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THE WEST FLORIDA WAR
A New Look at the 1864 Raid on Marianna
by: Dale A. Cox 

Copyright by Dale A. Cox 1989 and 1999


Part Six - Appendix

CASUALTY LIST

The Battle of Marianna, Florida
September 27, 1865

Confederate:

Killed:

Brett, James H., Norwood's Company, died of bullet wounds.
Carter, John C., Norwood's Company, killed outright.
Dickson, Marmaduke, Sr., Norwood's Company, died of bullet wounds.
Nickels, Woodbury "Woody," Norwood's Company, killed outright.
Lewis, Arthur, Sr., Norwood's Company, died of bullet wounds.
Bassett, Henry O., Norwood's Company, killed outright.
Sullivan, Solomon, Norwood's Company, died of bullet wounds.
Allen, Francis "Frank," Robinson's Club Cavalry, killed outright.
Butler, M.A., Robinson's Club Cavalry, killed outright.
Brogden, Z.T., Robinson's Club Cavalry, died of wounds.
Myrick, Littleton, Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, killed outright.

Total Killed: 11

Wounded:

Blount, A.F. Norwood's Company, severe shoulder wound.
Davis, John Sr., Norwood's Company, compound fracture of the thigh.
*Hentz, Thaddeus W., Norwood's Company, finger shot off.
*Chason, John, Norwood's Company, neck wound.
McNealy, Adam, Norwood's Company, shot through lung and blow to the head.
Lawrence, Richard C.B., Norwood's Company, gunshot wound to the thigh.
Gwin, Peyton, Norwood's Company, severe blow to the head.
*Baltzell, Thomas, Norwood's Company, finger wound.
*Mathews, William, Godwin's Cavalry, minor wounds.
Bosworth, Samuel, Godwin's Cavalry, severe arm wound.
King, Isaac, Godwin's Cavalry, gunshot wound.
*Dickson, John J., Robinson's Club Cavalry, blow to the head.
Sheats, C.N., Chisolm's Company, unspecified wounds.
*Shiver, W.N.W., Poe's Company, minor side wound.
McPherson, William, Company G, 5th Florida Cavalry, severe side wound.
*These men were also taken prisoner by the Federals.
Total Wounded: 15

Federal:

Killed:

Young, Mahlon M., 7th Vermont Veteran Volunteers, killed outright.
Ayer, Ellis, 2nd Maine Cavalry, killed outright.
Campbell, Silas, 2nd Maine Cavalry, killed outright.
Davis, Thomas A., 2nd Maine Cavalry, killed outright.
Adams, Isaac, 2nd Maine Cavalry, died of wounds.
Brackett, _____, 2nd Maine Cavalry, died of wounds.
Total Killed: 6

Wounded:

Asboth, Alexander, Commanding Officer.
Cutler, Nathan, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Moody, William, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Stanley, Gustavus, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Hutchinson, Eben, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Rowley, Lyman, 1st Florida U.S. Cavalry.
Clark, Elisha, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Evans, Joseph, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Clough, Charles, Jr., 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Pollard, Luthor, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Whitney, David, 2nd Maine Cavalry.
Unknown, 2nd Maine Cavalry (minor wounds).
Unknown, 2nd Maine Cavalry (minor wounds).
Unknown, 2nd Maine Cavalry (minor wounds).
Unknown, 2nd Maine Cavalry (minor wounds).
Unknown, 2nd Maine Cavalry (minor wounds).
Unknown, 2nd Maine Cavalry (minor wounds).
Total Wounded: 17

Confederate Participants

The Battle of Marianna, Florida
September 27, 1864

 

*NOTE:

The following list identifies by name more than 200 participants of the Battle of Marianna. This list was prepared by carefully reviewing original documents, military service and pension records on file at the Florida State Archives and in the National Archives and by cross-referencing existing lists to clear up spelling and misidentification errors. It should be noted, however, that no official roster was made of the Confederate forces before the battle and that it is all but impossible to positively identify each and every participant. While the rosters included here for Norwood's and Chisolm's Companies is probably close to accurate, there are obviously many names missing from the rosters of Godwin's, Robinson's and Poe's Company.

