
   
On the very same letter Drane replies,
“Dear Charlie:-The old man has been quite ill at this home in the country, and for that reason I have not been able to see him until this morning. He is in a low state  of health and cannot be here very long. I sincerely trust you will now be able to place his name on the Roll of Pensioners. He is a good citizen, is deserving of the pension and ought to have it. You will notice that he has a ce3rtificate from the Confederate Veterans Camp here, and that alone should be proof of his service. Please advise me upon receipt of this if the paper is approved. With kind regard and best wishes, I am, dear sir, Yours very truly, Lakeland, Fla., Feb. 13th., 1906.”
   
On October 31, 1908 Roan Sapp writes to Miss Jefferson Bell Secretary (Pension Board of Tallahassee),
“I mustered into Capt. E.J.Lutterloah’s Company # at Levyville, Levy County, Florida, I cannot now recall the date, to the # best of my recollection it was in 1863.  The first Lieutenant was Thomas Love; the second Lieutenant was James Brock; the third Lieutenant was Joe Prevatt. George Leavett was orderly Seargent.  I was with Tom.Philpot when he was shot at No. 4 near Cedar Keys. I was also in the skirmish# at Otter Creek Station.  I do not remember that our Company was ever altogether at any one time.  We were often in scattered detachments on various duties. I belonged to no other company during the war. I was # paroled with the other members of the command at Brunson in Levy County by the United States officers in April, 1865.
   
I was living about four miles north of Archer Station in Alachua County, Florida, when I joined the army.  I moved ot Polk County in January 1881 and have lived here ever since.  I lost my parole many years a go.  I will proved my service. Since I first made proof one of my witnesses, Mr. Harrison Slaughter, has died.  I do not now know where the other one, Mr. W.W. Hunt, is.  But I will endeaver to find the necessary witnesse, Respectfully.”
   
On December 17, 1908 comrades John L. Curry of Trenton, Alachua County  and U. J. Watson of Judson Post Office in Levy County gave sworn statement that he served with Sapp, that he was not a deserter and served until the end of the war. Comrade C. L. Slaughter of Alachua County gave similar testimony concerning Sapp.
   
On January 7, 1909 Secretary (Pension Board) writes to Mr. Roan Sapp of Lakeland, Fla.,
“Dear Sir:-
    I beg to acknowledge receipt of additional evidence in the matter of your service filed by Hon Park M. Trammell, January 6, 1909. Same will be submitted to the Board of Pensions at an early date and you will be advised of any action taken thereon Yours very truly.”
   
Sapp wrote a letter dated January 30, 1909 to Hon. A. C. Croom Comptroller, Tallahassee, Fla.,
“Dear Sir:  I sent you through the hands of Hon. Park M. Trammell on the 24th of December 1908, three additional affidavits that I was not a deserter during the Confederate War. He may have sent them to you through the U.S. Mail or personally handed them in--having heard nothing from you, I am anxious to learn what disposition has been made of the matter. My certificate number is 3684. Kindly let me hear from you. Yours Very Truly.”
   
On February 1, 1909 the Comptroller of Tallahassee wrote several letters.  1) He wrote to Sapp,
“Dear Sir:
    Replying to your letter of the 30th with regard to affidavit I beg to say that same was presented by Hon Park M. Trammell and this matter was taken up by the Board of Pensions recently and is held for replies to some inquiries the Board is making in relation thereto. You will be notified when it is passed upon. Yours very truly.”
   
2) He wrote to Mr. S. H. Weinges of Gainesville, Fla.,
“…Can you give me any information with regard to the service of Roan Sapp. You have mentioned him with numerous other Sapps and we have been trying to locate his service.  Please advise me if you know anything of his service. With good wishes, Yours sincerely.”
   
3) He wrote to Hon. E. J. Lutterloh of Cedar Keys, Fla.,
“Dear Sir:
    I am directed by the Board of Pensions to ask you if Roan Sapp, now of Lakeland Florida served in your company during the Civil War and if he deserted. Mr. Sapp is a pensioner for this service and is charged with having done no such service. … Please advise me …. If [he] served elsewhere, to your knowledge, before becoming member of your command, Yours very truly.”
   
On March 15, 1909 comrades Sol Osteen of Levy County and T. W. Philpot of Alachua County gave sworn testimony that they served with Sapp and that he was not a deserter and served until the end of the war.
   
On June 29, 1910 Secretary of the Pension Board, Tallahassee writes to Honorable S. H. Weinges of Gainesville, Florida,
“Dear Mr. Weinges:-
    The Board of Pensions is still contending with the strenuous efforts of Ran Sapp for restoration to the pension roll.  You will remember that you reported him with a number of others not entitled to pensions for desertion and similar reasons.  He made proof of service in Lutterloh’s Company which seems to have become a part of Munnerlyn’s Battalion late in the war and to be entitled under this law.
    The Board has asked me to refer this matter to you to ask that you will give me any information you can relative to the man’s service &c. He has several affidavits in support of his statements and unless the charge against him can be put into more definite form, the Board will not be able to sustain its position in this case. Yours very truly.  Did any contractor decide to bind on my work?”
   
On July 1, 1910 M. S. Cheves, Deputy Clerk writes to Miss Jefferson Bell of Tallahassee,
“Dear Madam
    Your letter to Mr. Wienges just received and I am writing you to let you know that Mr. Wienges has been sick nearly three months and is away from home for his health. I just received a letter from him in which he says he is improving fast. He received a letter from the Attorney Genl in regard to the same pension Roan Sapp I am satisfied that Mr. Wienges does not know anything of his own knowledge but only from what he has been told and being very bitter against deserters is quick to express himself. I don’t think he answered the letter from Mr. Trammell as I know he was not able to write at that time. No doubt Mr. Trammell thought very strange but Mr. Wienges will explain anything when he returns if he is well, Yours very truly.”
   
On July 22, 1910 S. H. Wienges Clerk Circuit Court write to Park Trammell of Tallahassee, Fla.,
“Dear Sir
    Your letter relative to Roan Sapp of June 13 came to hand in due time-I was sick at that time and have been absent since June 18th- I did not say positively that Roan Sapp was a deserter if I mentioned his name. I was informed in March 1865 in this place by some of Capt. Dickerson’s men that they were on their way to Bronson and around there looking for some deserters and Sapp here my looking with suspicion on the name-I got Mr. Warren to make inquiry in the Jonesville vicinity and he informed me this week that he could only learn that Mr. Sapp enlisted in Capt Lou Williams Co and served until the close of the war I have been told that a number of Confed who enlisted in other regiments obtained furloughs in \64 and remained in Fla joining Lou Williams Co just before the surrender.  I regarded all such as deserters and when speaking about them expressed myself in bitter terms. And I dare say if other Vets felt the same there are a number of pensioners that would be droped from the list. I am in favor of all who were true to our cause being pensioned. But am bitterly opposed to deserters being placed on the list. Asking that you will pardon my delay and taking in consideration the cause I am Yours very truly.”
   
On September 3, 1910 James A. Cox, Commander of Florida Division United Confederate Veterans writes to Hon. Park m. Trammell of Tallahassee, Fla.,
“Dear friend,
    Mr. Roan Sapp has submitted to me your letter with a copy of the Weinges letter-
    On my advice he has made the enclosed affidavit, which with the proof he has already filed with the Pension Board, ought to prove beyond question that he never served with Capt. Lou Williams Co. or any where else except in Capt E. J. Lutterloh’s as he has always claimed and proved from the day of his enlistment to the day of his parole at the close of the war.
    Park see that this man gets justice. You know me well enough to know that I would never favor a pension for a deserter-I am thoroughly satisfied that Roan Sapp was a true and faithful soldier to the end. Yours.”
   
On September 22, 1910 the Secretary from the Pension Board writes to Mr. Roan Sapp of Lakeland, Florida,
“Dear Sir
    I beg to advise you that the charges against you have been withdrawn and the Board of Pensions has directed me to notify you that you will be paid from the date of your last payment, June 30, 1908 to June 30, 1909 when the new pension law went into effect. You will be required to make a renewal of your claim under the present law. I enclose you blank form for that purpose. Yours very truly.”
  
In 1910 Roan, 62, was married for 38 years, owned their property, and was a general farmer.
   
On September 30, 1910 Sapp, a resident of Polk County, submitted a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909.  He was 67 years of age.  He stated his “real estate was located at providence Polk County 40 acres valued at $600, personal property valued at $100 and live stock valued at $100.” He previously received a state pension, number 3684, at the rate of $120 per annum.  Physician L. F. Henlsey examined the applicant and reported, “find Roan Sapp is suffering with Rheumatism and chronic cystitis and general disability and unable to make a living by manual labor.”  His claim for pension, number 5834, was approved on October 22, 1910 retroactive July 1, 1909, at the rate of $120 per annum.
   
Sapp passed away on November 9, 1910 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida and was laid to rest in Socrum Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida. Socrum Cemetery, also known as Bethel Baptist Cemetery, at the Betel Baptist Church, 10 miles north of Lakeland on State Road 35A, Section 4, Township 27, Range 23.   
   
On November 28, 1910 Mrs. Sapp, a resident of Lakeland, submitted a Widow’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909. She stated that she had real estate located in Polk County, Fla. NE¼ of SW ¼ Section 1, Township 27-S, Range 23-E valued at $600 and personal property valued at $500.”  Her claim for pension, number 6001, was approved on December 9, 1910 retroactive November 9, 1910 at the rate of $12 per annum.
   
Mrs. Sapp passed away on September 17, 1935 and was laid to rest in Socrum Cemetery.
   
On August 25, 2004 Sheila Tindle, member of United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, ordered a military marker from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, D.C. The marker arrived at Bethel Baptist Church on November 22, 2005 and it was placed on his grave.
   
On January 28, 2006, Annie H. Darracott Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, hosted a ceremony at Socrum Cemetery at Bethel Baptist Church to honor the memories of twenty-seven Confederate soldiers. Twenty-five of them were from Florida, one from Georgia, and one from South Carolina
   
Chapter President Sheila Tindle gave the dedication of grave markers, followed by a rifle salute by members of General Jubal A. Early, Camp 556, a cannon salute by Grayson Artillery, Pvt. Wm. Riley Milton, Camp 741, and taps by bugler Ken Murphy, Past 3rd Lt. Commander, Fla. Div., SCV & John T. Lesley Camp 31282. The ceremony also included an invocation, the reading of several Southern poems, beautiful music, and a reception in the Church Fellowship Hall.
   
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Sapp and his comrades to the Confederate States of  America.
William Henry Steinmeyer
Reverend and Veteran
W. H. Steinmeyer

William Henry Steinmeyer was born on September 30, 1843 in Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina to John Frederick Steinmeyer and Margaret Beckmann Steinmeyer.

South Carolina seceded from the Union on December 20, 1860. In 1862 the Twenty-fifth was formed to defend the coastal area with their main objective to defend Charleston Harbor.

Steinmeyer enlisted as a private in the Army of the Confederate States of America, Company A, 25th South Carolina Infantry Regiment about September 10, 1861. The unit was known as the “Eutaw Regiment,” nicknamed the “Washington Light Infantry,” of the Army of Northern Virginia. He served under Colonel C. H. Simonton and Captain James M. Carson. During his service with his unit, he became a chaplain.

They expanded into regimental size and pressed into Confederate service. That year, they saw action at Secessionville, skirmished with General Terry at James Island, and relocated to Wilmington, North Carolina into Gist’s First Brigade.
In 1863 they fought at James Island at Grimball’s Landing, Battery Wagner at Morris Island of which the troops rotated in and out of Battery Wagner, Mouth of Vincent’s Creek, and Charleston Harbor.

