Adair County >> 1884 Index

History of Guthrie and Adair Counties, Iowa
Springfield, Ill: Continental Hist. Co., 1884.

Jefferson Township

Transcribed by Bobbi Pohl


Simon Barrows, a single man, came here in the fall of 1856 from Davenport, Iowa. He was a native of Massachusetts, and came to superintend a large tract of land. He took possession of, and occupied a cabin that had been built on section 33. He taught the first school in this township in the winter of 1856-7, and was elected to the office of county superintendent of schools in 1861, but resigned before the expiration of his term of office. he then removed to Des Moines, and shortly after was elected superintendent of common schools of Polk county, in which office he served one or two terms, and then removed to Adams county, where he preached. He was a strong Congregationalist, and had done some preaching while in Adair county.

William E. Chamberlin, present proprietor of the Chamberlin Mills, is a native of Potts county, Pennsylvania, and was born on October 1, 1846. His father, Daniel Chamberlin, is a native of Allegheny county, New York, having been born in March, 1823, and was married in 1843 to Charlotte Baker, by whom he has had six children--William E., Albert, Morilla, Lois C., Elijah D. and Sophia H. In March 1871, he came to this township, where he now owns two hundred acres of cultivated land on section 34. The subject of this sketch moved with his parents to Genesee county, Michigan, in 1851, and to LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1869. In 1871 he came to his present location on section 20, Jefferson township, Adair county, where he owns one hundred and sixty acres of good land, which is mostly seeded with grass. He is a stock-raiser, having a few head of the Hereford grade cattle beside his other cattle. He was married in February, 1870, to Miss Sarah Hormel, a daughter of Joel Hormel. They have one child--Daniel W.

Charles R. Crabb, farmer and stockraiser, was born February 17, 1841, in Allen county, Ohio, being the son of John M. and Amanda (Root) Crabb. His parents moved to Williams county, Ohio, in 1848. Charles was married there on the 1st of January, 1860, to Miss Sarah C. Cleland, of Defiance county, Ohio, she being a daughter of John and Letetia (Carr) Cleland. They have four children--John, Edwin, Jennie, and Charles Looman. In 1861 he moved to Defiance county, and from there to Henry county, Illinois, in 1865. He came to Walnut township, Adair county, in the spring of 1870, and to Menlo in 1875, where he engaged in the agricultural implement business, and continued the same till 1877. He came to his present location in the spring of 1882. He is a member of the V.A.S. and of the Crescent lodge No. 228, A.O.U.W., of Menlo, being a trustee in the latter organization. Mr. Crabb enlisted in Company G, 142d Indiana infantry, October 24, 1864, and was discharged July 24, 1865. He is engaged in farming and stock-raising of all kinds, but pays particular attention to Hereford cattle, now having one hundred and ten head of them, with Imp. Heavy-sides at the head of the herd. At present he holds the position of clerk of the township.

John Easton resides on section 22, Jefferson township, where he owns one hundred and twenty acres of good farm land, and ten acres of timber, and follows general farming and stock-raising, having some fine imported stock. He was born on the 1st of March, 1808, near Cazenovia, New York. He moved with his parents to Onondaga county, in 1812, and there remained until 1827, when he came to Oswego county. He came to Peoria, Illinois, in 1837, where he followed carpentering, and came to Kickapoo mills in Peoria county, in 1851, where he operated a flouring mill until 1857. In 1857 he came to his present township, Adair county, and settled on section 26. In the spring of 1858 he bought a small log cabin on section 22, in which he lived until 1864, when he built his present residence, which has scarcely an equal in the township. He was married in February, 1833, to Miss Ruth Twichelle, a daughter of Sawin Twichelle. They have five children--William H., Dorcas, John, Hannah and Minnie. Mr. Easton has been honored by the office of justice of the peace.

