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Floyd County >> 1882 Index

History of Floyd County, Iowa
Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co., 1882.

Charles City
submitted by Kathy Gerkins


Henry C. Aldrich, M.D. and D.D.S. Page 724

One of the leading physicians of Charles City was born in the city of Minneapolis, Minn. His parents were Cyrus and Clara A. (Heaton) Aldrich. She was a native of New York and he of Rhode Island, where he received his education. When a young man he emigrated to Northern Illinois, and was one of the owners of the Chicago & Galena stage line and helped build the Illinois & Lake Michigan Canal. He was a member of the Illinois Legislature and receiver of public moneys at the land office at Dixon, Ill. In 1856 he removed to Minneapolis, Minn., and engaged in the real estate business. He was elected a member of the Minnesota Legislature and a member of Congress from Minnesota, in 1861. He died in October 1871, aged sixty-three years. His wife resides in Minneapolis. She and husband had a family of three daughters and one son, two living, viz.: Villa, wife of D. H. Wright, commission merchant at Minneapolis, Minn., and Henry C., subject of this sketch. He attended the Minneapolis High School and State University until 1877, when he began the study of dentistry graduating from the Dental Department of the University of Pennsylvania, then beginning the study of medicine, graduating from the Hahnemann Medical College, of Philadelphia. He located in Charles City, Ia., May 1881, where he has since practiced the profession of medicine, establishing a large and lucrative practice. He is the city physician. Dr. Aldrich was married to Miss Mary Whitney at Minneapolis, Sept. 24, 1879. She was the first white child born at Clear Water, Minn., and in honor of that event was presented a lot in Clear Water, Minn. She was a daughter of Samuel N. and Abbie (Hay) Whitney. Dr. Aldrich and wife attend the Congregational church in Charles City. He is a member of the Medical Examiner in the Iowa Legion of Honor, and in politics a Republican.

Edgar F. Atherton, Pages 724-725

One of the leading merchants of Charles City, is a native of Vermont, born in Moretown, Washington County, March 23, 1844; his parents were Joseph L. and Lucy B. (Adams) Atherton, natives also of the Green Mountain State. He resided in Moretown until 1858, when he came with his parents to Floyd County, Ia. They still reside on their farm in Cedar Township, and have a family of four children, three sons and one daughter, viz.: Ella A., who married John O. Adams; Eddie B., residing with his parents in Cedar Township; Walter E., also residing on the old homestead; Edgar F., subject of this sketch, was the eldest son; his parents moved to Floyd, Ia., when he was fourteen years old and resided there until 1870, when he went to Orchard Station, Mitchell County, and opened a store of general merchandise, remaining until the fall of 1879, when he sold out and located in Charles City, where he established his present business. He occupies a building 66 x 21 feet two stories in height and carries a full and complete stock of imported and domestic goods, ladies’ goods, dry goods, notions, and clothes, hats, caps, gloves and mittens. Mr. Atherton married Miss Amelia Wilbur, June 6, 1869, at Floyd; she was born in Otsego County, N.Y. and was a daughter of Henry and Angeline (Moore) Wilbur, natives of New York, and of Quaker descent. Mr. and Mrs. Atherton are members of the Congregational church, and have had a family of two children, viz.: Earnest W., born Aug. 17, 1870, and Winifred L., July 11, 1877. Mr. Atherton is one of the enterprising representative business men of Charles City, and an old settler of Floyd County, having been identified with the county since 1858. He is a charter member of the V.A.S. Fraternity, Charles City Lodge. In politics rather independent and inclined to vote of the best man. He is of Scotch descent.

Edmund Austin Pages 725-726

Retired farmer, and Vice-President of the Charles City National Bank and Charles City Water-Power Company, was born in Skaneateles, Onondaga County, N.Y., Jan. 4, 1821; his parents were Silas and Mary A. (Patchen) Austin, natives of New York. He was a farmer and they were members of the Episcopal church, and had a family of five sons and two daughters; five lived to be men and women. Edmund, subject of this sketch, was the eldest child and soon after his birth his parents removed to Cayuga County, N.Y. where he farmed until his marriage to Eliza Browning, which occurred March 4, 1852. She was born in Sommersetshire, England; was a daughter of Mathew and Nancy (Davis) Browning, also native of England. Soon after his marriage Mr. Austin moved to Skaneateles, N.Y. where he bought land and engaged in farming until the year 1854, when he went to Winnebago County, Ill., and in the spring of 1855 came to Charles City, Ia., and purchased a farm in St. Charles Township which he still owns, and cultivated until March, 1882, when he rented it and moved into Charles City, where he bought a residence and has since lived, leading a life of retirement from active business. Mr. Austin and wife are members of the Christian church and have had a family of three children; the eldest, John P., died in infancy, and two are living, viz.: Sarah N., born Nov. 28, 1856, resides with her parents, and Willis B., one of the proprietors of the Centennial Mills of Charles City, born Jan. 19, 1859. Mr. Austin was elected Vice-President of the Charles City National Bank upon its organization in 1876 and has been Vice-President of the Water-Power Company since Feb. 1880. He owns a farm of 365 acres in St. Charles Township and 240 acres in Union Township. He also owns property in Charles City, and stock in the Water-Power Company and in the Charles City National Bank. He is one of the few old settlers of 1855 now living and has seen Floyd County change from its old uncultivated state to its present prosperous condition. When he came to Charles City there were but three frame buildings and a few log cabins. In politic Mr. Austin is rather independent

V.W. Baker Page 726

Carpenter, was born in Worchester County, Mass., June 12, 1820. His parents were Vickery and Priscilla (Walker) Baker, natives of Massachusetts. His father died in 1870 in Vermont, in which state his mother still lives, at the age of eighty-seven. The subject of this sketch received a common-school education in Vermont. He was married in 1852 to Sarah P. Durkee, a native of Vermont. They removed to Illinois soon after, and lived at Rockford until 1857, when they removed to Floyd County. They had four children, two of whom are living- Alice, teaching in Indianapolis, and Estella, at home. Mrs. Baker died in 1870 and he was again married, in 1871, to Estella M. Patton, a native of New York. They have had two children – Clifford, and Gracie (deceased). Politically, Mr. Baker is a Republican. He is a member of the Baptist Church.

William D. Balch Pages 726-727

Of the firm of Reiniger & Balch, bankers, of Charles City, is a native of New Hampshire, born in the town of Claremont, Jan. 2, 1834. His parents were William S. and Adeline G. (Capron) Balch, natives of Vermont. He was a minister of the Universalist church and is still living, a retired minister, of Elgin, Ill., now in his seventy-seventh year. She died in 1855. They had a family of eight children, four sons and four daughters. William D., the subject of this sketch, was the eldest son. When a child, his parents removed to New York City, his father having charge of a church there. He attended school in New York City until fourteen when he entered the Clinton Liberal Institute, at Clinton, N.Y., remaining three years. He returned to New York City and engaged in banking, on Wall street, until the spring of 1865, when he came to Charles City, Ia., and started the first bank in the city, under the firm name of Mitchell, Fairfield & Balch, and in 1867, E. C. Chapin, now editor of the Davenport, Ia., Gazette, purchased Mr. Mitchell’s interest, and the firm remained Chapin, Fairfield & Balch, until 1873, when Mr. Chapin retired from the firm, and in 1875 Judge Reiniger bought Judge Fairfield’s interest and the firm has since remained Reiniger & Balch. Mr. Balch married Miss Ellen M. Melville, Jan. 19, 1858. She was born in New York City and was a daughter of Henry B. Melville, a manufacturing jeweler, of New York City. Mr. and Mrs. Balch had four children, one living, viz.: Estelle L., born in New York City, in October 1861. Their mother died in 1864. Mr. Balch married Miss Maria A. Palmer, at Charles City, Feb. 11, 1868. She was born in Maine, and is a daughter of Dr. William M. Palmer and Anna, nee Shaw. He was a physician of Charles City. Mr. and Mrs. Balch have had four children, two living, viz.; Margaret and Stevens. Mr. Balch is one of the old settlers and an enterprising representative business man of Charles City. He was elected Mayor of the city one year, has been Treasurer of Charles City and Floyd County Agricultural Society, and also Treasurer of the Independent School District, a number of years. He is Vice-President of the First National Bank, of Mason City, and active in its management. In politics he has always been a supporter of the Republican Party.

Col. V.G. Barney Pages 727-729

Formerly a marble manufacturer in Vermont, where he owned a quarry, is a native of the Green Mountain State, born in Swanton, Franklin County, August 26, 1834, a son of George and Emma D. (Goodrich) Barney. They were also natives of Vermont and members of the M.E. church; they had a family of four sons and four daughters, Col. V.G. being the second son; he attended school until nineteen when he clerked in a store a couple of years, then took charge of the marble mills in Danby, Rutland County, Vt., and remained there three years; then took charge of the mills at Swanton until 1861 when he enlisted in the Independent Company which afterward became Company A., First Vermont Regiment; enlisted for three months, and was Orderly Sergeant of the company; at the end of the three months returned to Swanton and soon after re-enlisted in Company A, Ninth Vermont Regiment, and was elected Captain of this company; remained as Captain one year, when he was Commissioned Lieut.-Colonel of the regiment, and held that position until the close of the war, when he returned home and engaged in the marble business four years; when, owing to trouble with his lungs from exposure in the army, went to Florida six months then removed with his family to Minneapolis, Minn. He engaged in the real estate business there three years, then came to Charles City, in 1872, and has loaned money and speculated in land here since. Mr. Barney married Miss Maria L. Hadwen, April 21, 1857; she was born in Danby, Vt., and was a daughter of John and Abigail (Baker) Hadwen; they were Quakers, and natives of New York; they had a family of nine children, seven daughters and two sons. Mrs. Col. Barney is a member of the M.E. Church. They have had four children, viz.: Caroline E., born Feb. 7, 1858; Fred E. Oct. 10, 1859, is Assistant Cashier in Commercial Bank of Minneapolis, Minn.; Bertha M., born July 9, 1866; Frank, Oct. 3, 1871. Mr. Barney is one of the representative business men and citizens of Charles City, and is one of the directors of the First National Bank here. He owns a farm of 200 acres in St. Charles Township, 160 acres in Sioux County, Ia., eighty acres in Chickasaw County, and 400 in Wright County. In politics he is a Republican and cast the first vote for John C. Fremont for President of the United States. He has been a supporter of that party since. He is of Welsh, English and French decent. His father put in the first American marble tile flooring in the United States; he is still living and actively engaged in business at Swanton, Vt. Col. V.G. Barney’s brother, Elisha L. Barney, was Colonel of the Sixth Vermont Infantry Volunteers, and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, in Virginia, in 1864. Mr. Barney has always taken an active interest in educational matters, and for the past six years has been a member of the School Board. He has been a member of the City Council two years. He is liberal in his views politically as well as religiously; he has always taken an active interest in any thing that promised progression to Charles City. He secured an appropriation from City Council to lay out city park and set out the trees, and lay out walks. Mr. Campbell and Mr. Barney own the Park House

J. A. Becker Page 729

Clerk of St. Charles Township and farmer, was born in Vernon, Oneida County, N.Y., on Dec. 24, 1837. His parents, Jacob and Melissa R. (Knox) Becker, were natives of New York, and had a family of two children, viz.: Melissa J., who married J.S. Freeman, and the subject of this sketch. His father died two weeks before he was born, and his mother afterward married Lyman Jacobs. J. A. lived in Vernon with his mother and stepfather on a farm and attended school until twenty-one, when he attended the Oneida Conference Seminary two terms; then took a three-months course at Eastman’s Business College Poughkeepsie. He then began teaching school, and taught winters and worked summers at the carpenter’s trade seven years; then came to Charles City, Ia., in March 1870. He has been engaged in farming since. He taught school in St. Charles Township the winter of 1871-‘2. He married Addie L Griswold, Oct. 23, 1867. She was born in Augusta, Oneida County, N.Y., and was a daughter of Warren H. and Aroxsa (Hart) Griswold. Mr. And Mrs. Becker are members of the M.E. Church and have had one son, viz.: Warren Earl, born Aug. 30, 1881. In the spring of 1879, Mr. Becker was appointed Township Clerk, but by subsequent election has held that office since. He has held the office of Secretary of the School Board since 1872, and that of Assessor three years. In politics he is a Republican. He is one of the enterprising, representative men of Charles City, and farmers of Floyd County, where he has been identified since 1870. He is of Mohawk Dutch and New England descent.

De Grand Benjamin Page 729-730

Retired farmer, miller and manufacturer of cheese, was born in De Ruyter, Madison County, N.Y., Oct. 2, 1816, a son of Elias P. and Martha (Rich) Benjamin. She was from Connecticut, and he was a native of Dutchess County, N.Y. He was a miller and farmer. They were members of the Universalist church, and had a family of six sons and three daughters. De Grand, subject of this sketch, was the third son. He attended school-working on his father’s farm-until twenty-one, when he engaged in teaching school in Madison County, continuing seven years. He was married to Miss Roxalina Sexton, Sept. 23, 1843, at Union Valley, Portland County, N.Y. She was born there and was a daughter of Daniel and Nancy (Carpenter) Sexton. After Mr. Benjamin was married he located in Union Valley, and through his efforts a post office was established here and he was appointed Postmaster. He also owned and conducted a farm there. In 1849 he returned to the home of his boyhood and purchased a farm within two miles of his father, and engaged in farming and milling until his father’s death. He inherited the old homestead of his father. The State changed the course of the river that propelled his mill for canal purposes, soon after, so he converted his mill into a cheese factory. In March 1874, he came to Charles City, Ia., purchased some property and has since resided here, engaged in speculating and loaning money. Mrs. Benjamina is a member of the Congregational church. They have had three children, two living, viz.: Martha A., born March 27, 1847, and Alida H., born May 8, 1852. Mr. Benjamin is one of the enterprising, representative men of Charles City. In politics, he was first a Democrat, but at the outbreak of the war became a strong Republican and has since supported that party. He is a man liberal in his views, original in mind, and a strong believer in all men having equal rights. He is of English descent. He owns a nice home and eight lots in Charles City, and a farm of 120 acres in Scott Township, most all under cultivation and well stocked.

