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Old Tyme Recipes
 


 
 
 

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Beverages
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Dandelion Wine

The following recipe from
the booklet, Fleischmann's Recipes
1915

Pour one gallon of boiling water over three quarts of dandelion flowers. Lets stand
twenty-four hours. train and add five pounds of light brown sugar, juice and rind of two lemons,
juice and rind of two oranges. Let boil ten minutes and strain. When cold, add half a cake of
FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST. Put in crock and let stand until it commences to work. Then bottle and put
corks in loose to let it work. In each bottle put one raisin, after it stops working. Cork tight.
 

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Mint Punch

The following recipe from
The Chicago Record-Herald Chicago, Illinois
1913

Make a sirup [sic] of one quart of water and two cupfuls of sugar. Boil for ten minutes.
meantime bruise and cut fine with scissors two cupfuls of mint leaves which have been carefully
washed and dried. Mix with the mint the juice and rind of three lemons, and pour the boiling sirup
over. Let stand several hours, or, better, overnight, then strain. Color with a bit of green coloring
material, if you choose. When serving use plenty of crushed ice and equal parts of mint and ginger ale.
 

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Cream Nectar

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

To one gallon of boiling water add four pounds of granulated sugar and five ounces of tartaric acid.
Beat the whites of three eggs, and pour into a bottle with a little of the warm syrup; shake briskly;
then pour it into the kettle of syrup, and stir it through well. Boil three minutes, removing the scum
as it rises. Flavor wiht any preferred extract, and bottle for use. When wanted for use, take
two or three tablespoonfuls of the syrup to a tumbler of ice-cold water, and one-half teaspoon of soda.
 

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Lemon Pop

The following recipe from the booklet,
Fleischmann's Recipes
1915

1/2 cake FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
2 pounds granulated sugar
2 ounces ginger root
8 quarts boiling water
2 ounces cream of tartar
Juice of 7 lemons

Place ginger root (crushed) in pot, add sugar and boiling water, lemon juice and cream of tartar.
Let stand until lukewarm, the add yeast dissolved in half cup water; stir well. Cover and let stand eight
hours in a warm room; strain through flannel bag and bottle.
Set bottles in  a cool place and put on ice as required for use.

This is a most refreshing summer beverage; as a thirst quencher nothing is superior.
 

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Kumyss

The following recipe from the booklet,
Fleischmann's Recipes
1915

This delightful beverage is highly recommended by modern food experts. It combines the rich,
nourishing qualities of sweet milk with the healthful action of buttermilk. Kumyss is a form of fermented
milk enjoyed by children and adults alike and especially recommended for those who have difficulty in
assimilating  milk in its natural state. It is easily prepared as follows:

Heat two quarts milk to blood-heat (100 degrees). Add  half a cake FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
and two tablespoonfuls sugar dissolved in a little warm water. Let stand for two hours, then bottle
and stand for six hours in a moderately warm room; then place on ice. Kumyss will keep four or five
days if kept cold, but it is better if made fresh every day or two.
 

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Deserts
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Soft Gingerbread

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Take half a pint of molasses, half a pound of brown sugar, half a pound of butter or lard,
six eggs, ginger to suit taste, a pound of flour, a teaspoonful of yeast powder, and milk sufficient
to make a thick batter.
 

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Cream Candy

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Two pounds sugar (one quart), half a pint of water, one-fourth of a pint of vinegar,
butter size of egg, one teaspoonful of lemon. Boil fifteen minutes without stirring; pull white.
 

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Molasses Candy

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Boil a quart of molasses slowly until it becomes brittle in cold water. Just before taking
from the fire add a teaspoonful of soda. Pour into buttered pans, and when nearly cold pull white.
 

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Jelly-Cake Fritters

The following recipe from
Kansas Free Press Topeka, Kansas
 1881

To make jelly-cake fritters cut some stale sponge or other cake into rounds with a
cake cutter. Fry these a nice brown in hot lard; dip each quickly into a bowl of boiling milk and
lay upon a hot plate, spread thickly with jam or preserves. Serve hot, with cream to pour over them.
 