With this in mind, the author welcomes the submission of verifiable names for inclusion on this list. All of the names currently on the list can be verified as participants, and for the sake of accuracy submissions must include positive verification of service.

Norwood's "Cradle to Grave" Volunteers

Norwood, Jesse J., Captain. A 30-year-old local attorney, Norwood had earlier served in the 5th Battalion of Florida Cavalry. He resigned to seek the office of state senator and was captured at Marianna while commanding a company of local volunteers. Imprisoned at Union p.o.w. camps at New Orleans, Fort Lafayette and Fort Warren, he was paroled on February 12, 1865. He left behind a wife and 3 children.

Staley, Christian J., Lieutenant. Fifty-three years old, Staley was captured during the Battle of Marianna and imprisoned at New Orleans, Fort Lafayette and Fort Warren. He was paroled from the latter place on February 12, 1865, and evidently returned home.

Blount, A.F., Lieutenant. A 44-year-old local physician, Blount sustained a severe shoulder wound during the engagement and was taken to the home of Dr. W.S. Wilson for treatment. He eventually recovered.

Bush, Allen Henry. Fifty-five years old, Bush was the local circuit judge and had been a practicing Marianna attorney since the early 1840s. Imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira, he returned home after the war and resumed his law practice. Judge Bush was a delegate to the ill-fated state constitutional convention on October 25, 1865, and was listed a year later as being friendly to the "Carpetbaggers" then controlling local politics.

Brett, James H. The town constable, Brett was a 52-year-old Mexican War veteran. The original first lieutenant of the defunct Jackson Guards, he suffered a severe bullet wound which tore the muscle from his left forearm and died shortly after the battle. He also was reported to have been clubbed to the head with a rifle butt.

Mooring, Edwin W. Thirty-six years old, Mooring was a local merchant and whiskey maker. Captured, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. At the latter prison, he was listed as an "adjutant." Eventually released, he returned home after the war.

Dickson, Marmaduke, Sr. A 53-year-old Greenwood resident, Dickson was active in Whig party politics before the war. Severely wounded during the battle, he died within a few hours - probably at the home of R.S. Dickson.

Davis, John, Sr. Sixty-three years old, Davis had served as the captain of a state militia company during the Second Seminole War (1836) and was the original captain of the Jackson Guards. He sustained a compound fracture of his thigh during the fighting and fell on the north side of St. Luke's Episcopal Church. He was probably treated at home.

Nickels, Woodbury "Woody." Sixteen years old, Nickels was the son of Marianna businessman and Unionist William Nickels. He was the youngest Confederate killed in the fighting.

Hentz, Thaddeus W. The 30-year-old dentist was also a member of a company of state artillery reservists. Suffering the loss of a finger during the fighting, he was captured and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Hospitalized during his stay at Elmira, he was released on March 2, 1865. After his release he was reported as a patient at a Confederate hospital in Richmond, Virginia, until March 14, 1865. He returned home and resumed his dentistry practice.

Chason, John. A 57-year-old farmer, Chason sustained a neck wound during the fighting and was taken prisoner. Confined at New Orleans and Ship Island, he died in the latter place of dysentery on December 19, 1864, and was buried in Grave Number 99.

McNealy, Adam. Forty-seven years old, McNealy was a Jackson County Commissioner at the time of the battle. He was active in the Greenwood Baptist Church before being excluded because he "does not believe in the Eternal punishment." He also served as a delegate to the Florida Secession Convention. Struck on the head and shot through the lung during the fighting, McNealy was taken to the home of Mrs. Mary Armistead for treatment and eventually recovered. In 1869 he urged the governor not to send occupation troops into Jackson County. He also served on the local school board during the post-war years.

Lawrence, Richard C.B. Forty-two years old, Rev. Lawrence was the brother-in-law of Dr. Thaddeus Hentz. He received a bullet through the fleshy part of his thigh during the fighting and took refuge in a blacksmith shop behind St. Luke's Church. Rescued by his daughter and several others, with the help of a Union sergeant, he was taken to his home on what is now West Lafayette Street where he eventually recovered.