Edward Berg Page 730

One of the oldest and most prominent business men of Charles City, was born in Eutin, Oldensburg, Germany, on Aug. 6, 1844, a son of Adoph and Sophia Berg, nee Bessing, who had a family of seven children. They were members of the Lutheran church, and Mr. Adoph Berg was a Privy Councilor of the Government of Oldenburg. Edward attended school in Germany, making a specialty of the studies of chemistry and forestry until twenty-two years of age, when he came to the United States, landed at New York, and from there went at once to St. Louis, Mo. He remained there a short time, and in December, 1867, came to Charles City, where he clerked for J.H. Stolle, until March, 1873, when he opened his present store. He carries a complete stock of groceries, provisions and staple goods, also keeps a full line of crockery and chinaware. One department of his store is devoted to drugs and medicines of all kinds. This stock is valued at $3000. He is agent for the German Fire Insurance Company, of Freeport, Ill., and has had the agency since 1871. Politically, he is independent in his views.

F.A. Burton Page 731

Proprietor of the Charles City livery, feed and sale stable, was born in Andover, Vt., March 7, 1854; his parents were Horace and Mary A. (Taylor) Burton. They were natives of Vermont and had a family of four sons and three daughters. Frank A., subject of this memoir, was the youngest; he attended school in Andover, Vt., until thirteen or fourteen years of age, when he emigrated with his parents to Black Earth, Dane County, Wis., where he attended school two years; then worked in the Wisconsin pineries on the Mississippi River one year; then came to Charles City, and attended the High School four years; then he purchased his present livery, feed and sale stable. Mr. Burton married Miss Emma Henderson, at Charles City, Ia. She was born in Mount Carroll, Ill., in 1856, and was a daughter of Berry and Amanda C. (Youce) Henderson. Mr. and Mrs. Burton have one daughter – Miss Jessie M., born June 24, 1879. Mr. Burton is one of the enterprising, representative business men of Charles City. He was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Floyd County for four years. He owns and runs the largest and most complete stables in the city. He keeps from eighteen to twenty fine buggy and carriage horses and a full line of buggies and carriages. Mr. Burton has taken the premium for carriage horses at the county fair, ever since he came here. He is a thorough gentleman and has the confidence and respect of all who know him. Mr. Burton started at seventeen years of age to make his way in the world, and it is by his own efforts that he has educated himself and established his present business.

Joseph Clemens Page 731- 732

Of the firm of Joseph Clemens & Co., manufacturers of wagons, carriages and buggies, Charles City, was a son of Jacob and Gertrude Clemens, nee Guble, and was born June 30, 1829, in Ediger, on the River Mosle, Prussia, Germany. He was the youngest of a family of six children, and was the recipient of a practical business education in his native country. He also learned the furniture-maker’s trade there, and when twenty years of age, came with three of his brothers to the United States. They landed at New York, and from there went to Milwaukee, Wis., where Joseph worked at the cabinet-maker’s trade three years, and at the wagon-maker’s one year; then went to Dubuque, Ia. He opened a shop there, and remained until 1867, when he went to McGregor, Ia., continuing there his former business. In July, 1872, he came to Charles City, where he has been prominently identified with the business interests since. In September, 1857, Mr. Clemens married Agnes Zumhof, a native of Hanover, Germany. They have five children – Joseph, Jr., who is employed in his father’s shop; Michael, clerking in Mile’s drug store; Mollie, Lucy and Augusta. Formerly Mr. Clemens was Republican in his political views, but of late has become rather independent, voting for principle rather than party.

Maurice S. Cole Page 732

One of Floyd County’s early settlers, is one of the oldest wagon-makes of this county. His is a native of Vermont, and was born in Sutton, Orleans County, on Feb. 14, 1827. His parents, Andrew and Mary A. Cole, were natives of Providence, RI., and had a family of six sons and one daughter. Maurice, subject of this sketch, was the youngest. He lived on the farm with his father until sixteen, then went to Charleston, Vt., and worked one year at his trade, that of a wagon-maker; thence to Holliston, Mass., where he spent two years, learning the boot and shoe trade; he then returned to Charleston, Vt., and worked at the wagon-maker’s trade until January, 1854, when he went to Gasconade County, Mo., and teamed there on the Missouri Pacific Road until October, 1855, then he came to Charles City, Ia., and teamed from Charles City and McGregor, Ia., until May, 1856, when he opened his wagon shop, and has been engaged in this business since, and is now the oldest wagon-maker in the county. Mr. Cole married Mary A. Ingram, at Charles City, in 1858. She was born in Vermont, and was a daughter of Henry Ingram – a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Cole have one child, a daughter – Celia. Mr. Cole is one of the early, few old settlers now living in Floyd County. When he came to Charles City there were but three frame buildings in town, and he has seen its change from a wild, uncultivated state to the present prosperous condition. In politics Mr. Cole is rather independent, and inclined to vote for the best man.

Charles P. Collins, Jr. Page 732-733

Stone mason and contractor, Charles City, is one of the old settlers of Floyd County. He was born opposite the town of Newport, at the head of Memphremagog Lake, Canada, Feb. 18, 1829. His parents were Charles P. and Mary J.W. (Rever) Collins; he was born in Chicopee, Mass., and she was a native of Canada; he was a painter and stone cutter and a member of the Baptist church, and she was a member of the Universalist church. They had one child, viz.: Charles P., Jr., subject of this sketch. When he was an infant he removed with his parents to Lowell, Mass., where he attended school until nineteen, when he learned the stone-mason’s trade; when twenty-three he went to Warner, NH., and worked here and at Nashua until the spring of 1853 when he came west to Beloit, Wis., and worked at his trade here until the spring of 1857; then came to Iowa and located in Charles City. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twelfth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and was in the battles of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh and was taken prisoner at Shiloh, April 6, 1862, and was taken to Corinth, Memphis, Tenn., Jackson, Miss, Mobile and Montgomery, Ala., thence to Camp Oglethrop, Macon, Ga., where he remained in the rebel prison four months, then was removed to Columbus, SC, thence to Wilmington, NC, thence to Raleigh, NC, thence to the “Libby Prison.” He was paroled Oct. 20, 1862. He went first to Annapolis, MD, from there to Benton Barracks, St. Louis, MO., where he joined the fifteen men that were left of his company; he was then in the fight at Springfield, MO., when he returned to St. Louis and was mustered out of the service on account of disability, March 17, 1863. He returned home to Charles City, until the fall of 1864, when he re-enlisted in Company C, Thirteenth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and went with Sherman on his march to the sea, around to Washington, thence to Louisville, Ky., and was discharged at Davenport, Ia., at the close of the war. He again returned home to Charles City, Ia., where he has since resided. Mr. Collins was promoted Orderly Sergeant of his company; at the battle of Fort Donelson he was wounded with a musket ball which passed through his right hand. Mr. Collins married Miss Elizabeth Osgood, April 11, 1841. She was born in New Hampshire. The fruits of this marriage were three sons and one daughter, viz.: Chas. H., who married Miss Eveline Clark; he is a mason and they reside at Verndale, Minn. Ellen M. is the wife of Frank Kellogg; he is engineer of the Charles City Furniture factory. William C. Collins married Miss Catherine Allen; they reside in Charles City, where he works at his trade of brick mason, and Frank E. Collins, engaged in farming at Osage, Mitchell County, Ia. Mr. Charles P. Collins married his present wife, Miss Minnie Cold, May 28, 1868. She was born in Bennington, Bennington County, VT. And was a daughter of Lorenzo Cold. Mr. Collins is one of the enterprising men and citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since its infancy. In politics he is a Republican and has always been a strong supporter of this party.

William W. Dennis Page 734

Deputy County Recorder of Floyd County, is a native of Ohio, and was born on a farm in Wayne County, May 16, 1838. His parents were William and Rebecca (Luther) Dennis, natives of Pennsylvania. He was a member of the Universalist church, and was by trade a carpenter and joiner, and also followed farming. She was a member of the Lutheran church. They had a family of four sons and four daughters, William, subject of this sketch, being the youngest son. He attended school winters, working on his father’s farm until seventeen, when his mother died. He then worked at the carpenter’s trade during the summer, attending school winters until twenty-one, and on May 19, 1861, he married Miss Angie Isora Logan at Seville, Medina County, O. She was born in Pennsylvania and was a daughter of William and Mary (Beale) Logan, natives of Pennsylvania and members of the Baptist church. After his marriage, on Nov. 14, 1861, Mr. Dennis enlisted in Company D, Third Battalion U.S. Infantry, and remained in the service three years. He was in various battles, among them the siege of Corinth, Miss., in the month of April and in May 1862. Stone River battles Dec. 31, 1862, and Jan. 12, of 1863, and the battle of Hoovers Gap, Tenn., June 26, 1863. The last sixteen months of his service he was detailed as a recruiting officer at Toledo, O., and was discharged at Columbus, O., Nov. 14, 1864. He remained in Ohio some time then removed to Bourbon, Marshall County, Ind., and followed his trade until July 19, 1865, when he located to Charles City, Ia. He followed contacting and building here until 1878, when, owing to failing health, he abandoned his trade, and on April 8, 1879, he was appointed his present office as Deputy County Recorder. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis are members of the Christian church, and have one son, viz., Arthur W., born Feb. 19, 1862. He is clerk in the Charles City Savings Bank. Mr. Dennis is one of the enterprising representative men and citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since June 1865. He is Secretary of St. Charles Lodge, A.F.& A.M. No. 141, and has held this office seven years. He has been a Mason since twenty-one years of age. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for A. Lincoln, first term. He is of English, Irish, Scotch and German descent.

E. J. Fisher Pages 739 – 740

Of the firm of Stevens, Herring & Co., wholesale and retail dealers in the manufacturers of furniture, Charles City, is a native of New Hampshire, born in Franklin, Merrimack County, Oct. 9, 1837. His parents, Ellis Fisher, who was a farmer, and Hannah, nee Noice, were natives of the Green Mountain State, and had a family of nine children, of who the subject of this memoir was the youngest son. He was educated in his native State, and at the age of fifteen went to Lowell, Mass., to learn the machinist’s trade. He followed that occupation four years, then went to Manchester, N. H., and remained there three years, learning the furniture trade. From there he went to Boston, Mass., and worked at the cabinet-maker’s trade, until his marriage to Abbie Haywood in December, 1861. She was born in Alexander, N. H., a daughter of Walter Haywood. Of five children born of this union three are living – Henry W., born Nov. 21, 1863, is working with his father in the factory; Frank, born Jan 6, 1869, and Fred, born Aug. 6, 1873. After his marriage, Mr. Fisher, removed to Two Rivers, Wis., thence to Appleton, that State, where he worked in a furniture factory one year, then established a factory of his own at Leeman, Wis., four years later he took charge of the furniture manufacturing department, at the House of Correction at Milwaukee, Wis. In 1869 he became a resident of Charles City and a partner, in his present business. He is a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, National Lodge, No. 165. Politically he favors the Democratic party.

Gustavus B. Eastman Page 734-736

Retired banker and First Assistant Internal Revenue Assessor for Floyd County, Ia., is a native of Vermont, born in New Haven, Addison County, Nov. 20, 1820. His parents were Silas N. and Amanda (Bird) Eastman; his father was a saddle and harness maker, and both were natives of Vermont and members of the Congregational church. They had a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters. Gustavus B., subject of this sketch, was the second son. When some three years of age he removed with his parents to Hopkinton, N.Y., where he lived three years, thence to Malone, Franklin County, where he attended school one year; then to Madrid, N.Y. There he attended school and worked in the harness-shop with his father until seventeen, when the family removed to Ogdensburg, N.Y.; one year later they moved to Heuvelton, and Mr. E. taught school in Morley, Canton Township, and other schools in the vicinity. He was Deputy Clerk of St. Lawrence County until 1846, when he came to Milwaukee, Wis., remained here until the fall, when he went to Roscoe, Ill., and taught school one winter; thence to Rockford, Ill, and worked for William Hulin, County Recorder, one year, when he began to work for Robertson & Hall, lawyers and land agents and bankers at Rockford. In the fall of 1852 he went to Dixon, Ill., and opened a bank and land office under the firm name of Robertson, Eastman & Co.; remained there until 1855, when he came to Dubuque, Ia, and engaged in buying and selling Iowa lands at Dubuque and Decorah, until the spring of 1856, when he moved to Charles City, Ia., where he has since remained; he engaged in the land and banking business until the fall of 1858, and since then has been operating in lands. In 1862 he was appointed Assistant Internal Revenue Assessor of Floyd County, and held that position until Jan. 1, 1864, when he resigned to accept the office of County Recorder of Floyd County, and held that office eight years; since then has speculated in land and city property. In 1857 Mr. Eastman, Duncan Ferguson, Samuel Riddill and Samuel Hackley built a saw-mill in the north part of Charles City, this being the second steam mill in Charles City. Mr. Eastman married Eleanor S. Dixon at Rockford, Ill., Feb. 26, 1850; She was born at Geneva, N.Y. and was a daughter of George and Eleanor (Stevenson) Dixon. She is a member of the Congregational church. They had a family of three children, none of whom are living. Mr. Eastman is one of the old settlers, and one of the enterprising representative men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1856. He has always taken an active interest in anything that promised progression to this city. Though not a member of any church, has always been a liberal supporter, not only of one but all churches. In politics he was first a Whig, and since the organization of the Republican party has been one of its strongest supporters.

