Butts County Obituaries      


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A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



Surnames C


Surname
C
Death Date
(or newspaper date)
 
CANTRELL , Infant of Dr. & Mrs. O. H.
September 16, 1898
CARR , Dick
June 18, 1889
CARR , Infant
September 13, 1895
CARGILE , Capt. John
December 4, 1888
CARMICHAEL , Carter
May 12, 1881
CARMICHAEL , Carter Age 12
September 8, 1893
CARMICHAEL , Child of Mr. & Mrs. Tom
June 1, 1900
CARMICHAEL , J. A.
May 4, 1915
CARMICHAEL , John
March 24, 1899
CARMICHAEL , John B.
June 17,1890
CARMICHAEL , Johnie
February 12, 18909
CARMICHAEL , Mrs. Mary
October 6, 1896
CARMICHAEL , Mrs. Nancy
January 1, 1897
CARMICHAEL , Oscar
February 12, 1889
CARMICHAEL , Porter
September 6, 1882
CARMICHAEL , Ralph
November 3, 1894
CARMICHAEL , Mrs. Rosa A.
July 9, 1953
CARR , Standhope
November 9, 1886
CARTER , Dr. G. H.
 
CARTER , Little Johnny
???
CASTLEBERRY , Susannah F.
July 30,1887
CAUTHEN , Miss Floree
December 10, 1889
CHILDS , Baby of Ed
May 12, 1881
CHILDS , Ed
November 18, 1898
CHILDS , Mrs. J. E.
May 12, 1899
CLARK , Mrs. Emily
April 20, 1900
CLARK , Judge John T.
July 23, 1889
CLARK , Judge Richard H.
February 21, 1896
CLUPPER , Mrs. Helen Thaxton
May 18, 1997
COCHRAN , Mrs. George
July 21, 1899
COCRAN , Woodie B.
December 30, 2001
COLE , Mrs. Alice
December 17, 1889
COLE , Bryant
August 4, 1899
COLE , Son of Tom
February 8, 1887
COLEMAN , Mary
March 10,1881
COLLIER , B. W.
October 13, 1894
COLLIER , Mrs. Martha
September 2, 1898
COLLINS , son of O. J.
July 20,1887
COLLINS , Mrs. T. J.
May 27, 1898
COMBS , Mrs. Joseph
May 12, 1890
COMBS , Mrs. Joe
June 10, 1898
CRAWFORD , Mattie
June 17, 1898
COMPTON , Mrs.
April 5, 1895
COMPTON , Miss Virginia
April 12, 1895
COOK , Betsy
March 1, 1894
COOK , Mrs. Dick
February 11, 1897
COUCH , Mrs. Melvina
January 28, 1897
CRAWFORD, Harold Marks
March 11, 1894
CRAWFORD , John
March 11, 1897
CRAWFORD , Miss Mamie
May 18, 1900
CRAWFORD , Mrs. W. D.
May 18, 1900
CRAWFORK , Mrs.
April 12, 1882
CRAWLEY , John L.
July 30, 1897
CREGG , Katie
May 7, 1889
CRUM , Little Eyalyn
December 13, 1895
CURRY , Betsy
May 31, 1895




Dick Carr
Dick Car, a faithful old colored man of this county, died on Mr. Taylor Buttrill’s place on yesterday. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of June 18, 1889)

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Dick Carr Infant
Infant child of Billy Carr who resided near Worthville, Georgia died Wednesday night. Jackson Argus - Week of September 13, 1895)

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Capt. John Cargile, well known citizen of this county, died at his home near Iron Springs on Friday. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of December 4, 1888)

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Carter Carmichael
It becomes our painful duty to announce the sudden death of one of our most highly esteemed and dearly beloved fellow citizens, Mr. Carter Carmichael, which occurred in Jackson on Saturday evening last, at about 2 o'clock. Mr. C. had just rode into town and dismounted from his horse, near Mr. Duke's store, and while closing his umbrella, fell backwards and expired without uttering a word.
His death is supposed to have caused by dropsy of the heart. His death is universally lamented as he was highly esteemed by all who knew him.
(Middle Ga. Argus - Week of May 12, 1881)