Gwin, Peyton. A teenage employee of the West Florida News, Gwin suffered a severe blow to the head and was treated at the home of publisher Robert Johnson.

Baltzell, Thomas W. Fifteen-years-old, Baltzell sustained a finger wound during the fighting and was taken prisoner. Imprisoned at New Orleans and Ship Island, he was too sick to leave the latter place when most of the Marianna captives were shipped to New York on November 5, 1864. He remained on Ship Island until May 1, 1865, when he was transferred to Vicksburg and released on May 5.

Wynn, William B. Captured during the fighting, Wynn was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Fort Columbus. He died at the latter place on December 21, 1864, and was buried in the Cypress Hill National Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.

Justiss, J.B. Sometimes called "Captain" Justiss, he was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He was exchanged in March of 1865 and was hospitalized at Howard's Grove Hospital in Richmond for two weeks before being released to return home on March 15, 1865.

Gammon, Samuel B. A 56-year-old farmer, Gammon was captured during the battle and imprisoned at New Orleans and Ship Island. He died in the latter place from typhoid on December 8, 1864, and was buried in Grave Number 72.

O'Neal, James (Daniel). Fifty-one years old, O'Neal was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Listed as "too sick" to be paroled on February 13, 1865, he died at Elmira on the 5th of March and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.

Davis, Ellis. A local farmer, Davis was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He returned home to his farm after the war.

Bush, Albert G. Forty-nine years old, Bush was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He returned home after the war.

Whitehurst, John B. The local Justice of the Peace, 40-year-old John Whitehurst was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans and Ship Island. He died at Ship Island on October 25, 1864, less than one month after the battle, from "consumption." He was buried in Grave Number 4.

Tucker, Charles (of Quincy). Captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at the latter place on December 11, 1864, and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.

Anderson, William E. Forty-one years old, Anderson had served as a brigadier general in the Florida militia before the war. He led the first brigade during the little-known Calhoun County "Abolition War" of September - October 1860, in which 27 local citizens were taken prisoner. Captured during the battle of Marianna while serving as a private with Norwood's company, he identified himself as a general and was imprisoned with the other officers at New Orleans, Fort Lafayette and Fort Warren. He was released from the latter place on June 26, 1865, after signing an affidavit verifying that he had never held the rang of brigadier general in the service of the Confederacy. He later held the post of county judge.

Merritt, Alex S. A 32-year-old local merchant, Merritt was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He was released on December 12, 1864, and returned home.

Hartsfield, John W. Captured during the battle, Hartsfield was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Fort Columbus, dying at the later place of diarrhea on February 15, 1865. He was buried in the Cypress Hill National Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.

Gautier, Thomas N. The 32-year-old owner of a Marianna mercantile firm and a leather tannery at Oak Hill, Gautier was captured during the fighting but was freed by Captain Poe's men before the end of the engagement.

Hinson, W.H. Captured during the fighting, Hinson was freed by Captain Poe's men.

Kincey, W.O. Captured during the fighting, Kincey was freed by Captain Poe's men.

Moore, C.R. Captured during the fighting, Moore was freed by Captain Poe's men.

Farley, William A. Forty-four years old, Farley was captured during the fighting but freed by Captain Poe's men.

Alderman, B.G. A Marianna merchant prior to 1848 and known California gold miner in 1849, Alderman was a suretor for the construction of the 1850 Marianna courthouse in which he was briefly imprisoned after the battle. He was paroled by the Federals in Marianna.

Myrick, John T., Sr. A former state senator, Myrick was a prominent local merchant and educator. He served on the Board of Trustees of the Marianna Male and Female Academy in 1851 and helped lead former governor Richard Keith Call's Unionist effort in 1860. He is known to have been in contact with Union military forces during at least January of 1864 and was the subject of judgements obtained by the Confederate government. Captured during the fighting, he was paroled at Marianna by the Federals.

Nickels, Charles. Fourteen-years-old, Nickels was captured during the fighting and held overnight. He was released the next afternoon in Vernon and allowed to walk back home.