As the war raged into it’s third year, the Twenty-fifth entered the thick of the battles and Steinmeyer’s unit moved into Virginia. Fighting began May 6 and 7, 1864 at Port Walthall Junction, Chesterfield County, with Major J. V. Glover and Lt. Colonel J. G. Pressley, Hagood’s Brigade, Johnson and Hill’s Division, and Pickett’s Corps. In conjunction with the opening of Grant’s Overland Campaign, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James, 33,000 strong, disembarked from transports at Bermuda Hundred on May 5th, threatening the Richmond-Petersburg Railroad. On May 6, Hagood’s brigade stopped initial Federal probes at Port Walthall Junction. On May 7, a Union division drove Hagood’s and Johnson’s brigades from the depot and cut the railroad at Port Walthall Junction. Confederate defenders retired behind Swift Run Creek and awaited reinforcements. It is during this battle that Lt. Col. Pressley loses an arm and Steinmeyer is injured at the right shoulder joint, disabling him from using his right arm. While Steinmeyer is recuperating, his unit went on to fight at Swift Run Creek under Major Glover, Hagood’s Brigade, with Johnson and Pickett’s Division. Captain James Carson was wounded. The fighting continued at Drewery’s Bluff under Hoke’s Division which was attached to the Twenty-fifth, and by the end of May the unit moved to Lee’s Army. They advanced to Cold Harbor under Major Glover and Colonel Simonton, who had rejoined the unit. Glover was killed in action at Cold Harbor. Orders were given to dispatch to Petersburg and Globe Tavern/Weldon Road under the command of Simonton, Capt. W. B. Gordon, and Captain Sellars. During this fierce battle, Gordon and Sellars were killed in action at Weldon Railroad. In the Fall of 1864 the unit saw action at Fort Harrison/ New Market Road, Darbytown, then moved to Wilmington North Carolina under the command of Captain James M. Carson, Hagood’s Brigade and Hoke’s Division. January 14, 1865 Colonel R. F. Graham had Captain Carson’s unit moved to Fort Fisher. Hagood’s Old Brigade consisted of about a regiment. This unit was consolidated under the command of Lt. Colonel Rion of the Seventh Battalion. Joined with other odd units it formed the final version of Hagood’s Brigade. They gave defense to the city of Wilmington, Kinston, and surrendered March 19, 1965 at the Battle of Bentonville in North Carolina. Steinmeyer was home on leave recuperating from his injury and surrendered in Sumter County, South Carolina. A total of 414 men served in the unit during the war, 114 of which were killed.

He married about 1866, at age 21, to Susan “Emma” (?). Emma was born in April, 1849. Their children from this union were:
William H., Jr. born April 1867 in South Carolina, married Dillie, possibly in Duval County, Florida
Edward F., born 1870 in South Carolina
Mary E., born 1873 in South Carolina
Loula May, born in 1875 in South Carolina married Claude D. Clangh of Polk County on October 16, 1898
Harry, born 1872 in South Carolina
Leon B., born October 1877 in South Carolina
Harry A., born October 1878 in South Carolina, married Florence Lameraux of Polk County March 15, 1905. He died January 6, 1954
Maude, born November 1882 in South Carolina, married F. D. McDonald of Polk County September 23, 1914

At the age of 25, he lived in the community of Sumter in Sumter County, South Carolina working as a clerk in a store. His real estate was valued at $21,500 with personal property valued at $500. He hired a domestic servant, Ms. M. B. Wingate who was a white, 15 years old girl to assist his wife in household chores and care of their two children.

By 1900 the Steinmeyers were living in Precinct 1 of Osceola County, Florida. His profession was clergyman and he had been married for 33 years. They had seven children born in South Carolina and all were living.

In 1907 Steinmeyer served as clergy in Macclenny, Florida. He lived in the City of Jacksonville, Florida and filed an Application For Pension on June 15, 1907. He states that he has full disability because I “am over 60 years of age was wounded May 7th 1864 at Port Wal(t)hall Junction in Virginia. The right shoulder has been injured so as to prevent hard labor and affects use of right arm.” He was approved on October 12, 1907 with retroactive pay from July 2, 1907 at the rate of $120 per annum.

He submitted “Soldier’s Pension Claim Under the Act of 1909” on August 4, 1909. He stated that he was a resident of Duval County, Florida living at 1440 Ionia Street in Jacksonville. He has real estate valued at $2,500, 10 acres in Oviedo valued at $500, and personal property valued at $500. He was approved on August 30, 1909 under pension certificate number 4468 retroactive July 1, 1909 for $120 per annum.

The Steinmeyers, living in Duval County in 1910, had been married for 46 years, had eight children, with only seven living. They provided for a single white female boarder, May Alexander, who was 21 years old.
Reverend William H. Steinmeyer, pastor of North Florida Mission, was on hand at the ground breaking of College Heights United Methodist Church on June 27, 1912. “The Dixieland Methodist Church congregation, with the first six nails being driven at 6:05 a.m. by Bishop H. C. Morrison of Leesburg and five members, finished the building by nightfall despite being hampered by a constant rain.” The first service was held by Reverend Steinmeyer at the new sanctuary that night.

On July 31, 1913 he filed an “Application For Increase in Pension” under pension number 1514. He stated he was 70 years of age. There is no mention rather this application was approved.

Steinmeyer passed away on July 20, 1919. His obituary in the Fort Meade Leader on Thursday, July 24, 1919 reads:  “Rev. W. H. Steinmeyer of Lakeland, a well known Methodist divine, passed to his final reward Sunday, death coming gently and with no suffering.

Mr. Steinmeyer was 75 years of age. He was licensed to preach in 1880 and joined the Florida Conference soon thereafter. He was formerly pastor of the First Methodist Church of Lakeland, was only retired from active service in the conference about three years ago, when he had completed a four-year term as pastor of the Dixieland Myrtle Street Churches of Lakeland.”


His wife, Susan died January 4, 1923 and was interred at Roselawn Cemetery, beside her husband. This is one of Lakeland’s oldest cemeteries.

Maude Steinmeyer McDonald, daughter of William Steinmeyer, applied for membership to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Lakeland Chapter, No. 791 under her father’s honorable service to the Confederacy. She states, “I was born in Sumter County, South Carolina.” There must have been a delay in filing the application with the organization because Steinmeyer made a personal statement on her application stating, “I am chaplain of Washington Light Infantry, Co. A, 25th SCV. Was severely wounded in right shoulder on 7th March, 1864 at Port Wal(t)hall Junction near Petersburg, Virginia” with his signature “Wm. H. Steinmeyer.” Steinmeyer died in 1919 and Maude was approved on November 4, 1921.

On May 1, 2004 the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott, No. 791, in conjunction with the chapter’s 100th anniversary celebration, recognized his service to the Confederate States of America.

Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott, No. 791, recognizes the honorable service of Steinmeyer and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Asbury A. Scott
Tax Collector, Sheriff, Entrepreneur and Veteran
Scott

Asbury A. Scott was born on November 12, 1841 in Macon County, Alabama.
           
In 1860 Scott resided in the 1st District of Montgomery County.  He lived with the F. C. Gregory family and the M. Govan family.  He was 18 years old and worked as a clerk.
           
Alabama seceded from the union to form the Confederate States of America. Scott enlisted on May 9, 1861 at Montgomery as 1st Sergeant in Company L, 6th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. He served under Captain John M. Kennedy.   The company later reorganized into Company B.
           
The 6th Infantry Regiment, about 1,400 strong, was organized at Montgomery, Alabama, in May, 1861. Its twelve companies were recruited in the counties of Montgomery, Jackson, Autuaga, Lowndes, Russell, Macon, Henry, and Wilson.
           
Ordered to Virginia, the unit was assigned to Rodes', O'Neal's, and Battle's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was engaged in many conflicts from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley, and ended the war at Appomattox
            
In April, 1862, it contained 1,100 effectives. Subsequently, it lost fifty-nine percent of the 632 engaged at Seven Pines and reported 156 casualties at Sharpsburg and 161 at Chancellorsville. Of the 382 in the fight at Gettysburg, more than fifty percent were disabled.
           
The Battle of Boonsboro, Maryland occurred along the National Road on Wednesday, July 8, 1863. Stuart, with five cavalry brigades, advanced from the direction of Funkstown and Williamsport. He first encountered Federal resistance at Beaver Creek Bridge, 4.5 miles north of Boonsboro. By 11 a.m., the Confederate cavalry had pushed forward to several mud-soaked fields, where fighting on horseback was nearly impossible, forcing Stuart's troopers and Brig. Gens.  Judson Kilpatrick's and John Buford's Union cavalry divisions to dismount and slug it out like infantry. By mid-afternoon, the Union left under Kilpatrick crumbled as the Federals ran low on ammunition under increasing Confederate pressure. Stuart's advanced ended about 7 p.m., however, when Union infantry arrived—the first to engage on a Maryland battlefield since Gettysburg. Stuart withdrew north to Funkstown, but he had gained another day for Lee's retreating army. 
          
It was during this battle at South Mountain that Scott was shot in the right arm and taken prisoner.  When taken to the Union surgeon, his right arm was amputated at the shoulder. He was exchanged at City Point.
           
After Scott returned to the South and recovered from his surgery, he was later assigned to post duty at Selma, Alabama and other light duty assignments. He gained the rank of 1st Lieutenant.   He was in Opelika, Alabama at the close of war.  He served under Captain William L. Rowe and Commander John B. Gordon – Lightfoot.
           
The regiment surrendered with 4 officers and 80 men. Its commanders were Colonels John B. Gordon and John L. Seibels; Lieutenant Colonels B.H. Baker, Augustus M. Gordon, George W. Hooper, J.N. Lightfoot, and J.J. Willingham; and Majors I.F. Culver, S. Perry Nesmith, and Walter H. Weems.
           
In 1870 Scott resided in Lee of Opelika County.  He lived with Miss A. I. Roberson, a 26 year old white female who kept the house and Miss M. Colly, a 21 year old black female who was a cook.  Scott was listed as a grocer who had real estate valued at $600 and personal property valued at $800.  Next door there is a R. E. Scott, 62 years old and housekeeper living with N. Coker, a 26 year old female, a Miss S. C. Tally, 40 years old, and Miss E. B. Tally, 15 years old.  Also, living on the other side of Scott resided his  friend, M. W. Boswell, age 28 who was his comrade in the military and was working as a grocer.
           
In 1874 Scott served his community as the county’s tax collector.
           
Scott met and fell in love with Emma V. Brooks. They married in Muskogee County, Georgia on February 2, 1875.  Emma was born in Georgia. Their child from this union:

•    T. L. (daughter), born 1877 in Alabama.

After his term as tax collector was completed in 1876,  he ran for Lee County Sheriff and held this office for one year. The Lee County Sheriff's Office states on their web site that they are “extremely proud of its history... These men dedicated their lives to protecting the citizens of Lee County and to serving the court system.  Some of them served a year while others served more than 15, each with his own distinct story to tell. For now, we honor them by displaying their names and the dates that they served. In the future we hope to be able to tell a little about each of them.”
               
