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Transcribed by Margie Travis


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 1918

June 14, 1918, ( More deserters, long article ) June 28, 1918 - H. G. MCPHERSON charged with aiding deserter - Aided deserter of Camp Wheeler to remain out of military service -Charged with aiding and assisting a deserter from the U. S. army, H. G. MCPHERSON, a resident of Maxville, is a federal prisoner in the Duval County Jail, held in the sum of $10,000 bond. He was arrested several days ago after government officials felt that they had woven a web of evidence about him. There will be a number of affidavits, it is said, the same alleging in specific detail how and when assistance was given by MCPHERSON to deserters from Camp Wheeler. For several months a dozen or so deserters from Camp Wheeler, near Macon, Georgia, had a sort of rendezvous in the Maxville and Highland sections. They were for the most part young men from that section who had been inducted into the military service. Failing to return to camp after making trips home on leaves, they automatically became deserters. It appears that they often camped in the woods together and did their own cooking. Captain MIDLETON and a detachment of soldiers from Camp Johnston have been instrumental in rounding up a good portion of the deserters. It is alleged that there seemed to be a decided antipathy for the present war on the part of a number of the older men of the Maxville and High-land sections. It is said they not only gave food and shelter to the deserters, but in the case of several, it is said they discouraged patriotism among the young men likely to be called through the draft. Several such have been arrested and required to put up bonds for their appearance before the federal court grand jury.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 5 NOVEMBER 1920

HIGHLAND

The Black Creek Association held a union meeting at the Highland Baptist Church three days of last week, ending Sunday with dinner on the grounds. It was estimated that between four hundred and four hundred and fifty people attended Sunday. Some of the delegates to the union were Messrs. James F. CONWAY and R. H. LEE, Black Creek Church; Mrs. WEST, Miss MURRAY and Thos. BELL, A. J. HATCHER, Black Pond; Messrs. Britt ROSIER and Bunk WILKINSON, Evergreen; H. J. TAYLOR, Long Branch; Messrs. James and L. F. GODWIN, Maxville; Robert NOLAN, Duck Pond; W. H. TAYLOR and John SELLERS, Whitehouse; Rev. C. A. MOSELEY, of Lackawanna Church.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 22 SEPTEMBER 1922

Through Rev. Elliott WILLIAMS, as agent, J. J. STROSSON, of Wisconsin has bought the John ELLINGTON place, east of Temples Mill. Mr. STROSSON will engage in strawberry growing and truck farming.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 30 NOVEMBER 1917

ROSIER

Misses Vaner and Fannie GRIFFIS and Victoria WILKINSON were the guests of Misses Laura and Rachel WILKINSON.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 22 AUGUST 1919

ELLARBEE

George ROSIER has moved near Elarbee where he will be nearer his work.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 25 APRIL 1919

ELLARBEE

Mrs. G. W. ROSIER visited her sister, Mrs. R. D. STOKE.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 10 MAY 1918 -

Misses Flossie and Aileen REYNOLDS entertained a few of the younger set at the Hotel Tavoli Thursday evening. Avery TISON rendered selections at the piano, and Jack GOBOLS sang "Indianna" in a very pleasing manner. At a late hour the guests departed having spent a very enjoyable evening. Among those invited were, Misses Mamie DENMARK, Nannie ANDREWS, Mazie SIMMONDS, Dora JOHNSON, Vesta REYNOLDS, Loca CASON; Messrs. Jack GOBOLS, Herbert RITCH, Avery TISON, Shepherd MOORE, Tate DENMARK, Brady ROSIER, Leaston JOHNSON and others.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 23 AUGUST 1943