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Cream Scones

The following recipe from
The Chicago Record-Herald Chicago, Illinois
1913

Two cupfuls flour, three teaspoonfuls baking powder, salt, one-fourth cupful butter,
two eggs, one-half cupful of cream. Mix as baking powder biscuit, adding the beaten eggs
with the cream. A diamond shape is attractive for scones.
 

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Savarin

The following recipe from the booklet,
Fleischmann's Recipes
1915

1 cake FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
1/2 cup milk
2 tablespoonfuls sugar
2 cups sifted flour
3/4 cup almonds, blanched and shredded
1/2 cup butter, melted
4 eggs
1/4 teaspoonful salt

Dissolve yeast and sugar in lukewarm milk.  Add one-half cup flour. Beat well. Cover and
set aside in warm place, free from draft, for fifteen minutes. Then add rest of flour, almonds,
butter, eggs unbeaten,  one at a time, and the salt. Beat ten minutes. Pour into thickly buttered molds,
cover and set aside to rise in warm place, free from draft, until double in bulk - about forty-five minutes.
Bake forty-five minutes in moderate oven. Fill center with whipped cream and serve with rum sauce.
 

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Orange Pudding

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Six oranges, three eggs or more, two-thirds of a quart of milk; heat the milk, dissolve
three tablespoonfuls of corn starch, add the yolks of the eggs, two-thirds of a cup of sugar, a
little salt; pour into the boiling milk, and stir until cooked.  Before making the above, slice
the oranges into a pudding dish and sprinkle sugar over them. Pour the cooked mixture over the
oranges. Beat the whites of the eggs, add sugar and spread on the top. Set in the oven to brown.
 

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Scotch Shortcake

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

One pound of butter, half pound of sugar, one and three-fourths pound of flour;
knead well together and roll out in cakes one-half inch thick.
 

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Banana Cake

The following recipe from
The Daily Picayune
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana
1913

One cup sugar, three tablespoons melted butter, one egg, one-half teaspoon orange extract,
one-half pint milk, one and one-half cups flour, one and one-half teaspoons baking powder, few grains salt.

Beat the sugar, butter, extract, egg and salt together. Mix the baking powder with the flour, and add
alternately with milk to the first mixture. Beat thoroughly. Bake in two layers and put together with
banana filling. Ice with plain frosting.
 
 

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Banana Filling

The following recipe from
The Daily Picayune
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana
 1913

Four bananas, two tablespoons sugar, few grains salt.
Put the banana pulp through the potato ricer, and scald with sugar
and salt. Cool, add lemon juice, and use as a cake or sandwich filling.
 

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Malted Milk Fudge

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

To make malted milk fudge dissolve three cupfuls of malted milk in a cupful of water,
add three and one-half pounds of granulated sugar and three cupfuls of hot water. Boil until
the syrup spins a substantial thread or forms into a soft ball when dropped into cold water. Beat
and cool in the usual way and cut into squares. A handful of nut meats and raisins may be
added just before it comes from the fire.
 
 

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Geneva Pudding

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Heat four cups of milk in a double boiler, stir in seven-eighths of a cup of corn meal and,
when smooth, add three cups of coarsely chopped, pared sweet apples, one-half cup of molasses, one-half
cup of sugar and one-quarter level teaspoon of salt. Mix all well together, add four more cups of milk, which need not be
heated, and pour into a large buttered pudding dish or into a kettle or pan of the fireless cooker, which must be buttered
the same as a baking dish. Set in a moderate oven for four hours or in the cooker for eight or ten hours.
 