Scott was found in a book Senate of the United States in regards to elections held in his county.  Undoubtedly, question must have arose in regards to election corruption. Scott was asked questions concerning the elections of 1870 through 1876.  His transcript is as follows:
   
                    TESTIMONY OF ASBURY A. SCOTT.
    Washington, D. C., February 12, 1877. Asbury A. Scott sworn and examined.
    By Mr. Barnes :
    Question. Where do you reside?—Answer. Opelika, Lee County, Alabama.
    Q. How long have you resided there ?—A. I have resided there all my life—not all the time in that county. I was out of the county perhaps four years.
    Q. Did you reside there in 1870 ?—A. Yes.
    POPULATION OF OPELIKA.
    Q. Do you know anything as to what the population of Opelika was in 1870 ?—A. I moved there in the spring of 1870. I think it was about fifteen hundred or sixteen hundred.
    Q. Do you know what it was in 1874?—A. It had increased considerably. I suppose that there were four or five thousand inhabitants there then.
    Q. Do you know about what its population was in 1872 ?—A. The census was taken in 1871, and it was between eighteen hundred and nineteen hundred.
    Q. In 1871 ?—A. Yes, sir.
    Q. Were you present at the general election of 1874 at Opelika?—A. Yes, sir.
    Q. Did you hold any official position there ?—A. I was tax-collector of the county.
    Q. Do you know anything about the character of that election ? If so, state what it was.
    The Witness. In what respect ?
    Mr. Barnes. As to peace, order, and quiet.  A. I did not see any disturbance.
    Q. What sort of a canvass was that of 1874; I mean in relation to getting out the vote of Lee County ?—A. There was more effort demonstrated than I ever saw before in the county.
    Q. Do you know anything about the apathy of the democratic voters there in 1872 ?—A. I know there was a great many that had not voted up to that time—never had registered.
    Q. Up to 1872 ?—A. Yes, sir.
    DEMOCRATS VOTED IN 1874 WHO HAD NOT PREVIOUSLY VOTED.
    Q. Did they take an interest and register in 1872 ?—A. I don't think they did, sir; at least, I know a great many voted in 1874 that had not voted previous to that time.
    Q. Had not voted in the elections at all up to that time ?—A. Yes.
    Q. How many do you suppose J—A. Well, sir, I have no idea. I could not give an estimate of it, because I don't know. I only know of hearing of individual instances and parties repeating to me about people in their own sections of the county who had voted that time for the first time since the war.
    Q. Do you know any considerable number or any number of voters that could not vote in 1872 on account of the dissatisfaction with the presidential candidate of their party, Mr. Greeley ?—A. I do not at this time recollect how many there were. I remember hearing before the election a great many persons say that they were not going to vote, but whether they did vote or not I don't know. I never made any inquiries about it afterward.
    INCREASED VOTING POPULATION.
    Q. How much, do you suppose, was the increased voting population of Lee County? You say you were raised in that county; you were tax collector at that time, and went pretty generally over the county!—A. Yes.
    Q. How much do you suppose was the increased voting population, from natural causes, such as young men coming of age and parties going into the city of Opelika, between the election of 1872 and the election of 1874 ?
    The Witness. Do you want my estimate ?
    Mr. Barnes. I want the best estimate that you can give.  A. I cannot tell. I know that a great many in different parts of the county that came to Opelika. The voting population of that town increased considerably. They increased also at Brownville.
    By Mr. Turner :
    Q. Is that on the Georgia line ?—A. Yes.
By Mr. Barnes :
    Q. You are acquainted with the natural legitimate increase of that precinct, are you not?  The Witness. Of which precinct?
    Mr. Barnes. Of Brownville. You know, as a fact, that it did increase by the acquisition of inhabitants?  A. Yes, I know that it did increase.
    Q. Since 1874 up to 1876 what has been the character of the voters ; that is, whether there has been an increase or decrease in the emigration from the county or the immigration to it?—A. The advance has been considerable.
    Q. Since 1874 ?—A. Yes.
    DECREASE IN POPULATION OF OPELIKA UNFAVORABLE TO REPUBLICAN VOTE.
    Q. Do you know anything about the decrease of population in the city of Opelika 1—A. It has been considerable.
    Q. What party would have lost by that emigration ?—A. The republican party.
    Q. Then there was more colored emigration than white emigration ?— A. A great many more. In one section of the county, in one season, I think there were as high as five hundred reported to have left that section of the county for Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas—black people.
    Q. What was the character of the population; mostly men?—A. Voters. They were carried off as laborers; some of them carried off their families, and a great many left their families behind.
    Q. At the election of August, 1876, were you still in Lee County?— A. I was, sir.
    Q. What official position were you holding at that time?—A. Sheriff of the county.
    WITNESS WAS RETURNING-OFFICER IN AUGUST, 1876.
    Q. You superintended the election, did you?—A. Yes, sir; I was returning-officer for the county by virtue of being sheriff of the county.
    ELECTION QUIET AND FAIR IN AUGUST, 1876.
    Q. State to the committee, if you please, the character of that election for quiet and fairness.—A. That election was as quiet as any election. I think so, and I had my deputies in each beat in the county, and never beard of any disturbance in the county. Everything was reported to me to be quiet and peaceable.
    Q. State, then, as to the fairness of the election, so far as it came under your observation.—A. It was as fair as any election can be at Opelika, so far as I saw, and one of the republicans—the republican postmaster there at Opelika—told me afterward that it was a fair election. He made use of this remark to me: that I was one officer that discharged my duty impartially, and that if I ran for an office he would vote for me, even if I were a democrat.
    Q. That was in 1876, was it?—A. That was in 1876: yes, sir.
    Q. Do you know who were the managers of election in 1874 ?—A. The sheriff was the returning-officer at Opelika precinct. The law makes him the returning-officer for that precinct as well as the returning officer for the county.
    Q. Do you know who were the managers of the election at that time ?—A. I remember some of them, but I cannot positively remember all. Mr. Heyman was one, and O. A. Howell was another.
    Q. Is that at Opelika ?—A. Yes, sir; and there was one republican ; I don't know who he was.
    Q. Was Dallas his name?—A. I don't remember what his name was.
    Q. They were Federal supervisors, appointed for that place also?—A. He is the one that I say was appointed Federal supervisor.
    Q. Were there one or two ?—A. I don't remember about that.
    Q. They staid anywhere the election was, did they not ?—A. Yes.
    Q. In the November election of 1876 were you still sheriff?—A. Yes.
    Q. You superintended and held that election ?—A. Yes.
    ELECTION IN NOVEMBER, 1876, QUIET.
    Q. Will you state to the committee the character of that election?— A. It was fair. I never saw any disturbance or heard of any in the county.
    Q. And you have heard of none at either of those elections—in the August or November election—up to now, have you ?—A. No, sir.
    By Mr. MAYER:
    Q. What is the number of the Opelika precinct?—A. Number 2.
    Q. Did I understand you to say that Mr. Heymau was inside the voting-place at the Opelika precinct on election-day? The Witness. What election-day ?
    Q. The election-day of August, 1876.—A. No, sir; you did not understand me to say that.
    Q. Was there any republican there? The Witness. In August, 1876; inside?
    Mr. Mayer. Yes.  A. Yes.
               
In 1880 the Scotts remained in the City of  Lee in Opelika County.  Scott worked as a cotton broker and Emma took care of their house and daughter.
               
The Scotts relocated to Florida approximately February 1884 and settled in the city of Lakeland.  Scott was listed “among the business and professional men prominent in Lakeland during the early period. 
               
In 1886 Scott, along with several  business leaders of Lakeland, J. Eppes Tucker, Herbert J. Drane, L. L. Bistow, N. B. Bowyer, F. R. Green, W. B. Bonacker, and J. M. Perry led the movement to launch a county division initiative to secure the county set to their struggling town. “Bartow real estate man Judson O. Blount headed the opposition and defeated the proposal in the state legislature.”
               
On October 6, 1908  Scott, a resident of Lakeland, filed an Application for Pension under the Laws of Florida. He states he had requested a pension because he is “65 years of age, totally disabled.  Lost an arm (right) at Boonsboro on South Mountain, Md. I am now totally disabled by reason of paralysis (see Physicians certificate).”  Comrades William M. Boswell, late of Co. G, 1st Alabama and J. M. Robinson, late of Company H, 8th Confederate Cavalry, both residing in Polk County, that they were acquainted with Scott, that he served in the Confederate Army and he lost his arm.  U.  H. Hane, Adjutant of Camp #1543 of United Confederate Veteran, stated that Scott was a member of good standing. Physician L. F. Henley stated that he examined the applicant and reported, “That he is paralysis and totally disable to make a living by manual labor. Disability.”  His claim for pension, number 7408, was approved December 14, 1908 retroactive November 4, 1908 at the rate of $150 per annum.
               
On July 31, 1909 Scott, a resident of Lakeland, filed a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909.  He was 67 years old.  He stated he had property in Lakeland valued at $500, property outside of Lakeland in Polk County valued at $200, and his wife’s property in Atlanta, Georgia valued at $500.  Their personal property was valued at $200 and a mortgage or note on wife’s property valued at $125.  He had previously received a pension, number 7408, at the rate of $150 per annum. Physicians L. F. Henley and Dr. Groover examined the applicant and reported, “paralysis.”  His claim for pension, number 842, was approved on August 25, 1909 retroactive July 1, 1909 at the rate of $150 per annum.
               
Scott passed away on March 25, 1910 in Polk County, Florida.  He was laid to rest at Roselawn Cemetery, one of Lakeland’s oldest city cemeteries.  It is locate at Section 18, Township 28, Range 24, in Lakeland on East Parker Street and Ingraham Avenue.  The Confederate Veteran magazine listed him as “Captain A. A. Scott.”
               
On March 31, 1910 Mrs. Scott, a resident of Lakeland, filed a Widow’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909.  She stated that she had property in Atlanta, Georgia valued at $700, property in Lakeland valued at $1,500 and personal property valued at $100. She was filing the pension under “Capt. A. A. Scott’s service.”  Her claim for pension, number 5573, was approved on April 23, 1910 retroactive March 25, 1910 at the rate of $120.
               
Annie H. Darracott Chapter, No. 791, United Daughters of the Confederacy held a 17-Marker Dedication Ceremony was held on May 1, 2004, in conjunction with the chapter’s 100th Anniversary. Attending the special occasion was Florida Division President Meta Parkinson and Florida Division Vice President Faye Castile. The chapter paid tribute to Scott’s service.
               
Each year on April 26, Confederate Memorial Day, Scott  and his comrades are recognized for their honorable service to the Confederate States of America by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, in Lakeland.
David C. Skaggs
Veteran
David Skaggs
David C. Skaggs was born on September 22, 1845 in Missouri.
   
Historically, Missouri was sometimes considered a Southern state, chiefly because of the settlement of migrants from the South and its status as a slave state before the War Between the States. The counties that made up "Little Dixie" were those along the Missouri River in the center of the state, settled by Southern migrants who held the greatest concentration of slaves.
   
Residents of cities farther north and of the state's large metropolitan areas, where most of the state's population resides (Kansas City, St. Louis, and Columbia), typically consider themselves Midwestern. In rural areas and cities farther south, such as (Cape Girardeau, Poplar Bluff, Springfield, and Sikeston), residents typically self-identify as more Southern.
   
Skaggs enlisted on March 5, 1862 in the 10th Regiment Missouri Cavalry, Confederate States Army.  He served under Captain William Wether’s, General Sterling Price, and General Marmaduke’s Division.
   
The 10th Cavalry Regiment was organized in December, 1863, using M.L. Young's 11th Missouri Cavalry Battalion as its nucleus. It contained 559 officers and men. The unit served in C. Greene's and J.B. Clarke's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department, and skirmished in Arkansas and saw action in Price's Missouri Expedition.
   
During this operation it reported 16 killed, 56 wounded, and 73 missing. The regiment was included in the surrender in June, 1865. Its commanders were Colonel Robert R. Lawther, Lieutenant Colonel Merritt L. Young, and Major George W.C. Bennett.
   
Skaggs was taken as a prisoner of war and was taken into custody by the Union Forces at Bloomfield, Missouri.  He was held until the close of the war.
   
Skaggs made the journey back home and settled into the civilian life.  He met and fell in love with Miss Alice Norvell. They married on July 1, 1897 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Alice was born September 2, 1858 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.
   
The Skaggs’ removed to the State of Texas. After ten years they once again packed their belongings and relocated to the State of Florida on January 12, 1911.
   
Skaggs passed away on January 12, 1918 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida. He was laid to rest at Mount Tabor Cemetery. Mount Tabor Cemetery is located West of Galloway Road on Mount Tabor Road; Section 28, Township 27, Range 23, South of Kathleen Community. His obituary was listed in the Polk County Star of Lakeland on the 18th.
   
On January 15, 1919 Mrs. Skaggs, a resident of Lakeland, filed a Widow’s Pension. Comrades M. V. Baird and J. M. Walltrip, both of Dunklin County, Missouri gave sworn statements that they served with the applicant’s husband. Her claim for pension, number 21391, was not approved.
   