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CARTER CARMICHAEL - MEMORIAM
In early "ere decay's effacing fingers had marked the lines where beauty lingers" and all animate nature seemed to revel in the joy of existence, death came to one of our best loved homes and claimed a his victim the youngest and fondest of it inmates.
Carter Carmichael, the youngest child of Mrs. Rose Carmichael, was born in Butts County February 19, 1881, and died on September 8, 1893.
This the brie record of a young life, which closed its earthly relation in our midst so recently, and saddened inexpressively the circle of his friends and relatives. The youngest of an affectionate family, he had endeared himself to the ……..etc.
(Middle Ga. Argus - Week of November 2, 1893)

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Mr. J. A. Carmichael Passes To His Reward
After a lingering illness extending over a period of several months, Mr. J. A Carmichael, passed away Tuesday afternoon at the home of his son, Mr. (_____?____), in this city, (part of page missing)
He was a veteran of the war Between the States, having joined the Second Georgia cavalry in Rome in 1863 at the age of 29.
Short funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Olin King at Fellowship cemetery, where members of his immediate family are buried.
Mr. Carmichael is survived by two sons, Mr. J. B. Carmichael of this city, and Mr. Joe Carmichael, of Molena; one sister, Mrs. R. B. Harkness, who is now the only surviving child of the family.
Among the out of town people coming to attend the funeral were: Mr. Walter Sams of Sylvester, Messrs. Andrew and Rufus Sams, of Macon, Messrs. B. B. Carmichael and Harver Carmichael and Mr. and Mrs. Green Copeland all of McDonough.
(Butts Argus - 1915)

Butts County Cemetery Book states:
Carmichael, J. A., born February 6, 1836 and died May 4, 1915 and buried at the Fellowship Presbyterian Church Cemetery.

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John B. Carmichael - Memoriam
Fellowship Church, June 1, 1890
Whereas, God whom we worship and adore, and we acknowledge just and supreme, has seen fit in the wise dispensation of His providence to remove from the cares and trials of life, from the church and our brotherhood, one of the oldest, yet strongest, standard bearers of Christ in our midst, Bro. John B. Carmichael; therefore, be it
Resolved, first, That while we bow with humble resignation to God’s will, knowing that He doeth all things well, we see a chair in our midst vacated, that for many years has been filled by one true to his convictions, ever ready to assist in the up building of his church and the cause of Christ, earnest and persistent in putting down sin and worldliness and sitting up truth, honor and Christian virtues; one whose life from early youth was spent in God’s vineyard, one whose death was the consummation of the rich fruits of a life well spent.
Resolved, second, That in his death we feel a great loss in our working force, but knowing that the labors of the good are abundantly rewarded, we feel that his spirit is today pinioned among the host of Heaven where there is no more sorrow, pain and death, when it may quaff the limpid waters of the river of life flowing from beneath the throne of God, where sun of eternal life is never clouded and the harp strings of eternal praise and thanksgiving are ever tuned.
Resolved, third, That we tend our poor comfort, our sympathy, to the bereaved ones; that a copy of these resolutions be sent his wife; that they be recorded upon the minutes of the church, and printed in The Middle Georgia Argus

J. C. Woodward
E. L. Phillips
H. M. Fletcher, Committee
(Middle Ga Argus – Week of June 17,1890)

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CARMICHAEL, Uncle Johnie
On Thursday at 4 o’clock p.m. the spirit of “Uncle Johnie” Carmichael took its everlasting flight to that bourne from which no traveler returns. He had been sick but a few days with neuralgia of the stomach.
It is useless for us to speak of Mr. Carmichael’s many good traits, as he was well known and loved far and near. He had long been a leader in Fellowship Presbyterian church and was never known to miss a church meeting, when able to attend. He was especially attentive to the sick in his neighborhood, and never failed to perform an act of charity, when such demanded. If he had lived a short while longer, he would have been seventy-nine years of age. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of February 12, 18909)