 

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Caramel Sauce

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Put eight tablespoonfuls of white sugar into a saucepan upon the fire with two tablespoonfuls of water.
Stir it constantly with a wooden spoon for three or four minutes until all the water evaporates and watch it carefully
till it turns a delicate brown color. In the meantime put into another saucepan twelve ounces of sugar,half the
yellow rind of a lemon sliced thin, two inches of stick cinnamon, and a quart of cold water. Bring these gradually
to a boil and let them simmer for ten minutes, then add a wine glassful of wine or half as much brandy. Strain the whole
into the caramel quickly, mix them together well, and serve the sauce with any pudding desired.
 
 

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Baked Stuffed Apples

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Bake carefully six apples. Core and fill with sugar, allowing a scant half cupful of sugar to this number
of apples. Cover the bottom of your baking dish with boiling water, to which add two teaspoonfuls of lemon juice.
Bake the apples in sauce in a hot oven, basting often. When cooked remove the dish and fill cores with apple
jelly and pour over all any juice left from baking. Then sprinkle the whole with chopped nuts and serve with cream,
whipped or plain.
 

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Maple Ice Cream

The following recipe from the following vintage newspaper:
The Rains County Leader Emory, Texas
1913

This is not an inexpensive cream because there will be needed the yolks of five eggs, two cups
each of cream and maple sirup [sic]. Heat the sirup and pour over the yolks of the eggs that have been
beaten until light colored. Stir constantly while mixing  the sirup and eggs, then cook until thick like
a custard. Cool in a bowl, stirring now and then. Add a teaspoon of vanilla flavoring and two cups of cream.
Freeze, using three parts ice to one of salt.
 
 

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Opera Creams

The following recipe from the following vintage magazine:
The House The Journal of Arts & Crafts
England
 1901

1/2 lb. loaf sugar
1/2 lb. icing sugar
Vanilla essence
1/4 good rich cream

Dissolve the loaf sugar in water, and then add the icing sugar as directed last month for raspberry pralines,
and when quite smooth and stiff place in a saucepan and stir over the fire with a wooden spoon until the mixture
is warm but not hot. Then work in the cream by degrees, but not on the fire, also add the vanilla. (Any other essence
may be used, and the mixture may be coloured if preferred.) Line a small deep tin with grease-proof paper and turn
on the cream mixture. it should be about a half inch deep; spread smoothly and let it stand for twelve hours.
Then turn out, cut into squares with a sharp knife, and put into a warm, dry place for a few hours, when they may be
packed away as required. A very shallow biscuit-box is a suitable tin in which to set these creams, as it has straight
sides, but a small baking-tin will do.
 
 

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Christmas Cake

The following recipe magazine:The House
The Journal of Arts & Crafts
England
 1901

Procure a nice, well-baked cake from a first-rate shop, it is seldom advisable to attempt to make
such a thing at home, as the baking of a large cake in an ordinary small oven is seldom satisfactory,
and often results in utter failure. For about four shillings a very satisfactory article can be obtained.
The finishing of the cake should certainly be carried out at home, as the process is both simple and
interesting, besides which any little fancies of either donor or receiver can be attended to. Sugar
icing cannot be taught except practically, and is really a waste of time and money, as few people
eat it, but if the cake is finished as directed it will be found a general favorite.
Make some almond icing and place it on the cake. It should be about two inches deep, deeper
if liked; smooth it over carefully and be sure that the sides are even. Have ready some almonds
and pistachio nuts, blanche and cut in halves, and arrange these in rows on the icing, pressing
them well down  when they will adhere to the almond mixture. Place the cake in a warm, dry
place for about twenty-four hours, when the icing should be firm; it is ready for use at once, or
can be kept for some time. The sides of the cake can be left plain or decorated with a fine paper
frill tied on by a white satin ribbon. Dried fruits, cut into fancy shapes, or small bonbons may be used
to decorate the almond icing instead of the nuts, but the latter are best for packing.
 
 

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Almond Icing

The following recipe magazine:
The House
The Journal of Arts & Crafts
England
 1901

2 lbs. ground almonds
1 lb. icing sugar
1 lb. castor sugar
4 eggs
1 glass brandy
 

METHOD - Pound the sugars and almonds well together, add the eggs one at a time,
then the brandy, and work into a stiff paste; if the mixture is too moist add more icing sugar,
but it is impossible to give an exact recipe. If no mortar is available the ingredients may
be beaten in a large bowl with the rolling-pin.
 