A blank widow’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1917 is in the pension file with the exception of her marriage information as stated below,
“State of Missouri
County of Cape Girardeau
I, F. H. Schrader of Cape Girardeau County, Missouri hereby certify that the records in this office show that a marriage license was issued to D. C. Skaggs and Alice Norvell on the 30th day of June, A.D. 1897. The records further show that the above named parties were married on the 1st day of July, A.D. 1897, and that the ceremony was performed by A. R. Willett. F. H. Schrader, Recorder of Deeds.”
   
It was received by the Pension Board on February 10, 1919. It was not granted.

On April 22 Ernest Amos, Comptroller sent three letters writes to the Adjutant-General in Washington D.C.,
“Dear Sir:
    J. M. Watthrip is witnessing an application for a pension under the Laws of Florida. Claims to have been a member of Capt. Wm. Mather’s 10th Missouri Cavlary Confederate States Army. Please furnish me with the record of this soldier. Yours Very Truly.”
   
A second letter to the Adjutant-General for the information on M. V. Baird. A third letter was asking for the record of D. C. Skaggs.
    On April 23, 1919 the Adjutant General’s Office, War Department in Washington, D.C., writes two letters,
    1) “A company muster roll of Co. G, (Capt. W. R. Wethers), 7th (Formerly designed the 10th) Regt. Mo. Cav., C.S.A., dated October 25, 1862 shows David Skaggs), private joined for duty and enrolled in Dunkin County, Mo, September 1, 1862.
Not found on the only other roll on file, for January. And February 1864.
    No record found of his capture or parole.”
    2) “A roster of the 1st Regt Infantry, 1st Division Mo. Stae Guard C.S.A. (For which no rolls are on file) shows: M. V. Baird, 2 Lt., Co. A, commencement Aug. 8, 1861, expiration January 4, 1862.
    A company muster roll of Co. G (Capt. W. R. Wethers) 7th.   (Formerly designated the 10th) Regt. Mo. Cav., C.S.A. dated October 25, 1862 shows: M. V. Baird 2" Sergt. Joined for duty and enrolled October 23, 1862 in Dunkin Co., Mo.
Not found on the only other roll on file for Jany. & Feby. 1864. No later record found.
    3) “A company muster roll of Co. G (Capt. W. R. Wethers) 7th. (Formerly designated the 10th ) Regt. Mo. Cav., C.S.A. dated October 25, 1862 shows: James Waltrip, pvt., joined for duty and enrolled in Dunkin Co., Mo. October 23, 1862.
    Not found on the only other roll on file for Jany. & Feby. 1864. Not fond as J. M. Waltrip.
   
On June 4, 1920 the Secretary of Sate board of Pensions writes to Adjutant General in Washington D.C.,
“Dear Sir:
    In re war service D.C. Skaggs as a member of Company G, Captain W. R. Weathers 7th regiment, Missouri Cavalry, C.S.A., I beg to advise that Mrs. Skaggs in application filed for pension in this office advises that her husband was captured at Bloomfield, Mo. at the close of the war.
    Kindly examine your records and see if record can be located. Yours Very Truly, Sinclair Wells.”
   
June 10, 1920 the Adjuant General wrotes to State Board of Pensions in Tallahassee, Fla.,
“David Scaggs (name not found as D.C. Skaggs) Pvt. Co. G (Capt. W. R. Wethers) 7 Regt. Mo. Cavy C.S.A. Enlsited September 1, 1862 Dunklin County, Mo. This name appears only on Muster roll dated October 25, 1862. Presence or absent not stated. There is but one other roll of this Co. On file in this office namely Jany & Feby 1864. No record of capture or parole has been found.”
   
On October 21, 1922 Mrs. Skaggs of Polk County gave a sworn affidavit,
    “This is to certify that before me, the undersigned authority, personally appeared Alice Norvell Skaggs, known to me and known to me to be the widow of David C. Skaggs, and who states that the constantly lived with David C. Skaggs, now deceased, from the time of their marriage in 1897 until his death in 1918, a period of twenty years.
    Affiant further states that during their married life he often told her that he was a prisoner of war in the custody of the Union forces, at Bloomfield, Mo. At the close of the war, and often referred to incidents of his prison life, and that he spoke of it so often and in such a natural way that she verily believes the statements he made were truthful in every particular. Notarized by A. M. Franklin.”
   
On October 21, 1922 Herbert Drane, House of Representatives, U.S., Washington D.C. at Lakeland, Florida to the Secretary of the Board of Pensions, Tallahassee, Florida,
“Dear Mr. Secretary:-
    Mrs. David C. Skaggs, the widow of David C. Skaggs, has requested me to write you in her behalf, so far as I consistently can, from personal knowledge. The soldier and his wife came to Lakeland in 1911. He died in 1918. He was always known and recognized by those who came in contact with him, as a Confederate Veteran and his record as such was never questioned, so far as I know. Mrs. Skaggs is recognized as a lady of high moral character, is past the age of sixty-four, and is in great need.
    I would appreciate your courtesy if you would review the record in the case of this application, and extend to her every consideration possible under the rules of propriety.
With very kind personal regard I am, dear Sir, Yours very truly.”
   
On November 10, 1922 Ernest Amos, Comptroller of the State of Florida writes to The Adjutant General, Washington, D.C.,
“Dear Sir:
D. C. Skaggs, whose widow is applying for a pension, claims to have been a prisoner of war in the custody of the Union Forces at Bloomfield, Mo. at the close of the war. If you can furnish me with an official record of same, it will be appreciated very much by both Mrs. Skaggs and myself. Yours very truly.”
   
On November 10, 1922 the Comptroller writes to Hon. Herber J. Drane, Lakeland, Florida,
“Dear Mr. Drane:
    Your letter of recent date in connection with pension for Mrs. D. C. Skaggs received and upon reference to this application, which I find was denied by the Board on account of insufficient proof. I beg to advise as follows: Mrs. Skaggs has furnished the affidavits of a Commissioned Officer and one comrade. The witnesses state that they do not know if Mr. Skaggs was with his command when the war ended. The War Department at Washington has furnished records showing that both Mr. Skaggs and his witnesses were enrolled but nothing more than enrollment is furnished. In other words there is proof to show that Mr. Skaggs and the two witnesses to his service enlisted in September ‘62 but although there are roll calls of the Company as late as ‘64, none of the names show thereon. The Board declined to allow this application and requested Mrs. Skaggs to furnish proof to show that her husband was in the service when the war ended.
    If you will recall the affidavit sent up by Mrs. Skaggs can make no material change in the status of the application, however, I have addressed a communication to the War Department with the request that a careful search be made in an effort to locate a records of his capture and detention at Bloomfield, Mo. When the war ended. I will be very glad to mail you copy. Yours very truly.”
   
On November 14, 1922 the Adjutant General writes to Ernest Amos, Comptroller of the State of Florida in Tallahassee, Florida,
“The name D. C. Skaggs has not been found on Gen. Index, C.S.A. Statements of the service of David Skaggs, Pvt.Co.G,7 Regt. Mo.Cav. C.S.A. were mailed your office Apr.23.1919. And June 10, 1920. To which your attention is respectfully invited.”
   
Mrs. Skaggs learns her fate from the Comptroller, Board of Pensions of Tallahassee.  On November 27, 1922 The Comptroller writes a letter to Mrs. D. C. Skaggs of Lakeland, Fla.,
“Dear Madam:
    referring to your application for pension, and also to your affidavit of October 21, in which you advise that your husband had told you during his life time that he was a prisoner of war at Bloomfield, Mo., I beg to advise that I addressed a communication to the Adjutant General at Washington with the request that a further investigation be made. I am advised by the War Department that no record of the service is found other than the one furnished this office sometime ago which shows your husband as present on muster roll of October 25, 1862.
    I am exceedingly sorry, Mrs. Skaggs, that the records are so scant that they are insufficient upon which a pension can be granted. Yours very truly.”
   
On August 21, 2004 at 10 o’clock president Sheila Tindle and her chapter, Annie H. Darracott, No. 791, United Daughters of the Confederacy, gave a Memorial Service and Dedication of Six Confederate Markers. There were approximately 160 descendants, friends, and families present during the hour dedication. Skaggs service was recognized at this ceremony.
   
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, recognizes the honorable service of Skaggs and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Franklin R. Shepherd
Citrus Grower, Veteran and Boarding House Manager
Franklin Shepherd

Franklin “Frank” R. Shepherd was born on April 16, 1844 in Clarke County, Virginia. He was the son of P. D. and Mary A. Sheppard. Both parents were born in Virginia.
  
In 1860 the Shephard family resided in Clarke County, Virginia. Frank, at the age of 15, worked on the family farm that was valued at $22,500. They had personal property valued at $12,000.
   
On April 17, 1861 Virginia seceded from the union after Fort Sumter, South Carolina was fired upon on April 12th. When the call came to take up arms, 18-year-old Shepherd enlisted on March 17, 1862 (or April 18) near Cedar Creek as a private in Company I, 2 Virginia Infantry, Confederate States Army. Shepherd served under Captain S. J. C. Moore. He was 5’8”, light complexion, gray eyes, and brown hair.
   
At the Battle of Gettysburg, he was taken as a prisoner-of-war on July 4, 1863 and taken to Fort McHenry, Fort Delaware, and then to Point Lookout, Maryland. He was held for 21 months and 11 days as a prisoner. During his confinement he contracted chronic diarrhea. He was exchanged on February 18, 1865 and paroled on April 24, 1865 at Winchester, Virginia.
   
The 2nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry, was assembled at Charles Town in April, 1861, then moved to Harper's Ferry to seize the armory. The unit was accepted into Confederate service in July. Its companies were from the counties of Clarke, Frederick, Floyd, Jefferson, and Berkeley.
   
It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under Generals T.J. Jackson, R.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry. The 2nd fought at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson's Valley Campaign. It went on to fight with the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor except during the Maryland Campaign when it was detached to Martinsburg as provost guards. Later the unit was involved in Early's operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox operations.
   
It reported 90 casualties at First Kernstown, 25 at Cross Keys and Port Republic, 27 at Gaines' Mill, and 77 at Second Manassas. The regiment lost 2 killed and 19 wounded at Fredericksburg, had 8 killed and 58 wounded at Chancellorsville, and had about eight percent of the 333 engaged at Gettysburg disabled.
   
On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 62 men. Its field officers were Colonels James W. Allen, Lawson Botts, and John Q.A. Nadenbousch; Lieutenant Colonels Raleigh T. Colston, Francis Lackland, and William W. Randolph; and Majors Francis B. Jones, Edwin L. Moore, and Charles H. Stewart.
   
He was discharged on March 21, 1865 in Frederick County, Virginia.
   
Shepherd met and fell in love with Miss Anna Sales. On October 22, 1867 they wed in Caroline County, Virginia. Their children from this union:
•    Willie, born 1868 in Clarke County, Virginia
•    Elmer, born August 1880 in Orange County, Georgia, interred December 8 1950 in Lakeview Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida
•    5 unknown children
   
By 1880 the Shepherd family moved to Division 3 in Orange County, Florida. Shepherd and his brothers, Alpheus and S.P., developed their lands to produce citrus. Anna took care of the house and children.
  
By 1900 they have settled in Precinct No. 10 of Lakeland in Polk County. They had been married for 32 years having 7 children and 2 remained living. Shepherd, now 56, ran a boarding house. Those who rented from the Shepherd’s that year were Frank McDonald, John Bailey and Eugene Spearman.
  
On September 7, 1903 Shepherd, a resident of Lakeland, filed a Soldier’s Application for Pension. During his incarceration as a prisoner of war, he “contracted a chronic diarrhea which has ever since disabled me and I have never been cured of the said disease. It total disables me from per forming any manual labor.” Comrades John R. Shipe and Thomas D. Gold, both of Clarke County, Virginia, stated that they served with him, that he was sick with diarrhea, and that he never deserted the Confederate Army. Physicians L. F. Henley and Joseph Forbes, both of Lakeland, examined the applicant and reported, “Him suffering from chronic diarrhea and general senility and that he has suffered with the chronic diarrhea ever since he was a soldier in Confederate Army and he is not now able to perform manual labor.” His claim for pension, number 2396, was approved on September 25 with pay retroactive for September 9, 1903 at the rate of $96 per annum.
   