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Mrs. Mary Carmichael Dead
After many years of useful life this woman has gone to live among the inhabitants of the better world. At time of her death which occurred Sunday afternoon at her home in the western part of the county, she was about seventy five or eighty years of age, having the greater part of this time been a member of the Presbyterian church. She was a Christian whose daily life exemplified the genuineness of the good old time religion.
She was the widow of old uncle Jno. B. Carmichael now deceased and the brother of Mr. D. N. Carmichael. Her beautiful Christ like life will rest and remain after her as a sweet benediction to those who came under her influence.
(Jackson Argus - Week of October 6, 1896)

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CARMICHAEL, Mrs. Nancy
The death of Mrs. Nancy Carmichael, which occurred at her home near McDonough last week, is sad intelligence to many people in this county. Mrs. Carmichael was quite old. She was the widow of "Uncle" Jimmie Carmichael who died about fifteen years ago.
(Jackson Argus - Week of January 1, 1897)

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CARMICHAEL, Oscar
The dead body of Oscar Carmichael, the Negro convict who murdered his guard, Mr. Jason Gresham on November 26, last, was found near McDonough on Wednesday. It was lying a short distance from his mother’s in the woods, where it is supposed he fell after being wounded by his pursurers and had been partially devoured by dogs and buzzards. Gresham’s watch and pistol was by him. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of February 12, 1889)

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CARMICHAEL, Porter
On Wednesday night last, little Porter, son of Mr. and Mrs. David N. Carmichael was borne away on angels wings.  He was taken violently with the croup and died before he could obtain relief.

Our most heartfelt sympathies are with the stricken family, and we mourn with them in their affliction.  Thought young he had shown that he was possessed of a fine mind, and bid fair to become a man of brilliant intellect.

The good die young, so God took little Porter in the second year of his pilgrimage to live with him.   God took their treasure because He knew that the their hearts would be with Him; and now

"Death lies on him like an untimely frost.
Upon the sweetest flower of all the field."
E.P.C.
(Jackson News - Week of September 6, 1882)

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Ralph Carmichael
On Friday evening last, death claimed the sweet little three year old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. r. Carmichael. Ralph was attacked with that dreaded disease diphtheria about a week before his death. Of course the presence of this disease always alarms, but seems to be doing well and hopes of his recovery were entertained to within a few moments of his departure form earth to heaven. The funeral services were conducted Saturday afternoon from the Presbyterian Church by Rev. Mr. Pharr assisted by Rev. G. W. Gardner, after which his little body was laid to rest in our village cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Carmichael have the profound sympathy of the entire community in this sore and sad bereavement.(Middle Ga. Argus - Week of November 3, 1894)

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CARMICHAEL, Mrs. Rosa A.
DEATH COMES TO MRS. CARMICHAEL IN JACKSON HOUSE
Mrs. Rose A. Carmichael, one of the counties widely beloved women and one of its oldest residents, died at her home in Jackson, shortly after noon Thursday July 9. She had been gravely ill for several days. A period of ill health dated more than a year and resulted from a fall and complications. As Rose Ann Elizabeth Kinard, daughter of the late Barney C. Kinard and Prudence Vickers Kinard, she was born November 14, 1865 and observed her 87th birthday the past fall. She descended from pioneer families of Towaliga district and Butts County. On Feb. 14, 1884 she married the late J. R. Carmichael, banker and carriage manufacturer, and made her home in Jackson for a long period of years. She was a member of the Jackson Presbyterian Church and interested in all its programs and activities. Her deep religious faith was a source of comfort and strength in her daily living. The core of a devoted family circle, Mrs. Carmichael found pleasure in her children and grandchildren, Service to others brought her solid satisfaction and she retained the youthful outlook in her concern and welfare for young people. Vibrant living kept her young in spirit in spite of the passing years. Survivors are four sons and three daughters; A. Homer Carmichael, Atlanta broker; Mrs. T. J. Dempsey, of Watkinsville; Victor H. Carmichael, postmaster of Jackson; John Edward Carmichael, Butts County Tax Receiver, John R. Carmichael, purchasing agent of Georgia Power Company in Atlanta; Mrs. Ralph W. Barnwell of Atlanta; Mrs. E. Stanley McNiece of Dallas, Texas; one sister, Mrs. Walter P. Thaxton of Jackson; one brother J. M. Kinard of Baxley, several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the residence Friday at 4 P. M. The Rev. Wade H. Bell, pastor of the Jackson Presbyterian Church and Dr. R. MacFerrin Crows, pastor of the North Avenue Presbyterian Church in Atlanta officiated. The pallbearers were grandsons, Joe Joyner of Atlanta, James Joyner of Charleston, n. C., Hugh Dempsey of Griffin, Willingham Carmichael, Broadus Carmichael and Bob Carmichael of Atlanta, Bert Carmichael of Jackson. Burial was in the family lot in the Jenkinsburg cemetery under the direction of Peacock & Ball Funeral Home. (Jackson Progress Argus July 16, 1953)