E.C. Egloff Pages 737- 738

Agent for the Illinois Central Railroad, is a native of Germany, born near Frankfort, on the Main River, June 17, 1851. His parents were William J. a nd Mary (Brandel) Egloff. The former was born in the eastern part of France, in the province of Alsace, April 9, 1804. At the age of five, he commenced study in a French school, where he continued until the age of thirteen. He then attended the University of Passau, in Bavaria, where he remained eight years, graduating as a classic student. He next took up the study of law, which he followed for three years, graduating with honors, afterward practicing his profession with success. He was appointed District Judge in 1850, which position he held until 1855, when he resigned to come to America. He came to Iowa, and settled in Delaware County, and farmed until 1859. He then opened a hotel and restaurant at Manchester, and in 1861 removed to Cedar Falls, Ia., and continued in the same business there for five years. In 1865 remove to Waterloo, Ia., and in the spring of 1868 came to Charles City and retired from active business. He removed to Mason City in 1871, and died there, April 22, 1881. His wife is still living at Mason City. She and husband had a family of ten children, eight living. E.C., subject of this sketch, is the second son; he was but three years of age when he came with his parents to America, and eighteen years of age when he came to Charles City; he attended school here and assisted his brother, M. G. Egloff, who was the first station agent for the Illinois Central Railroad, at Charles City. E.C. remained here, studying telegraphy and station work until 1876, when he was given charge of Aplington Station; remained here some two years and three months, when his brother M. G. Egloff , was appointed train dispatcher at Fort Dodge, Ia., and E.C. was appointed his brother’s former position as station agent here at Charles City, which office he still retains. Mr. E.C. Egloff married Miss Rusha Cilley, at Mason City, Ia., Nov. 8, 1880. She was born in Illinois, and was a daughter of Nathaniel P. and Louisa (Miller) Cilley. Mrs. E. C. Egloff is a member of the First Methodist Church, of Charles City. Mr. Egloff is a member of the V.A.S. fraternity, Charles City Lodge. In politics he is a Republican, and is one of the enterprising, representative citizens and business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1868.

Rev. George Elliott Page 736

Pastor of the M.E. church of Charles City, is a native of Ohio, born in Tucking County, near Pataskala, Lima Township, Dec. 14, 1851, a son of Alexander C. and Margaret (Hanawalt) Elliott. His father was a farmer in early life, and afterward a minister of the M. E. church; she was also a member of the church. They had a family of three sons and five daughters, George, subject of this memoir, being the eldest. When five years of age he removed, with his parents, to Green County, Wis., and soon after his father entered the ministry, and traveled in the Wisconsin Conference until George was fifteen, when he was transferred to the Upper Iowa Conference and located in Maquoketa. In 1868 George entered Cornell College, at Mount Vernon, Ia., a Methodist Institution, graduating in 1872. He went to Sabula, Ia., and edited a newspaper for one year, the Sabula Index, and thence to Humboldt and edited the Humboldt Kosmos one year. He entered the Upper Iowa Annual Conference of the M.E. church at Charles City, in October 1874, and was appointed pastor of a church at Parkersburg, where he remained one year, and was stationed at Lansing two years, Mitchell one year, Cresco three years, and appointed minister of the First M.E. Church of Charles City, in the fall of 1881. Mr. Elliott married Miss A.M. Corfield, at Clinton, Ia., Nov. 12, 1875. She was born in Philadelphia, Pa., and was a daughter of William and Mary (Kemplon) Corfield. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have three children – George, born Dec. 18, 1876; Phillip, Sept. 7, 1878; Mary Nov. 1, 1880. Mrs. Elliott is also a member of the M.E. Church. He is of Scotch, Irish and Dutch descent. He was one of the active workers in the late temperance contest, in favor of the amendment prohibiting the sale and manufacture of intoxicating liquor. His great-grandfather served in the Revolutionary war.

Charles Engelhart Pages 736-737

Business manager for his father, F. Engelhart, grocer, Charles City, was born near Gotha, Prussia, Germany, Nov. 7, 1846. His parents, Frederick and Mary (Otto) Engelhart, were natives of Prussia, and members of the Lutheran church. They had a family of four children, three sons and one daughter; Charles, subject of this sketch was the eldest. He came with his parents to American when seven years of age, landed in New York City, after being eleven weeks at sea in a sailing vessel; the family settled on a farm twenty-four miles southwest of Chicago. Charles remained on the farm until twenty-two, when he married Johanna Grosskopf in New Bremen, Ill. They lived with his father one year, and then ran a store of his own in New Bremen, one year, when he bought a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1872, when he came to Charles City with his father. He and wife are members of the German M.E. church, and have had two sons and one daughter, viz.: Louisa, Frederick and Ernest. Mr. Engelhart is one of the enterprising representative business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1874. In politics he is a Republican. He enlisted in Company G, Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, in the late Rebellion, and remained in the service until the close of the war. He was wounded twice: first at the siege of Vicksburg in front of the skirmish line in June, 1864, being shot in the hand and losing the fore finger of his right hand; and was wounded in the left thigh at Fort Craig in front of Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and he remained at Fort Monroe, Va., six months; was in all the battles of 1864 and 1865. At the close of the war he returned home to Illinois. His parents are living in New Bremen, Cook County, Ill.

S.F. Farnham Pages 738-739

Cashier of the Charles City National Bank, was born in Palmyra, Somerset County, Me., May 23, 1846, a son of Samuel and Eliza C. Barnham, nee Robinson, natives of Massachusetts, S. F. being the eldest of a family of four sons and three daughters born of this union. He received his primary education in Palmyra, and at the age of sixteen he entered the preparatory school at Bucksport, Me., which he attended two years, and was then matriculated in the Maine Wesleyan College at Kent’s Hill, graduating from that institution June 7, 1870. He received the appointment of principal of the Old Town High School, which he accepted and retained five years, and in 1875 he came to Charles City. He was principal of the High School here one year, and upon the organization of the Charles City National Bank, he was elected its cashier, a position he has since held. On Aug. 27, 1871 he was married to Miss Phebe F. Johnson, of Dixmont, Me. She was a daughter of H. C. Johnson and Susan B., nee Edgerly. Two children were born of this union – Le Roy S., born June 6, 1872, died may 30, 1874; and Ralph H., born Dec. 5, 1881. Mrs. Farnham died Dec. 21, 1881. She was a member of Eastern Star Chapter, Masonic fraternity of Iowa, of which she was Grand Associate Matron. Mr. Farnham is a member of Lodge No. 172, A. F. & A. M., and Easter Chapter, A. O. U. W., Charles City Lodge. He was elected City Treasurer in April 1878, and held the office one year, and was also elected Treasurer of the Water-Power Company, of this city, in 1878. He still retains the office, and is also one of the proprietors and directors of that company. Politically, he affiliates with the Republican Party, and is one of the prominent business men of Charles City.

John Ferguson Page 739

Of the firm of Woolley, Snyder, Ferguson & Bailey, proprietors of the Charles City Plow Company, is a native of Scotland, born in the city of Glasgow Jan. 18, 1834, a son of Duncan and Agnes M. Ferguson, nee Hope. His father was born in Crieff, Scotland, and reared and educated in Glasgow. His mother was born in the north of Ireland. They had a family of seven children of whom John was the second son. The family emigrated to America in 1837, and located in Erie, Pa., thence two years afterward to Rockford, Ill. John attended school, engaged in clerking and learned the carpenter and joiner’s trade there, and in September, 1855, he came to Charles City, where he embarked in the mercantile business. In 1857 he disposed of his stock to Wright & McKnabb and followed farming until 1874, when he again engaged in the mercantile trade, which he prosecuted until Jan. 1, 1882, when he sold out to his partner, S H. Starr, and purchased an interest in the Charles City Plow Company, a prominent manufacturing interest. He was married in Charles City, to Mary E. Strawn, of Rockford, Ill., on March 10, 1856. They have had three children, Ida E., born Aug. 7, 1858, died while yet in the full bloom of youth on July 15, 1874; J. A., born Aug. 30, 1861, is agent for the New York Life Insurance Company of this city, and Marie M., born Aug. 20, 1867. The subject of this memoir is a member of St. Charles Lodge No. 141, A. F. & A. M., and a member of the Chapter. He has served acceptably in many of the city offices and was a member of the City Council four years. Politically he favors the Republican party. He is one of the pioneer and enterprising citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1855.

William N. Fisher, Pages 740 - 741

Constable, sexton of cemetery, and farmer, was born in Washington County, Vt., June 13, 1829, a son of Silas W. and Emily (Peck) Fisher; father a native of New Hampshire and mother of Vermont. Of a family of three children the subject of this sketch was the eldest, and is the only one living. He was brought up on a farm, and when within two months of age he left home and worked out two or three years, and in 1854 came West, to Rockford, Ill. In the spring of 1857 he went to Minnesota with three yoke of cattle to break prairie; but hard times came on and he lost nearly all. He then located to Charles City and started a meat market, which business he prosecuted extensively. Some seasons he would kill as many as fifty or sixty hogs at a time, which were hauled to market at McGregor. But in the following spring he abandoned the market, and did odd jobs until 1860, when he started for Pike’s Peak; at Denver, however, he learned such facts as discouraged him from going further, and he returned, footing all the way from Omaha to Charles City. In the autumn of 1864 he was drafted and attached to Company G, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry; in the army, during the winter, he contracted rheumatism, and was sent to the hospital, where he remained until July. After the close of the war he returned home to Charles City. Except what time he was in the war, he has been Constable ever since 1858. The first time he was elected he had failed of a nomination in caucus by a vote or two, and he ran independently, and yet was elected almost unanimously. In 1862 he was appointed Constable, the elected man not qualifying. He ran independently again in 1868, and was again elected. Mr. Fisher has done much for the interests of his community. In the way of fence-building he as done more than any other man in the county, and probably excels all in the neatness of his work. He has, by his business talent, accumulated considerable property and money, and is now independent and happy. Oct. 3, 1867, in Rockford, this county, he married Miss Mary Rudd, of Rockford, Ill., daughter of Joe M. and Miranda (Palmer) Rudd, her parents having been early settlers of Buffalo, N. Y. She is a member of the Christian church. Of their two children, Victoria E. is living, and Chester S. is deceased.

William Giermann, Page 742

Proprietor of the German meat market, Charles City, was born in Prenzlau, Prussia, Germany, July 19, 1845. His parents were Christian and Caroline (Haman) Giermann. They had a family of five sons and four daughters. William, subject of this memoir, was the youngest, and the only one in America. He attended school in Germany until fifteen, when he learned the butcher’s trade four years; then served three years as soldier in the cavalry of the German army, and in 1870 came to America. He brought his girl with him, and they landed in New York and were married at New Bremen, Cook County, Ill., June 7, 1870. She was born in Germany, and was a daughter of Gottlieb and Caroline (Schultz) Frabel. Mrs. Giermann’s maiden name was Emelia Frabel. In December, 1870, Mr. Giermann located in Charles City, and worked by the day at different work till 1864, when he began to work at the butcher’s trade, and in March, 1878,
Established his present market. Mr. and Mrs. Giermann are members of the German M.E. church, and have five children, viz.: Miss Ida, born July 24, 1882, John, born May 25, 1874; Miss Emma, born April 14, 1876; Miss Emelia, Feb. 13, 1879, and Lydia, born Oct. 14, 1881. Mr. Giermann is a member of the A. O. U. W., Charles City Lodge, No. 158. In politics, a Republican. He is one of the enterprising business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since December 1870. He built his present market-house in 1877, and it is the leading market in the city, and Mr. Giermann tries to please all his customers, and to that end buys the best the market affords. He also carries a fine stock of dried and smoked meats.

Geo. Gilbert Pages 742-743

Station agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, is a native of New York, and was born in Castile, Wyoming County, July 23, 1842; his parents were Seymour and Permelia (Mabie) Gilbert, natives of New York, and members of the Baptist church. He in early life was a hardware merchant and in after years engaged in farming. He moved from Wyoming County, N. Y. to Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., in 1846, where he died. He and wife had two sons and one daughter. Geo. E., subject of this sketch, was the second son; he lived in Winnebago County, Ill., on his father’s farm, attending school until twelve when he began to run on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, as newsboy. Subsequently rose to the position of brakeman, then baggage man. In February, 1874, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-third Illinois Infantry Volunteers and remained in the service until the close of the war, when he returned to Rockford, Ill., and opened a grocery store. Eighteen months later he sold out and engaged in railroading on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway until September 1869, when he came to Charles City, and began to work as freight agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, and was warehouseman operator and clerked for E. J. Gilbert, three years, when he was appointed agent at Garner, Hancock County, and remained two years; then took charge of the station at Algona one year, and was appointed agent at Charles City, where he has since remained. Mr. Gilbert married Miss Ada J. Halsted, at Rockford, Ill., October 22, 1866; she was born in New York, and was a daughter of Egbert and Ester (Kingsley) Halsted. Mrs. Gilbert is a member of the Congregational church. They have had three children, viz.: George H., Archer and Mabel I. Gilbert. Mr. Gilbert is one of the enterprising representative men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1869. In politics he is a Republican.

Samuel C. Goddard Pages 743 –744

Contractor and builder, and agent for the Domestic and Victor sewing machines, is a native of Michigan, and was born in Calhoun County, Oct. 26, 1829, he being the first white child born in this county. His father, Josiah Goddard, was born in Massachusetts, and when twenty-one years of age enlisted as Sergeant Major in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of Plattsburg. After the close of the war he went to Detroit, Mich., where he married Miss Hannah Luckett; soon after his marriage he removed to Calhoun County, Mich., and was one of the first settlers of this county. He and his wife had a family of sixteen children, eleven sons and five daughters. Samuel C., subject of this sketch was the third son, he worked on his father’s farm, attending school winters until fifteen, when he removed to Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., and one year later to Green County, Wis. They remained there and engaged in farming until October 1848, when they came to Fort Atkinson, Winneshiek County, Ia. In 1851 Samuel C. started out with fifty cents in his pocket to make his fortune, and located in Bradford, Chickasaw County, Ia. He worked at the carpenter’s trade and clerked in a store about a year, when he was elected County Clerk, he being the first to hold that office in the county. In March 1854, Mr. Goddard came to Charles City, Floyd County, Ia., and bought the general merchandise stock of Robert L. Freeman, the first store keeper in Charles City. Mr. Goddard built the first frame house in Charles City, the town was then called Freeman, and Mr. Freeman was the first Postmaster and Mr. Goddard the second. Mr. Goddard sold his store to John and William Ferguson in the spring of 1856, then built the Magnolia Hotel, which he conducted two years, when it burned down in the fire of Charles City; he then clerked in Lehmkuhl’s store ten years, since then he has worked at his trade, as carpenter and contractor, and engaged in the sale of sewing machines. Mr. Goddard married Miss Amanda Bigelow, at Waverly, Bremer County, Ia., July 16, 1857. She was born in Wyoming County, N.Y., and was a daughter of Julius and Philena (Dayton) Bigelow, natives of Connecticut; he was a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Goddard had five children, viz.: Cora, born April 26, 1858, wife of Harry A. Merrill (he is Cashier in the Rockford Bank, at Rockford, Ia.); Angie, born July 29, 1851; May, Sept. 21, 1863; Gladys, Feb. 22, 1865, and Guy A., March 8, 1867, who reside with their parents. Mr. Goddard is a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge. In politics he is a Republican. He is one of the oldest settlers, and is an enterprising representative citizen of Charles City, where he has been identified since March 1854.

