Cover

Cane Reapers is the story about the Chinese who were procured to replace the emancipated slaves on the sugar plantations of Guyana (then British Guiana). Following China's defeat by Britain in the Opium Wars in the 1840s the European powers, and Spain in particular, began a recruitment drive to obtain Chinese labourers for their colonies. This was executed using all manner of methods ranging from subtle inducement to kidnapping. Numerous abuses arose from this trade in human cargo and Britain later set up local emigration depots aimed at enlisting willing emigrants, with some degree of success. Between 1853 and 1879 a total of 13,541 indentured labourers arrived in British Guiana from China but by 1900 the resident Chinese population was down to 3,000 mainly because only 15% of the Chinese immigrants were females. The Chinese endured many tribulations both in the journey and after arrival in the new land. In the process of assimilation into Western culture some unique names have evolved for Chinese families, creating both a mystery and a topic of fascination for their descendants and for genealogists. 

Cane Reapers, 2nd revised edition (2003), has 352 pages, including 36 pages of illustrations, and is published by Cane Press.

Contents

Chapter 1 Labour's Love Lost * The end of slavery * New immigrants * Massa day done * Trying to stay in the black * Orientals from the East * Orientals from the West

Chapter 2 China and the Barbarians * 1834 for a start * The opium trade * The Napier fisaco * Clampdown on opium * Commissioner Lin takes charge * Igniting the powder keg * Expedition to Peiho * The Ch'uan-Pi Convention * Treaty of Nanking * Postwar period * Open Canton * Treaty of Tientsin * Taku repulse * Conventions of Peking * Taiping rebellion

Chapter 3 Chinese Take-Out * Coming and going * Coolies to go * Crimping methods * Initial experiences * All at sea * Death and disaster * Cuba and Peru * Regulating the coolie trade * Convention on emigration * Coolie trade at Macao

Chapter 4 Demerara Bound * Visions in the hot sun * First immigrants * White's third encounter * Second wave * Pursuing Chinese women * First ladies * Emigration increases * The season of 1861-62 * Hincks becomes governor * Revival 1864-66 * Convention agreements * Arrival of the Corona * Free immigration * The last shipment

Chapter 5 Working on the Plantation * Making an impression * Adjusting to local conditions * Recruitment and distribution * Odd men out * Taking out the driver * Work habits * Slow boat to China

Chapter 6 A Walk in the Dark * A word of caution * Plantains * Other dishes * Murder * Class conflict * Mulling the motive * Suicide * Robbery * Cream collar crime * Opium * Targets * Innocents * Going to court * Respected citizens

Chapter 7 Becoming Creole * The new environment * Thought for food * Health * Family considerations * Causes of death * Recreation * Opium and gambling * In the eyes of the beholder * Social interactions * Christian influences * Church building

Chapter 8 The Shepherd and Hopetown * O. Tye Kim arrives * A Chinese settlement proposed * A town for Hope * Flight of the shepherd * Hopetown carries on * The decline of Hopetown

Chapter 9 Going Further Afield * Becoming free * Sugar technologists * Travels to Trinidad * Sauntering to Surinam * Sailing to St. Lucia * The settlers * Getting down to business * Growing in Georgetown * Blooming in Berbice * Country shops * Property purchases * The second generation * Gaining a higher education

Chapter 10 Name Calling * Chinese characters * Translation troubles * Dash it all * What-A-Name * Anglicized names * Lineage charts * Name list * Going international

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Cane Ripples is a sequel to Cane Reapers and describes the experiences of the Chinese in Guyana, presented in the form of short stories about individuals and families in their working and recreational lives.  

Cane Ripples is a 352-page book with 85 illustrations, published by Cane Press.

Dr. Vibert C. Cambridge, Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Ohio University, writes:

Cane Ripples is an integrated work that expresses the joy and pains experienced by a vital sector of Guyanese society during the 20th century. . . It uses oral histories, personal recollections, photographs, and archival materials to illuminate an important aspect of Guyana’s complex history. . . We can see the names and the faces that influenced Guyana’s social, economic, political, cultural, and scientific life. Contributors take us into their homes, share family histories, and tell us about the creation of some of Guyana’s most successful institutions and enterprises . . . Dr. Trev Sue-A-Quan must be congratulated for a most valuable and accessible contribution.

