Floyd County Veterans

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ATKINS, Clarence Edward (Master Sergeant, U. S. Army Ret.)

Born August 7, 1920, in Somerville, Morgan County, Alabama
Died June 11, 1993, in Rome, Floyd County, Georgia.

By authority of General Order Number 76, issued 9 May 1944, by Headquarters, Fifth Army, APO 464, United States Army, Private First Class Clarence E. Atkins, RA 19049724, is entitled to wear the Distinguished Unit Badge per the following citation:
The 2nd Battalion (Reinforced), 30th Infantry Regiment, is cited for outstanding performance of duty in action during the period 8 August 1943 to 12 August 1943. When a determined enemy is successfully withstanding the attack of an American Army, the 2nd Battalion (Reinforced) made an amphibious landing near San Agata, Sicily, eight miles behind the German lines. This battalion forced a breach in the enemy positions, inflicted heavy casualties upon him in men and material, and advanced the American positions ten miles. Forty-eight hours later, without rest or normal preparations, the 2nd Battalion made a second amphibious landing, this time fifteen miles behind the German lines, in order to seize Mount Creole, a dominating terrain feature between the Naso and Brolo Rivers. In the face of murderous fire from all type of weapons, and tanks, the battalion, without supporting artillery, doggedly fought its way up the precipitous heights of its objective. The soldiers of this organization maintained their captured positions for nineteen and one-half hours, despite constant shelling and repeated counterattacks, until the balance of the division drove through fifteen miles of enemy territory to their relief. In seizing Mount Creole, the 2nd Battalion inflicted and suffered heavy losses in men and material, but forced the enemy to withdraw fifteen miles and denied him the use of a lateral supply line to his inland positions. The action of the 2nd Battalion was marked by gallantry, fearlessness and profound devotion to duty in the successful accomplishment of two vital missions.

By authority of General Order Number 24, issued 24 January 1945, by the Headquarters, Third Infantry Division, APO 3, under the command of Major General O'Daniel, Corporal Clarence E. Atkins, RA 19049724, is awarded the Purple Heart for wounds received in action against the enemy on 20 December 1944, while a member of the Medical Detachment, Company C, 3d Medical Battalion, France.
Submitted by
Clarence Atkins April 11, 2003

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MATHIS, George H.

Enlisted 11 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery. He served his full term, ending as a POW.
Update: 12 March 2005
George H. Mathis, older brother of Richard Marion Mathis was born 18 October 1841 and he died after 1 April 1882 and before 6 June 1882 but as of now this is the best I can pinpoint his date of death. I believe that George H. Mathis is buried at Mizpah Methodist Church but cannot prove that.
Submitted by
Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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MATHIS, Richard Marion

Enlisted 11 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery. He served his full term. He went in as a private and came out as a Corporal, having spent part of his service as a POW.
Update: 12 March 2005
Richard Marion Mathis was born 1 May 1842 in GA, to William H. and Susan Rebecca RUSSELL MATHIS and he died 8 May 1910 in North Rome. He is buried at Oakland Cemetery and has a military marker.
Richard and his brother, George, enlisted in the Cherokee Light Artillery (Van DeCorput's Battery) on June 11, 1861 at Camp McDonald in Cobb County, GA. The Cherokee Light Artillery was originally attached to the Third GA Infantry Battalion. The Cherokee Artillery served in the following campaigns and battles: Cumberland Gap, TN, June, 1862. The Vicksburg Campaign and Seige of Vicksburg, May to July, 1863. The Battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi, in June, 1863. The report of Brigadier General Seth M. Barton, CSA, states "Van DeCorput's Battery, posted on teh road on the left, was beautifully served. It's horses and many men were killed; and finding it impossible to save the guns, they were fired with double cannister to the last, and abandoned only when they could no longer be served." (1) All of the guns, except one iron six pound rifle that was made at the Noble Foundry, in Rome, GA, were lost to the Union Army. The Company was reforned in September 1863, just in time to serve in the Battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge.
The Atlanta Campaign took place. Van DeCorput's battery had advanced about eighty yards in front of the overrun by the 2nd and 3rd Divisions of the 20th Army Corps. The gunners were overwhelmed and fought to save the guns, but they were forced to retreat back to the fortifications. The Union troops were pinned down by the fire from the Confederate lines, but they would not leave without the cannon. Under the cover of darkness, a ditch was dug in the front of the depression by the Union troops and the guns were hauled away by ropes. Without artillery to serve, the surviving members of Van DeCorput's Battery were parceled out to depleted infantry companies. They served with the infantry the rest of the Atlanta Campaign, including the battles of New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain. Peachtree Creek and the battles and sieges of Atlanta. The Nashville Campaign in the fall of 1864. The company was captured by General Stoneman's cavalry, along with about 1700 other Confederates at the Battle of Salisbury, NC, on April 12, 1865. Less than 15 of the original members of the Company remained. They were sent to Camp Chase, OH, as prisoners and released on October, 1865. (2) Richard was 23 years old when captured. He was 5'9 1/2" tall, dark complexion, black hair and hazel eyes. (3) George was 24 years old when captured. He was 5" 10 1/2" tall, dark complexion, black hair and hazel eyes. (4) The Pension Application for Richard Marion Mathis of June, 1905, states that "he is unable to work and is very deaf". The deafness is no doubt caused by the cannons from his military service. Submitted by Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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RUSSELL, A.R.

Enlisted as a private on 13 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artilllery.
Submitted by
Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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RUSSELL, James F.

Enlisted as a private 13 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery. He died 25 Dec 1918.
Submitted by Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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RUSSELL, John H.

Enlisted as a private 13 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery.
Submitted by Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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RUSSELL, W.A.

Enlisted as 2nd Sgt. 13 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery.
Submitted by Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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RUSSELL, W.S.(B or D)

Enlisted 13 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery.
Submitted by Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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RUSSELL, Wm. W.

Enlisted as a private 13 Jun 1861 in Van De Corput's Cherokee Light Artillery. Died 13 Jun 1862 in Cumberland Gap.
Submitted by Mary Anderson February 3, 2005

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