Shepherd passed away on November 18, 1904 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida. He was interred in Lakeview Cemetery, one of Lakeland’s oldest city cemeteries. Lakeview Cemetery is located Lakeland, corner of East Parker Street and Ingraham Avenue, east of Old Searstown; Section 18, Township 25, Range 24.
   
On October 9, 1905 Mrs. Shepherd, a 50-year-old resident of Lakeland, filed a Widow’s Application for Pension. She stated, “my husband was drawing a pension from the state of Florida for several years prior and at the time of his death in November 1904. The pension board is respectfully referred to his original papers on file in Tallahassee.” Comrades Saml. C. Moore and Thomas D. Gold, both of Perryville, Virginia stated that they served with Shepherd. Physician L. F. Henley of Lakeland stated, “F. R. Shepherd and are satisfied that he died of paralysis, though he had been under my treatment for chronic troubles for years.”
   
On January 4, 1906 a letter written by H. Drane of Lakeland, Florida for Mrs. Shepherd to Hon. C. H. Dickinson, Secretary Pension Board of Tallahassee, Fla.,
“Dear Sir:-
Mrs. Shepherd, a worth widow of this town, has asked me to forward the enclosed application to the Board. I trust you will find the paper in order and that the good woman may soon have her pension. She works very hard, keeping boarders, and has no other support, save the services (of questionable value) of a half demented son.
You member Mr. Shepherd, who used to represent Orange County in the Legislature, when you and I were clerks? This lady is a sister-in-law of his. With kind regard and best wishes, I am, dear Sir., Yours very truly.”
   
Her claim for pension, number 120, was approved on March 12, 1906 at the rate of $96 per annum. There was a notation that her pension was increased to $120.
On August 7, 1909 Mrs. Shepherd, a resident of Lakeland, filed a Widow’s Pension Claim under the act of 1909. She stated that she had personal property valued at $300. She previously received a pension, number 2396. She signed her pension as Mrs. F. R. Shepherd. Her claim for pension, number 4580 was approved on September 23, 1909 retroactive July 1, 1909 at the rate of $120 per annum.
   
On October 31, 2003 Sheila Tindle, a member of the Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, United Daughters of the Confederacy ordered a military marker from the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C.
   
On Saturday, May 1, 2004, Shepherd, one of seventeen markers placed, was honored with a Marker Dedication Ceremony, in conjunction with the chapter’s 100th anniversary celebration. Attending the special occasion was Florida Division President Meta Parkinson and Florida Division Vice President Faye Castile..
   
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26th, the chapter recognizes Shepherd and his comrades honorable service to the Confederate States of America.
Robert "Rab" Rufus Smith
Veteran, Bounty Hunter and Entrepreneur
Robert Rufus SmithR. R. Smith

Photograph Courtsey of Jennifer Nichols
Prepared by the family of Rab Smith:
Mary Traylor Lyons, Kathy Best Brosky, Jennifer Taylor Nichols, Jeff & Shelda Gary in Deepest Appreciation and Honor


In 1838 Robert Rufus Smith was born in Wilcox County Alabama to Seth Smith and Nancy Rackley Smith.
           
Seth Smith died fighting in the Alabama Creek Indian uprising.  Shortly thereafter when Rab was 12 years old his mother died, leaving him with no living relatives.  Tradition has it that Rab, at the young age of 12, set out on foot to Florida, heading to Calhoun County.  Brave Rab made it to  Calhoun County and was befriended by a black preacher (free-man) named Nathaniel Hiers.  Preacher Hiers took Rab in and taught him to read and write the "Old English" style that was common in those days. 
           
Until Rab was 20 years old he remained with Preacher Hiers who, according to census documents, was a "shingle cutter".  A man named Halcomb Hagan lived in Calhoun County and also befriended young Rab.  Halcomb Hagan had 5 sons near the age of Rab.  Rab, along with Hagan's 5 son's entered the Civil War together.
           
Rab enlisted at Apalatchicola, Florida on 10 March 1862.  He enlisted as a Sergeant in Company E, 5th Battalion, Florida Cavalry, Confederate States Army.
           
The  5th Cavalry Battalion was organized during the summer of 1863 with eight companies. Its members were recruited in the counties of Jackson, Gadsden, Leon, Escambia, Columbia, and Wakulla. It served in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, and took an active part in the battles of Olustee, Gainesville, Milton, and Braddock's Farm. The unit surrendered at Tallahassee on May 10, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel George W. Scott and Major William H. Milton were in command.
           
He later transferred into Company A, 2nd Florida Cavalry and Co. H, 1st Florida Cavalry.  Rab was paroled at Quincy, Florida 22 May 1865.
           
Upon Rab's discharge he returned home to Calhoun County and married Halcomb Hagan's eldest daughter, Sarah Louisa on 5 September 1866.  Rab supported his family as a
bounty hunter and entrepreneur living most of his married life in Sumter County.  Later in life he settled in Auburndale, Polk County, where he died at the home of his only living daughter, Mary Dove (Smith) Norman.
           
On Saturday, May 6, 2000 9AM at Gapway Cemetery in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida, the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, General E. M. Law Camp, No. 1323, The United Daughters of the Confederacy,  Annie H. Dararcott, No. 791 & Color Guard held a marker dedication for Smith.  Several friends and descendants were present to honor their ancestor.
           
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Smith and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Zachariah Seward
Farmer and Veteran
           
Zachariah Seward was born in 1816.    Believed to have married Sarah.
           
The Seward family settled in Carroll County, Mississippi around the early 1830s.  The church rolls of Carrollton Baptist Church reflect their membership as early as August 24, 1833.  They withdrew their membership January 1, 1852, probably in preparation for their relocation to Florida.
          
 “Early in 1854 the community near Fort Fraser had been enlarged by the arrival from Mississippi of Zachariah G. Seward, Henry S. Seward, and their families. Along with the Sewards came as many as twelve slaves, including Charity, Jim, Sarah, Frank, and Matilda. On September 3, 1854, these families, including pre-existing settlers, organized the first Christian congregation in the Peace River Valley, the Baptist Church of Christ as Peas Creek, which numbered among its first eight members the slave Jim Seward.”
           
The Bureau of Land Management issued a land patent to Seward on October 2, 1854 for 79.76 acres, on April 2, 1855 for 80.08 acres, and on August 1, 1860 for 79.64 acres.
           
On the Polk County Tax Roll for 1861 Seward paid $25.25 for taxes on 600 acres and 6 slaves. That year he also paid $6 in taxes on the estate of Z & M.B. Seward for 320 acres.  In 1862 it was reported that Seward had 400 acres, 6 slaves, and 90 head of live stock and was taxed $22.68.  Again he paid the taxes on the estates of Z. & M.B. Seward at $5.26 for 320 acres. In 1866 Seward had 440 acres and paid $16.89 in taxes.  He was listed as Administrator and paid the taxes for W.B. Seward at $3.75 and W. Z. Seward for 160 acres at $1.95.
           
Florida seceded from the union on January 10, 1861.  The organization of the local military, the 7th Florida Regiment, was a slow moving process.  Commissions for the officers were not available until late July, and the first full-scale muster of the Peace River company does not appear to have taken place until April 27, 1861, seven weeks after president Lincoln’s inauguration.  Thereafter, for almost a year, the company met “at stated times” at the county seat “to practice mustering.”  On March 10, 1862, it and all other Florida militia companies were abolished by the Florida legislature.
           
Perhaps out of frustration with the leadership and progress of the militia, a separate company of mounted volunteers was organized at Fort Meade the week of the Lincoln’s inauguration. Nicknamed the “Hickory Boys,’ this company elected Streaty Parker as its captain and John R. Durrance and Zachariah Seward as its lieutenants. A detachment of the company under the command of John R. Durrance took up station at Fort Meade from July 14 to August 27, 1861.”
           
Seward enlisted in 7th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army as Second Lieutenant.  The unit was nicknamed “South Florida Bulldogs.”
           
The 7th Infantry Regiment was organized at Gainesville, Florida, in April, 1862. Its companies were recruited in the counties of Bradford, Hillsborough, Alachua, Manatee, and Marion. During the war it served in R.C. Trigg's, Finley's, and J.A. Smith's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. The 7th took an active part in the arduous campaigns of the army from Chickamauga to Nashville, then fought its last battle at Bentonville. It sustained few casualties at Chickamauga and in December, 1863, totaled 278 men and 206 arms.
           
The unit surrendered on April 26, 1865. Its commanders were Colonels Robert Bullock and Madison S. Perry, Lieutenant Colonel Tillman Ingram, and Major Nathan S. Blount.
           
Seward passed away in 1868 and was laid to rest in Seward Lake Cemetery. Seward Lake Cemetery is located west of Highland City on Lake Seward, Section 22, Township 29, Range 24.
           
In the Polk County Historical Association Quarterly of June 1982 it reported Z. Seward as  2nd Lieutenant on the monument, The Sons of Confederate Veterans have erected a black granite marker on the Courthouse lawn to perpetuate the member of Polk County’s earliest and finest heroes.
           
They left Bartow on March 8, 1862 and marched thru the woods to Gainesville to be mustered in as Company E, 7th Florida Regiment.
           
They subscribed to the same conviction that President Jefferson Davis expressed to the CS Congress and the world:  “We seek no conquest – all we ask is to be left alone.”

We honor these Polk County Soldiers with reverence, affection and undying remembrance.”
           
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Dararcott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Seward and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Orvil Sloan
Veteran
O. SloanO. Sloan

Orvil Sloan was born on August 11, 1840 in Thomas County, Georgia. He was the son of Daniel and Nancy Lanier Sloan. His family relocated to Florida after 1850.
Florida seceded from the union on January 10, 1861. Sloan enlisted in 1861 at Tampa as a private in Company B, 7th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army. He served under Captain Gettis.
   
The 7th Infantry Regiment was organized at Gainesville, Florida, in April, 1862. Its companies were recruited in the counties of Bradford, Hillsborough, Alachua, Manatee, and Marion.
   
During the war it served in R.C. Trigg's, Finley's, and J.A. Smith's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. The 7th took an active part in the arduous campaigns of the army from Chickamauga to Nashville, then fought its last battle at Bentonville. It sustained few casualties at Chickamauga and in December, 1863, totaled 278 men and 206 arms.
Sloan was injured in his left arm from being shot.
   
The unit surrendered on April 26, 1865. Its commanders were Colonels Robert Bullock and Madison S. Perry, Lieutenant Colonel Tillman Ingram, and Major Nathan S. Blount.
   
At the time of the surrendered of the army, Sloan was on detail service near Kissimmee collecting beef cattle for the Confederate army. He was discharged by Captain John T. Lesley, Ex-Governor Perry and Colonel Robert Bullock from the army in May of 1865 near Fort Meade, Florida.
   
Sloan met and fell in love with Miss Sarah M. Frier. They married January 14, 1864 in Polk County, Florida. Sarah was born on August 6, 1843 in Lowndes County, Georgia. Their children from this union:
• Daniel Henry, Sr., born October 18, 1864 in Polk County, Florida, married Ruby Estelle Wilder on March 14, 1886 in Polk County, Florida, died November 1, 1934, interred at Socrum Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida
• Aaron E., born about 1873, married Miss Eddie Wilder on February 23, 1893 in Polk County, Florida.
• 10 children unknown
   
By 1860 the Sloan family have settled in Hillsborough County. In 1866 Sloan pay Polk County taxes at the rate of $11.82.
   
On December 27, 1880 he is found on a list for Precinct 9, Lakeland, Polk County.
   