Contents

Story 1: Lay of the Land      Story 2: Entrepreneurial Spirit      Story 3: Fireworks      

Story 4: Down by the Riverside      Story 5: Mixed Marriage      Story 6: Bearing Fruit      

Story 7: Wheeling Along      Story 8: Path to Education      Story 9: Outdoorsman      

Story 10: Dry Goods Shop       Story 11: Baker’s Man      Story 12: Hand Laundry

Story 13: Bee Queen      Story 14: Rice Milling      Story 15: Comings      

Story 16: Goings      Story 17: Ghost Story      Story 18: Dental Practice      

Story 19: Chinese Merchant      Story 20: Best Little Whorehouse      Story 21: Broadcasting Ace      

Story 22: Chinese Lessons      Story 23: Drug Store      Story 24: Short Cuts

Story 25: Rice Grader      Story 26: Laws and Lows      Story 27: Sound Effects      

Story 28: Vision and Service      Story 29: Commission Agent & Hairdresser      Story 30: Cookshop, Cakeshop

Story 31: Taking a Count      Story 32: Country Doctor      Story 33: Good Sport

Story 34: Community Spirit      Story 35: Piloting the Way      Story 36: Family Jewels

Story 37: Overseer      Story 38: District Commissioner    Story 39: Life on the Plantation 

Contributors: Ada Akai, Irene Akai (née Sue-Ping), Bob Chee-A-Tow, Godfrey Chin, James Chow, Marlene Crawford (née Kwok), David Foo, Jennifer P. Foo, Elaine Fung-A-Ling, Rita Graham (née Cheong), Alvin Hugh, Ulex Hugh (née Phang), Gladys Kissoon (née Lee), Andy Lee (née Lam), Vivian Lee, Harvey Lou-Hing, Louis Low, Michaele Low-A-Chee (née Young), Neville Luck, Jerry Manson-Hing, Joe Pierre, Arif Rayman, Alice Singh (née Loo), Barney Singh, Ruby Sue-A-Quan (née Lou-Hing), Trev Sue-A-Quan, Donald Tang, Grace Ten-Pow (née Young-Ping), Leonard Ten-Pow, Mike U-Ming, Phoebe Wong (née Kon Sue), Roy V. Wong, Sandra Wong-Moon (née Ho-Sing-Loy), Esther Yhap (née Chan), Lawrence Yhap, Helena Young-Ping (née Wong)

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Cane Rovers is the third book in the series describing the experiences of the Chinese associated with Guyana. It is a collection of stories   describing the experiences of the Chinese-Guyana as migrants to other countries .

Cane Rovers is a 352-page book with 135 illustrations, published by Cane Press.

Odeen Ishmael, Ambassador of Guyana to the State of Kuwait and formerly Ambassador to the USA, the OAS and Venezuela writes:

Anyone following Trev Sue-A-Quan's research into the history of his Chinese ancestors and compatriots as they migrated from China to Guyana and later to other lands will be profoundly astounded by the voluminous facts he has accumulated and woven together to produce the most valuable accounts that have enriched our knowledge and culture. At the same time, they have instilled in us a spirit of determination that anyone can succeed in any enterprise or challenge that may arise in life. 

 

Contents

Story 1: Slow Boat to China  - - - James Chow

Story 2: Being Civil in Engineering - -  William Manson-Hing

Story 3: In His Majesty's Service - -  Marian Sueafatt

Story 4: Lawyer in Singapore - -  Elma Thwaites

Story 5: Recipe for Adventure - -  Laura Hall

Story 6: Swiss Movement - - Janet Signer

Story 7: Diplomats and Diplomas - - Ivy Gee

Story 8:  China Mission - -  Li Bixia

Story 9: Life in Israel - -  Sally Bors

Story 10: Songs, Strings and Steel - -  Trev Sue-A-Quan

Story 11: Leaving the Cold, Taking the Heat - -  Michelle Lam

Story 12: Turtle Trail - -  Maxine Everson and Jackie Balls

Story 13: Learning to Handle Hot Things - -  Jennifer D.E. Wong

Story 14: Fast Plane to China - -  Trev Sue-A-Quan

Story 15: Practical Accounting - -  Joe Pierre

Story 16: Multi-Cultural Education - -  Cheryl Stinson

Story 17: From Calypso to Samba - -  Rosaleine Bacchus

Story 18: Scenes from a Life of Music - -  Ray Luck

Story 19: Around the World - -  Vivian Lee

Story 20: At the Antipodes - - Colin Ying

Story 21: When the World Came Crashing Down - -  Barbara Sohan

Story 22: Blown Away - -  Paula Stehling

Story 23: Banking and Batabano - -  Cecil Chan-A-Sue and Camille Short

Story 24: Astronauts in China - -  Andy Lee  

       

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How to Order

Name ________________________________________________

Address ______________________________________________

______________________________________________________

Phone No. (for delivery purposes)______________________

Please send me ______ copies of Cane Reapers
at CAN$ 25 each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     = $_______

Please send me ______ copies of Cane Ripples
at CAN$ 25 each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     = $_______

Please send me ______ copies of Cane Rovers
at CAN$ 25 each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      = $_______

Add CAN$10 shipping and handling costs for the first copy,
CAN$ 2 for each additional copy. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .  . . . . .    = $_______


Total payment to Trev Sue-A-Quan (CAN$) . . . . . . . . . . . . .   = $_______

Payment by bank draft or money order.

Mail to: Trev Sue-A-Quan,
240 Woodstock Avenue E.,
Vancouver, B.C. V5W 1N1,
Canada.

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This website page was updated on 9 March 2012.

© Trev Sue-A-Quan