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Mr. Stanhope Carr, another one of the landmarks of this county passed peacefully away at his home in Worthville on Friday night. He died from the effects of a stroke of paralysis, which had stricken him down a few days before. He was well known to the people of Butts and not a word can be said against his good name. He never sought notoriety, but preferred to remain on his farm, which was his delight. By hard work he emassed splendid possessions and leaves the world without owing any man a cent. He leaves many children, grandchildren and relations and friends to mourn his death. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of November 9, 1886)

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Little Johnny Carter, It is with pain that we note the death of little Johnnie, three-year-old son of Mr. C. R. Carter, of this county, which sad event occurred on Saturday morning. He was an unusual bright little boy and was the idol of his parents. His remains were interred in the cemetery at Towalaga on Sunday. Our sympathies are expressed to the bereaved family. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of ???)

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Susannah F. Castlebury – Obit
Mrs. Susannah F. Castlebury, the subject of this sketch, was born February 11,1820, in Monroe County, Ga. Her death occurred at her residence in Butts County on Saturday, July 30,1887.

She was the widow of Jeptha Castlebury, who was born in Warren County, Ga., November 22,1811, died suddenly at his home April 27th, 1866; and who, like her, was a devout Christian and a steadfast adherent to the doctrines and principles of the Primitive Baptist church.

The funeral services were conducted at her home by the Rev. James G. Kimbell, who took for his text, "She hath done what she could;" and after a most beautiful and appropriate sermon, her remains were laid away in the family burying ground, August 1.

She leaves three sons and five daughters and a large circle of grandchildren and friends to mourn her loss, but their loss is her eternal gain.

We can pay her no higher tribute than to say she daily lived the religion she professed and died triumphant over death and the grave.  As a Christian she was blameless in life and pure in heart, kind and gentle in spirit.  The life at home, the tender consideration toward her family and neighbors and devotion to her church are all in proof of her love for the savior.

She has been connected with the Primitive Baptist church ever since her early womanhood, and her life was a beautiful illustration of the life of a true Christian.  She bore her sufferings with fortitude until the summons came for her spirit to quit its earthly tenement and go forth to that better land to enjoy a blest eternity “beyond the sunset´s radiant glow,’ where the saints of all ages in harmony meet.

Middle Ga Argus  -  Week of August 9,1887

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Miss Floree Cauthen, Miss Floree Cauthen died last Saturday and was buried Sunday. She was a good girl, just entered into her teens. We extend our sympthies to the bereaved ones. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of December 10, 1889)

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Ed. Childs It is with a heavy heart, that the pen stroke, has to announce that another home, that of Mr. Ed. Childs, is crushed beneath a weight of grief.
As we nearer the home of our friend on last Friday night, the low sobs of parents and friends told that the hopes of future years had been wrecked.
All is explained in three words, "baby is dead". A daisty form still and cold, eyes that yesterday were bright as skies of June dropped to night beneath white lips that no voice can ever rise again.
Too soft hand whose rose leaf fingers were wont to wander loving around mother's neck and face folded quietly across an innocent breast.
Soft lips accustomed to rippling laughter, sweet as woodlands, brooks falling gay as thrill of forest bird, to night unresponsive to kiss or call of love.
Little "Sheppie" too pure for earth has been called away, the patter of his little feet forever hushed.
Little garments that had been neatly folded away for his comfort are turned about by one with an aching heart, to prepare the sweet form for the place where the tiny mound is to be made.
(Middle Ga Argus - Week of May 12, 1881)