On September 4, 1905 Sloan, a resident of Lakeland, filed an Application for Pension under Laws of Florida. “I’m over 65 years of age and by reason there of incapable of providing a living for himself.” He reported that he had one horse valued at $40 and personal property valued at $50. Have “4 sons and 4 daughters – they have all they can support in their own families.” He has not been able to perform any manual labor to support his family. Comrades, J. W. Bryant and John W. Lanier, both “late of Capt. Lesley’s “B” 7th Florida, gave sworn statements that they served with Sloan, that he did not desert the army.” Adjutant, U. H. Hane, of Lakeland Camp, United Confederate Veterans stated that Sloan was a member of good standing. His claim for pension, number 3696, was submitted on September 26, 1905 and not approved. It was sent back for a physician’s certificate.
   
On February 19, 1906 Dr. L. F. Henley, M.D. gave sworn statement, “Upon being duly sworn L.F. Henley, M.D. deposes and says that he is well acquainted with Orvil Sloan, of Lakeland, Florida, who has made an application for a pension that on account of old age and an injury in his left arm from being shot therein, he is unable to gain a livelihood from manual labor and that he hasn’t any income from any source whatever that he knows of.”
   
It was approved on March 12, 1906 at the rate of $96 with an increase of $120 per annum.
   
On July 12, 1909 Sloan, a resident of Polk County, filed a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909. He stated that he was 68 11/12 years. He stated the has no real estate and that his personal property was valued at $100. He previously received a pension, number 3696, at the rate of $120 per annum. Doctors L. F. Henley and C. W. Holloway examined the applicant and reported, “Age and cripple arm and hand.” His claim for pension, number 796, was approved on August 25, 1909 retroactive July 1, 1909 at the rate of $120 per annum.
   
The War Department wrote to the pension board on August 30, 1909 giving details to Sloan’s service, “The records show that Orville Sloan, private, Company B, 7th Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army, enlisted March 10, 1862, for the war. On the company roll dated February 29, 1864 (the last roll on file), he is reported absent, “detailed to drive cattle in Fla., October 16, 1863.” No further record of him has been found.”
   
In 1910 Sloan is retired at the age of 69. He and Sarah had been married for 47 years and had 12 children.
   
On May 27, 1911 Sloan submitted an Application for Increase of Pension. Pension No. 796 increased to $120 per annum. “Affiant is suffering with rheumatism on both shoulders to the extent that he cannot perform manual labor also has heart disease, blind to the extent that he can scarcely see to do any work; and has lost the entire use of this left arm.” Doctors J. D. Griffin and L. F. Hensley, “That Orvil Sloan has chronic Rheumatism very deficient eye sight, and is paralyzed in left arm all of which render him unable to perform any kind of work.” He was granted an increase of $150 per annum.

Sloan passed away on April 13, 1925 and was laid to rest at Socrum Cemetery. Socrum Cemetery is also known as Bethel Baptist Cemetery at the Bethel Baptist Church. It is located 10 miles north of Lakeland on State Road 35A, Section 4, Township 27, Range 23.
  
Letters in Sloan’s pension file requesting copies of his pension records were requested by:
    1) On April 9, 19-Safety-3, Mr. D. H. Sloan, Jr., Clerk of the Circuit Court, P. O. Box 511, Bartow Florida for “ a copy of Application for Confederate pension which was approved under date of March 13, 1906, and photo static copy of this application is also enclosed, the military service record with the C.S.A. being set forth in the body of this application.”
    2) On March 29, 1967 Gen. A. Lester Henderson, Treas., 402 East Huntingdon Street, Savannah, Georgia 31401 Requested a copy of Sloan’s pension records.
    3) On April 17, 1968 Mrs. Venetia Dees, P. O. Box 425 Alhambra, California 91802 requested a copy of Sloan’s Pension records.
   
On August 23, 2005 Sheila Tindle, member of Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, United Daughters of the Confederacy ordered a military marker for Sloan from the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C. It arrived on November 22, 1905 and was placed on his grave.
   
On August 23, 2005 Sheila Tindle, member of United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, ordered a military marker from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, D.C. The marker arrived at Bethel Baptist Church on November 22, 2005 and it was placed on his grave.
   
On January 28, 2006, Annie H. Darracott Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, hosted a ceremony at Socrum Cemetery at Bethel Baptist Church to honor the memories of twenty-seven Confederate soldiers. Twenty-five of them were from Florida, one from Georgia, and one from South Carolina
   
Chapter President Sheila Tindle gave the dedication of grave markers, followed by a rifle salute by members of General Jubal A. Early, Camp 556, a cannon salute by Grayson Artillery, Pvt. Wm. Riley Milton, Camp 741, and taps by bugler Ken Murphy, Past 3rd Lt. Commander, Fla. Div., SCV & John T. Lesley Camp 31282. The ceremony also included an invocation, the reading of several Southern poems, beautiful music, and a reception in the Church Fellowship Hall.
   
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Sloan and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
James Harrison Spence
Farmer, Carpenter and Veteran
James Spence
           
James Harrison Spence was born on March 18, 1845 in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia.  He was the son of James and Laura Ellen Spence.  James Sr. was born in 1825 in Georgia. Laura was born in 1825 in Georgia.
           
Mississippi seceded from the union on January 9, 1861.  Spence enlisted as a private in Company C, 31st Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, Confederate States Army.
           
The 31st Infantry Regiment was organized in March, 1862, using the 6th (Orr's) Mississippi Infantry Battalion as its nucleus.
           
The unit served in Rust's, L. Hebert's, and Featherston's Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. It was part of the garrison at Vicksburg, then fought at Baton Rouge and Jackson. Later it continued the fight under General Featherson in the Army of Tennessee.
           
The 31st was active throughout the Atlanta Campaign, endured Hood's winter operations in Tennessee, and saw action in North Carolina.  It lost 10 killed and 37 wounded at Baton Rouge, and of the 215 engaged at Peach Tree Creek, seventy-six percent were disabled. In December, 1864, there were 86 men present for duty, and only a handful surrendered in April, 1865.  The field officers were Colonels J.A. Orr and Marcus D.L. Stephens, Lieutenant Colonels John W. Balfour and James W. Drane, and Majors Francis M. Gillespie and H.E. Topp.
           
In 1870 Spence, age 22, resided in Dooly County, Georgia with his parents. He worked as a farm laborer and his father is listed as working in the Ministry. Spence met and fell in love with Miss Mary Elizabeth Pipkin.  They married on April 6, 1871 in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia. She was born on November 18, 1854 in Dooly County, Georgia. She is the daughter of Nathan Lewi Pipkin and Margaret Elizabeth Hart Pipkin.  Their children from this union:
•    James Robert, born May 29, 1875 in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, died May 23, 1904 in Polk County, Florida.
•    Lillia, born 1879 in Dooly County, Georgia, married Archibald F. Fletcher on March 24, 1898 in Polk County, Florida
•    Carrie E., born May 1881 in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, married Ose O. Hubbard on December 25, 1903 in Polk County, Florida.
•    Hallie, born April 3, 1883 in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, married W. K. Coleman on June 2, 1905 in Polk County, Florida; died July 3, 1973 in Arcadia, Desoto County, Florida.
•    Grover Cleveland, born March 1885 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida, died 1958; interred at Fitzgerald Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.
•    Beatrice Della, born March 1888 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida, married John Leslie Clark on December 26, 1909 in Polk County, Florida.
•    Nathaniel Levi, born October 28, 1890 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida, died May 2, 1911 in Polk County, Florida; interred at Fitzgerald Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.
•    Bertha E., born December 1893 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida, married F. M. Jolly on July 20, 1911 in Polk County, Florida.
•    William Flave, born February 22, 1896 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida, died December 26, 1970 in Polk County, Florida; interred at Fitzgerald Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.
           
By 1883 they relocated to Polk County, Florida.  Beulah Pipkin wrote in the Polk County Historical Association Quarterly, “My uncle Jim Spence, who came with the Nathan Pipkin family in 1883, took out a 180 acre homestead on the east side of Land Pebble Road. He cut the timber and logs from the heavily timbered land to haul logs by tram rail to the Land Pebble Mine to make steam for the shovels. He made his living doing that while living in Greenwood.
           
Land Pebble Phosphate Company’s rapid growth was the reason for moving and building houses in the Pebble Heights community in 1878. When this mine was made, there were no railroads, no Mulberry or Lakeland in Polk County.”
           
Hazel L. Bowman wrote in the Quarterly, “Other members of the Pipkin wagon train were the son-in-law and daughter, John T. Margaret Estella Mitchell, the James Pollocks, and the James Spences.  The Spence family settled just north of Nathan Pipkin on the road to Bartow.”
           
In 1890 the Bureau of Land Management issued a land patent to Spence for 159.76 acres located at W1/2NE Section 30, Township 29-S Range 24-E, E1/2NW Section 30 Township 29-S Range 24-E in Polk County.
           
Spence was a prominent citizen in the city of Mulberry in the early years.  Some of his closest acquaintances in 1895 were with Doctor A. F. Fletcher, Mulberry’s first physician, Mr. McKilley, L. N. Pipkin.
           
In 1900 Spence’s occupation was a wood contractor.
           
Tragedy stuck the Spence household when James, age  57,  passed away on July 27, 1902 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.  He was laid to rest at Fitzgerald Cemetery.  The cemetery is located South of Lakeland on Fitzgerald Road; Section 12, Township 29, Range 23 in the Medulla Community.  Mary passed away June 18, 1937 and was interred beside her husband.
          
 Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Spence and his comrades to the Confederate States of American.
Wade (William) Hampton Stalls
Farmer and Veteran
William Hampton Stalls
Wade (William) Hampton Stalls was born October 24, 1844 in Hamilton County, Florida.  The family relocated to Florida on October 13, 1848.  In his later years he went by William Hampton Stalls. 
           
On January 10, 1861 Florida seceded from the union. Stalls, age 20, enlisted at Camp Finnegan in Co. E, 1st Battalion Special Cavalry Florida, Confederate States Army.
           
The 1st Battalion, Florida Special Cavalry, the 1st Special Infantry Battalion, originally mustered as artillery, was organized during the fall of 1861 with six companies which totaled 577 officers and men. The unit served in Florida, Georgia, and in the Charleston area before fighting at Olustee in February, 1864.
           
Stalls fought in the Battle of Olustee, Lake City, Florida on February 20, 1864 and in the Battle of Mouth of McGurt’s Creek at St. John’s River on March 1, 1864. The Confederates fortified a position above McGirt's Creek 12 miles west of Jacksonville, where by March 1 the new commander for Florida, Major Gen James Patton Anderson, had over 8,000 troops. The expected renewal of the fighting never occurred.
           
He was discharged at Lake City, Florida due to “being too light or too small.”  His  unit continued on and during June it moved to Virginia and became part of the 10th Florida Infantry Regiment. Lieutenant Colonels Daniel P. Holland and Charles F. Hopkins and Major William W. Scott were in command. 
           
Stalls was at home by the close of war.
           
Stalls met and fell in love with Miss Rebecca “Beckey” A. McClelland.   They were married on April 26, 1872 in Polk County, Florida.  She was born on October 24, 1855 in Hillsborough County, Florida.  She is the daughter of John Lane McClelland and Winnie Vickers McClelland.  Their children from this union:
•    William Cornelius “Neil” (Stauls), born July 4, 1873 in Polk County, Florida, married Louisa Maloy on April 26, 1872 in Polk County, Florida
•    Henrietta, born January 12, 1876 in Florida, died October 2, 1909, buried at Gapway Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida
•    Alexander, born December 12, 1882, died February 3, 1883, buried at Gapway Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida
•    Alice B., born June 1884 in Florida, married James Silcox on October 19, 1905 in Polk County, Florida
•    Barbara, born November  1886 in Florida, married Walter J. Langford on June 8, 1905 in Polk County, Florida
•    John H., born December 1889 in Florida;  married Ethel Regan on January 30, 1911 in Polk County, Florida.
•    Virginia, married Thomas C. Lewis on June 30, 1892 in Polk County, Florida
•    Thelma Elizabeth, twin of Velma, born March 1894, died in infancy
•    Velma, twin of Thelma, born March 1894, died in infancy
•    Henry N., born May 1896 in Florida
•    Winnie, married F. S. Reynolds on June 30, 1898 in Polk County, Florida
•    Victoria, born March 1899 in Florida.
•    Frances Zenobia
•    One  unknown child
           
By 1900 Stalls resided at the 11th Precinct in Lakeland, Polk County.  He is listed at William, works as a farmer and owns his property. They had been married for 27 years having 14 children and only 11 remained living.
           