William H. Easton, a son of John and Ruth (Twichelle) Easton, is a native of Oswego county, New York, having been born on the 17th of November, 1833. He moved with his parents to Peoria, Illinois, in 1837, where he was married in 1854 to Miss Mary J. Thurston, a daughter of Jesse Thurston. They have been blessed with eight children--Mary Emma, Ella May, Ruth Caroline, Nathaniel Lyon, J. Scott, William H., Edwin S. and Adeline. In May, 1855, Mr. Easton entered four hundred acres of prairie land in Jefferson township, and bought seventy acres of timberland of G. M. Haladay on section 4, Grove township. He returned to Peoria, Illinois, and in October of the same year he moved his family to his land, spending the winter in a log cabin, which is now standing on the farm of Andrew Dicky. He built a log cabin on what is now his present location, and there lived until 1882, when he erected his new dwelling place. He now owns four hundred acres of good cultivated land, and ten acres of timberland, which is of great value. He is general farmer and stock-raiser having some fine shorthorn cattle. Mr. Easton has held every township office, and helped make the first assessment while in the assessor's office, and was the second representative from Adair, being elected in the fall of 1873.

Leander Jones, a prominent man of Jefferson township, was born on the 21st of January, 1827, in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. In 1843 he moved with his parents to West Virginia, where he was married, in February, 1849, to Miss Jane A., a daughter of Squire Sayre. In the year 1852, Leander and his family moved to Peoria county, Illinois, and to Woodford county in 1854. In 1856 he came to Marshall county, there remained until 1878, when he came to his present location in Adair county. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 5, Jefferson township, and also a large orchard, containing one hundred and thirty-five bearing trees, and has a nice stock of Herefords and shorthorns. He learned cabinetmaking in Pennsylvania, and followed that trade for eight years, and then learned the carpentering trade in Virginia, but on coming to the West he began farming, and has followed that occupation ever since. He has, and now holds, the position of justice of the peace, and is road supervisor. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have been blessed with four children--Viola E., W. Wood, Fairest F. and Cassius C.John Loucks settled upon section 27 during the month of December, 1856, where he still resides. John Loucks is a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, and was born on the 15th of December, 1824. He was married in Marion county, Indiana, March 13th, 1845, to Miss Catherine M. Robinson, who died in June, 1849. On the 1st of January, 1851, he was again married to Mrs. Vastha Day, a daughter of Benjamin McClure. They have seven children--Lydia F., Theophilus, Hannah J., David, Eddie, Kate, and Hallie. John came to Polk county, Iowa, in October, 1854, and there remained until 1856, when he came to Adair county and settled on section 27, Jefferson township, where he owns four hundred and forty acres of land, all under cultivation, and has some fine-graded shorthorn stock, sheep and hogs. He was called out when Anderson made a raid through this part of the state, but it was only for a short time, and was offered the resolution to give every soldier who went from this county, a coupon bond for a hundred dollars, payable twenty dollars a year with interest, besides regular bounty. Mr. Loucks is a member of the Christian church, has been road supervisor, school treasurer, and called the first school meeting in the township in 1857. He learned the carpentering trade in Greenfield, Illinois, and there received most of his education. He has been secretary of the school board, trustee and justice of the peace, chairman of the republican party of Adair county, and is at present a member of the cemetery association. Mr. L. has taken a prominent part in the politics of this county, and by his good judgement and wisdom has made many friends in the republican party.