E. J. Guilbert Pages 744 – 745

Ex-County Treasurer of Floyd County was born in Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., June 18, 1848, a son of Milo and Margaret (Palmer) Guilbert; he a native of Vermont, and she of Ohio. They had a family of six sons and four daughters. E. J., subject of this sketch, being the eldest, was but six years of age when he came with his parents to Charles City, Ia., where his father, with Dr. H.J. Palmer, purchased of Joseph Kelly half the town. He built the first frame house here. E. J. attended school and worked on a farm until eighteen, when he was employed as bookkeeper, at Prairie du Chien, Wis., for the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway; worked there two years when he was appointed the first station agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, at Charles City, and retained the position four years. He was then elected Deputy County Treasurer and held that office four years, when he purchased a farm of 160 acres, in St. Charles Township, where he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Guilbert married Miss Estella Merrill, at Charles City, May 4, 1870. She was born in Harmony, Me., and was a daughter of J.W. Merrill, an attorney at Rockford, Ia., and Sarah E. (Parsons) Merrill. Mr. and Mrs. Guilbert have three children, viz.: Roy M, born July 27, 1871; Lulie, Aug. 6, 1873; and Margaret, Dec. 9, 1876. Mr. Guilbert is a member of the Iowa Legion of Honor, and is one of the charter members of Hope Lodge, No. 76, and was president for one year. He was elected City Clerk of Charles City, for one year, and has held various local offices of trust. In politics, a Republican, and cast his first vote for Grant for President the second term. Mr. Guilbert is one of the pioneer children of Floyd County, and one of the enterprising, representative men of Floyd County, where he has been identified since fall, 1853. He is of Scotch and Irish descent.

William Hansberg Pages 745 – 746

Of the firm of Hansberg & Holbrook, is the oldest merchant in Floyd County, having been identified with the mercantile interests here since 1856. A native of Eckernfoerde, Schleswig, Germany. He was born July 2, 1833, son of John and Anna (Gerber) Hansberg, who were the parents of three children, of whom William is the eldest. His father died when he was four years of age, and he attended school in Germany until fifteen, then served a five years’ apprenticeship at a trade in the town of Bredstadt, Germany. In July 1855 he came alone to the United States; landed at New York after a forty-five days journey at sea. From New York he went to Lyons, Clinton County, Ia., where he clerked in a store and warehouse for the old firm of Burrows, Prettyman & Pearsall, and at Commanche until 1855, when Mr. Pearsall died and he went to Waverly, Bremer County, Ia., and clerked in a store for Hazlett & Co. until April 1856, when he came to Charles City with Rumpf, Lehmkuhl & Co., who built a dry goods store here, which they opened in June 1856 employing Mr. Hansberg as clerk. In 1859 Mr. Rumpf withdrew from the firm, and in 1862 Mr. Hansberg was taken into partnership. They established a branch store at Floyd, of which he was manager. In 1868 they closed the store at Floyd, and the business was conducted at Charles City, under the firm name of Lihmkuhl & Hansberg until the spring of 1876, when Mr. Hansberg purchased his partner’s interest, and conducted the business until March 1, 1879, and then formed his present partnership with Mr. W. E. Holbrook. They are the recipients of a firmly established trade, and are known throughout the county as men of irreproachable business integrity. Mr. Hansberg was married Aug. 30, 1863, to Theresa Merckel, who was born in Andernach, on the River Rhine, Germany, a daughter of Carl and Anna M. Merckel, nee Just. Four children blessed this union, viz.: Mary, Born May 31, 1864; Charles in November 1866; Emil, born Aug. 18, 1868, died Sept. 21, 1869; Ernst, born Aug. 27, 1878. Mr. Hansberg was elected County Supervisor in the fall of 1880, and still holds the office. He was the first Alderman and Treasurer elected in Charles City, and has held numerous other township offices. Politically he is independent, and he and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

A. M. Harrison Pages 746 – 749

A prominent lawyer of Charles City, and a member of the firm of Starr & Harrison, has been actively connected with the legal profession of Charles City since May 1870. A son of Charles Harrison of New Jersey, and Catherine, nee DeWitt of Ulster County, N. Y.; he was born on his father’s farm in what is now the city of Pit Hole, Pa., on Nov. 5, 1847. His parents were members of the Old School Presbyterian Church, in which his father was a Deacon many years. He attended school and assisted on the farm until 1862, when he with his father and brother, began operating in oil. He worked with them and attended the academy at Pleasantville, Pa., until 1865, when he removed, with his father, to Fredonia, N. Y. He entered the academy at that place, and graduated there in 1868. In the fall of that year he was matriculated in the law school at Ann Arbor, Mich., graduating in 1870, and was admitted to the Michigan Supreme Court bar in April of that year. He came at once to Charles City, where he established an office, and soon after was employed in the law office of Starr & Patterson, and in 1873 was taken into partnership. They continued to practice under the firm name of Starr , Patterson & Harrison until the death of Mr. Patterson, which occurred Oct. 29, 1878. Since then the firm has remained Starr & Harrison, On Aug. 13, 1873, at Silver Creek, N. Y., occurred the marriage of A. M. Harrison and Lizzie Chapin, daughter of Charles and Calista A. (Gage) Chapin. She was born in that city on Feb. 4, 1852. Two sons have blessed this union, viz.: Gage M., born March 21, 1875, and Merton E., Oct. 18, 1876. Mr. Harrison is a member of St. Charles Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 141. He was, too, elected City Attorney of Charles City three terms, and served as Justice of the Peace from 1871 to 1881.

Harwood & Mooney Page 750

Photographers, Charles City, Ia., is one of the city’s enterprising young firms. Though both are young men, the do some of the finest work in their line in the State.
The senior member of the firm, Burritt Harwood, is a native of Charles City, and was born Nov. 26, 1855. He received his early education here, attending the Charles City High School, and afterward the Academy of Design, Chicago.

John Arthur Mooney, was born in Rockford, Ill., Oct. 10, 1857, and came with his parents to Charles City in 1873. He learned the art of photography with J. E. Rich, with whom he remained seven years. He then went to Independence, Ia., and engaged in the photographic business a short time, but subsequently returned to this city and formed the present partnership, under the firm name of Harwood & Mooney.

Sanford Harwood Page 749

Dealer in boots and shoes, and manufacturer of harness, Charles City, is a native of New York, and was born at Hadley, Saratoga County, July 31, 1818. His parents were Jesse and Sarah (Scofield) Harwood. He was a native of Vermont, and farmer; she was a native of Massachusetts, and they had a family of four sons and four daughters. Sanford was the second son. When he was six years of age his father died. He then remained on the farm with his mother until seventeen, when he went to Chautauqua County, N. Y., and worked at the harness trade in Maysville two years; then went to Essex County and worked at Crown Point two years, then came to La Salle County, Ill., and located in the town of Lowell and farmed until spring of 1852 when he came to Independence, Buchanan County, Ia., where he purchased a farm, and farmed eighteen months, then in fall of 1854, came to Charles City and engaged in farming until 1863, when he established his present business. Mr. Harwood married Miss Keziah Dryer, Aug. 31, 1843, at Lowell, La Salle County, Ill. She was born in Seneca County, N. Y., and was a daughter of Chester Dryer and Susan (Hobro) Dryer. Mr. and Mrs. Harwood are members of Baptist church, and have had a family of eight children, four sons and one daughter living, viz.: James C., printer and editor of Wright County Monitor, at Clarion, Wright County, Ia.; Miss Susie M. Harwood; Burt E., photographer of Charles City; William S., of editorial staff of Dubuque Herald; and Frank E., engaged in business with his father. Mr. Harwood has been a member of the City Council, member of the School Board, and Township Trustee a number of years, and member of County Supervisors in 1860 – held this office two years. In politics, he is a Republican, and has always been a supporter of that party. He is one of the old settlers and enterprising representative men of Charles City, where he has been identified since fall of 1854.

William C. Hering, Page 750

Of the firm of Stevens & Hering, furniture manufacturers, Charles City, is a native of Mecklenburgh-Schwerin, Germany, born Oct 12, 1838, the only son of William and Sophia (Oden) Hering, likewise of German birth. They were members of the Lutheran church. William C. attended school in Germany until his fourteenth year, when he immigrated with his parents to the United States, locating in Cincinnati, O. Two years later they removed to Milwaukee, Wis., where W. C. learned and followed the chair maker’s trade until 1869, when he came to Charles City, and in the company with E. J. Fisher and W. E. Elkins established a furniture factory at this place. In 1870, Mr. Parkhurst became a partner, and July 1871 he sold his interest to Mr. Stevens, one of the present proprietors. In October 1874, the company bought out Mr. Elkins, and the firm has since remained Steves, Hering & Co. The subject of this memoir was married Feb. 8, 1866, to Dora Stelling of Washington, Wis. Seven children have blessed their married life, of whom six are living – Hattie M., Jennie, Carrie, Lulu, Arwin and Ida. Arthur died in infancy. Mr. Hering is a prominent member of National Lodge, No. 165, I. O. O. F., and in politics is a strong supporter of the Republican party.

S. R. Hewitt, M.D. Pages 750-751

Has been prominently identified with the medical, profession of Floyd County since 1869, a son of Samuel B. and Elmina Hewitt, nee Tucker. He was born in Middlebury, Wyoming County, N.Y., July 22, 1839.

S. R. was the eldest of a family of four children, and when he was six years old his parents moved to Sharon, Wis., and two years later to Fond du Lac. His father settled upon a farm near by, and S. R. assisted on the farm and attended school during the winter months, until twenty years of age, when he entered the Baraboo Wis. Institute. He spent one term in that institute, then taught school and studied medicine until his twenty-fourth year, when he went to Brandon, Wis., and continued the study of medicine under
Dr. B. F. Dodson, three years. He then became a student in Rush Medical College, at Chicago, from which he graduated in 1867. He at once located at Berlin, Wis, in the practice of his profession, and shortly afterward went to Waupun, Wis., where he practiced two years, then removed to Nora Springs, Floyd County, Ia. In June 1881 he came to Charles City, where he as since remained. He was married at Alto, Wis. On Oct. 30, 1867, to Alice E. Talcott, who was born at Kenosha, Wis., and was a daughter of Gilbert and Mary (Larabee) Talcott, natives of New York. Their union has been blessed with one child, a daughter, Alice B., born April 25, 1871. Dr. Hewitt is a Mason and a prominent member of St. Charles Lodge, No. 141. In politics he is a Republican. During the time he was at Rush Medical College, Dr. Hewitt was the assistant of Prof. E. L. Holmes, of the Eye and Ear Infirmary of Chicago, two years. He makes a specialty of surgery, and has successfully operated on many difficult and complicated cases. He was surgeon for the G., C. R. & N. R. R. six years, and during the war was selected from the medical college as assistant surgeon of the Marine Hospital, where he remained three years and gained a thorough knowledge of this department of his profession.

William E. Holbrook Pages 751 – 752

Junior member of the firm of Hansberg & Holbrook was born in Masonville, Canada East, Dec. 11, 1841. His parents were Abram and Azubah Holbrook, nee Perkins, the former a native of Vermont, the latter of Canada. They had a family of seven children; five lived to maturity. In 1852 the family moved to Freeport, Ill., where they remained until 1855, then came to Floyd County, Ia., settling on a farm of 400 acres in Floyd Township, which the eldest son had entered in 1854. William E. assisted on this farm and attended school until nineteen years old, when he taught school here two terms, then visited the home of his boyhood and Vermont with his mother and sister, where he taught school and worked on a farm until the spring of 1864, when he returned to Floyd. In June of that year he commenced clerking for Lehmkuhl & Hansberg, and came with them to Charles City in 1868. He was clerk and bookkeeper until 1879, when he was taken into partnership. On Feb. 27, 1880, he married Mathilda Kellogg, who was born in Ohio, and was a daughter of John and Rachael Kellogg, nee Shelly, who settled in Charles City in 1854. Their union has been blessed with two children – Eugene W., born Dec. 3, 1870, and Cora G., Aug. 30, 1872. Mr. Holbrook is a member of Charles City Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; also Almond Chapter. He has taken all the degrees of the I. O. O. F. Encampment. He was elected City Treasurer in March 1882, and still retains the office. He has always been a strong adherent to the principals of the Republican party. His father died her on Nov. 6, 1859, and his mother is residing with her son, the subject of this memoir.

John Howard Pages 753 – 754

Retired farmer and grain dealer was born in Lawrence County, Ind., May 31, 1820, a son of Elbert and Phebe (McNeal) Howard, the former a native of Georgia, the latter of Kentucky. They were members of the Methodist church, and the parents of seven children. In 1834 the family moved to Illinois and settled in Kane County. In 1840 the subject of this memoir left home to make his own way in the world. He went to Waukegan, Lake County, Ill., and was there married, Jan. 16, 1848, to Harriet M. Gould, who was born in Utica, N. Y., March 8, 1819, a daughter of Louis and Nancy Gould, nee Hickox. Her father was a native of Massachusetts, her mother of New York. They were Methodists in their religious views, and were members of that church over fifty years. After his marriage Mr. Howard followed his trade, that of a furniture manufacturer, in Waukegan, until April 1854, when he cam to Charles City and opened the first cabinet-makers shop in the county. The machinery in his shop was run by horse-power, and he made the first chair and brought the first lathe into the county. He continued in this business five years, then purchased a farm in St. Charles Township, which he cultivated until July 1864, when he sold it and returned to Charles City. He engaged in grain and other business here until 1872 and since then has lived a retired life, having accumulated an ample competency for the support of his declining years. Mr. Howard and wife, Newman Dutcher and wife, and Mrs. John Kellogg organized the first church in Charles City, and their first meeting was held in an unfinished log barn, the sermon being preached by Rev. John Ball. Mr. and Mrs. Howard have been faithful and active workers in the church since that time, and he has served as Trustee and Steward many years. They have had two sons, both now deceased, viz.: Louis Gould, born April 20, 1849, died Aug. 20, 1851, and John Gould, born Sept. 19, 1852, died May 14, 1853. Mr. Howard can truly be classed with the pioneers and representative men of Floyd County, and his works for the good of the city will live after him, “By their works ye shall know them.”