 

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Cream Pie

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Texas
1913

Beat the whites of three eggs very stiff, then add two-thirds of a cup of sugar, one teaspoon vanilla,
a little nutmeg and beat all well together. Hastily stir in one pint of thin cream. Make pies with the one crust,
same as a custard and bake thirty minutes in quite a quick oven.
 
 

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Almond Cake

The following recipe from
The Daily American
Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee
1884

A famous caterer gives the following recipe for almond cake: blanche and pound in a mortar
thoroughly eight ounces of sweet and one of bitter almonds; add a few drops of rose water, or white
of egg every few minutes to prevent oiling; add six tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar and eight beaten eggs,
sift in six tablespoonfuls of flour, and work it thoroughly with the mixture, adding gradually a quarter of a
pound of creamed butter. Beat constantly or it will be heavy. Put a buttered paper into the cake tin, then
pour the mixture into the tin, allowing room for it to rise. The oven should be a quick oven.
 
 

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Charlotte Russe

The following recipe from
The Nashville Daily American
Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee
1884

An easy way to make Charlotte Russe is to take about one-fifth of a package of gelatin, and half
a cupful of cold milk; place this in a farina boiler if you have one; if not, set a basin containing it into
a pan or pail of boiling water; stir until the gelatin is dissolved, pour into a dish and place it where
it will cool rapidly; then take a pint of perfectly sweet cream, beat it with an egg beater until it is light
and thick; flavor the cream with lemon or vanilla and sweeten to your taste; when the gelatin is cold,
or at least cool, stir it into the cream and pour this over lady fingers, which you have arranged in a
glass dish or mould; to vary the appearances of the dish you can split the lady fingers and
cover the cream with them.
 

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Lemon-Apple Pie

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Grate the rind and strain the juice of two lemons. Pare, core and chop fine one large tart apple.
Round two crackers very fine. Mix with two teaspoons melted butter. Mix the lemon juice and rind and
apple with two scant cups of sugar. Beat the yolks of two eggs to a thick froth  and the whites stiff, mix
and beat together and mix with the lemon, apple and sugar and add crumbs and butter. Beat thoroughly and line
two pie tins as for custard pie. Pour in filling and bake until crust is done.
 
 

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Baked Peaches

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Peel ripe peaches, put them in a pan, sprinkle generously with sugar, add a few drops of
lemon juice, nearly cover with water and bake in a slow oven about two hours.
 
 

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Salads
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Olive Salad

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Olive salad is delectable. Put nice, crisp lettuce leaves on salad dishes, cut olives in halves,
also a little hard-boiled egg and sweet pepper - first a layer of egg, the olives in the center,
and a border of sweet red peppers. Then add mayonnaise or salad dressing as preferred.
 

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Jams and Jellies
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Cherry Jam

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Steam, wash and pit the cherries and heat slightly to extract the juice. To each pound of fruit
add three-quarters pound of sugar. Bring slowly to a boil and simmer for twenty minutes. Skim, put into
jam pots, and at the end of 24 hours cover and put away.
 
 

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Grape Marmalade

The following recipe from
The Chicago Record-Herald
Chicago, Illinois
 1913

Wash and stem the grapes, remove skins, heat the pulp and press through a sieve to remove the seeds.
Adds the skins to the pulp and place it on a fire, then add three cupfuls of very hot sugar to each of four
cupfuls of fruit and let simmer twenty minutes. If the grapes are very ripe, add a little lemon juice.
Turn the mixture into glass jars and seal.
 