John Loucks settled upon section 27 during the month of December, 1856, where he still resides. John Loucks is a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, and was born on the 15th of December, 1824. He was married in Marion county, Indiana, March 13th, 1845, to Miss Catherine M. Robinson, who died in June, 1849. On the 1st of January, 1851, he was again married to Mrs. Vastha Day, a daughter of Benjamin McClure. They have seven children--Lydia F., Theophilus, Hannah J., David, Eddie, Kate, and Hallie. John came to Polk county, Iowa, in October, 1854, and there remained until 1856, when he came to Adair county and settled on section 27, Jefferson township, where he owns four hundred and forty acres of land, all under cultivation, and has some fine-graded shorthorn stock, sheep and hogs. He was called out when Anderson made a raid through this part of the state, but it was only for a short time, and was offered the resolution to give every soldier who went from this county, a coupon bond for a hundred dollars, payable twenty dollars a year with interest, besides regular bounty. Mr. Loucks is a member of the Christian church, has been road supervisor, school treasurer, and called the first school meeting in the township in 1857. He learned the carpentering trade in Greenfield, Illinois, and there received most of his education. He has been secretary of the school board, trustee and justice of the peace, chairman of the republican party of Adair county, and is at present a member of the cemetery association. Mr. L. has taken a prominent part in the politics of this county, and by his good judgement and wisdom has made many friends in the republican party.

Benjamin F. McMullen is a native of Montgomery county, Virginia, and was born on August 30, 1824. He removed with his parents to Tazewell county, Virginia, in the fall of 1847, and there remained until 1860, when he came to Guthrie county, and to his present location on section 7, Jefferson township, in 1864. He has two hundred and ten acres of land, mostly under cultivation, and a large pasture. He is a member of the Purity lodge, No. 283, A.F. and A.M., of Casey, and has been justice of the peace and a member of the board of supervisors. Mr. McMullen was married in the fall of 1847, to Miss Celia Carter, a daughter of John Carter. Mrs. McMullen was killed by lightning in May, 1867, while in bed. It cut a path about the width of a finger down Mr. McMullen's left side, and shattered the bed-post at the foot. Mrs. McMullen left six children--J. Hershell, Casiah, Millard, Cyrus, Lucinda and Abram. Mr. McMullen was married again, in 1868, to Miss Mary Zornes, by whom he has had six children--Emiline, Frank, Charlie, Dora, Delilah and Clara. His eldest son, John Hershell, was born on the 1st of July, 1848 in Virginia. He came to Thompson township, Guthrie county, in 1860, and in the spring of 1863 he came to Jefferson township, Adair county, and settled on his present location on section 7 in 1868. He owns fifty-two acres of good land, and has a fine stock of Norman stock. He is a member of the Purity lodge, No. 283, A.F. and A.M.

William A. Perkins is a native of Barron county, Kentucky, having been born on the 1st of February, 1812, and is the son of Jesse and Mary (Allen) Perkins. He was married there to Miss Virginia Perkins, a daughter of Charles Perkins. Mrs. Perkins died in Marshall county, Illinois, leaving one child, Virginia. He was again married in Ilinois, in 1855, to Miss Lucinda Hester, a daughter of John Hester. They have six children--Thomas, Elizabeth, Josephine, Emma, Ellen and Allen. In 1877 William Perkins came to his present location, on section 4, where he now owns four hundred acres of good land, and raises Poland-China hogs and shorthorn cattle. He has held a number of offices while in Illinois.

Jeremiah Rinard - In the summer of 1856 Jeremiah Rinard made a settlement on section 5 in this township [Jefferson], with his family. He built a cabin on the south half of the northeast quarter of the section, where he lived for many years. He came from Indiana, where he was born, and in August, 1879, removed to Franklin county, Kansas, and in 1883, to Washington county, Arkansas, where he is now living. He was married in Indiana, in 1850, to Miss Lucinda Underwood, a daughter of Lewis and Keziah (Bond) Underwood. They had two children--Alonzo H. and Amorian. Mrs. Rinard died at her residence in this township, February 5, 1870.

Stover Rinard made his appearance in this township in April, 1856, and located upon section 8. He is a native of Randolph county, Indiana, and is the son of Adam and Patience (Greene) Rinard, and was born March 29, 1832. He came to this state in 1855 with Lewis Underwood and Jeremiah Rinard, and with them tarried in Henry county for a short time before coming to this section. He was married in Henry county to Miss Elizabeth Underwood, daughter of Lewis and Keziah Underwood, on the 4th of July, 1855. The fruit of this union has been four children--Charles F., Nettie M., Ulysses G. and Alonzo. Mr. Rinard is still a resident of the township.