On June 19, 1914 Stalls filed a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1913.  He was a resident Pebbledale and was 66 years-of-age.  He gives details that he was born October 13, 1848 in Hamilton County, Georgia.  This cannot be correct because there is no Hamilton County, Georgia.  His headstone reflects the birth date as being October 24, 1844.  He stated that he had a horse and 6 acres in the country in Pebbledale valued at $2,000 and one house valued at $75.  He was partially paralyzed and his mind was weak.  He received his mail in Bartow at P.F.D. No. 3.  Physicians W. R. Groover and J. D. Griffin examined the applicant and reported, “Partial paralysis of left side and injury being sufficient to prevent him from making a living.”  Comrade Jordan Cribbs  and Owen B. Cribbs, both of Hamilton County, Florida stated that they served with Stalls in E, First Florida Battalion.  J.Cribbs said he was discharged due to his “being small to carry” and O. Cribbs said it was “his size, youth.”  His pension was not approved.
           
The War Department wrote that there was no record found of Stalls service.
           
On January 18, 1915 Secretary of the Pension Board wrote to Mr. Wade H. Stalls of R. F. D. #3, Bartow, Florida,
“Dear Sir:-
            Your pension claim has been considered by the State Board of Pensions and not allowed for the reason that you have failed to show  that you served twelve months or was in the service at the close of the war.  Yours very truly, #19909.”
           
A letter wrote on January 20, 1915 from W. H. Stalls of Bartow, Florida to Mr. M. Y. Mcintosh,
“Dear Sir
            I will write you in regard of my pension and in a.m. to yours just received as I have stated before I joined Dickerson Co. February 2, 1863 at Camp Finigan and remain with the company until the close of the war in 1865 then they took us to the whitehouse near Jacksonville there I took the oath and was dismist there but I don’t rember just what day of the month it was in May 1865. The only man that I know that was discharged the same day of war is Bob Taylor and I don’t know where he is at we both took the oath at the same time we went in by two and he and I went in and came out together as there such a man showing a pension if I could find him he would be my mane witness if he is showing please let me know at once yours Respectifully, W. H. Stalls.”  (typed as written)
           
On September 26, 1914 Secretary of the pension board wrote to Stalls,
“Dear Sir:
            In Re: Pension Claim #19909:
            Your application for pension has been considered by the State Board of Pensions and I am directed to say that you have failed to show twelve months service, -the length of time required under the present law.  Inquiry has been made of the war department at Washington with a view to assisting you in making complete proof but no record of your service is reported. Yours very truly."

Stalls passed away March 19, 1919 in Lakeland Polk County, Florida.  He was laid to rest at Gapway Cemetery in Lakeland; Section 21, Township 28, Range 24.
           
Mrs. Stalls passed away November 14, 1924 and was laid to rest beside her husband at Gapway Cemetery.
           
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Stalls and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Alonzo Bibb Stroud
Veteran, Railroad Agent, Postmaster and Citrus Farmer

Alonzo Stroud tombstone

Alonzo Bibb Stroud was born December 27, 1847 in Talbotton, Talbot County, Georgia. He was the son of Applin Bibb Stroud and Louisa Parker Stroud.  Applin was born  November 20, 1820 in Conecuh County, Alabama and Louisa born in Georgia.

 In 1850 the Strouds resided in Sumter County, Georgia.  Stroud was two-years-old at the time.

 In 1860 the Stroud family resided in Auburn, Macon County, Alabama. Stroud, age 13, worked on the family farm.  The farm was valued at $3,333 and personal property valued at $16,285. His siblings were Ennis (female), Jade, and Eli J. Stroud. Also, their overseer John Elliott resided with them.

Alabama seceded from the union on January 11, 1861.  Stroud, at age 17, enlisted at Talladega in the Fall of 1864 as a private in General Daniel Adams Escort. This unit was an independent escort company. He served under Captain T. B. Shockley.

After Northern Alabama was occupied by the Union, Tuscaloosa and the University of Alabama were increasingly in fear of Union raids. In 1864, there were 296 students at the University and they formed the "Corp of Cadets." While attempts were made to keep to the usual academic courses then taught, the University was also a military camp of instruction.

Branscom T. Shockley and Henry McKenzie Burt were nineteen-year-old students at the University of Alabama in March 1864. They secretly worked together to enroll enough Cadets from the University to form a Cavalry company for the Confederate Army -- with the understanding that the volunteers would remain students until the term ended in July 1864. It was important that Shockley and Burt keep there plans from the faculty as they would have viewed it as insubordination.

It does not appear that Stroud was a student at University of Alabama. Perhaps he got caught up in the frenzy of youthful cadets and joined in the ranks.

Over one hundred students joined Shockley and Burt forming Shockley's Independent Escort.

On April 1, 1865 he was captured at Selma, Alabama and rejoined his command after his escape at Montgomery.  He was paroled at Tuskeegee, Alabama and discharged at Macon County, Alabama April 1865.

These cadets served under Brig. Gen. Daniel W. Adams until they were surrendered with Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest on May 10, 1865, at Gainesville, Alabama.

Several years later, Shockley's brave cadets were remembered with a plaque at the University of Alabama noting the patriotic devotion of Capt. Branscom T. Shockley and his comrades who formed the Cavalry escort that faithfully served with Brig. Gen. Dan Adams until they were paroled at Gainesville, Alabama, on May 10, 1865. 

Stroud did not receive any injuries while in the service and was discharged by Captain T. B. Shockley.

Stroud met and fell in love with Miss Augusta “Gussie” L. Owen.  They married on September 8, 1870 in Loachapoka, Lee County, Alabama.  She was born on April 3, 1847. Their children from this union:
*    Clarence Eugene, born July 20, 1871 in Notasula, Alabama
*    Claude Owen, born December 23, 1873 in Notasula, Alabama
*    Annie Louisa, born September 28, 1876 in Grantville, Georgia
*    “Darlin” Bessie Inez, born July 22, 1879 in Grantville, Georgia
*    Leon Alonzo, born August 7, 1884 in Grantville, Georgia
*    Harrison Jones, born February 28, 1887 in Haines City, Polk County, Florida
*    Henry Grady, born December 1891 in Florida

In 1880 the family resided in Grantville, Coweta County, Georgia. He was employed at the post office. Gussie took care of the house and the children Clarence 8, Claude 6, and Darlin 1.

By 1900 the family has relocated to Seville, Volusia County, Florida.  Stroud worked as a railroad station agent and Augusta kept the house and children Annie L. 21, Inez 18, Leon A. 12, and Henry G. 8. They had been married for 20 years, having 7 children and 6 remained living.

On July 10, 1907 N. H. Frazer, Tax Collector of Bullock County, Alabama gives a sworn and notarized statement that, “Alonzo B. Stroud of Nocatee Fla was a private in the Confederate army and was a member of Gen. Dan Adams Escot formerly Gen. Pillows Escot and  that I the undersigned was a member of same Co.”

On December 28, 1907 Stroud, a resident of Nocatee, Desoto County, filed an Application for Pension under Laws of Florida.  He states that [I] “am sixty years old and in poor health.”  Comrades Henry M. Burt, former 1st Lt. of Talladaga, Alabama and A. H. Gray of Bullock County, Alabama, served with Stroud in Shockley’s Independent Escort Company. 

On January 2, 1908 H. M. Bush of Talladega, Alabama  to General,
“Dear General

            Yours recd with Stroud’s appreciate for pension which I take great pleasure in doing my part in getting him in line – I hope you and family are well & that Ratter will take better care of herself in the future I did not have much xmas in fact the only thing I got out of  it was in trying to make a few old friends happy – who I knew would be overlooked & neglected a few years ago when my wife was with me we took great pleasure in making plans for xmas & would include each other in our plans on xmas day I went out to our summer home to bring in some things on a wagon that we had left for our use in the summer. Owing to the fact that the burglars had been breaking in - the next day I went down to wardsville to see some old friends who were friends in the day of my youth & young manhood Since then I have been busy settling with my hands & making new contractor – for 1908 our town now wears a very efficient  aspect since the advance of prohibition. The ? are rejoicing to-day then the law of Cullman has been pronounced unconstitutional – They no doubt will make an effort to abolish prohibition in Jefferson Calhoun & Talladega – Send me some more of your cards – I am going to get our legislation to write Martin – on your behalf – also one or two other prominent politicians.
            With best wishes for you & yours  I am Your comrade.”

On Jany. 6, 1908 M. S. Gilliun writes,
“My Dear Friend.
            I enclose your application for pension, which was sent me by Nath Fraser. I am pretty sure that I have it all O.K. I at first thought that two of your comrades other than a commissioned officer would have to sign, but after reading carefully the directions I found that form.C was sufficient.
            Hope that you had pleasant xmas and that the present year my be to your and yours a profitable one.Drop me a line occasionally always glad to hear from you.”
            If this is not right let me know and am always glad to help you out. Your friend.”

Alonzo B. Stroud, late Private Gen. Dan Adams, Escort C.S.A., Nocatee, Fla., Feb. 4, 1908 write to the Hon. Board of Commissioners of Desoto County, Arcadia, Fla.,
“Gents:-
            Herewith I beg to submit my application for a pension under recent Act of the Legislature of the State of Fla. Respectfully,”

He was approved on February 29, 1908 retroactive February 14, 1908 at the rate of $100 per annum.

On July 23, 1909 Stroud re-files a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909.  He states he has a house and several lots in Nocatee that are valued at $1,200, $400, $300, and $125, with a total of $2,025.  He had previously been granted a pension number 6726 at the rate of $100 per annum. His claim for pension, number 1070 was approved August 26, 1909 retroactive July 1, 1909 at the rate o $100 per annum.

In 1910 Stroud, age 62, resides in Nocatee, Desoto County, Florida.  He is employed as the United States Post Office Post Master.  He and “Gussie” have been married for 40 years, had 7 children and 6 remain living. Grady who is employed as a clerk in the post office, is residing with his parents.

On July 9, 1915 Stroud has filed an Application for Increase in Pension. He is 67 ½ years of age under pension number 7318.  Physicians C. C. Whittle and H. C. Brannon, examined the applicant and reported, “wholly and physically disabled due to age.”   

By 1920 Stroud has retired and works as a “fruit grower.” Between 1920 and 1928 he relocates to Lakeland, Polk County.

Stroud passed away on August 22, 1928 and was laid to rest at Lakeview Cemetery, one of Lakeland’s oldest city cemeteries.  It is located on Parker Street and Ingraham Avenue, Section 18, Township 25, Range 24,  in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.

            His tombstone reads,
Father
Alonzo B. Stroud
Dec. 27, 1847
Aug. 22, 1928”

Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Stalls and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Robert Henry Sylvester/Silvester
Farmer and Veteran  
Sylvester

Robert Henry Sylvester (Silvester) was born on February 3, 1840 in Alachua or Columbia County, Florida.
           
In 1858 Bartow’s first school house was built.  H. R. Sylvester was one of its first pupils.
           
Florida seceded from the union on January 10, 1861.  Sylvester enlisted in Captain William J. Turner’s Company of Hillsborough County, Florida.  In 1863 was transferred into Company K, 8th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army.  Then he went into Company C, 5th Florida Battalion Cavalry under John T. Lesley, Munnelyn’s Battalion in Tampa.
           
The 8th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Lake City, Florida, during the summer of 1862. Its members were raised in the counties of Walton, Washington, Jackson, Santa Rosa, Escambia, Leon, and Gadsden.
           
The unit was soon ordered to Virginia with a force of 950 men, and brigaded under Generals Pryor, E.A. Perry, and Finnegan. It was prominent in numerous battles from Second Manassas to Cold Harbor, endured the hardships of the Petersburg trenches south of the James River, and fought in various conflicts around Appomattox.
           