Baltzell, Franklin. The youngest known participant, 13-year-old Frank Baltzell is credited with firing the shots that wounded Major Nathan Cutler. Taken prisoner, he was held overnight and released the next afternoon at Vernon. He later became the editor of the Marianna Courier, a position he held until 1873 when he moved to Alabama. There he continued his journalism career and emerged as a leader of that state's "Populist" movement.

Armistead, Robert. Fifteen-years-old, Armistead was captured during the fighting and released the following afternoon at Vernon.

Tucker, Charles (of Marianna). One of two men named "Charles Tucker" to participate in the battle, this Tucker was captured during the fighting but paroled by the Federals before they left Marianna.

Watson, Hinton J. An owner of the Marianna mercantile firm of H.J. Watson and Company, he had been indicted in 1858 for selling liquor without a license. Captured during the battle, he was paroled by the Federals before they left Marianna. Watson's business collapsed due to post-war conditions in 1866. He was later elected to the Florida House of Representatives.

Bush, Richard. A 60-year-old local minister, Rev. Bush was captured during the fighting but paroled by the Federals before they left Marianna.

Dann, T.W. A local physician, Dann was captured during the battle and paroled by the Federals before they left Marianna. According to legend, he then disappeared and did not return home until after the war.

Baltzell, Richard. Fifteen years old, Baltzell was captured during the fighting but was released at Vernon on the following afternoon.

Stephens (Stevens?), Henry. Fifteen years old, Stephens was captured during the fighting and released at Vernon the next afternoon.

Wilson, W.S. A physician, Dr. Wilson arrived in Marianna during the 1840s and formed a partnership with Dr. William H. Whitehead in 1857. Although he participated in the fighting, he was not taken prisoner and assisted tremendously in caring for the wounded after the battle.

Norton, E.B. A local minister, Rev. Norton escaped following the end of the battle.

McKinley, W.L. McKinley escaped following the battle.

Watson, O.M. Watson escaped following the battle.

Nickels, William. A 64-year-old merchant and hotel keeper, Nickels had been a Trustee of the Marianna Academy in 1851 and was rumored to have been in contact with Federal forced during the course of the war. He was captured in the fighting, but was paroled before the Federals left town.

Sewell, H. Sewell escaped following the battle.

Rostrum, Oliver. The local tailor, Rostrum escaped following the battle.

Rouse, John. Rouse escaped following the battle.

Taylor, Peter. Taylor escaped following the battle.

Mosely, Milton. Mosely escaped following the battle.

Morgan, Nicholas. Morgan escaped following the battle.

Blaney, John. Fifty-years-old, Blaney was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at Elmira on December 15, 1864, and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.

Lewis, Arthur Sr. Fifty-eight years old, the former merchant was severely wounded during the battle and died at his home on September 29, 1864. He was the father of the scout he brought first news of the Union advance to Marianna.

Everett, Miles. Captured during the fighting, Everett was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He was released from prison on March 2, 1865, and hospitalized in Richmond, Virginia until May 14, when he was furloughed and allowed to return home.

Myrick, J.T., Jr. Sixteen years old, "Jack" Myrick was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Released from prison on May 29, 1865, he made his way home. A bitter opponent of Reconstruction, despite his father's Unionist attitudes, Myrick was convicted in October of 1869 for killing local black leader Matt Nichols, his wife and son. He also was charged with assault and battery in connection with another crime and was alleged to have been involved in the ambush of a party of freed slaves near Blue Spring. He fled the county to avoid prison or hanging and eventually surfaced in Texas.

Ely, Horace. A local physician, merchant and hotel keeper, Horace Ely was the construction contractor for the 1850 Jackson County Courthouse. He also had been accused of selling liquor to slaves. Captured during the fighting, he was paroled by the Federals before they left Marianna.

Carter, John C. A private in Company E, 6th Florida Infantry, Carter was given a medical discharge after being wounded at Chickamauga, but volunteered for service with Norwood's men. He was 22-years-old when he was killed in the fighting. His body was among those burned inside St. Luke's Church.