 

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Green Tomato Preserves

The following recipe from
The Daily American
Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee
1883

Green tomato preserves are in high favor in certain localities, and are entirely unknown in others.
Here is a reliable recipe for making them: Take one peck of hard and unripe tomatoes, scald them by pouring
boiling water over them, remove the skin and cut them into thin slices; slice also 6 lemons, the skin of the
lemon is to be left upon them, but the bitter seeds must be removed; scatter six pounds of brown sugar over
the tomatoes and one heaping tablespoonful of ginger; put into a large kettle and let them boil slowly until they
are tender; skim them thoroughly; can just as you do any other preserves
 
 

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Meat and Fish
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Fricasseed Rabbit

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Cut up and disjoint the rabbit; put in a stewpan and season with cayenne pepper, salt,
and chopped parsley. Pour in a pint of warm water and stew over a slow fire until quite tender,
adding when nearly done some bits of butter.
 
 

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Quail Pie

The following recipe from
Kansas Free Press Topeka, Kansas
1881

Quail, butter, pepper and salt. Cut the quail in pieces and stew them about ten minutes, or till tender.
Line you baking-dish with a nice paste; put in the birds; a little of the water in which they were stewed, thickened
with a little flour; shake in pepper and salt and bits of butter; cover with a nice crust and bake a delictae brown.
 

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Mutton en Casserole

The following recipe from
The Oklahoma News
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
1915

Cut in small pieces 2-1/2 pounds of mutton from breast and neck. Season with salt, dredge with flour
and put into casserole or deep baking pan. Peel and slice 1 large pepper into strips and 3 ripe tomatoes; put
vegetables around the meat and add water enough to half cover the meat. Cover and let cook 2 hours in oven;
add 1/2 cup blanched rice and 1 cup of water and cook another hour; serve in casserole. A fine dish for cold days.
 
 

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Salmon Fish Balls

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Two cups salmon, one cup mashed potatoes, one-half cup melted butter, little pepper and salt.
Work potatoes in with salmon and moisten with the melted butter until it is soft enough to mold and keep
its shape. Roll the balls in flour and fry quickly in lard till a golden brown. Take it from fat as soon as done
and lay in a sieve to drain. Serve hot.
 
 

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Chicken Griddle Cakes

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
 1913

Beat one egg, add two tablespoonfuls of chicken fat, melted; one cupful of minced chicken,
half a level teaspoonful of salt, one pint of milk, and flour enough to make a batter that will spread slowly
when placed on the griddle, having previously sifted three teaspoonfuls of baking powder into the flour.
 

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Chicken Salad with Almonds

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
 1913

Cook chicken until tender. When ready to take from fire there should be one quart of stock left.
Cut the chicken meat and three stalks of celery into small bits. Prepare half a pound blanched almonds,
cutting each kernel lengthwise into two or three pieces. Mix all lightly together, and add enough cooked
dressing to season well. Serve on lettuce leaves with mayonnaise dressing.
 
 

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How To Roast a Turkey

This recipe is taken from
 Methodical Cook
A Facsimile of an Authentic Early American Cookbook
By Mary Randolph
 
 

Make the forcemeat thus: take the crumb of a loaf of bread, a quarter of a pound of beef suet shred fine,
a little sausage meat or veal scraped and pounded very fine, nutmeg, pepper, and salt to your taste; mix it
lightly with three eggs, stuff the craw with it, spit it, and lay it down a good distance from the fire, which
should be clear and brisk; dust and baste it several times with cold lard; it makes the froth stronger than basting
it with the hot out of the dripping pan, and makes the turkey rise better; when it is enough, froth it up as
before, dish it, and pour on the same gravy as for the boiled turkey, or bread sauce; garnish with lemon and pickles,
and serve it up; if it be of middle size, it will require one hour and a quarter to roast."
 

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Fricatelli

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Chop raw fresh pork very fine, add a little salt, plenty of pepper, and two small onions chopped
fine, half as much bread as there is meat soaked until soft, two eggs; mix well together, make into
oblong patties and fry like oysters. These are nice for breakfast; if used for supper serve with sliced lemon.
 