SHOOTING SPREE FATAL TO ONE; WOMAN HELD

Ancil THOMPSON, 32 year old Lawtey carpenter, is dead, and Joe D. PEELE, also of Lawtey, is being held in the County Jail charged with first-degree murder in connection with his shooting at Lawtey Saturday night. Richard BENNETT, JR., son of Mr. and Mrs. R. D. BENNETT, of Lawtey, was also shot through the cheek, nose and right arm; and Ossie Bell WIGGINS, of Lawtey received one or two bullets through the hip at the same time, and presumably by the same person. A bullet also grazed Ed STARLING'S stomach, but he was not injured. Mr. PEELE was also jailed here along with his wife; but was released Tuesday and a first-degree murder charge was filed against Mrs. PEELE, following a thorough investigation Monday by State Attorney T. E. DUNCAN and Assistant State Attorney Joe Hill WILLIAMS. The 32-calibre pistol that Mrs. PEELE is alleged to have used was found, along with eight empty 32 cartridges, Sheriff A. O. ANDREU stated this week. Neither a 38 caliber pistol that Mr. PEELE was supposed to have had, nor any empty 38 cartridges were found. He helped fire a shotgun into the ground to prevent anybody's using it to kill somebody with, the sheriff stated. Just exactly how the shooting started is not clear--at least, those who know the most talk the least about the actual cause of the fray. However, a lengthy interview with Richard BENNETT, who received perhaps the worst wounds of any who "lived to tell the tale", reveals that the real argument seems to have started about 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon. "Ossie Bell WIGGINS talked though to Elsie VISAGGI" (his sweetheart who worked as a waitress in the PEELES' cafe). Richard BENNETT said in the Telegraph office Monday afternoon, Then Miss VISAGGI and Richard BENNETT'S father were also in the office. But he said after a few words, it all passed over. However, after the cafe closed about __:45 o'clock Saturday night, trouble started in earnest, though it is not clear just what caused it. Miss VISAGGI rented an apartment from the PEELES upstairs at the rear of the store, and she and Richard BENNETT and the other waitress, Jean JOHANSON, and the PEELES' 12 year old son, Roger, were all up there where Miss VISAGGI was cooking supper. They were to have supper, take Miss JOHANSON home, and then BENNETT and Miss VISAGGI were to come to Starke to a movie. A large crowd was milling around in front of the cafe, and some were "throwing things" upstairs, BENNETT said, and "fooling around my car." He came down with his shot-gun "to protect his car", he said. Ed STARLING and others tried to take it away from him. They finished their supper and took the girl home and when they came back it seem that the fire-works began. It is said that Mrs. PEELE had exhausted her efforts in trying to disperse the Saturday night beer-soaked crowd, and failing to do so, shot eight or more bullets at random into the crowd, killing one and wounding three others. She will likely be tried in the November term of Circuit Court.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 10 SEPTEMBER 1943

BOND GRANTED FOR MRS. JOE D. PEELE

Lawtey store-keeper who shot and killed Ancil THOMPSON, wounded Richard BENNETT, JR., and Ossie Bell WIGGINS, and "grazed" Ed STARLING with a bullet from her .32 caliber pistol in front of her store Saturday night, August 14, was released from the County Jail Tuesday on $7,500 bail. As a result of the special hearing conducted in the office of Circuit Judge A. Z. ADKINS on Monday, August 16, under the direction of State Attorney T. E. DUNCAN and Assistant State Attorney Joe Hill WILLIAMS, Judge ADKINS, upon further investigation, released Mrs. PEELE from custody. She was released under a writ of habeas corpus petitioned for by her attorneys, Zach DOUGLAS, of Gainsville, and Hal Y. MAINES, of Lake Butler. In his order, signed September 6, Judge ADKINS said: "The Court having heard the testimony in said cause and argument of Council for the State and petitioner, and being advised in the premises, is of the opinion that the proof is not evident, and the presumption great that the petitioner, Edna PEELE, is guilty of murder in the first degree; therefore she is entitled to bail. It is therefore ordered, adjudged and decreed by the Court that upon Edna PEELE, the petitioner, giving bond as required by law in the sum of $7,500, to be approved by the Clerk of this Court, condition for her appearance at the next special or regular term of this Court to abide the order and decree of this Court, that she then be released from custody by the Sheriff of the County.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 12 NOVEMBER 1943