Bassett, Henry O. The captain of Company E, 6th Florida Infantry, Bassett was home on leave and volunteered for service with Norwood's company. A former Jackson County Sheriff, the 39-year-old captain was killed by bayonet wounds on the banks of Stage Creek.

Long, Nicholas A. A local physician and planter, the 49-year-old Long had been the first lieutenant of a local militia company during the Second Seminole War. Active in Whig politics, he had been elected to the Florida Legislature in 1849 and had served as a delegate to the National Whig Convention the year before. A private in the 11th Florida Infantry, he was home on leave and volunteered for service. Captured, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Fort Lafayette. He was released from prison on December 14, 1864, and returned home.

Long, Felix H.G. A local planter, the 47-year-old Long was a private in the 11th Florida Infantry but was home on leave and volunteered for service. Captured during the fighting, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Fort Lafayette. He suffered a stroke in the latter prison and was released on December 14, 1864.

Pittman, Frederick R. A private in the 11th Florida Infantry, Pittman was home on leave and volunteered for service. The 51-year-old former Whig politician was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He was released from prison on December 12, 1864.

Austin, J. Background unknown, Austin was captured during the battle and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and possibly Elmira. His fate is unknown.

McBright, Isreal. Background unknown, McBright identified himself as a member of Norwood's company and was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and probably Elmira. His name is not included on Asboth's p.o.w. list, but does appear on subsequent Northern prison records. His fate is unknown.

Harrison, Samuel (William). Background unknown, Harrison identified himself as a member of Norwood's company and was captured during the battle and sent to prison. His name does not, however, appear on Asboth's p.o.w. list. His fate is unknown.

Sullivan, Solomon. Fifty-four years old, Sullivan sustained a severe elbow wound during the battle and soon died at the home of Mrs. Mary Armistead.

TOTAL IDENTIFIABLE: 67

Godwin's Campbellton Cavalry

Godwin, Alexander C. A Campbellton area plantation owner, Godwin formed his company in the "Spring Field" (Spring Hill?) area of Jackson County during the summer of 1864. He escaped across the Chipola River.

Ball, George. Seventeen years old, Ball escaped across the Chipola River after helping Captain Godwin unhorse and disarm a Federal cavalryman. He was later active in community affairs.

Abercrombie, William A. Sixty-four years old, Abercrombie was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans and Ship Island. He died at the latter place of chronic diarrhea on December 4, 1864, and was buried in Grave Number 11.

Haywood, T.B. Captured during the fighting, Haywood was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He was released from the latter place by Presidential Pardon on December 12, 1864.

Daniel, William. Fifty-six years old, Daniel was captured during the fighting and confined at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at the latter place of diarrhea on December 25, 1864, and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery.

Elmore, Mark. Seventy-two years old, Elmore was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died in Elmira on December 12, 1864 and pneumonia and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery.

Mathews, William. Wounded during the battle, Mathews was taken prisoner and confined at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died in Elmira on December 24, 1864, and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery.

Bosworth, Samuel. A Confederate regular home on leave from the Army of Tennessee, Bosworth volunteered with the Campbellton unit. He received a severe arm wound during the fighting and ultimately lost his arm to amputation.

Curl, Cullin. Thirty or thirty-one years old, Curl was captured in the battle and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He was prepared for exchange from Elmira on February 13, 1865, but was "too sick." After a lengthy hospital stay, he was finally released and returned home. In 1866 he won a court case against a freed slave and in 1877 caught four former slaves stealing cotton from his home 15 miles north of Marianna. He engaged them in a gun battle that resulted in no injuries, although the running fight stretched from northern Jackson County to the Gritney Community in Holmes County.

Clayton, William. Captured during the Battle of Marianna, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira.

Spencer, Lamb. A Confederate regular home on leave, he evidently escaped across the Chipola River.

King, Isaac. A private from Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, King lost his horse in the fighting at the Courthouse but escaped into the swamps on Lieutenant McPherson's mount. Later that night he stumbled into a Union sentry and was shot, but again eluded capture.