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Judge John T Clark Killed, Cuthbert, Ga., July 22, 1889 - Judge John T. Clark, judge of the Patsula circuit was the victim of a horrible accident today about two o’clock at Smithville, in which he lost his life in the twinkling of an eye. His head was almost completely severed from the body, beneath the wheels of the westbound Macon and Montgomery passenger train.
He left Cuthbert on the twelve o’clock train, and was on his way to Macon to hold court for Judge Gustin this week, having agreed to sit in the famous Cotton State Life insurance case. (Middle Ga. Argus – Week of July 23, 1889)

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Judge Clark's Death
In the death of Judge Richard H. Clark, of Atlanta, Georgia lost one of her bravest and purest sons. A great and good man has gone from among men to join the throng across the river. His life was one of continued usefulness and good deeds. There were very few such men as Judge Clark before his death. In his official capacity he was brought in contact with the woes and miseries of life. He sternly obey the summons of duty through all of his dealing were tempered with mercy and moderation. His brilliant intellect and natural sunny disposition made him a favorite wherever he went. Always full of life and making others happy by deeds of kindness and humanity.
When prisoners were brought into this presence they were sure of merciful and just treatment at his hands, nor did he ever use his position to add one pang of sorrow to any condemned man.
He wore the ermine with all dignity and never was any position more honored than the one he held. He will be greatly missed from among the legal councils of the State, but the memory of this man will be cherished as a sweet habit of the blest.
Long may his influence be with us and let the light of his life continue to lead others to the divine path of duty while engaged in the toilsome duties of this earthly life.

(Jackson Argus - Week of February 21, 1896)

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CLUPPER,
Mrs. Helen Thaxton Clupper, 90, of Kinard Mill Road, Jackson, died Sunday, May 18, 1997 in a Marietta, Cobb County, Georgia nursing home. She had resided at Leisure Living in Jackson before her last illness. She was born in Butts County June 18, 1906, the daughter of the late Walter and Allie Kinard Thaxton. She was the wife of the late Forest Leonard Clupper Sr. who died in 1979. Mrs. Clupper was a homemaker and a member of the Fellowship Presbyterian Church in Butts County. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, Len and Lauren Clupper of Marietta; daughter-in-law Sally Clupper of Stockbridge; six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her son, Bob Clupper of Stockbridge. Funeral services will be Wednesday at 11 a.m. in the chapel of Haisten Funeral Home. Rev. David Schulherr and Rev. Andy Holston will officiate, with interment in the Fellowship Cemetery. Friends may visit the family at the funeral home Tuesday evening from 7-9. (Haisten Funeral Home, Jackson. 770-775-3119)(The Atlanta Constitution May 20, 1997)

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COCRAN, Woodie B.
Sylvania - Mr. Woodie B. Cochran, 78, died Sunday, Dec. 30 at Emory Cartersville Medical Center.
He was born in Butts County and was a member of Bay Branch Baptist Church. He was a retired Section Foreman for BASF Corp. He was preceded in death by his wife, Polly Bragg Cochran.
Survivors: daughter, Polly V. Cochran Blackburn, of Sylvania; sons, William R Cochran of Acworth, Douglas R. Cochran of Athens, and K. W. Cochran of Sylvania; sister, Edna E. Collins of Oak Park; half-brother, Franklin D. Cochran of Jackson; ten grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.
Visitation: 6:00-8:00 p. m. Wednesday, Jan. 2, at Thompson-Strickland-Waters Funeral Home.
Funeral: 11:00 a. m. Thursday, Jan. 3, Thompson-Strickland-Waters Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Russell Pressy officiating.
Burial: Bay Branch Baptist Church Cemetery.
Thompson-Strickland-Waters Funeral Home, Inc
(Savannah (GA) Morning News January 2, 2001)

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A Peculiarly Sad Death
We clip the following paragraph from the Tampa, Fla., Journal of December 6, 1889
Mrs. Alice Cole died at her home in West Tampa yesterday evening at 6 o’clock, of heart disease. Her death was very sudden and altogether unexpected. She had fever several days previous, but had recovered her usual health, and five minutes before she died was with her child. She had, however, had several previous attacks of heart disease, though none of them proved serious. Mrs. Cole was a native of Galt, Ont., where her parents still reside. She has one brother in Tampa, one at Manatee and another in Georgia. She was married to Mr. John C. Cole on February 14, 1888, and they had one child, a boy four months old. The bereaved husband and family have the sincere sympathy of the entire community in their heavy affliction.
The funeral will take place tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock.
Mrs. Cole was an only sister to our fellow townsman, Mr. G. W. Kinsman, chief blacksmith of the Jackson carriage factory. The Argus extends sympathy to him in his bereavements.
(Middle Ga Argus - Week of December 17, 1889)