FIRST DEGREE MURDER TRIAL SET FOR DECEMBER 6

The Circuit Court Grand Jury, in session here Monday, brought in a ___rue bill of first degree murder in the case of Mrs. Edna PEELE, of Lawtey, who on August 14 killed Ancil THOMPSON and wounded Richard BENNETT, JR., Ossie Bell WIGGINS and Ed STARLING in front of her place of business in Lawtey. When arraigned before Judge A. Z. ADKINS, she pleaded not guilty, and her trial was set for 10 A.M. Monday, December 6.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 15 MAY 1997

POLICE MEMORIAL DAY TO RECOGNIZE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE BY LOCAL OFFICERS - (DIFFERENT ARTICLES)

RICHARDE DIES AS RESULT OF A FEUD

Henry O. RICHARDE (pronounced Ri-shard), a Bradford deputy sheriff, died Nov. 19, 1903. He was shot and killed during the final stages of a feud with three brothers. Two of the brothers were found not guilty at the trial two years later. RICHARDE and Attorney A. V. (Gus) LONG returned to Lawtey from Starke in a horsedrawn buggy. Around 4 p.m. they stopped at the home of the BENNETT brothers so that long could discuss an upcoming court case with a potential client, John BENNETT of Lawtey. Newspaper accounts at the time said there was "bad blood" between BENNETT and RICHARDE. According to the Jacksonville Times Union, BENNETT had shot at RICHARDE earlier in that day "while the latter was passing in front of his (BENNETT'S) store. RICHARDE returned the fire in a brief shootout. The BENNETTS had been known to make threats against RICHARDE.

In spite of this earlier altercation, LONG later testified that during the visit on Nov. 19 RICHARDE and BENNETT seemed cordial until LONG and RICHARDE began to drive away from the BENNETT home.

According to LONG'S account, the situation erupted into a shootout. RICHARDE fired a shotgun and rifle from the buggy while the three brothers fired from three different positions in and around the house. LONG was not wounded and jumped from the buggy before RICHARDE was shot and killed, falling from the buggy himself.

The BENNETTS were well-known businessmen in Lawtey and John BENNETT was chairman of the board of county commissioners, although he had frequently been in trouble with the law. WILBANKS said that at the time of RICHARD'S death, at least five cases were pending against him in state and federal courts. John D. and Richard (Dick) BENNETT were charged with murder in the killing of RICHARDE. They were arrested without resistance at their Lawtey home later the same day by Sheriff Everett E. JOHNS.

They were kept under guard at their house until Saturday, Nov. 21, when the coroner's jury returned a verdict directing that they be held for murder. The three brothers were taken to Starke and placed in jail to await a preliminary hearing.

County Judge GARDINER sat on the bench for the hearing on Wednesday, Nov. 25.

LONG was the state's chief witness. He testified that he and RICHARDE ended their conversation with BENNETT, got back in the buggy and prepared to leave. As they drove away, LONG said he saw RICHARDE suddenly raise his shotgun to his shoulder and shout something, although LONG could not understand what he said.

LONG looked back at the house and saw John and Henry BENNETT moving toward the buggy. RICHARDE fired his shotgun at the house at almost the same instant a shot was fired from someone at the house, LONG said.

RICHARDE told LONG to drive and he said he drove away as rapidly as possible. LONG said they were under rapid fire of a "fusillade" (barrage) of bullets from the house as they drove away. LONG jumped from the buggy and said he heard several more shots fired at the buggy after he jumped.

Other witnesses testified that Henry and Dick BENNETT fired at the buggy in addition to John and that more than 25 shots in all were fired at the deputy sheriff. Other witnesses also testified that, before Nov. 19, one or more of the brothers claimed they would kill RICHARDE. Sheriff Everett JOHNS testified that John BENNETT asked the sheriff to remove Deputy RICHARDE from Lawtey since "the town was too small for both of them and that he (BENNETT) had too much there to leave.