TOTAL IDENTIFIABLE: 12

Robinson's Club Cavalry, Greenwood

Robinson, George, Captain. A Greenwood area plantation owner, Robinson formed his company during the summer of 1864. He escaped across the Chipola River.

Avery, Charles C. A resident of the Owens' community in eastern Jackson County, Avery escaped across the Chipola River.

Baker, James S. A planter and merchant, Baker escaped across the Chipola River.

Barnes, Thomas. One of the original organizers of the Greenwood Baptist Church, Barnes was said to be a sergeant in the regular Confederate army. He escaped across the Chipola River. During the Reconstruction era, he was accused in the February 27, 1869 killing of local "scalawag" Dr. John Finlayson and the wounding of Carpetbagger William J. Purman. Relocating to the Chattahoochee area after those incidents, he was lynched by a group of armed blacks.

Cox, William Henry. The great-grandfather of the author and a resident of the Parramore community in eastern Jackson County, Cox was 19-years-old at the time of the battle. He escaped across the Chipola River.

Culverson, Thomas J. Culverson escaped across the Chipola River.

Dykes, James H. Dykes escaped across the Chipola River.

Ferguson, John R. A resident of the Bascom area, Ferguson escaped across the Chipola River.

Hill, William O. Hill escaped across the Chipola River.

Hare, William. Hare escaped across the Chipola River.

Knowles, Francis M. Knowles escaped across the Chipola River.

McCarty, E.R. McCarty escaped across the Chipola River.

McMillan, James W. McMillan escaped across the Chipola River.

Nichols, E.F. Nichols escaped across the Chipola River.

Owens, John B. A resident of the Owens' community of eastern Jackson County, Owens escaped across the Chipola River.

Scott, Andrew. Scott escaped across the Chipola River. He was elected as Sheriff of Jackson County in 1881 and served for three terms.

Sims, B.F. Sims escaped across the Chipola River.

Sorey, William D. One of the founders of Greenwood Baptist Church, Sorey escaped across the Chipola River.

Stephens, Cornelius. Stephens escaped across the Chipola River.

Wester, Elias. Wester escaped across the Chipola River.

Dickson, John J. Fifty-nine years old, Dickson was a Greenwood wheelwright. Wounded by a blow to the head during the battle, he was captured and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Fort Columbus. He died at the latter place on December 16, 1864, of chronic diarrhea and was buried at Cypress Hill National Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.

Allen, Francis "Frank." A senior deacon and Sunday School leader at the Greenwood Baptist Church, the 76-year-old Allen was the oldest man killed in the Battle of Marianna. His body was burned beyond recognition in St. Luke's Church.

Butler, M.A. A 23-year-old doctor, Butler was killed during the fighting around St. Luke's Church.

Kimball, W.H. Thirty-four years old, Kimball was the sheriff of Jackson County. He was captured during the fighting and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Released from Elmira on May 29, 1865, he returned home and resumed his duties as sheriff. His father had served in the interim. Due to concerns over possible violence, he asked that the Fourth of July holiday not be observed in 1866 because he feared that a display of Lincoln's portrait might cause trouble. Kimball served as sheriff through 1867 and was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 1877. He was later one of the founders of the Bascom Methodist Church.

Sorey, Robert D. Twenty-five years old, Sorey was captured during the battle and paroled by the Federals before they left Marianna.

Newsom, T.D. Forty-four years old, Newsom was listed as missing following the battle. He was captured and imprisoned, but his eventual fate is unknown.

Grice, Hansel. Captured during the fighting, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Freed from Elmira on February 25, 1865, he returned home. On some lists, his name is spelled "Amstead Greise," but Grice is a much more common name in Jackson County and is most likely correct.

Bowles, J.R. Bowles escaped across the Chipola River and later went on to become a prominent Cottondale area citizen, serving in the state legislature.

Gray, Davis. A Greenwood plantation owner, Davis Gray was credited with firing the shots that wounded General Asboth. He escaped across the Chipola River.

Brogden, Z.T. An east Jackson County native, Brogden was killed during the fighting.