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Died with Hydrophobia
A Colored child died after having been bitten by a mad dog six weeks.
A genuine case of death by hydrophobia has occurred in Jackson.
During Christmas an unknown dog appeared in the yard of Tom Cole, colored, in this place and began fighting his yard dog. His children were playing near by, and a little boy, five years old, ran to the rescue and with a stick caused the furious beast to loose its hold, when it turned upon the child and bit it severely on the head and face. Dr. Mapp was called who dressed the wounds. In a short while the thought of rabies had about been forgotten. The dog however was killed. On Friday the child was again taken ill and lingered until Sunday night when it died in great agony, and Dr. Map, who attended the case pronounced it a genuine case of hydrophobia.
Death from rabies is certainly terrible and or people should use every precaution to prevent the spread of this trouble. Ever dog that is suspected of being mad should be killed outright. (Middle Ga Argus - Week of February 8, 1887)

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Mary Coleman
On Sunday morning last, Mrs. Mary Coleman, nee Head, wife of Mr. Wilson Coleman, after a long protracted term of suffering, with consumption breathed her last and passed quietly into the happy spirit land. She was buried at Sandy Creek church on Monday evening last attended by a large assemblage of friends. Rev. McRae of our town conducted the religious exercise in some timely appropriate and feeling remarks.
She was a consistent follower of Christ and although she left a large family of little children to mourn her loss. We rejoice to know and feel that their loss is her gain and the ones who has blessed her will bless the bereaved ones.
(Middle Ga. Argus - Week of March 10,1881)

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B. W. Collier
Mr. B. W. Collier, an old and much beloved citizen of Indian Spring, died there Saturday. Mr. Collier has been at Indian Spring for sixty years, or longer. Mr. Collier was very old and there was therefore no one greatly surprised at his death, but we learn that he died suddenly. Our people are ………balance of obit is illegible. (Middle Ga. Argus - Week of October 18, 1894)

B. W. Collier
Sweetly and apparently without pain the gentle spirit of Mr. B. W. Collier passed from earth to Heaven Saturday night, Oct. 13, at his home at Indian Spring.  His last day on earth was a perfect day and a very happy one to him.  He was unusually bright and cheerful and spoke of the many reasons he had for gratitude and thanksgiving.  He was busy during the day attending church, and looking after the finances of the church, and the comfort of his pastor.  He retired in his usual health about 9 o'clock.  Soon after retiring, paralysis of the brain attacked him, and in an hour his soul was in Heaven.  He leaves a devoted wife, six sons and three daughters, besides several grandchildren who all love and reverence his memory.  No children were ever more devoted to a parent than were his, and if any differences ever arose, his wide council always prevailed.  He was truly a peacemaker.  He used his life for others, thinking little of himself.  His children were all present at the funeral except three who have homes in the far west.
Four sons and two grandsons acted as pallbearers.  He was followed to the grave by a large number of mourning friends, where he was buried with Masonic honors, the funeral having been preached by Rev. Mr. Hurst, a student of Mercer and pastor of the Baptist church at Indian Spring.  Mr. Collier was for many years before the war well known all over Georgia as the proprietor of the celebrated McIntosh House, which was destroyed by fire about fourteen years ago.  Since which time he has lived in retirement, surrounded by his devoted family and always tenderly cared for by them and their saintly mother.
Visitors to the now famous Wigwam presided over by sons of Mr. Collier, never failed to seek out the genial and venerable patriarch, who was always delighted to talk of the former glory of Indian spring and of the virtues of the water.  No man was better posted in the history of Georgia, and he numbered among his acquaintances and friends many of her most illustrious sons and daughters.  His cordial greeting and pleasant smile will be long missed by the visitors to the Spring and many will doubtless feel that much of the charm of the place has vanished with him.  The beauty of his Christian character shows more resplendently in his own home and in his own family.
Those who by marriage or otherwise were members of his family, always received the tenderest consideration.  The writer can give cardinal testimony to this fact, after a membership in the family extending over more than a quarter of a century.
Middle Ga. Argus - Week of September 6, 1894