After the preliminary hearing, Judge GARDINER discharged Dick BENNETT but bound over Henry and John for trial. Bond was set at $3,000 each. Both paid bond and were released pending trial.

Continuances had the trial postponed until Oct. 26-28, 1905. The two brothers were found not guilty by a jury on Oct. 28, 1905.

Not a lot is known about Deputy Henry Osceola RICHARDE, other than he was 33 years old when he died and had been a faithful deputy for Sheriff JOHNS for several years. He was described as one of the most "fearless men in the state."

His wife, Annie MATTHEWS RICHARDE, was born in Providence to William and Ella LIDDON MATTHEWS.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - FRIDAY 21 DECEMBER 1917

WILLIAM GAINEY RECEIVES FATAL WOUND IN FIGHT

Trouble Started by Disagreement Arising Over Settlement of Rents

William GAINEY, a former citizen of this place, was shot and fatally wounded by Tom MARSHBURN at Bronson last Thursday. After the shooting GAINEY was taken to Gainesville for treatment, but succumbed to the wound on Tuesday. His body was brought to Starke Tuesday afternoon and interment made in Crosby Lake Cemetery

The following account of the shooting was sent to the Times-Union by its Bronson correspondent:

Bronson, Dec. 14 - William GAINEY formerly of Starke, but who farmed with M. T. MARSHBURN, of this place the present year, was shot, it is alleged and doubtless fatally wounded by MARSHBURN'S 16 year-old son, Tom. The tragedy occurred at 9 o'clock yesterday morning at the home occupied by the GAINEY and family. The trouble which terminated in the tragedy came up over settlement of rents, GAINEY claiming he was unfairly treated by those owning the farm. The row was at first between MARSHBURN and GAINEY, the boy, it is said, later firing the fatal shots, claiming in defense of his father. GAINEY since his residence in Bronson has been peaceable and law-abiding and his probable untimely death is deplored by the entire community.

He had a devoted wife and three small children who are receiving every comfort and succor in their trouble. Both the MARSHBURNS are lodged in the Levy County jail awaiting full investigation of the affair. MARSHBURN is one of the wealthiest citizens of the county owns thousands of acres of property but despite this he was unable to secure leniency from Sheriff E. WALKER and so far no bond has been allowed.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - FRIDAY 28 DECEMBER 1917

MARSHBURNS CHARGED WITH MANSLAUGHTER

Testimony Conflicted, But Did Not Seem To Support Murder Charge

State Attorney A. V. LONG went ot Otter Creek, Levy County, Monday to represent the state at the preliminary hearing of Col. Thomas MARSHBURN and his son, Tom, charge with killing William GAINEY, a former citizen of Starke. The testimony of Mrs. GAINEY and the MARSHBURNS conflicted on the point of who fired the first shots in the altercation that proved fatal to GAINEY, but the circumstances did not seem to support the charge of murder and the committing magistrate fixed the bond of the defendants at $1,000 each.

The Archer correspondent of the Gainesville Sun gives the following version of the tragedy:

Archer, Fla., Dec. 22 - Mrs. H. MADDOX returned last night from Bronson, where she went to visit her cousins, Col. Tom MARSHBURN and his son, Tom, Jr., who are confined in the Levy county jail, both charged with the killing of William GAINEY at MARSHBURN'S farm in Bronson last Thursday morning and Mrs. MADDOX reports an entirely different accounty of the affair. Mrs. MADDOX and Hon. FINAYSON are both confident that at this trail both the accused will be fully exonerated. The unfortunate affair occurred at MARSHBURN'S farm early on the morning of the 13th. GAINEY was a half-cropper for MARSHBURN, and lived on the place, but MARSHBURN reserved one room in the house for his own use. The crop had been amicably divided some time ago, and the quarrel began when GAINEY wanted to rent the farm for the coming year for less money than MARSHBURN would agree to.