TOTAL IDENTIFIABLE: 30

Chisolm's Company I, 5th Florida Cavalry
(Naming only members of the unit at the time of the Battle of Marianna)

Chisolm, Robert. Captain.
Wilson, W.C. First Lieutenant.
Rutherford, W.A. Second Lieutenant.
Solomon, R.A. Second Lieutenant.
Anderson, John.
Adams, E.W.J.
Belser, Lit.
Bowden, W.L.
Baies, M.
Barnes, J.H.
Boon, Robert.
Beauchamp, David.
Bowden, Samuel. First Sergeant.
Chambers, J.W.
Chambers, J.B.
Callaway, J.W.
Callaway, R.H.
Carter, J.W.
Cowart, A.J.
Carlisle, William.
Clark, T.B. Second Sergeant.
Cargile, Frank.
Cassady, F.H.
Cawthon, S.S.
Dansey, S.E.
Dawkins, R.H.
Durham, H.C.
Everitt, B.F.
Everitt, E.F.
Fewell, R.A.
Fennell, Perry.
Fullerton, A. Second Corporal.
Fordham, B.J. Captured 9/27/64 and imprisoned at New Orleans. No further record.
Grimesley, H.H.
Holmes, L.H.
Hatton, W.L. Captured 9/27/64 and held at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Died 12/24/64 from diarrhea.
Holmes, John L.
Hardy, John G.
Hall, Allen.
Hall, John.
Harrison, John.
Johns, C.P.
King, Franklin E.
Lee, J.D.
Lee, J.G.B.
Lewis, Arthur. Brought first news of the Union approach to Marianna. His father died in the battle.
Lucas, J.W. Joined on 9/24/64, one day after the attack on Eucheeanna and three days before the battle at Marianna.
Montgomery, R.W.
Martin, A.D.
Merriwether, Charles H.
Monday, James.
Mercer, A.J.
McDaniel, John W.
McDonald, J.B.
Owens, W.D.
Page, J.H.
Pitts, Jackson.
Pitts, Ira.
Register, J.S.
Register, M.G.
Robinson, J.H.
Russ, John G.
Richards, R.J.
Ray, B.H.
Sanders, B.
Singletary, John.
Spence, A.T.
Strickland, Ithial H.
Sims, Ashley.
Solomon, F.W.
Solomon, F. Wiley.
Stanford, Monroe.
Sheats, C.N. Wounded during the Battle of Marianna but eluded capture.
Tennille, William.
Wooten, A.J.
Wester, D.C.
Watson, J.M.

TOTAL IDENTIFIABLE: 77

Captain Poe's Company C, 1st Florida Reserves
(Known Marianna Participants Only)

Abercrombie, Peter F. Captured at Marianna and imprisoned at New Orleans and Ship Island. He died at Ship Island of dysentery on January 18, 1865, and was buried in Grave Number 130.

Alley, John. Captured during the battle, Alley was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at Elmira on February 22, 1865, from diarrhea.

Anderson, John C., Corporal. Captured at Marianna, Anderson was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira.

Shiver, W.N.W. Shiver sustained a minor side wound during the battle and was captured. Held at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira, he died in the latter place from pleuro-pneumonia on December 1, 1864.

Sims, Miles (Myles?). Private Sims was captured during the Battle of Marianna and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at Elmira from diarrhea on March 19, 1865.

Brown, J.M. Brown was captured at Marianna and held in New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at Elmira of chronic diarrhea on March 9, 1865.

Williams, J.R. Captured during the battle, Williams was held at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died in the latter place of small pox on March 13, 1865.

Kiel, Mathney. Captured at the Battle of Marianna, Kiel was held at New Orleans and Ship Island. Transferred to Vicksburg on May 1, 1865, he was released a few days later. At the time of his capture, Kiel identified himself as a member of "Captain Justice's Company," but available records indicate he was attached to Poe's unit.

Cox, Joseph B. Private Cox escaped across the Chipola River.