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COLLINS
Mr. O. J. Collins, of course it is hard to give up the little darling boy, though it is in a better land. Mr. Collins and his good wife bear their affictions with a fortitude becoming the children of God. (Middle Ga Argus - Week of July 20,1887)

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Mrs. Joseph Combs
Mrs. Joseph Combs, of Locust Grove and daughter of Rev. J. G. Kimbell, died on Friday. (Middle Ga Argus – Week of May 12, 1890)

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Mrs. Compton
We regret to announce the death of two good old ladies who recently died in our county: Mrs. Compton, the widow of our former ordinary, and Mrs. King of Jenkinsburg. These two good ladies have lived a long and useful life in our county.. Their relatives have our sympathy. (Jackson Argus - Week of April 5, 1895)

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Miss Virginia Copmton
We are again called upon to chronicle another death near our town this week. Miss Virginia Compton (whose mother died recently), died Sunday. Two of the same family and from the same house in the same week. They have both been afflicted many years, and death had been expected for some time. (Jackson Argus - Week of April 12, 1895)

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Betsy Cook
We are sorry to announce the death of Mrs. Betsy Cook, a respected and beloved lady of Henry County, who died one week since. (Middle Ga. Argus - Week of March 1, 1894)

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Mrs. Dick Cook
We are pained to announce the death of Mrs. Dick cook which sad event occurred at her home in the upper part of this county last Thursday. Mrs. Cook was a noble lady, beloved by all that knew her. She leaves a devoted husband and several small children to mourn her, but we trust that their loss is her eternal gain.
(Jackson Argus - Week of February 11, 1897)

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Mrs. Mrs. Melvina - FOUND DEAD
Mice Had Begun To Devour The Body

At four o'clock yesterday afternoon the dead body of Mrs. Melvina Couch was found in her bed in her residence on Solomon street, the discovery being made by W. K. Howard. From the position of the body and the condition of it, and the testimony of the examining physician, she had been dead for some time - possibly since Monday night, and must have died while in a paroxysm of some sort - perhaps a coughing spell. The body was lying on its back with the right arm outside, the lower extended, and the left arm bent, with the hand raised. The mouth was slightly open; on her lower lip rats or mice had begun to eat into the face, but the disfigurement was slight.
Mrs. Couch had lived alone in the cottage since the death of her husband, within the sound of the bustle on Hill street, and where hundreds passed daily. She was last seen alive by Mrs. J. Q. Boynton on Monday afternoon. It was rumored that some one saw her Tuesday morning, but the rumor could not be substantiated.
Coroner Williams empanelled a jury about 6 o'clock and examined a few witnesses only. W. K. Howard testified that he was passing and his attention was called to the house by someone who had been knocking at the door. He knocked several times and receiving no response, he went to a window and managed to see the bed and one hand and still failing to attract her attention, he broke open a door and found her dead as described above.
Mrs. J. Q. Boynton testified to seeing her at home Monday afternoon and reading the Bible with her. She seemed in her usual spirits, indicated the chapter she wished read at her funeral, and the dress she was to be buried in.
Dr. T. E. Drewry testified that she had been dead more than twenty four hours - possibly since Monday night - and must have died in a paroxysm of some sort - possibly a coughing spell. That to his knowledge she had been suffering from the grip for the past ten days and that she told his father, Dr. N. B. Drewry, that she had a spell not long since at night, that prevented her from moving or calling for help.
In accordance with the testimony the jury brought in a verdict of "Death from natural causes."
A little daughter of Mrs. Boynton had a letter for Mrs. Couch on Tuesday. She knocked on the door repeatedly and finally put the letter under the door, where it was found yesterday. The little girl was sent back yesterday and her repeated efforts to make herself heard attracted the attention of neighbors, and Mr. Howard was called with the above results.
Mrs. Couch was about seventy two years of age. She had been married twice, the first time to a Mr. Crawford; the second time to Dr. Couch, who has been dead many years. She had been a resident of Griffin for perhaps forty years and was well known to nearly everybody. She had one son, the late James J. Couch, killed about ten years ago by J. E. Glenn on the sidewalk near the Odd Fellows building. Wrapped up, in her son, her darling boy whom she idolized, she never recovered from the shock of his death and constantly referred to him in conversation and a large picture of him hung near her bedside. She was supposed to be eccentric, perhaps she was to an extent but those who knew her best loved and honored her for her good traits of character. She was a member of the Methodist church and had been for years.
Some days ago she went to an undertaking establishment and selected the casket she wished to be buried in, and today she will be placed in it according to her wish. Griffin News
(Jackson Argus - Week of January 28, 1897)