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Supreme of Chicken

The following from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Boil soft a good chicken, strain the stock, and cut the meat in strips. Melt two ounces of butter,
add three tablespoons of sifted flour, pepper, salt and a little mace, pour the chicken stick on this, adding
a cup of cream, simmer for five minutes, pour on the chicken and serve. A teaspoonful of extract of beef imparts
color and fine flavor to the dish.
 
 

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Soups
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Ox-Tail Soup

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Ox-tails make specially good soup, on account of the gelatinous matter they contain.

Two ox-tails, a soup bunch of good-sized onion, two carrots, one stalk of celery, a little parsley, and a small cut of pork.
Cut the ox-tails at the joints, slice the vegetables and mince the pork. Put the pork into a stew pan; when hot, add first the
onions; when they begin to color add the ox-tail. Let them fry a very short time. Now cut them to the bone that the juice may
run out in boiling. Put both the ox-tails and fried onions into a soup kettle, with four quarts of cold water. Let them simmer
about four hours; then add the other vegetables, with three cloves stuck in a little piece of onion, and pepper and salt. As soon
as the vegetables are well cooked the soup is done. Strain it.
 
 

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Green Turtle Soup

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Get a small live turtle weighing about twenty-five pounds, hang it by the hind legs or fins, cut off the head
and let it bleed all day; then with a sharp knife part the two shells; remove the intestines; take all the meat from the
shells, bones, and fins; cut each shell in four pieces and plunge, for a moment only, into boiling water to take the horny skin off.

For soup for twelve persons: Thicken three quarts of the broth  with four ounces of flour browned in butter,;
boil half an hour, skim well; add half a pint of sherry wine, a gill of port wine, a pinch of red pepper, and enough
of the turtle; boil ten minutes, skim again and serve with slices of of pared lemon on a plate.
 
 

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Mock Turtle Soup

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Boil half a calf's head with the skin on until soft; cut the meat into small pieces; also the tongue;
prepare from the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs round balls the size of marbles, and chop up the whites; take
of soup stock two quarts; then fry in one ounce of butter a medium-sized onion and add one ounce of flour
and brown the same; then add the stock, a teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce, pepper and salt, the juice of
one lemon, and let simmer for ten minutes. Pour over the meat and imitation turtle eggs and serve hot,
adding the chopped whites of the eggs.
 
 

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Swiss Soup

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Five gallons water, six potatoes and three turnips sliced; boil five
hours until perfectly dissolved and the consistency of pea soup, filling
up as it boils away; add butter size of an egg, season with salt and
pepper, and serve. A small piece of salt pork, a bone or bit of veal or
lamb, and an onion, may be added to vary this soup.
 
 

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Old-Fashioned Bean Soup

The following recipe from
The Daily Picayune
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana
1912

Put in [to] soak overnight one pint of white beans. Next day put on to boil a piece of lean beef,
a soup bone with a bit of meat on it is best, and a piece of fat pork about three inches square. Turn
in the beans, water and all. Put in a little pepper and salt and and a bit of sliced onion. Cook at least
four hours. At the proper time, so as to be thoroughly cooked at serving time, put in a few carrots, potatoes
and sliced turnips. Old-fashioned, but delicious.
 

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Misc
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Pickled Walnuts

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

One hundred walnuts, salt and water. To each quart of vinegar allow two ounces of whole black pepper,
one ounce of allspice, one ounce of bruised ginger. Procure the walnuts while young; be careful they are not
woody, and prick them well with a fork; prepare a strong brine of salt and water (four pounds of salt to each
gallon of water), into which put the walnuts, letting them remain nine days, and changing the brine
 

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Grapefruit Cocktail
And Other Grapefruit Recipes
The following recipe from
The Daily Picayune
New Orleans, Louisiana
1912

Hostesses who have handsome grapefruit glasses, cut the pulp in large pieces, cover it with sugar
and maraschino cherries or pieces of ginger, and heap it in the small inner glass. The outer one is
filled with shaved ice.