Jonathan Shreves was born in Clay county, Illinois, on the 8th of April, 1936. His father died, and in 1844 Jonathan and his mother moved to Montgomery county, Indiana, and in 1850 came to Madison county, Iowa, where the subject remained until 1860, when he came to Adair county, and settled in Jefferson township. He was married on October 11, 1860, to Miss Dorcas A. Easton, a daughter of John and Ruth (Twichelle) Easton. They have one child, Lydia Shreves. He enlisted in August, 1862, at Greenfield, in Company D, Twenty-ninth Iowa Infantry. He was in the engagements at Helena, Little Rock, Arkansas; Mobile, Alabama, and several smaller engagements. He was honorably discharged on the 10th of August, 1865, at New Orleans. Mr. Shreves owns one hundred acres of good land, all under cultivation. His nicely cultivated farm and well breeded stock show that Mr. Shreves is an intelligent and progressive farmer, and one who meets with the best success.

George B. Wilson moved to Adair county, June 16, 1855, having, in April previous, purchased of David Shields two hundred and forty acres of land, one hundred and sixty of prairie and eighty acres of timber, situated on sections 27 and 34, Jefferson township, known as the Alcorn place. G. B. Wilson was born in Highland county, Ohio, September 5, 1825. He moved with his parents to Indianapolis, Indiana, in the fall of 1843, where he resided until the spring of 1855. From thence he moved to his present home. He was married in the fall of 1850, to Sarah A. McClure, a daughter of Benjamin and Nancy (Watts) McClure, of Indianapolis. The father of G. B. Wilson lived to the good old age of eighty-eight years. His mother and only brother fell victims to the cholera in the fall of 1850, near Indianapolis, Indiana. Of a family of eight children all have passed away but the subject of this sketch, and a sister, a resident of Chicago, Illinois. G. B. and Sarah A. Wilson have a family of five children living and two dead--Flora E., Mary., Charles L., Oscar D. and Arthur F. G. B. Wilson has given his attention to farming in the main, though he has connected therewith for many years, showing land for entry, buying and selling lands, acting as agent for non-resident landowners, paying taxes, making collections and has been for many years a notary public. He is probably the oldest postmaster in Iowa, as he has filled that position at Holaday's for over twenty years. The subject of this sketch being averse to seeking and holding office had, at an early day, much against his will, to fill various township offices, as the result of his being a fair accountant and a good penman. He is now making a specialty of thoroughbred shorthorn cattle and Poland-China hogs, which he takes pleasure in showing to lovers of good stock. He has at the head of his herd of shorthorns Wiley Duke 3, a Bates' bull, bred by Martin Flynn, of Polk county, Iowa. "Wiley Duke" was sired by Baron Stanhope, a noted prize winner, who won first prize as a yearling at the Western Provincial Fair, in 1878, and also of the golden medal (sweepstakes), beating the best show bulls in Canada. His winnings at the Iowa State Fair in 1873 were first prize in his class as a two-year-old, first position at the head of first prize herd, and the grand sweepstakes prize.

William Wilson was born in Lambertville, New Jersey, on the 5th of July, 1816, and is the son of Joseph and Sarah (Pidcock) Wilson. He was married on June 11, 1842, to Miss Charlotte Martindale, a daughter of Jacob Martindale. They have had four children--Aaron, Joseph, Sarah A. and George H. Joseph died January 17, 1881. After his marriage William was engaged in farming, which he followed for some fifteen years. In 1861 he moved to Henry county, Illinois, and there remained until the spring of 1880, when he came to his present location in Jefferson township, where he now owns one hundred and sixty acres of good land, all under dultivation and some fine stock of shorthorn cattle.