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Harold Marks Crawford
Harrold Marks Crawford, the infant son of J. M. and Annie e. Crawford, died at the home of his parents Sunday morning, March 11, 1894. He was born April 15, 1893, being not quite one year old. He was a bright interesting child, and the pet of the home, and filled a large place in the heart of each member of a devoted family. The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Crawford deeply sympathize with them in the loss of their dear little baby boy. (Middle Ga. Argus - week of March 29, 1894)

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John Crawford
The death of John Crawford which occurred at the John McKibben homestead in Henry county last Sunday was attended with circumstances that were unusual and sad.

Several days ago he got up one morning to kindle a fire and as he knelt down by the hearth stuck a pen pin in his knee. At that time very little was thought of the occurrence but with the course of ten or twelve hours the little wound began to pain him. Blood poison set in and he rapidly grew worse until death came as a sweet messenger of peace and relieved him of great suffering.

Before his death he became blind and expressed his sorrow at not being able to see his friends a last time. He was buried at New Hope Methodist church and leaves a wife and three small children.

In connection with the death of this excellent man a very touching incident occurred which shows that the milk of human kindness has not yet soured in the souls of some people. Applications were made to rent the premises occupied by the deceased which would have deprived his widow of a home. But, speaking for himself and brother, Frank, Mr. Ci McKibben said to the applicants:

You need not apply. John was a poor man, but he was as kind as could be to my old father and mother and though he owed Frank and myself some money and leaves nothing with which to pay we are determined that his wife and children shall have a home here as long as they want it.

And though Frank and Ci McKibben are big, strong 250 pounders their hearts were touched and they cried like children over the death of the man who has proven such a faithful friend to their parents and to themselves.

(Jackson Argus - March 11, 1897)

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Mrs. Crawfork
We regret to chronicle the death of Mrs. Crawfork, who died Thursday last at her home in this county. She lay on her bed of affliction for several weeks before her death, which we learn was caused from general debility. We extend our sympathies to the bereaved family and relations. (Jackson News - Week of April 12, 1882)

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John L. Crawley
John L. Crawley, one of Jackson's best young men, died at his home here last Wednesday morning and was buried at the city cemetery yesterday morning.
The funeral sermon was preached at the M. E. church by Rev. J. M. Bowden, the pastor of the deceased. It was a good sermon and visibly affected the large audience.
Mr. Crawley was a noble, Christian young man and his wife and children are entitled to the tenderest sympathy of the people. Other relatives he had who were near and ear and they, too, are heart broken and sad.
The Argus offers its condolence to the bereaved family in the loss of so noble a member.
(Jackson Argus - Week of July 30, 1897)

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Katie Cregg
The remains of little Katie Cregg was intered in the New Hope cemetery Sunday 21st ult. (Middle Ga Argus - Week of May 7, 1889)

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Little Eyalyn Crum
Little Eyalyn Crum, the 6 year-old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Crum, died Friday morning about 2 o'clock after a short illness.
The sympathy of the whole town goes out to the bereaved family in this their greatest affliction.
She was buried Friday afternoon in the cemetery. A more extended notice will appear next week.
(Jackson Argus - Week of December 13, 1895)

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Betsy Curry
Mrs. Betsy Curry, an old lady of Morgan county, who was 86 years old, died at the home of Mr. W. F. Kimbell, Sunday night, and was buried at Macedonia church Monday evening. (Jackson Argus - Week of May 31, 1895)

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