This quarrel took place in the house by the fire, and after heated words from both parties, GAINEY drew his pistol from his pocket, and MARSHBURN picked up a gun that was standing in a corner of the room. Both men decided not to shoot, the quarrel was settled, and MARSHBURN put his gun back in its corner of the room. An hour or more later, GAINEY, his wife, MARSHBURN and his 15-year-old son, Tom, Jr., all went out to the barnyard. There it was discovered that corn was missing from the barn in which MARSHBURN had his portion of the corn stored. GAINEY agreed that the corn was missing, but said he did not know what had become of saine. MARSHBURN told GAINEY that if he did not know what had become of the corn he should know, as he, GAINEY, was left in charge of the place. GAINEY seemed to think that MARSHBURN accused him of taking the corn, which was not MARSHBURN'S thoughts. This brought on a volley of oaths from both parties in which GAINEY drew his pistol from his pocket and snapped the gun in MARSHBURN'S breast.

In the meantime Tom Jr., ran in the house and upstairs to get his father's pistol. When GAINEY tried to fire at MARSHBURN, being unarmed, turned and ran toward the house. GAINEY tried to fire again, but the pistol snapped and with pistol in hand he ran towards the house to enter the same room in which MARSHBURN was trying to make by a different door. In this room was the shot gun mentioned in the first quarrel. Tom, rushing down the hall to his father's assistance, met GAINEY coming with the pistol in hand. Several shots were fired, and it is alleged that GAINEY fired at the boy, the ball grazing at the boy's neck. The boy emptied his pistol at GAINEY, two or three shots taking effect. By this time MARSHBURN had gained the room and rushed on through to find that GAINEY had been fatally injured by his son. Col. MARSHBURN rushed Tom for a physician, while he stood by and rendered all assistance in his power to the injured man, until Judge WILLIS went to the farm, Sheriff WALKER being out of town, and took the MARSHBURNS into custody.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 9 AUGUST 1935

TEMPORARY BUDGET GIVEN

The following applications for Widow's Pension allowance were approved:

Delaney DICKINSON $4;
Mrs. Chess PADGETT $2;
Mrs. Vallis HART $2;
Mrs. Maggie STEWART $4;
Mrs. Belle PARMENTER $2;
Mrs. Eliza HALL $2;
Mrs. Vida DYAL $8;
Mrs. R. D. BENNETT $4;
Mrs. Louanna GRIFFIS $2;
Mrs. Julia CREWS $6;
Mrs Bessie LEE $4;
Mrs. Maggie ADKINS $7;
Mrs Nettie STARLING $4;
Mrs. Queen DENMARD $4;
Mrs. Katie PADGETT $4;
Mrs. R. H. FUTCH $2;
Mrs. Ruth MARR $6;
Mrs Annie Mae GILLS $6;
Mrs. Mary PHILLMAN $2;
Mrs. Alice G. BRADLEY $2;
Mrs. Jane ALLEN $4;
Miss Jessie Mae KING $2;
Mrs. H. F. REDDING $4;
Mrs. Kate STARLING $4;
Mrs. A. W. BROUGHTON $2;
Mrs. Alice THOMAS $4;
Mrs. N WYNN $4;


FLORIDA WEEKLY ADVOCATE - 30 MARCH 1899

Circuit Court convened here this week. Not many cases were tried and consequently the term was a short one. Court adjourned Thursday at noon. The most important case tried was Edward ALVAREZ charged with murdering Sam HILLIARD some 5 years ago. The jury brought in a verdict of murder in the second degree and the Judge sentenced Alvarez to prison for life. His attorney pled for a new trial but it was overuled by the Judge. They will appeal to the Supreme Court.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 31 MARCH 1933

HIGHLAND

Friends of Mrs. J. W. GRIFFIS will be glad to learn that she is improving after a serious eye operation. She is at St. Luke's Hospital, Jacksonville.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 28 MAY 1933

HIGHLAND

Mrs. J. W. GRIFFIS is at St. Luke's Hospital following an operation Friday.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 2 JUNE 1933