Grapefruit salad is an excellent digester at the close of a heavy meal. It is better with French dressing
than with mayonnaise, and should be marinated for at least half an hour before serving. Ices and
sherbets of grapefruit are delicious. The use of halves of grapefruit as receptacles for oyster cocktails is by no
means a new idea, and yet it is one of those unique combinations of flavors that can not be too widely known.

To prepare the grapefruit for this purpose the cook has to remove the seeds and core, and then, having
filled the center with small, raw oysters, dress them, as for a cocktail, with tomato ketchup, grated horseradish,
tobasco sauce, etc., without, of course, the use of lemon, for the pulp of the fruit itself will impart all the acidity required.
 

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Iced Tea

The following vintage recipefrom the newspaper:
The White River Herald
South Royalton,  Windsor County, Vermont
 1887

 For each person, allow one teaspoon of black tea, pour boiling water upon it and let it stand
where it will "draw" for ten minutes; cool in a refrigerator, or on the bottom of the cellar. When ready to serve,
sweeten, enrich with cream and pour upon bits of ice in a glass.
 
 

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Cheese Sticks

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Four tablespoons grated cheese, four tablespoons flour, two tablespoons melted butter, one tablespoon
water, one-half tablespoon salt, dash red pepper, roll them out in sticks one-quarter inch wide and four inches
long,. Also cut part in rings, bake carefully, slip sticks in rings when cold.
 

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Veggies
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Scalloped Tomatoes

The following recipe  from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Twelve large, smooth tomatoes, one teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper, one tablespoonful of butter,
one of sugar, one cupful of bread crumbs, one teaspoonful of onion juice. Arrange the tomatoes in a baking
pan. Cut a thin slice from the smooth end of each. With a small spoon, scoop out as much of the pulp and
juice as possible without injuring the shape. When all have been treated in this way, mix the pulp and
juice with the other ingredients, and fill the tomatoes with this mixture. Put on the tops, and bake slowly three quarters
of an hour. Slide the cake turner under the tomatoes and lift gently on to a flat dish. Garnish with parsley, and serve.
 

~~~~~
 

Vegetable Cutlets

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Boil six large potatoes, mash them, add butter, seasoning, and enough hot milk to moisten.
Chop fine three button onions, fry in butter to a light brown. Wash, peel and scrape and boil separately
twelve small carrots and four small white turnips. Chop and add with the onions to the potato. Season to taste,
add a little minced parsley and cool. Mold into small cutlets, dip in beaten egg, then powdered cracker crumbs.
Fry to a golden brown in boiling fat.
 
 

~~~~~
 
 

Carrot Croquettes

The following vintage recipefrom the following newspaper:
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Wash and scrape the carrots and boil until tender. Drain and mash them. To each teacupful add salt
and pepper to season very highly, the yolks of two raw eggs, a pinch of mace and one level teaspoonful
of butter. Mix thoroughly and set away until cold. Shape into tiny croquettes, dip into slightly beaten egg,
roll in fine bread crumbs and fry in smoking hot fat.
 
 

~~~~~
 

Potatoes au Gratin

The following recipe from
The Oklahoma News
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
1915

Cut cold boiled potatoes into small dice; enough to fill 2 cups. Put 2 tablespoonfuls of butter into saucepan,
melt slowly, and when it is "bubbling" add 1-1/2 tablespoonfuls of flour mixed with 1 tablespoonful of salt
and dash of white pepper. Stir until perfectly blended and smooth. Do not brown. Pour on gradually
1 cup of milk, adding 1/3 at a time - stir and beat to avoid lumps. Cook until smooth and glossy. Then
add diced potatoes but do not stir, simply heat and turn into buttered baking dish. Cover with fine crumbs
and bits of butter and place them under broiler until crumbs are brown. Serve in same dish.
 
 

~~~~~

Real Boston Baked Beans

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Boil one pint of beans in a half gallon of water for one hour. Then pour off the water, put the
beans in a large pan, pour over them half a pail of cold water and wash thoroughly. Repeat this several
times, until the skins of the beans are all washed off. Place the beans in a half gallon stone jar and
cover with water; add a pound of fat pork or bacon, a tablespoonful of molasses and a little salt, and
bake all. Must be kept tightly covered, and, if it gets too dry, add more water.
 
