The first railroad depot in Clearwater (built in 1888) was a Russian style frame building attributable to Orange Belt Railway developer Peter A. Demens. "More fun, Clearwater, Florida" seems to be synonymous terms in this 1910 photograph where spectators line both sides on Cleveland Street as children engage in some sort of competitive sport. Site of old Bank of Clearwater building. The city hall shared office space with the fire department in 1915 when this picture was taken. Built in 1911, this original fire station and city hall still stands on the east side of No. Fort Harrison Ave. at Laura Street.
An early color postcard of the Pinellas County Courthouse which was built in 1917. This replaced the original courthouse which was built "overnight" in 1912 securing Clearwater as the County Seat. Beauty contest on Clearwater beach circa 1930 Miss America Miss Healthiest Girl Miss Clearwater - Lillian Roland (3rd from left) Taken at Joyland Pavilion Louise Bennett is 8th from left A winter concert entertains the tourists and residents in this mid-1920's photograph at the old Band Shell on the site of today's City Hall.
Cleveland Street looking east in 1910 just after the "Big Fire of 1910". The fire brought about changes in the fire code dictating former wooden buildings be built back in brick. Note that Cleveland Street had yet to be paved when this picture was taken. A military equipment display is the source of much interest on Cleveland Street in 1944. Military onlookers transport vehicles and even a Roebling Alligator designed in Clearwater are on hand for the celebration. This amphibious tank was, in part, responsible for Allied success in the Pacific Theatre of WWII. A view looking towards the business district taken from a boat.
A 1940's view of Cleveland Street looking west before most of the historic buildings had been "modernized" during the 1950's. Note the wooden benches similar to St. Pete's famous "greenbenches". Just past the McCrory's sign on the left was the site of Jack Eckerd's first Drug store. An aerial of Clearwater Beach during the 1940's showing Everingham's Pavilion, the focal point of socializing and bathing before Pier 60 displaced it in the 1960's. Circa 1940 Ft Harrison south from Wilkinson's Fulmer's Photo occupies the storefront on the right today. The First United Methodist Church may be seen on the left side of the photograph.
These are the Rousseau children whose mother, Sarah Rousseau, was the daughter of John S. Taylor of Largo. The Rousseaus were pioneers in east Clearwater, and the Rousseau Cemetery just south of Clearwater High School contains some of the oldest graves in the area. Courtesy of George Fulmer. A pre-1920's view of Cyrus Lowrey's Curio Depot on Cleveland Street shows an array of curious looking stuffed alligators, turtles, and a couple of real dogs. Courtesy of Heritage Park. In the 1880's, Friend's Dry Goods was located on the northwest corner of Cleveland Street and Fort Harrison Avenue. It was destroyed in the Big Fire of 1910. courtesy of Heritage Park.
Built about 1896, the home and studio of early Clearwater and Belleair photographer, Louis Ducros, were originally located just north of the bicycle track on the Hotel Belleview grounds. Today the home of Ducros is located on South Fort Harrison north of the railroad tracks, just north of Lakeview Avenue. Fully restored, the carpenter gothic structure is currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Courtesy Belleview Biltmore Hotel. The Gray Moss Inn, originally known as the Verona Inn. Built in 1898, the original building had twenty-eight bedrooms on two floors, a large lobby, and a large sweeping inset porch on the ground level. George Washburn changed the name to the Gray Moss Inn in 1926 as a fourth floor was added. Courtesy of Heritage Park. Cleveland Street during the boom about 1925 shows the brick commercial buildings on the south side between South Fort Harrison and Garden. The White Way Drug Store became Jack Eckerd's first drugstore in 1952. Courtesy of Heritage Park.

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