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Troup County, Georgia and Georgia Newspaper Abstracts of Georgia
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An Account of the Defeat of the Spaniards  (1) Submitted by anon
Passenger train No. 35  (2) Submitted by anon
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(1) An Account of the Defeat of the Spaniards.
Boston Evening Post; November 29, 1742;
The Virginia Gazette, of October 1, 1742.

Williamsburgh, October 1. Last week arrived here Lieut. Thomas WATKINS, express from General OGLETHORPE, at Georgia, who gives us a particular account of the defeat of the Spaniards at that place, with some remarks on the conduct of South Carolina, the neighboring Colony.

The Spaniards had brought 1500 shackles to iron the English. They had some thousands of printed Bulls from the Pope, wherein they had absolution to the 7th generation, for an encouragement to murder the heretics. (If these Bulls, or pardons were as wretchedly printed as all those we have ever seen were (and we have seen some scores of reams) they would be of as little use to the possessors, as that poor man's was, who had at great expense purchased of the Pope an exemption from the pains of Purgatory, and was only to call there to shew is pass in his way to H------n. This man earnestly advised a neighbour of his to be also at the charge of an indulgence, but he being covetous, neglected it, and some time after he died, and went to Purgatory, where, to his surprise, he found his old friend, who had died a little before him, to whom he said, with a sneer, How now, neighbour, what brings you here? What's come of your indulgence? To whom the poor fellow reply'd, (scratching his head) with a whining voice and meeching look, that the Pope wrote so bad a hand, that the D---l could not read it).

They took but two Englishmen, one of them lying sick in the path, whose head they cut off, the other lying drunk in the rushes at St. Simon's, whom they scalped, and would have serv'd all they had taken in the same manner.
(2) Serious accident at West Point; Date: October 8 1894; Buffalo, NY
Serious Accident in Georgia. Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 7. Passenger train No. 35 of the Atlanta & West Point Road, which left Atlanta at 5:25 o'clock this morning tumbled from the high trestle over Osanappa Creek, a few miles beyond West Point, and seven passengers were badly injured, of whom one or two may die. The most seriously injured are:
R. J. VAUGHAN, conductor of a construction train, badly cut and bruised.
W. R. KENNAN or Charlotte, cut over the left eye and leg hurt.
D. CUNNINGHAM, New Orleans, hip hurt and right hand injured.
Unknown white man fatally injured.

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