The regiment reported 7 killed, 37 wounded, and 44 missing at Fredericksburg, had 11 killed and 28 wounded at Chancellorsville, and lost fifty-nine percent of the 176 engaged at Gettysburg. Only 4 officers and 28 men surrendered with the Army of Northern Virginia. The field officers were Colonels Richard F. Floyd and David Lang, Lieutenant Colonels William Baya and John M. Pons, and Majors Thomas E. Clarke and William J. Turner.
           
He was discharged at Ft. Brooke, Tampa by Captain John T. Lesley May of 1865.
           
Sylvester was found on the Polk County Tax Rolls.  In 1861 he paid taxes in the amount of $4.86.  In 1862 he had 300 head of live stock and paid $8.19 in taxes. In 1866 the taxes increased to $12.38 following the close of the War Between the States and the reconstruction period.
           
Sylvester met and fell in love with Miss Mary Ann Rogers. Mr. A. Wilson, Minister of Gospel, married them on July 20, 1865 in Polk County, Florida. Mary was born in Florida. There were no children born to this union.
           
In 1880 the Sylvester’s lived in the 4th and 5th Precinct, community of Kathleen, Polk County. Sylvester’s sister, Sarah, age 19 resided with the couple. Sylvester worked as a farmer and Mary kept the house. They had married 35 years.
           
In 1900 the Sylvester’s lived in Precinct 5, community of Kathleen of Polk County. They took in boarders, George and Addie Sands, possible to earn extra money.  Sylvester farmed for a living.
           
On August 3, 1907 Sylvester, a resident of Galloway/Kathleen, filed an Application for Pension under Laws of Florida.  He states, “apply for pension under recent law passed by the Fla. Legislature Act of 1907 No. 5 by reason of being over sixty years old and having lived in the State of Florida 67 years.”  He resided near Kathleen and he reports that his home was valued at $500, 4 cattle and one horse valued at $100 and personal property valued at $25. Sylvester previously received a pension, number 6365, at the rate of $100.  Comrades John W. Lanier and E. G. Wilder stated that they served with Sylvester in the 5th Fla. Cavalry.  His claim for pension, number 8908 was approved on February 8, 1908 retroactive August 8, 1907 at the rate of $100 per annum.
           
On July 20, 1909 Sylvester, age 69, re-filed his Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909. Physician C. L. Hyatt examined the applicant and reported, “The said Robert H. Sylvester is sixty nine yrs old. Health fairly good for his age. cant be in hot sun not suffering from any injury received during war, suffers some from rheumatism and occasion attach of acute indigestion.”  His claim for pension, number 5794, was approved on June 8, 1910 retroactive July 1, 1909 at the rate of $100 per annum.
           
On April 28, 1910 Sylvester, age 70, submitted a Soldier’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1909.  He states that he lives in Galloway and his resident is valued at $200 and live stock valued at $150. Captain John T. Lesley of Hillsborough County and comrade John Robertson of Youmans stated that they served with Sylvester. His claim for pension, number 18376, was filed with the pension board on May 4, 1910 without any notation of it being granted.
           
In 1910 they resided in Kathleen, Polk County, Florida.  Sylvester, 70, and Mary, 64, had been married for 45 years.  He owned his own property and worked as a general farmer.  Mary had a companion, 17-year-old Ruby Prine to assist her in her daily needs.
           
On November 16, 1911 Sylvester submitted an Application for Increase of Pension under the Laws of Florida, pension number 5794, requesting his pension to be increased to $100 per annum.  Physician H. E. McMurray states, “Robert H. Sylvester is nearly seventy-two years of age. No loss of limb nor sight. He is suffering from weakness of heart muscle (myocanditis), heart enlarged and dilated, arteries hard (arterio sclerosia).
           
On October 13, 1913 Sylvester, age 73, of Galloway, files an Application for Increase in Pension, number 5794. Physicians Charles S. Miller and G. R. Heaton states that he “is suffering from heart and kidney disease”
           
By 1920 the Sylvester’s are residing with their nephew, Denver Hawthorne and his mother Martha J., in Precinct 36, community of Knights, of Hillsborough County.  Hawthorne worked as a general farmer and owned his own property.
           
Sylvester passed away on February 24, 1920 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.  He was laid to rest in Socrum Cemetery. Socrum Cemetery, also known as Bethel Baptist Cemetery, is located at Bethel Baptist Church, 10 miles north of Lakeland on State Road 35A, Section 4, Township 27, Range 23.
           
On March 17, 1920 Mrs. Sylvester, a resident of Knights in Hillsborough County, filed a Widow’s Pension Claim under the Act of 1917.  Her statement, “For proof of husband’s service refer to number 8016.” She has no property, personal or real. She signed the application with her mark “x.” Her claim for pension, number 2222, was approved on May 4, 1920 retroactive February 24, 1920 at the rate of $240 per annum.
           
Two years later on May 16, 1922 Mary passed away and was laid to rest beside her husband in Socrum Cemetery.
           
On August 7, 1968 Mrs. Venetia Dees, Post Office Box 425, Alhambra, California 91802 wrote to the State of Florida, Comptroller’s Office of Tallahassee  requesting a copy of Sylvester’s pension file.
           
On August 26, 2005 Sheila Tindle, member of Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791, United Daughters of the Confederacy ordered a military marker from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, D.C. The marker arrived at Bethel Baptist Church on November 22, 2005 and it was placed on his grave.
           
On January 28, 2006, Annie H. Darracott Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, hosted a ceremony at Socrum Cemetery at Bethel Baptist Church to honor the memories of twenty-seven Confederate soldiers. Twenty-five of them were from Florida, one from Georgia, and one from South Carolina.
          
Eighty-six years later from the date of death of Sylvester, Chapter President Sheila Tindle gave the dedication of grave markers, followed by a rifle salute by members of General Jubal A. Early, Camp 556, a cannon salute by Grayson Artillery, Pvt. Wm. Riley Milton, Camp 741, and taps by bugler Ken Murphy, Past 3rd Lt. Commander, Fla. Div., SCV & John T. Lesley Camp 31282. The ceremony also included an invocation, the reading of several Southern poems, beautiful music, and a reception in the Church Fellowship Hall.
           
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Sylvester and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.
Thomas Williford Smith
Veteran of the 2nd Seminole Indian War and War Between the States, Farmer 

Thomas Willford Smith was born in 1813 in Marlboro District, South Carolina.
           
Smith a pioneer, removed to the Florida Territory and settled before Florida became a state on March 3, 1845.
           
Smith met and fell in love with Miss Louisa. They married in Hamilton County, Florida about 1834.  Louisa was born in Georgia.  They had five daughters. Mrs. Smith probably went home to her parents to delivery her first three daughters.
Elizabeth, born 1836, died 1915, married a Mr. Shirley
Lydia A., born  1837 in Georgia
Sylpha A., born  1843 in Georgia
Julia A., born 1849 in Florida
Martha “Josephine”, born November 1860 in Florida, died 1899
           
There is a noticeable age span on the children’s ages.  This would lead to an assumption of  pre-adolescence deaths.
           
About 1837 Smith, age 24, served in the Florida Mounted Volunteers during the Second Seminole Indian War.
           
By 1860 they resided in the community of McQueen in Alachua County.   Smith, age 47, worked as a farmer. They had real estate valued at $500 and personal property valued at $815. Louisa kept the house and cared for their children Lydia A., Sylpha A., Julia A., and Martha J.
           
On January 10, 1861 Florida seceded from the union.  Smith is listed as a Confederate Veteran in the Works Projects Administration (WPA) Veterans’ Graves Registration Project 1940-1941. It is believed that Smith enlisted as a private in Companies C and H, 1st Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army.
           
The 1st Infantry Regiment, formerly the 1st Florida Infantry Battalion, was assembled in March, 1861, at Chattahoochee Arsenal. Its members were from the counties of Leon, Alachua, Madison, Jefferson, Jackson, Franklin, Gadsden, and Escambia.
           
The unit was involved in the conflict on Santa Rosa Island, then fought at Shiloh, Farmington, and Perryville. Later it was placed in General Preston's, Stovall's, Finley's, and J.A. Smith's Brigade, and in December, 1862, it was united with the 3rd Florida Infantry Regiment.
          
This command fought at Murfreesboro and Jackson, participated in the campaigns of the Army of Tennessee from Chickamauga to Nashville , and was active in North Carolina.
           
The 1st/3rd lost twenty-six percent of the 531 engaged at Murfreesboro, had thirty-four percent disabled out of the 273 at Chickamauga, and totaled 240 men and 119 arms in December, 1863. Few surrendered on April 26, 1865.
           
The field officers were Colonels J. Patton Anderson and William Miller, Lieutenant Colonels William K. Beard and Thaddeus A. McDonell, and Major Clover A. Ball.
           
After the war Smith settled back into civilian life.  In 1870 the family resided in the community of Gainesville in Alachua County. Smith, age 59, was a prosperous farmer owning $2,000 real estate and $1,000 personal property.  Louisa kept the house and cared for Lydia, Julie and Josephine. The Smiths’ also cared for ?Frank Jones, 10 year old white male, and Frances Lewis, 8 year old white female.
           
Between 1870 and 1879 Louisa passed away. Smith met and fell in love with Miss Sarah Deese Browning and they married in Hillsborough County about 1879. This union produced one child:  
George W., born January 1880 in Polk County, Florida.
           
By 1880 the Smith family relocated to Polk County and settled in the Green Pond community. Smith is going by the name of Williford (Willoford).  At the age of 70, Smith becomes a father again.    He works as a laborer and he and his new wife have a new born son named George W. Smith.
           
Smith, age 83, passed away on July 8, 1896 in Polk County, Florida.  He was laid to rest at Green Pond Cemetery in Polk City, Florida. Green Pond Cemetery is located at Section 7, Township 25, Range 25, north of Polk City.  
           
Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, we honor Smith and his comrades’ honorable service to the Confederate States of America.

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Samuel B. Smith
Veteran
Samuel Smith

Samuel B. Smith was born in 1830.     

Florida seceded from the union on January 10, 1861.  Smith enlisted in Company H, 2nd Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army.    

The 2nd Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Jacksonville, Florida, in July, 1861. Its twelve companies contained men from Escambia, Columbia, Leon, Marion, Jackson, Alachua, St. Johns, Putnam, Hamilton, Nassau, and Madison counties.     

The regiment was soon ordered to Virginia and in April, 1862, had 530 effectives. It was unattached in the fight at Williamsburg and under the command of General Garland at Seven Pines. Later it was assigned to General Pryor's, E.A. Perry's, and Finegan's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 2nd participated in many conflicts from the Seven Days' Battles to Cold Harbor, then was active in the Petersburg siege south of the James River and around Appomattox.     

This unit was organized with 1,185 officers and men, reported 23 killed and 114 wounded at Gaines' Mill and Frayser's Farm, sustained 49 casualties during the Maryland Campaign, and had 3 killed and 29 wounded at Chancellorsville. At the Battle of Gettysburg it lost forty-two percent of the 242 engaged, and on April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 7 officers and 59 men.     

The field officers were Colonels Walter R. Moore, Edward A. Perry, Lewis G. Pyles, and George T. Ward, Lieutenant Colonel S. St. George Rogers, and Major G.W. Call.     

In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census there is a Samuel B. Smith residing in Polk County. He was born in July 1830, single, age 69 years, born in Vermont, father born in Maine, and mother born in Vermont. He was a farmer and owned his property. He was not located on any other census. Information conclusive to determine if this is the one and same Samuel B. Smith.    

Smith passed away in 1906 in Lakeland, Polk County, Florida. He was laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery, Polk County, Florida. Lakeview is the oldest cemetery in Lakeland. It is located on the corner of North Parker Street and Ingraham Avenue.    

Each year on Confederate Memorial Day, April 26, the members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Annie H. Darracott chapter, No. 791 recognizes the honorable service of Smith and his comrades to the Confederate States of America.


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