HIGHLAND

Misses Myrtie and Virgie GRIFFIS, J. F. and C. M. GRIFFIS visited their mother in Jacksonville.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 12 JANUARY 1934

HIGHLAND

Mrs. J. W. GRIFFIS, Mrs. H. C. WIMBERLY and Carson M. GRIFFIS were visitors to Jacksonville Tuesday, Mrs. GRIFFIS remained at St. Luke's Hospital where she underwent an operation on her eyes.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 26 JANUARY 1934

HIGHLAND

Mrs. J. W. GRIFFIS returned to her home here Wednesday after a two weeks stay in Jacksonville.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 14 JULY 1922

SERIOUSLY WOUNDED - JOHN OF HIGHLAND, SHOT IN LEG HAS LIMB AMPUTATED

Tuesday, John, of Maxville was brought to Starke suffering from a shot wound in the leg. He was placed in the care of Dr. E. L. BIGGS, who found an amputation of the limb necessary. The amputation was accomplished and Mr. MARR is resting easy at the home of his sister, Mrs. D. L. RIGBY, of this city. How the accident happened we have been unable to learn. An Associated Press dispatch in the Times Union of Wednesday had the following to say:

Starke, July 11 - John MARR, section foreman of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad of Maxville, near here, was brought here today suffering from a gunshot wound in his upper thigh which necessitated the amputation of his leg. Although he is in a serious condition he is expected to recover. Nothing could be learned as to how MARR received his wound, and he refused to discuss it in any way. The shooting is said to have occurred at Highland, between here and Maxville early this morning. The sheriff, who went from Starke to the scene after the man was brought here for medical attention, could find no one who admitted any knownledge of the affair.

The same silence was maintained by the man's brother who brought him here. MARR is about 25 years old and unmarried.

Later - Mr. MARR died at 4 a.m. Thursday, his death being caused by tetanus and embolism, consequences of the shot wound.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 21 JULY 1922

FATAL ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AT INQUEST

CORONER'S JURY FINDS JOHN MARR DEATH DUE TO ACCIDENT

R. A. GREEN impannelled a coroner's jury to inquire to the cause of the shooting, from the effects of which John I. MARR died the same morning. The shooting took place on the night of July 11 on the road between Highland and Maxville. MARR was shot in the thigh and was brought to Starke the same night by J. T. (Runt) REDDISH and R. M. TRACEY and put in the care of Dr. E. L. BIGGS. Dr. BIGGS amputated the leg above the knee, but tetanus and embolism later caused the patients death. Mr. MARR consistantly refused to tell how he came by the wound, insisting that it was an accident and that it was he himself was the only to blame. The witnesses summoned were R. M. TRACEY, J. T. REDDISH, W. E. MARR, and Dr. E. L. BIGGS. The jury was composed of the following citizens: S. R. JOHNS, foreman, W. L. WALL, Jeff J. JOHNS, B. M. DOWLING, J. M. ALVAREZ and A. O. ANDREU;

Mr. TRACEY a drugist of Lawtey, said that about 8:30 o'clock on the night of July 11, John MARR came to him and asked for the loan of his car. The request was granted. A couple of hours later, J. T. REDDISH called him out. he had brought the car back and told him MARR was shot, shot in the leg and that he was to be taken to Dr. BIGGS in Starke for attention. Mr. TRACEY asked how the accident happened, but MARR would not tell him, only saying it was an accident and nobody to be blamed but himself.

W. E. MARR a brother of the deceased said "I don't know anything about the actual shooting, except that Mr. REDDISH came to me on Tuesday afternoon and told me that he acidently shot my brother, John MARR."