H. S. Howard Pages 752 – 753

Of the Boss Harrow Company, is one of the leading business men of Charles City, and was born at Saline, Mich., Aug. 4, 1842; he was the son of Rufus, whose ancestors were English. Rufus was born at Utica, N.Y., Dec. 22, 1817. He was a physician. He moved from New York State to Michigan, where he married Ann Cook, Nov. 27, 1839. In the fall of 1846 he moved to Cottage Grove, Wis. He died June 4, 1857, after an illness of seven days. He had an extensive practice as a physician, and was worn out by his zealous labors. His wife, Mrs. Ann Howard, died at the residence of her son, H. S. Howard, at Floyd, Ia., Thanksgiving Day, November 1876. She and husband had a family of three sons and three daughters.

H. S., W. P. and Murtie, who resides with her brother, H. S. Howard, subject of this sketch; he was the eldest. He enlisted, Aug. 29, 1861, in the Third Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery, for three years, and was discharged in October 1864. He served under Generals Buel, Rosecrans and Grant at the battle of Chickamauga, and was taken prisoner with ten other members of the battery, along with the guns, and taken to Richmond, thence to Libby Prison; and Nov. 28, 1863, they were moved to Danville, Va., and Nov. 29, 1863, took leg bail for Uncle Sam’s land, and after a tramp of thirty days and nights through the rebel country and over the Blue Ridge and Alleghany mountains, he reached the Union lines at Camp Fayette, W. Va. After a weeks rest in camp he visited his home, and returned to his command at Chattanooga, and after his discharge he went to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and attended the Eastman’s Business College, from which he graduated. He then visited some friends in New Jersey, then took a position her as bookkeeper in the store of J. L…… . Finding confinement in the store imperious to his health, he decided to return to his home in the west. In 1868 began to sell farm machinery, which business has been followed with very little intermission, until the manufacturing of “Boss Harrow” has compelled the cessation of all other interests. Mr. Howard moved from Janesville, Wis., to Floyd County, Ia., October 1874 and in a few months began to sell farm machinery at Floyd, and in the spring of 1876 manufactured a few “Scotch Harrows,” for retail trade, and made to harrows of an entirely new pattern, a harrow patent by John E. Perkins, formerly of Verona, Wis. Mr. Howard made about sixty of these, and called them the “Boss Harrow,” because all who used them called them the “Boss.” These were made in 1876. A further account of this enterprise, under the firm of the “Boss Harrow Company,” has been given on a preceding page.

Charles Kelly Page 754

For whom the town of Charles City was named, is a son of Joseph Kelly, a native of Ohio, and Malinda, nee Rader, of Virginia. Joseph Kelly came to Floyd County in 1856, and laid out the town of Charles City, naming it for his son, and built the first saw mill in the county. They had a family of ten children, six living – Charles, Melvina, wife of Christopher Martin, of Monroe, Wis.; Jane, wife of F. O. McCallister, a resident of Charles City; Harriet, widow of Chas. H. Haskell, is residing with her mother and conducts a milliner shop in Charles City; Mary, wife of D. W. Carver, editor of the Dubuque Herald, and Joseph, Jr., a musician and band leader in Buena Vista, Cal. The subject of this memoir was born in Monroe, Green County, Wis., Feb. 28, 1838, and was there reared and educated. In 1855, at the age of seventeen, he came to Charles City to join his father, and helped haul the machinery for his father’s mill from Galena, Ill. He worked in the mill until his marriage to Ida Wrisley, which occurred Oct. 19, 1870. She was born in Rutland, Vt. In 1874 Mr. Kelly went to Oakland, Cal., where he was employed in the marble works until December, 1881, when he returned to Charles City, where he has since resided. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly have one child, a son, William F., born Nov. 19, 1873. Mrs. Kelly is a member of the Congregational church. He is politically a Democrat, and is known as one of the old settlers and representative citizens of Charles City.

John Kuck Pages 754 – 755

Dealer in leather findings, saddles, hardware, buffalo robes, horse blankets, etc., Charles City, Ia., is a native of Germany, and was born near the city of Bremen, Prussia, Dec. 5, 1836. His parents were Henry and Anna (Gerken) Kuck, also natives of Germany. They had a family of eight children, seven sons and one daughter. John, subject of this sketch, was the third son, and the oldest now living. He attended school in Germany and farmed until sixteen, and then came alone to America; landed at Baltimore, Md., after being eight weeks at sea. He went to Wheeling, Va., and two months after to Marietta, Ohio, where he learned the harness maker’s trade and resided until twenty, the went to Le Sure, Minn. He was partner in a store of general merchandise there one year, then sold out and went to Galena, Ill., and worked at his trade until 1860, when he opened a harness shop at Lansing, Ia., and engaged in business here until 1864, when he came to Charles City, Ia., and established his present business. Mr. Kuck married Mary Meyer at Galena, Ill., June 1, 1860. She was born in Switzerland. They are members of the M. E. church, and have had a family of seven children, two living, viz.; Henry L., born Dec. 1, 1862; George W., born Dec. 14, 1868. Both work with their father in the harness shop. The mother died May 30, 1879, and Mr. Kuck married Lizzie Brandon April 22, 1880, at Charles City. She was born in Cook County, Ill., and was a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Sibbel) Brandon. They have one daughter – Bertha A. C., born Feb. 10, 1881. Mr. Kuck, in politics, is a Republican. He is one of the oldest harness makers and business men of Floyd County and Charles City, having been identified with this city since July 1864. He was a member of the Council of Charles City one year from Second Ward. He was one of the first members of the German M. E. church, which is now the Charles City District, embracing many counties, which was one of the first to organize the church in this city.

William M. Langstaff Pages 755 – 756

Blacksmith, Charles City, was born in Montrose, Susquehanna County, Pa., Oct. 22, 1830, a son of John and Rachel Langstaff, nee Bush, the former of English birth, the latter born in the Keystone State. They were the parents of nine children, William being the third son. His father died when he was eight years old, and he continued to reside on the farm with his mother until 1839, when the family moved to Brooklyn, Pa., where he learned the blacksmith’s trade. In 1852 he went to Rockford, Ill., remaining there working at his trade one year, then went to Janesville, Wis., where he was married Jan. 31, 1854, to Margaret Warn, a native of Jacksonville, N. J., and a daughter of James M. and Margaret (Burlew) Warn, likewise natives of New Jersey, and the parents of six children. Mr. and Mrs. Langstaff had a family of three sons, two living – Will Leslie, born Dec. 5, 1855, at Janesville Wis., is a merchant at Belmont, Ia., and Henry L., born in Charles City, July 31, 1860, is a printer at Stanton Pa., Clarence, born Nov. 25, 1858, died Sept. 25, 1859. After his marriage Mr. Langstaff resided in Janesville until the spring of 1856, when he came to Charles City, where he established a blacksmith shop, and has remained since. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, Charles City Lodge, No. 165. Politically he is a Democrat. He is one of the oldest blacksmiths now living in the county, having opened a shop her in 1856.

Jacob Leonard Page 756

Proprietor of the Leonard Hotel, Charles City was born near Bedford, Lawrence County, Ind., Dec. 12, 1819, a son of Henry and Martha (Raims) Leonard, natives of North Carolina. They had a family of thirteen children, eleven of who lived to maturity. When Jacob was about two years old his parents removed to Monroe County, Ind., and settled on a farm. He was reared and educated at that place, and was married there on Dec. 20, 1843, to Catharine Berkey, who was born in Valonia, Jackson County, Ind., a daughter of Henry and Margaret (Iseminger) Berkey. Of nine children born of this union, eight are living – William H., editor and proprietor of the Rock County Recorder, at Janesville, Wis.; Margaret A., wife of William Ganges; Mary E., wife of Charles Leaman; N. Kate, wife of Joseph Flannigan; E. Hattie, who is cashier in a store at Janesville, Wis., L. Agnes, who is a printer; Ester E. and Clara A. After his marriage Mr. Leonard farmed in Monroe County, Ind., until 1843, then taught school two years, and in 1845 went to Doe Prairie, where he farmed and taught until 1847, when he went to Green County, Wis., continuing in the same occupations there. In the spring of 1856, he came to Charles City, moving his family here the following year. He farmed, teamed and engaged in draying until 1875, then opened a grocery store, which he sold a short time afterward, and bought the Cleveland House. In October 1879 he built his present hotel, which is a two story building, containing fifteen sleeping rooms, parlors, dining room, office and kitchen, all fitted up in good style. Mr. Leonard shows his guests every attention and is a popular landlord. He was elected Justice of the Peace for two years, but resigned the office before the expiration of his term. Politically he is a strong supporter of the Republican party.

Milton Martin, Page 756 –757

Proprietor of the “Central Market.” Charles City, is a native of New York, born in Oneida County, June 9, 1840. His parents were Ebenezer and Mercy (Doty) Martin, also natives of New York, and members of the M. E. church. They had a family of five children, two sons and three daughters. Martin, subject of this sketch, was the eldest son. When five years of age he removed, with his parents, to Winnebago County, Wis., where his father settled on a farm. They resided there four years, then moved into Ripon, Wis., where Martin attended school until fourteen, then worked with his father in the market until 1855, when he went to Wautoma, Washara County, Wis., and ran a hotel eighteen months. Subsequently returned to Ripon, and in the spring of 1858 went overland with a party to Pike’s Peak and mined and prospected until fall, when he returned to Ripon, and removed with his father to Washara County, Wis., and farmed until the outbreaking of the late war, when he enlisted in Company F, First Wisconsin Cavalry, in spring of 1862, as a private, and was first appointed Sergeant, then First Lieutenant, and afterward Captain of the company, remaining until the close of the war, when he was mustered out a Nashville, Tenn. He returned to Ripon and embarked in the market business. He was married to Miss Mercy A. Eggleston, at Ripon, May 7, 1866. She was born in Wisconsin and was the daughter of Giles and Catherine (Bullis) Eggleston, natives of New York. After his marriage, on Oct. 31, 1866, Mr. Martin located in Charles City, and established his present market. They have been members of the First M. E. Church of Charles City for the past ten years, and have had six children, viz.: Andrew, Cora, George, Ebenezer, Earl and Ellinor. Mr. Martin is a member of the A. O. U. W. and V. A. fraternities of Charles City. In politics he is a strong Republican, and voted for the amendment in 1882, and was the first Prohibitionist elected in the City Council, and is now serving his fourth year. He is one of the old residents and enterprising representative citizens and business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1866. He is of English and German descent. His great-grandfather was Captain on an English man-of-war ship in the Revolutionary war.

Carl Merckel, Sr., Pages 757 – 758

Of the firm of Merckel & Son, hardware, Charles City, was born in Andernach, Prussia, German, Oct. 19, 1812, a son of Elias and Theresa Merckel, nee Kerig. Carl attended school and college until thirteen years of age when he began learning the tinner’s trade with his father, continuing with him three years. He then traveled in Holland, Belgium, France and German, until twenty; then worked with his father at Andernach until 1838, and on June 10 of that year he was untied in marriage with Anna Marie Just, a native of Andernach, and a daughter of John just, who had charge of a forest in Germany. After his marriage Mr. Merckel worked at his trade in his native place, until 1852, when he came to America; landed at New York City, after a fifty-two day’s journey. He worked in Albany, Rochester and Buffalo, New York, until 1854, when he came West, locating in Decorah, Ia., where he established the first tin shop in that city. One year later he removed to St. Paul, Minn., thence to Dubuque, Ia., where he resided until August 1856, when he settled in Charles City, and in 1857 he sent to German for his family. He was employed in the first tin shop in this county, operated by Ferguson & Stanley until 1858, when he opened a shop of his own. He was burned out in 1862, and then built his present store. Mr. and Mrs. Merckel have been blessed with nine children, three living – Theresa, wife of Wm. Hansberg, and old settler and merchant of Charles City; Carl, Jr.; and Maggie. Carl, Jr., was born in Andernach, July 2, 1844, and attended school there until thirteen years of age when he came to Charles City, and when fourteen learned the tinner’s trade with his father, and in 1870 formed his present partnership with him. He married Gracie F. Davidson, at Charles City, Sept. 19, 1870. She was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was a daughter of Donald Davidson and Marion L., nee Brown, who were likewise of Scottish birth, and emigrated to America in 1855, settling in Floyd County, Ia., in 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Merckel, Jr., have had two children, - Carl D., born June 13, 1880, and Clyde, born Aug. 21, 1871, died Oct. 27, 1879. Mr. Merckel, Jr., was elected Mayor of Charles City in 1880, and held the office one year. He has been a member of the City Council seven years. Father and son are both strong supporters of the Republican party, and are classed with prominent and enterprising business men of Charles City.

George Wilhelm Meyer Pages 758 – 759

The oldest and leading clothier and merchant-tailor in Charles City, has been prominently identified with the business interest of this city since 1868. A son of John and Marie (Zimmerman) Meyer. He was born Jan. 6, 1838, in the village of Sumte, Prussia, Germany. He was the eldest son of a family of five daughters and two sons, and after receiving a practical business education in his native town, went to Neubans where he was apprenticed to the tailor’s trade; when twenty years of age, having become proficient in his trade, he went to Hamburg, and two years later emigrated to the United States, accompanied by his sister, Mrs. John Pertzborm. He located in Madison, Wis., where he obtained employment at his trade. He was married there on Apr. 7, 1862, to Marie Schneider, who was born in Switzerland, a daughter of John J. and Maria Schneider, nee Speich. Mr. Meyer resided in Madison until 1867, when he removed to Boscobel, Wis., remaining there until 1868, and then came to Charles City. He at once established his present business, and has met with deserved success, being known throughout the county as a man of irreproachable business integrity. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer have ten children, viz.: Wilhelm G. H., working in his father’s tailoring establishment; Paulina, George W., Amelia, Louisa, Wilhelmina, Mary, Matilda, Henrietta and Cora. Politically Mr. Meyer was formerly a Republican, but of late has been rather independent, voting for principle rather than party.