 

~~~~~
 
 

Asparagus

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Asparagus, besides boiling, may be cooked in the oven. Boil s bunch of fine asparagus for twelve minutes.
Lay it in a baking dish. Moisten it with half a cup of the water in which it was boiled. Grate Parmesan cheese
over it, season it well with salt and pepper, sprinkle a tablespoonful of fresh bread crumbs over the top with a
tablespoonful of butter cut in bits, and bake in a moderately hot oven for fifteen minutes. Cold boiled
asparagus is very nice served as a salad with French dressing or with the following sauce: Pound the
yolk of a hard-boiled egg to a paste, add two teaspoonfuls of good vinegar, a saltspoonful of salt and half
the amount of pepper. Add an onion minced fine. Toss all together thoroughly and pour it over the cold asparagus.
 
 

~~~~~

Turnips Stewed in Butter

The following recipe from
The Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Take two pounds of young turnips; cut them into small squares, or make them any shape that may
be preferred; dissolve two ounces of fresh butter in a saucepan sufficiently large to hold the vegetables
in a single layer; put in the turnips and simmer them very gently until they are tender, without being
broken. A few minutes before they are done enough, sprinkle a little salt and white pepper over
them; put them in the center of a dish, and arrange fried or boiled cutlets neatly around them. Time,
three-quarters of an hour to an hour to stew turnips.
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Salads
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
 

Pineapple Salad

The following vintage recipe from the newspaper:
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Texas
1913

Place the shredded fruit into a deep glass dish and pour over it half a pint powdered sugar
mixed with one tablespoonful each of orange and lemon juice. This should be done at least three
hours before  serving, so that the sugar will dissolve.
 

~~~~~

Apple Salad

The following recipe from
The Rains County Leader
Emory, Rains County, Texas
1913

Apple salad is delicious and seasonable, too. You take large red apples and scoop out the inside,
creating cups. These are put into cold water with a few drops of lemon juice until ready to be filled.
The filling consists of the apple chopped with celery, a little grapefruit and mayonnaise dressing.
On the top heap bits of walnut and maraschino cherries, and lay each cup on a lettuce leaf. This is a
very dainty salad, put together at very little cost. Wafers and cheese are served with it.
 
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Breads, Buns
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Southern Corn Bread

The following from
Home Comfort Range Cook Book
Ca 1900

Sift one quart of white corn meal with two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Add three tablespoonfuls of melted
lard, salt to taste, three beaten eggs and a pint of milk, or enough to make a thin batter. Beat all very hard for two
minutes and bake rather quickly in a hot, well-greased pan in which a little dry meal has been sifted. Eat immediately
 

~~~~~
 

Buckwheat Cakes

The following recipe from
Fleischmann's Recipes
1915

1 cake Fleischmann's Yeast
2 cups lukewarm water
1 cup milk, scalded and cooled
2 tablespoonfuls light brown sugar
2 cups buckwheat flour
1 cup sifted white flour
1-1/2 teaspoonfuls salt

Dissolve yeast and sugar in lukewarm liquid, add buckwheat and white flour gradually, and salt.
Beat until smooth. Cover and set aside in warm place, free from draft, to rise - about one hour.
When light, stir well and bake on hot griddle. If wanted for over night, use one-fourth cake of yeast and
an extra half teaspoonful of salt. Cover and keep in a cool place.
 

~~~~~
 

Sweet Potato Buns

This recipe from  Methodical Cook
A Facsimile of an Authentic Early American Cookbook
By Mary Randolph

"Boil and mash a potato, run into it as much flour as will make it like bread - add spice
and sugar to your taste, with a spoonful of yeast; when it has risen well, work in a piece of butter, bake
it in small rolls to be eaten with hot butter, either for breakfast or tea."
 

~~~~~