J. T. REDDISH testified: On the night that John MARR was shot, about 9:30, I was on the sheet in my work. He said to me, "Get in Runt, and let's take a ride." I said alright and we rode around for a hour or two. He headed toward Highland. I said "Where are we going?" He says, "That's all right, I have always gotten you back." After we left Highlands, I asked, "Where are we going?" and he said, "Let's ride up to Maxville." I supposed we were about two miles or more from Highland towards Maxville, I was driving. He suggested we stop and take a look, so I stopped and cut the motor off, and we got out of the car. During this time he asked me if I had a gun. I said no. He said he did, but there were but two or three balls in it, and he handed it to me and asked me to line them up. In moving the cylinder in and placing the cartridges, the gun was discharged one time, and MARR said he was shot. As quickly as I could get him into the car, I headed for Lawtey and I asked him if he wished to see Dr. BROWN and he told me to carry him to Dr. BIGGS. I suggested to carry him to Mr. TRACEY, as he could be of assistance, so he told me to do so, as it was Mr. TRACEY'S car. The gun appeared to be a 38 calibre and was in my hands at the time of the shooting. Only one shot was fired. When the gun was fired I dropped it and have not seen it since. I went the next morning to look for it but could not find it. No one else was in the car with me. I put him in the car myself. Dr. E. L. BIGGS said about th ewound in MARR'S leg that it was big enough to allow two fingers to be put into it; had apparently been made by a bullet of large calibre; that there were two holes, one made by the bullet and another probably by a piece of shattered bone; also that MARR would only say it was caused by an accident.

The jury gave the following verdict: "John MARR came to his death from a pistol wound inflicted in the lower limb, said pistol being held by J. T. REDDISH, and that it was accidental. So say we all." While cause that led to MARR'S death was very singular, no less remarkable was the fact that the man in whose hand the pistol was that fired the fatal shot, voluntarily admitted it while the man who suffered the injury would not tell how it happened, only that, "it was an accident and no one to blame but myself."

The deceased was 28 years old at his death and a son of J. T. MARR of Highland. He was unmarried and lived at Highland, being a section foreman of the Seaboard Railway. That he was of fine character can be understood from his anxiety to shield his friend from possible blame of his death. Besides his father, he leaves to mourn his untimely departure, four brothers, Owen MARR of Titusville and Edward, Joe and Clarence MARR of Highland; also four sisters, Mrs. D. L. RIGBY and Ella MARR of Starke, Mrs. R. D. LEE of Raiford and Miss Ollie MARR of Highland. The bereaved relatives have the sympathy of all.

The interment was at Long Branch Cemetery last Thursday afternoon. Rev. L. W. KICKLITER, of Starke conducting the obsequies.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 21 JULY 1922

LAWTEY

A large number of our citizens attended the funeral of John I. MARR at Long Branch Cemetery last Thursday.


HIGHLAND

Mr. and Mrs. Owen MARR and baby of Mims were here last week to attend the funeral of his brother John MARR, who was accidently shot near here Monday night and died later.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 3 OCTOBER 1919

Marion CREWS of Jacksonville visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. CREWS.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 31 DECEMBER 1920

HIGHLAND

Messrs Marion CREWS of Raiford, W. G. CREWS of Lithia spent Christmas with relatives.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 14 JULY 1922

HIGHLAND

Mrs. M. L. CREWS and son Frances and B. WILKINSON visited relatives at maxville several days last week.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 19 SEPTEMBER 1924

HIGHLAND

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. CREWS and children, of Raiford, are spending two weeks here the guest of Mr. and Mrs. B. WILKINSON part of and with Mr. F. M. CREWS and family the remainder. M. L. CREWS, A. A. CREWS, Max WIMBERLY and Harry WIMBERLY attended the revival meeting being held at the Baptist Church at Maxville, Thursday night. M. L. CREWS is spending a couple of days with his uncle, Jack O'STEEN at Maxville.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 15 DECEMBER 1933

HIGHLAND

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. CREWS of the State Farm visited Mrs. CREWS parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. WILKINSON.


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH - 8 MAY 1936

HIGHLAND

M. L. CREWS visited relatives here Saturday.


EVERGREEN

Mrs. R. S. ROSIER and children were visiting Mrs. Marion CREWS at the State Farm Friday night.


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