Miles Brothers Pages 759 – 760

W. F. and H. F. Miles, druggists, and dealers in paints, oils, wall-paper and stationery. This is one of the oldest and leading business houses of Charles City, and was established in 1858, by Dr. J. W. Smith and C. W. Atkinson, Mr. W. F. and H. F. Miles becoming proprietors in 1868, and they have increased their business, and enlarged their store from time to time, until they now occupy a three-story building, 120 feet deep by 22 feet wide, with a basement, and they carry a full and complete stock of imported and domestic goods. W. F. and H. F. Miles were born in Franklin, Delaware County, N. Y. W. F. was born Sept. 23, 1840, and H. F., Nov. 28, 1832. They were sons of Levi and Emily (Boyd) Miles, he a native of Connecticut and she of Massachusetts. They were members of the M. E. church, and had a family of four sons and four daughters. W. F. Miles attended school, working on his father’s farm until he began teaching school; taught winters and worked on the farm summers, until twenty, when he attended the Commercial College, at Binghamton, N.Y., where he graduated one year after. He then resided at Beloit, Wis., until the outbreaking of the late Rebellion, when he returned home to New York, and enlisted in Company A, Thirteenth New York Infantry and heavy Artillery; was shot through the right foot at the battle in front of Pittsburg, Pa., and laid in the hospital suffering from fever and his wound, and came near losing his life from exposure and neglect. He was found three days after being wounded, by Dr. Tennant, a surgeon, who proved to be a brother-in-law to Mr. Miles’ brother, H. F. Miles. Through the effort of Dr. Tennant, Mr. Miles’ life and limb was saved. At the close of the war Mr. Miles returned to Deposit, N. Y., and was appointed Principal of the Deposit Military Academy for one year; he then clerked for eighteen months in a drug store at Deposit, then came West to Waterloo, Ia., and clerked in a dry-goods store one year, and then located in Charles City. Mr. Miles married Miss Estella Corson, at Waterloo, Ia., Sept. 8, 1870. She was born in Ohio, and was a daughter of Charles and Maria (Britton) Corson. Mr. Miles is a member of the M. E. church, and Mrs. Miles a member of the Baptist church. They have two children, viz.: Miss Carry and Charles L. Miles. Mr. Miles is a charter member of I. O. O. F. and A. O U. W. lodges. Mr. Miles, during the war, was in the battles of Weldon R. R., City Point, Spring Valley and eighteen days in the battle of the Wilderness, and at the battles and skirmishes of the regiment. He was once taken prisoner by the Mosby’s guerrillas; while carrying dispatches, his horse threw him and ran down the road, and was met by a company of cavalry, who returned and recaptured him from the guerrillas, before they read his dispatches. Mr. H. F. Miles was also in the late war. He enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Forty-fourth New York Infantry Volunteers, and remained in the service until the close of the war, and was promoted Second Lieutenant; was in the siege and capture of Fort Sumter, the Peninsula campaign and at Gettysburg, and all the battles of the regiment. Mr. H. F. Miles married Miss Mary A. Hanford, Oct. 4, 1869. She was born at Rome, Oneida County, N. Y. and was a daughter of George W. and Jane (Phillips) Hanford. Mr. Miles is a member of the Congregational church, and Mrs. Miles a member of the M. E. church. They have had two children, viz.: Fred H. and Clarence W. Fred died May 5, 1879, aged eight years. Mr. H. F. Miles is a Mason and a member of St. Charles Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 141, and A. O. U. W. lodge, of Charles City. Messrs. W. F. and H. F. Miles are leading business men, and representative citizens of Charles City, where they have been in business since 1868.

George P. Morris Pages 760 – 761

Treasurer of Floyd County, is a native of Wisconsin, born in Racine, March 27, 1843, a son of Roswell Morris (an native of Vermont) and Rowena, nee Goodwin, born in New Hampshire. Roswell Morris was a merchant, and in 1852 he removed with his family, which consisted of his wife and two sons, viz.: Julius R. and George P., to De Pere, thence to Green Bay, Wis. George P. was educated in his native city and in Green Bay, and in 1857 left home, and started out to fight life’s battles for himself, going to New York City, and engaging as clerk in a wholesale hardware house at that place. In April 1861, he enlisted in the Eight New York National Guards Infantry Volunteers, that being one of the first troops ordered to Washington. He enlisted for three months as a private, and was promoted to the rank of Commissary Sergeant of the regiment. He served three months, then returned to Green Bay, and in the fall of 1861 enlisted in Company H, Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry Volunteers, and remained with them until January, 1862, when he was transferred to the Second Wisconsin Cavalry as a Battalion Commissary Sergeant, remaining in the service until the fall of 1862, when he received an honorable discharge, at Helena, Ark. He returned to his old home in Wisconsin, and soon after was commissioned First Lieutenant of the Duryea, New York, Zouaves, and prepared again for service, but was compelled to remain at home, on account of illness. In the winter of 1862, he went to Sparta, Wis., for his health, and after recuperating a few months, went to La Crosse, where he clerked until 1868; then came to Charles City, Ia., and established a news depot, and also dealt in fancy notions. In January 1872, he was appointed Deputy Treasurer of Floyd Count, retaining the position until May of that year, when he received the appointment of United States Express Agent, and in 1878 was appointed agent for the American Express Company. He held the positions until the fall of 1881, when he was elected to his present position, being nominated by acclamation, and receiving the almost unanimous vote of the county. Mr. Morris was married July 9, 1866, to Julia A. Ely, who was born in Cleveland, O., a daughter of Lyman and Almira Ely, nee Kent. They have had six children – Bessie R., born Jan. 11, 1868; Daisy M., July 21, 1873; M. Louisa, Oct. 12, 1876; Emma M., June 9, 1878; George R., July 19, 1880; and Julia A., deceased. Mr. Morris has held many of the city offices, and in each instance has shown himself to be eminently fitted to hold public positions of trust. He is a member of the Iowa Legion of Honor, of which he is Treasurer. Politically, he is a Republican.

Julius P. North Pages 761 – 763

Tinner and dealer in stoves and general hardware, was born in Angelica, Allegany County, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1834. He was a son of Geo. B. and Julia (Perrine) North. The former was a native of Vermont and he as a son of Noah North, whose father came from England and settled in Connecticut. Noah North’s family consisted of five sons and two daughters, viz.: Henry P., tinsmith of Geneseo, N. Y.; William, gunsmith at Hartford, Conn., Albert, tinsmith, who died at Geneseo, N.Y., George B., tin an coppersmith; Charles A., tinsmith at Wyoming, N. Y., and Olive and Laura. The former died at Angelica, N.Y. Noah emigrated to Geneseo, N. Y. with his family, and his son Geo. B., father of Julius P., subject of this sketch, early showed a fondness for the water by building small water crafts. He worked at the tinner’s and coppersmith’s trade until twenty-two, when he made two cruises in the war ship “Brandywine” for four years, then went to Buffalo, N. Y., where he worked at his trade and owned property. On a visit to Geneseo he met and afterward married Miss Julia Perrine; married May 1831. She was a daughter of Jeremiah and Hannah (Wright) Perrine. Her father served in the Revolutionary war, and for his meritorious services his wife received a pension; she outlived him a number of years and finally died at Ovid, N. Y. Her daughter, Hannah Perrine, grandmother of Julius P. North, was born at Hebron, Conn., and emigrated to Geneseo, N.Y., in 1827, and died at Angelica in 1854, aged seventy-six years. She and husband had a family of two sons and three daughters, viz.: Thomas, Julius, Julia, Eveline and Emeline Perrin. Geo. B. and Julia (Perrine) North, parents of Julius P., had a family of four sons and two daughters, Viz.: Alford, Julius P., Mary J. Eveline, George and George second; the last two died in infancy. Mary J. died at Geneseo, Feb. 26, 1879, aged forty-five; the rest are living. Julius P., subject of this sketch, was the second son. He attended school until thirteen, when he learned the tinner’s trade with his uncle, Henry P. North, until nineteen. Julius then came to Chicago and worked at his trade two years, then came to Jacksonville, Chickasaw County, Ia., and located land and worked here and in Elkader, Clayton County, until 1866, when he came to Charles City and established his present business. Mr. North married Miss Carrie M. Updike, at Jacksonville, Ia., Jan. 26, 1858. She was born in Westfield, N.Y. and was a daughter of William and Mercy (Loveless) Updike, he of New Jersey and she of New York. Mr. and Mrs. North are members of the M. E. church and they have been members of this church for the past twenty-two years. Mr. North is Class Leader in the First M. E. Church of Charles City. He and wife have had three sons and one daughter, viz.: Earl J., born Nov. 3, 1859, Miss Hattie M., born Sept. 2, 1862; Henry P., born Nov. 12, 1865, and George F., born Sept. 12, 1870. Mr. North is one of the leading manufacturers and business men of Charles City. In politics, a Republican, and he has always been a strong advocate of temperance, having voted the Iowa prohibitory law in 1855, and also voted the amendment prohibiting the sale and manufacture of intoxicating liquors in 1882.

A. E. Palmer Pages 763 – 764

An old settler and farmer, residing in Charles City, is a native of Illinois, and was born in Aurora, Kane County, July 27, 1841, a son of Dr. N. H. and Miranda (Isball) Palmer, who where members of the M. E. church. He was a native of Vermont, and immigrated to New York, where he was married. In 1835 he moved to Aurora, Ill., where he practiced medicine until the spring of 1854, when he came to Bremer County, Ia., and the fall of that year located in Charles City. In company with Milo Gilbert he bought a half interest in Charles City and the water-power of Joseph Kelly. Dr. Palmer practiced medicine in Charles City until his death, which occurred Oct. 9, 1872, aged seventy-five years and one day. He was married four times. He first married Miss Samantha Blair, Nov. 17, 1825; they had one son and three daughters; three daughters living, viz.: Martha, wife of Wm. D. Smith, a farmer of Rockford, Floyd County; Margaret, wife of Milo Gilbert, of Nora Springs; Mary, wife of George Squires, of Ohio. The mother died Jan. 10, 1835. Dr. Palmer then married Miranda Isball, Nov. 19, 1835. The fruit of this marriage was five children, one son and four daughters, two living, viz.: Malinda, wife of John Howland, residing on a farm at Blue Earth City, Minn., and A. E. Palmer, subject of this sketch. The mother died April 8. 1848. She was a member of the M. E. church. Dr. Palmer then married Miss N. Rhodes, April 29, 1849. They had one daughter, viz.: Eva, wife of Henry McGowen; they reside at Clear Lake, Ia. The mother died Oct. 27, 1856. Dr. Palmer married Mrs. Jane Howland, March 12, 1857, Her maiden name was Lowell. They had one daughter – Eugenia, wife of a Mr. West. A. E. Palmer, subject of this memoir, in 1854, came with his parents to Charles City, and attended school until seventeen, when he began farming, and bought land, which he still owns. He married Miss Alice Stahl, at Panora, Ia., Nov. 27, 1873. She was born in Ohio, and was a daughter of Harmon and Mary (Moffitt) Stahl; he of Pennsylvania and she of Ohio. They were members of the M. E. church, and had a family of two sons and two daughters. After his marriage Mr. Palmer settled on his farm, where they still reside, in the suburbs of Charles City. Mrs. Palmer is a member of the Baptist church. They have a family of four children, viz.: N. Harmon, born Oct. 10, 1874; M. Miranda, Aug. 31, 1877; J. Elston, Aug. 30, 1879, and Irwing S., Sept. 15, 1881. Mr. Palmer owns thirty-eight acres of land inside of city corporation and three lots and his residence. He is one of the old settlers of Floyd County, where he has been identified since 1854. There was but one frame house in Charles City when he cam, and his sister, Mrs. Malinda Howland, taught the first school in Charles City. In politics Mr. Palmer is a Republican, and was formerly a member of it I. O. O. F. He is one of the enterprising representative men of Charles City.

William M. Palmer, M. D. Pages 764 – 765

Charles City, was born in Lincolnville, then Hancock, now Waldo County, Mr., on Jan. 23, 1809. He was the second son of a family of eleven children, born of Nathaniel and Susan (Pendleton) Palmer, the former a native of Massachusetts, the latter of Maine. He lived on his father’s farm and attended school until twenty years of age, when he left the paternal roof to make his own way in the world, going to Somerset County, Me., where he engaged in farming and studied medicine until 1857, and then engaged in the practice of his profession. He was untied in marriage with Ann Shaw, at Palmyra, on Sept. 29, 1833. She was born in Winthrop, Me., a daughter of S. C. and Rachael Shaw, nee Sinkler. Of eight children, born of this union four are living – Maria, married W. D. Balch, a banker of Charles City; L. G., engaged in mining in Missouri; Mary E., wife of Judge Reiniger, banker of Charles City; Bina S., wife of Alford Wood, a merchant at Gallasen, Col. J. R., the eldest son, enlisted in the First Illinois Cavalry, and was killed at the battle of Lexington, Mo., while bravely defending his country’s cause; Le Roy was a drummer boy in the Twenty-first Maine Infantry, and died in the hospital at City Point, VA.., Eveline died in Palmyra, Me., aged fourteen years and ten months, and Kate, wife of L. H. Cheney, died in Charles City, aged twenty years and ten months. Dr. Palmer located in Charles City, in March 1865, and has been engaged in active practice here since, and has met with flattering success. He is a Mason and a prominent member of the St. Charles Lodge, No. 141; is also a member of the chapter. He has served as a member of the City Council, and while a resident of Palmyra was elected to many public positions of trust, being elected to the office of Legislator in 1848. Politically he was formerly a Jackson Democrat, but since the organization of the Republican party has been one of its strongest supporters. Dr. Palmer came of English ancestry and is a descendant of two brothers of that name, who came over on the “Mayflower.”