TOTAL IDENTIFIABLE: 9

 

Staff and Others:

Montgomery, Alexander B., Colonel. The Post Commandant, Colonel Montgomery was a native of Richmond County, Georgia, and a former U.S. Army officer. He fought with the 3rd Georgia Infantry during the Battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg. Captured during the Battle of Marianna after being unhorsed near the courthouse, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Fort Lafayette and Fort Delaware. The colonel was released from prison on July 24, 1865, long after the end of the war. He was described as being 5'10" tall, with a fair complexion, dark hair and gray eyes. There is no record that he ever applied for his Confederate pension.

McPherson, William, 2nd Lieutenant and Post Adjutant. A member of Company G, 5th Florida Cavalry, McPherson was a native of Walton County and a graduate of the first class at the now-defunct Knox Hill Academy. He also studied at Oglethorpe College, Georgia, and at the Lebanon, Tennessee, Law School. The original captain of the "Walton Guards," he later was promoted to the rank of Major with the 1st Florida Infantry. He was captured in Tennessee, but later released. Described as a "ladies man" and "a great smoker," he was shot through the side during the fighting around Courthouse Square. He later recovered and married a local girl, but following her death he relocated to California where he established a reputation as a poet. His Propos de Table was widely read.

Miller, ______, Captain. The Post Quartermaster, Captain Miller escaped across the Chipola River and was instrumental in reforming the Confederate forces there.

Robinson, Henry, Assistant Surgeon. Surgeon Robinson escaped across the river and assisted Captain Miller in reforming the forces there. He returned to private medical practice after the war and eventually relocated to Jacksonville.

Hawkins, Charles. A private with the 5th Florida Cavalry, Hawkins eluded capture by hiding under a house until the Federals withdrew. He then swam the Chipola River to alert the troops on the other side.

Robinson, Walter J. The captain of Company A, 11th Florida Infantry, Robinson fought with Montgomery's cavalrymen during the battle and escaped across the Chipola River.

Roulhac, Joseph B, 1st Lieutenant. On "detached duty" from Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, Roulhac fought with Montgomery's cavalrymen at Marianna. 39-years-old, he was a brother-in-law of former militia general W.E. Anderson. Prior to the war he had run for Congress during the 1856 elections and also operated a buggy factory. Captured during the fighting, he was imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. Released from Elmira on December 12, 1864, he returned home where he died on June 5, 1865. His records indicate he had a light complexion, dark hair and stood 5' 9½" tall.

Pittman, H.R. A private from Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, Pittman escaped across the Chipola River.

Daniels, Lawson. A private from Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, the 46-year-old Daniels was captured during the battle and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died at the latter prison from "general debility" on April 14, 1865.

Myrick, Littleton. A private from Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, the 20-year-old Myrick was killed during the battle and his body burned in St. Luke's Church.

Dykes, Jacob. A private from Company B, 15th Confederate Cavalry, the 26-year-old Dykes escaped across the Chipola River.

Farley, Francis M. Twenty-four years old, Farley was the former captain of Company E, 8th Florida Infantry but had been given a medical discharge after receiving a severe wound at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Early in the war he had been captured at the Battle of Santa Rosa Island and paroled. By 1864, he was Jackson County's Clerk of Courts. He fought with Montgomery's cavalry and escaped across the Chipola River.

Armistead, Lawrence T. A lieutenant with Company E, 6th Florida Infantry, Armistead was home on leave at the time of the battle and volunteered for service. A 20-year-old ministerial student, he had previously been wounded in the wrist at Chickamauga. He escaped across the river.

Irwin, Freeman B. A Washington County native, Irwin had represented Washington County at the Florida Secession Convention. He was a member of Captain W.B. Jones' company of scouts and had fallen back to Marianna following the skirmish at Campbellton. He was captured in the battle and imprisoned at New Orleans, Ship Island and Elmira. He died in the latter prison on February 7, 1865.

King, H.C. A member of Captain Jones' company of scouts, King was captured in Marianna, but his eventual fate is unknown.

TOTAL IDENTIFIABLE: 15

 

TOTAL KNOWN PARTICIPANTS: 207


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Web page revised by:
James L. Edenfield
Jun 25, 2001