E. L. Pease Page 765

Manufacturer of fine buggies, carriages and wagons, Charles City, established his factory here in the spring of 1865. He employs first-class workmen, including wagon-makers, carriage painters, trimmers and blacksmiths. He is prepared to first-class work, which he warrants. This is one of the leading manufactories of Charles City. Mr. Pease was born in Colesville, Broome County, N. Y., March 9, 1832. His parents were Isaac and Hannah (Clark) Pease, who were natives of Massachusetts, and members of the M. E. church. They had a family of three sons and two daughters. E. L., subject of this memoir, was the youngest, and when three years of age, in 1835, he removed with his parents to Hancock County, Ill., and one year after removed with his parents to Chautauqua County, N. Y., and attended school and worked on a farm until nineteen, when he began to work at the carriage-maker’s trade. One year after they went to Hume, Allegany County, for two and a half year; thence to Jamestown two years, then at Ripon Wis., where he worked until spring of 1865, when he came to Charles City and established his present business. Mr. Pease married Miss Catherine Webster at Poplar Grove, Boone County, Ill., June 18, 1862. She was born in New York, and was a daughter of N. S. Webster, lumber and coal dealer at Poplar Grove, Ill. Mrs. Pease is a member of the Baptist church, and she and husband have two sons and one daughter, viz.: Frank N., and Fred E., born May 16, 1863, working in the carriage factory with their father, and Miss Anna M., born in Charles City, Dec. 2, 1865; she resides with her parents. Mr. Pease is one of the enterprising business men of Charles City, where he has resided since 1865. In politics he is a Republican, and he is of English descent.

Nathan Phelps Pages 765 – 766

Manufacturer of wagons, carriages and buggies, and dealer in all kinds of agricultural implements, is one of the leading manufacturers of Charles City. He was born in Pembrokeshire, Wales, Oct. 31, 1845, and was a son of William and Martha (Hodges) Phelps, who have a family of five sons and five daughters. Nathan being the youngest son. When eight years of age he came with his parents to America; landed in New York City, and located in Chicago, Ill., where he remained one year; then moved to Lake County, Ill., and in 1857 came to Decorah, Ia., where he learned the blacksmith and wagon-maker’s trade, and in 1868 came to Charles City, and established his present agricultural business; in 1873 he began the manufacture of wagons, carriages, etc. Mr. Phelps married Miss Emma E. Stearns, Dec. 9, 1869; she was born in Lake County, Ill., a daughter of John Stearns. Mrs. Phelps is a member of the Congregational church. They have had a family of two daughters and one son, viz.: Fred, Bertha and Veara. Mr. Phelps is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, Charles City lodge and chapter. In politics, he has always been a supporter of the Republican party. He is one of the enterprising manufacturers and business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1868.

E. A. Reiniger Pages 767 – 768

Sheriff of Floyd County was born in Seneca Township, Seneca County, O., June 1, 1836. His parents, Gustavus Reiniger and Rose, nee Derr, were natives of Wurtemberg, German, who emigrated to America in 1828, landed in New York and settled in Seneca County, O. They had a family of three sons and three daughters, E. A. being the youngest. His early life was spent in attending school and assisting on the farm, and when about fifteen years of age, he learned the carpenter and joiner’s trade, at which he worked in Ohio until the fall of 1855, when he came to Floyd County, and obtained employment at his trade. In April 1861, in response to the President’s call for 75,000 men, he enlisted in Company K, Third Iowa Infantry Volunteers, being the first man to offer himself on the altar of the Union’s salvation, in this county. On Jan. 1, 1862, he was transferred to Company B, Seventh Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and was promoted from private to a non-commissioned officer. In July 1862, he was sent North to enlist men to supply the depleted ranks of his company, and in September 1862, the consolidated with Company G, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry Volunteers, he being commissioned Second Lieutenant. He served until the close of the war; then returned to Charles City, where he followed his trade until 1870; then engaging in farming, in St. Charles Township. In October 1881, he was elected to the office of Sheriff of Floyd County, which he still holds. On Jan. 1, 1867, he was united in marriage with Clarinda, daughter of Louis and Eunice Cole, nee Alexander. She was born in Goshen, Vt. Mr. Reiniger is a member of I. O. O. F., Charles City Lodge, and in politics a pronounced Republican. He is one of the pioneers and representative men of Floyd County, where he has been identified since October 1855.

P. Rose Pages 768 – 769

Manufacturer of wagons, buggies, carriages, and repairer of farm machinery, etc., Charles City, is a native of Perthshire, Scotland, born in Crieff, April 15, 1830; a son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Drummond) Rose, likewise natives of Scotland, and members of the Presbyterian church. They had a family of seven children, of who our subject was the eldest. In 1832 he embarked with his parents in the brig “Victoria” for America, and landed at Quebec, Canada, after a voyage of six weeks. They settled in London District, where he was educated and learned the wagon-maker’s trade. He was married at Fort Atkinson, Iowa, on Jan. 1, 1860, to Hattie Updike, who was born in Batavia, Ill. Two children blessed this union, viz.: Minnie C. and Charles A., the printer of this city. The mother died Jan. 3, 1869, and Mr. Rose was married on March 20, 1872, to Lucretia Putney, who died in May 1874. He married his present wife, Mrs. Mary B. Angell, April 21, 1877. She has five children by a former marriage, viz.: Edwin I., gardener near Golden, Col.; Nellie, engaged in teaching in St. Charles Township; C. B., working in the sash, door and blind factory; William, with his brother in Colorado, and John, employed in Wilkins’ art gallery. In 1856 Mr. Rose came to Iowa, locating in Waterloo, where he constructed the first wagon made in Black Hawk County. One year later he went to Fort Atkinson, and there also made the first wagon, and in April 1860, he came to Charles City, where he has been actively engaged in his present business since. In politics he is a strong supporter of the Republican party, and voted for the amendment in 1882.

F. A. Roziene Page 769

Real estate dealer, loan broker and treasurer of the Floyd County Savings Bank, was born in Wimmerby, Province of Smaland, Sweden, Aug. 7, 1835, a son of Thos. Roziene and Fredrika, nee Lagervall. Prior to emigrating to this country he spent seven years in Lapland, arriving in the United States, on Dec. 1, 1854. He enlisted in the Seventy-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry in June 1862, as a private, and served in the Mississippi Valley with his regiment. For gallant and meritorious services he was promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant, and was detached from the command at Vicksburg, and appointed Assistant Commissary of Muster (mustering office), department of Mississippi, in June 1865, and was retained in that capacity until May 1866. He was Assistant Provost Marshal at Vicksburg, in 1864 and 1865. Mr. Roziene settled in Charles City, Ia., in 1868. He was married to Adeline A. Barnes, on Jan. 5, 1866, at Elk Grove, Cook County, Ill., her birth-place. She is a daughter of Joseph A. Barnes and Eliza, nee Wilder, who settled in Chicago in 1833. Two children have blessed their union, viz.: Frederick B., born Aug. 28, 1867, and Addie E., April 10, 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Roziene are members of the Congregational church. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. fraternity, and in politics he is a Republican.

Charles H. Shaw Page 769 – 770

Proprietor of the Union House, Charles City, is a native of Maine and was born in the city of Bangor, Penobscott County, on Oct. 3, 1848. His father, James M. Shaw, was a merchant of Bangor, Me., where he married Susan Tyler; they are members of the Baptist church, and now reside in Northwood, Ia. They had a family of six daughters and one son, five daughters and one son living. Chas. H., subject of this sketch, was the third child. He attended school in Corinth until seventeen when he engaged in the mercantile business in Bangor, a member of the firm of Boden & Shaw, grocers, until August 1876, when he sold out and came to Charles City, where he has since been engaged in the hotel business. In January 1882, he purchased the Union House, for an account of which, see Chapter XVII. No one can excel “Charlie Shaw” in keeping a good hotel.

George P. Smith Pages 770

Proprietor of the Charles City Sash, Door and Blind Factory, was born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, N. Y., March 9, 1836, a son of George E. Smith, Sr., a cabinet-maker by trade, and Harriet, nee Emerson. They were natives of New York, and members of the Episcopal church. George P., Jr. was the eldest of a family of nine children, and when two years old removed with his parents to Saratoga, N.Y., where his father embarked in the furniture business. He attended school there until twelve years of age when the family located in Burlington, Vt. His father assisted in the building of the Vermont Central R. R., and on its completion, George, Jr., was employed as fireman on an engine, and gradually rose to the position of engineer on both a freight and passenger engine. In January 1861, he came to Iowa, locating in Floyd, Floyd County. He enlisted in August 1862, in Company G, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, being promoted in 1864 to rank of Quartermaster of his regiment. Upon leaving the service he came to Charles City and engaged in running stationary engines until 1875, when he purchased a half interest in his present factory with D. Andrews, and in December 1881, Mr. Andrews sold his interest to Geo. T. Willman, who in March 1882, disposed of his interest to Mr. Smith, who has since conducted it alone. The factory gives direct employment to thirteen men, and is the only one of the kind in Floyd County, and the second established in Northwestern Iowa. Mr. Smith was married Oct. 12, 1871, to Frances E. Tuttle, of Rockford, Ill., and a daughter of Daniel and Rebecca (Bowen) Tuttle, who were among the settlers of Floyd County in 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have one child, a daughter, Ivy, born July 12, 1872. Mr. Smith is a Mason and a member of St. Charles Lodge, No. 141. He has served as a member of the City Council two years, and politically is a Republican. He came of Scotch ancestry and is a descendant of Alexander McGregor, founder of the town of McGregor. Ia.

Joel Washington Smith Page 771 – 775

Is one of the oldest physicians and older residents of Floyd County. He came here in 1857, when thirty-two years of age. He was born in Franklin, Delaware County, N. Y., July 23, 1824. The most remote member of his family that is clearly authenticated was Thomas Smith, - born near 1700. Traditionally, he or his near ancestors emigrated from Haverhill, in Northeastern Massachusetts, to Feeding Hills, in West Springfield, Mass., where he and several succeeding generations resided. His wife was Abigail, daughter of Anthony Austin, of Suffield, Conn. His father, Anthony, when about twenty-two years of age, went from Boston to Suffield. He was the youngest child of Christian Jew parents, that, near the time of Luther, to escape religious (?) persecution, fled from Bohemia or Hungary to Holland, then to England; and thence the widow with three boys – youngest, three years – and two girls, came to Boston. There she soon married a merchant and the children were well educated for those times. Mrs. Smith lived to the age of ninety-eight. They had two sons, John and Thomas. The descendants of the latter are numerous about Springfield, and are widely scattered.

John married M. Stockwell. They had four sons and two daughters. He died at Franklin, N. Y. One son Anthony, had a large family and died at Whiting, Vt., in 1853. Juba and Thomas, with families, removed to Springfield, Bradford County, Pa. The daughters married but had no children.

The other son, Darius – Doctor’s grandfather – was born 1766; near 1790, married Elizabeth, daughter of Isaac Colegrove and Mary Olin. She is reported as born at Preston, R. I. There is such a place in New London County, Conn., adjoining – none in Rhode Island. Colgrove was of English descent. Died at Southwick, Mass. Family removed to New York. About 1801 Darius Smith and family removed to Franklin, N. Y. Six children grew up. His wife died near 1828 at Otego, Otsego County, N. Y.; he at Franklin, 1849; both were buried at Otego.

Their elder son, Silas, Doctor’s father, was born at Feeding Hills, Sept. 3, 1794; died at Franklin, N. Y., April 10, 1878. His wife – married 1821 – was Lydia, eldest daughter of Major Joel Gillett, of Franklin, N.Y., who emigrated from Hebron, Conn., near 1806. She was born at the latter place 1801; died at Franklin, 1877.

The earliest Gillett ancestor known was John – said to be Welsh – born at Rehoboth, Mass., near Providence, R. I. He was taken prisoner at Deerfield, Mass., by the Indians and French, Sept. 16, 1696; taken to Quebec; a servant for a time at a nunnery, and returned home the next year. (?) via France and England; settling at Lebanon, Conn., - farther from Indians, - where he had a large family. One son was Ebenezer; a son of his, Ezekiel, born at Lebanon, April 3, 1743, was, during the Revolution, on of the staff, or body-guard of Gov. Trumbull, of Lebanon. Ezekiel married Dorcas Hawkins, born May 1739, at Coventry, Conn. He removed to Hebron, Conn., near 1768. Major Gillett was one of his sons, born at Hebron, Feb. 7, 1773; with his family removed to Franklin, N. Y., 1806-‘7, where he died 1853. His wife, Clarissa, born March 28, 1778, daughter of Capt. Thomas Carrier and Lydia Ingram, of Marlborough, Conn., is reported a descendant of Martha Allen, wife of Thomas Carrier. She was put to death for witchcraft at Salem. They had thirteen children, six sons and seven daughters; all grew to maturity and eight of them are living (1882) her age was eighty-five. Major Gillett was a captain of artillery, and the Doctor’s father a private in the war of 1812.

Silas Smith was a successful farmer, living fifty-five years, or until his death, April 10. 1878, upon the same farm, at Franklin, N. Y. Joel W. is the second of twelve children. He has eight brothers and two sisters living. The father and nine sons cast ten votes for Gen. Grant for President in 1868.

It was thus the good fortune of the subject of this sketch to spend the early years of his life upon a farm – to learn to work. He was born in a log house, - is not ashamed to own it either; was an average boy, though called a trusty one, and spent his time as was usual with boys of the place and period. Some of the occupations were, turning grindstone, helping clear the heavy timbered land, building stone walls for fences, catching trout – then plenty – and attending the district school in winter. His impressions of picking up stones into heaps, on mowing land, and planting and hoeing corn and potatoes in tough, stony soil, were not favorable to such farming.

When fifteen, he was sent to the academy in Franklin, - “Delaware Literary Institute,” – even then, as later, a school of high reputation. Until 1846, each winter, with one exception, was spent there or in teaching; the other time upon the farm. Fortunately, if his early opportunities were somewhat limited, he made the best possible use of what he had. Home influences, business training and most of the surroundings were good. While he liked farming and teaching pretty well, as successful in each, he did for a time think of becoming a civil engineer, but finally decided to be what he had long thought of, a physician. Most of the time from 1846 to 1850 was spent in Connecticut, Massachusetts and New York City, pursuing professional studies, - teaching several terms to partly defray expenses, - and graduating at Yale in January 1850. Previous to and after that time, he took special courses of instruction in New York, being the private pupil of Prof. William Detmold, a distinguished physician and surgeon of that city.

April 4, 1850, he married Susan Maria, only daughter of William Wheat, Esq., of East Franklin – Croton Postoffice – New York, where she was born, Jan. 8, 1826. Her father was born 1796, at Marlborough, Hartford County, Conn. When twelve years of age, his parents removed to Franklin, N. Y., where he died in 1871. His father, also William, was a sea captain in early life. His wife was Mary, daughter of Joshua Bolles and Eunice Shepherd, she of Hartford, Conn.; each died at Franklin; she, March 4, 1839; her husband near 1866, aged ninety-six years. They had a family of nine children. The Captain’s father was Solomon Wheat, a preacher and a physician. He and his wife Rebecca or Susannah Richardson died at Franklin, New York. They had thirteen children, of who twelve grew up. Their descendants are widely scattered. Traditionally, the Wheats are Welsh.

Mrs. Smith’s mother – wife of William Wheat, Esq. – was Altamira, eldest daughter of Deacon Thomas Wolcott and Margery Boyd, of East Franklin, N. Y., where Deacon Wolcott and wife died. The family came from near Southampton, Mass., where Mrs. Wheat was born. She died Sept. 27, 1871, aged sixty-nine years. Four of their five children are living.

Dr. Smith practiced successfully in his native county and town until 1857, when he removed to Charles City, then St. Charles. His quick perception, industry, good judgment, thorough medical education, kindness and gentlemanly deportment have been appreciated; and professionally he now ranks the equal of any physician of his years in the State. In practice, he has always been conservative, yet progressive and independent. He has never thought that to use drugs was the only way by which the good physician may earn his fee. His great excellence has been a rare gift of seeing the end from the beginning, and using such means, and such means only, as he believed might aid nature in her work of restoration. As a pioneer surgeon he has been quick to improvise means to accomplish the best results; and he has performed many new and delicate operations, usually attempted only by city specialists. The prevention and cure of disease by hygienic and sanitary measures early engaged his attention, - too often to his cost, - and long before it was the popular subject that is now is with the more intelligent classes. He has always preferred to excel in one calling – his profession – to engaging in too many other things, politics included. Pecuniarily, he has been reasonably successful, though a poor collector for himself. The key note of permanent success with him, as in all cases, has been to try do everything well, and observe the golden rule in all his dealings.

A man of quiet demeanor and kindly nature, of intelligent but positive views, of deep convictions and large common sense, cannot fail to impress the community and age in which he lives. Taking a deep interest and an active part in all educational, moral and material interests; contributing liberally to benevolent objects according to his means; at times holding various positions of public trust, in none of which was his integrity or ability ever questioned. None but himself can know, and eternity only can reveal, the labors, the sacrifices and pecuniary cost to himself of the work which he has done for the school of Charles City and vicinity. This alone showed business capacity of high order. He has often spoken with his pen through the press of his town and other leading newspapers, - oftenest without name, that the matter might be judged by its merit, - and has contributed valuable papers in his profession. In 1876 he was a member of the International Medical Congress, at Philadelphia, a delegate from the Iowa State Medical Society. He is connected with different medical and scientific bodies, but is not a member of any secret societies, and more from want of time than any other reason. While his life has been a busy and active one, he is still a student; and with an excellent memory, possesses extensive general knowledge; is a progressive and practical man, a close observer of men and things, an independent thinker, a good public worker when interested, and, though forgiving in his nature, abhors shams and frauds in individuals, in politics, in medicine, in religion and everywhere. As much as he desires the good opinion of his fellow men, he had rather be right than popular. He has uniformly opposed the use of tobacco and alcoholic drinks, and worked vigorously for the Constitutional Amendment of 1882. In politics he was a Republican from the first, but places principle above party obligations. In religious belief he is liberal orthodox, a usual attendant at the Congregational church, partly from force of education, but is wholly unsectarian in his views. The family consists of four sons and one daughter – another died when young. The eldest, Irving Wheat Smith, M. D. born in New York, March 1, 1851, graduated at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1875, and is in business with his father – Smith & Son. In 1876 he married Sallie, daughter of George Stalker and Hannah Milliken, of Richland, Keokuk County, Ia. They have one daughter – Hannah – and one has died. Ida Elizabeth, the daughter, is the wife of La Verne W. Noyes, of Chicago, a successful inventor and manufacturer. Mr. Noyes is the son of Leonard R. Noyes and Jane Jessup, former residents of Geneva, Cayuga County, N. Y., but now of Springfield, Linn County, Ia. The son and wife, daughter and husband are graduates of the Iowa State Agricultural College. William Thomas and Charles Francis – twins – born Nov. 3, 1864, and Fred Edmund, born Aug 18, 1866, reside with their parents. Theirs is an elegant home, the family a happy one, its members commanding the respect of all who know them.

Isaiah Snyder Pages 775 – 776

A member of the Charles City Plow Co., was born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, O., Aug. 31, 1834, a son of William Snyder, of Pennsylvania, and Elizabeth, nee Bixler. He as the second son of a family of six children, and when he as some three years of age his parents moved to Shelbyville, Ill., and one year later located in Sullivan, now the county-seat of Moultrie County, that State. He was there reared and educated, and when he was fourteen years old his father died, and he farmed with his mother until eighteen, when he went to Sullivan, and there followed blacksmithing and the manufacture of plows four years. In the fall of 1857 he went to Mitchell County, Ia., spent one year in a mill there, then came to Charles City. In partnership with F. R. Woolley he opened the first plow factory in Floyd County, and they made the first plow in this county. This partnership continued until February 1881, when the present stock company was formed. The factory had previously been enlarged from time to time, and is now one of the principal manufacturing interest of the city and county. On July 4, 1859, Mr. Snyder was united in marriage with Miss Sarah A. Lewis, who was born near Rockford, Ill., a daughter of Nelson and Elizabeth (Vance) Lewis. Of seven children born of this union, five are living – Bertha E., May Antoinette, Frank L., Henry L., and George W. Mr. Snyder is a strong supporter of the Republican party, and is classed with the prominent citizens and business men of Charles City.

Samuel H. Starr Pages 776

Proprietor of the largest boot and shoe emporium in Floyd County, as born in Charles City, Ia., on May 17, 1858, a son of S. B. Starr and Adeline, nee Hughes. His father is one of the pioneers and the oldest member of the bar now living in Charles City. Samuel H. attended school in his native town until 1875, when he entered the Military Academy, at Faribault, Minn., remaining there one year, then attended college at Morgan Park, Ill., one year. He entered Bailey’s Commercial College, of Dubuque, Ia., and graduated from that institution in 1878. Upon leaving school he accepted a situation as clerk in the hardware store of Townsend & Smith, which he retained two years, then, in partnership with John Ferguson, established his present store. In January 1882, Mr. Starr purchased his partner’s interest, and has since conducted the business alone. He was married Sept. 19, 1879, to Cornie Clute, who was born in New York State, a daughter of N. M. Clute, a Presbyterian minister, now located in Davenport, Ia. Mr. Starr is a prominent member of St. Charles Lodge, No. 141, A. F. & A. M., and politically favors the Republican party. He is one of the prominent and representative business men of Charles City.

B. W. Stevens Pages 776 –777

Of the firm of Stevens, Hering & Co., wholesale and retail dealers in and manufacturers of all kinds of furniture, was born in Methuen, Essex County, Mass., Feb. 18, 1843; his father, Benjamin A. Stevens, is a native of Deerfield, Mass., born June 18, 1815, the day of the battle of Waterloo, and Oct. 20, 1839 he married Harriet Osgood at Methuen, Mass., where she was born. Of four children born of this union, three are living – Harriet E., wife of William H. Coffin; B. W., subject of this sketch, and Arthur O., engaged in the furniture business at Spencer, Ia. In 1871 B. A. Stevens came with his family to Charles City, where he has since remained, and is classed with the prominent and respected citizens of the city. In politics he is a Republican. His wife died here on Dec. 8, 1881. The subject of this memoir was educated in his native town, and in 1857 removed to Bad Axe County, Wis., where he engaged in farming until 1871, when he came to Charles City and engaged in the present business. He was married on Nov. 24, 1868 to Hattie E. Atkins, born at La Porte, Ind. She was a daughter of J. T. and Amanda Atkins, nee Heaton. They have two children – Grafton A., born June 15, 1876, and Barton, Aug. 29, 1880. In politics Mr. Stevens is strong adherent to the principles of the Republican party. The factory of Stevens, Herring & Co. is among the most prominent of the business and manufacturing interests of Charles City, and its proprietors are recognized as gentlemen of irreproachable business integrity. They give direct employment to twenty men, and their trade extends throughout the States of Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Dakota.

Mrs. Elizabeth Strawn Page 777

One of the old settlers of Floyd County, and at present a resident of Charles City, was born near Chillicothe, Ross County, O., Feb. 5, 1810. Her parents were William and Elizabeth (Cating) Jolly, also natives of Ohio and members of the Presbyterian church. They had a family of four sons and six daughters; seven of the family lived to be men and women. When Mrs. Strawn, the subject of this memoir, was fifteen years of age, she removed with her parents to Indiana and settled on a farm near Covington, Warren County, where she married James Oxford, September, 1826. He was born in Ohio. The fruit of this marriage was two children, viz.: David H. Oxford, who died in 1850, and Martha, the wife of A. H. Brackett. They reside in Charles City, old settlers of Floyd County. Mr. James Oxford died in 1831; Mrs. Strawn then married Enoch Strawn and they had one daughter, viz.: Mary E., wife of John Ferguson. They reside in Charles City, and are old settlers also. Enoch Strawn died in 1854. Mrs. Strawn then came with her family to Floyd County and purchased a large tract of land in St. Charles Township. She has since sold her farms and purchased a nice home in Charles City, where she resides. Mrs. Strawn is a member of the Christian church and has been a member of this church for the past fifty-two years. Mrs. Strawn is one of the few old settlers now living who came to Charles City in its infancy. She is now in the seventy-third year of her age and looks much younger.

C. A. Sylvester Pages 777 – 778

Of the firm of Sylvester Bros., manufacturers of fine carriages, buggies and wagons, blacksmiths and repairers, Charles City, are among the leading manufacturers of Charles City. They employ five skilled workmen and warrant all their work, using the best material in the factory which they established here in 1879. C. A. and Fred Sylvester were sons of August and Minnie (Hoffman) Sylvester, natives of Germany. The father was a blacksmith, and he and wife had six children, three sons and three daughters. C. A. Sylvester, the eldest, was born Nov. 20, 1854, and Fred was the third son, and was born Feb. 12, 1856. He and brother attended school in Germany until fourteen, when they learned the blacksmith’s trade, continuing until 1872, when they came with their parents to America. They landed at New York, and from there came to Floyd County and settled in Charles City. The father bought a farm and C. A. and Fred began to work at their trade, and in 1879 opened their present day shop. C. A. married Miss Mary Marcen, Jan. 5, 1879. She was born in Floyd County, a daughter of John Marcen. Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Sylvester have two children, viz.: Charley and Miss Jessie. Mr. Sylvester and brother are enterprising, representative men and manufacturers of Charles City, and their factory is one of the principal features of the city. They also own and run the Sylvester Bros.’ Livery stable, and keep twenty head of horses, carriages and buggies for the accommodation of the public. In politics, independent.

J. P. Taylor Pages 778 –779

President of the Charles City, National Bank, has been prominently identified with the business interest of this city since October 1866. A son of John and Betsey Taylor, nee Pierce. He was born in Waterville, Madison County, N. Y., May 5, 1822. His boyhood was spent in Parsalia, Chenango County, N. Y., to which place his parents had removed when he was about two years old. He was educated and learned the boot and shoe trade there, where he remained until twenty-one years of age; then engaged in the boot and shoe manufacture of South Otselic, where he also built and conducted a hotel. He was married Aug. 21, 1848, to Mercelia S. Ford, who was born in South Otselic, N.Y., Aug. 25, 1827, a daughter of Dr. Norman Ford and Mary, nee Beach. In 1854 Mr. and Mrs. Taylor moved to Bloomington, Ill., w here he engaged in the livery business until 1860, then removed to Mason City, Ia. He engaged in farming and in the sale of agricultural implements there until October 1866, when he settled in Charles City, and continued the latter business here until 1879. In March 1871, he in company with Charles Siver organized the First National Bank, with which he was actively connected until 1875. In 1876 he and S. F. Farnham organized the Charles City National Bank, of which he has since been President. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have had one child, a son – Frank v., born June 25, 1858, who is bookkeeper and assistant cashier in his father’s bank. He was educated in the common and high schools of this city, and in the military college of Faribault, Min. The subject of this memoir owns ninety acres of land in St. Charles Township, and valuable property in Charles City. He is a Mason and a member of the St. Charles Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 141. He has served acceptable in numerous township and county offices, among them that of School Director and County Supervisor. He was formerly a Whig in politics, but since the organization of the Republican party has affiliated with them. He has ever made Charles City’s interests his own, and has been foremost in any project that promised advancement to her interests morally and financially.

Ebenezer A. Teeling Pages 779–780

Miller of the Water-Power Company, Charles City, is a native of New York, and was born at Greenbush, Rensselaer, July 30, 1832, a son of Charles and Susan (Crandall) Teeling. His father was born at Teeling’s Bay, Donegal County, Ireland, where he was married, and soon after, in 1830, came to America; they located in East Troy, N. Y., and subsequently removed to Greenbush. They were members of the Presbyterian church and had a family of five sons and five daughters, Ebenezer, the subject of this sketch, being the eldest. He resided in Greenbush, and attended school at Albany, N. Y., until sixteen; then learned the miller’s trade, which he followed in Albany and New York City until twenty-one, when he came to Watertown, Wis., and worked in a mill one year; thence to Stoughton, Dane County, Wis., and worked at his trade until April 1856, when he came to Charles City, Ia. He was employed in the first mill in the county, and worked here and held the office of Assistant Deputy Sheriff of Floyd County until 1862, when he was appointed Special Agent, Deputy Provost Marshal to the War Department, and held that office until the fall of 1865, when he was mustered out; he then ran the mill until January 1868, when he was elected Clerk of the District Court, and held that office until 1871, then resumed his former business and ran this mill until it was torn down in 1876; since then has been miller in the present new mill. Mr. Teeling has been in the employ of the Water-Power Company since they purchased the water-power. He married Ellen Ingram, Aug. 18, 1860, at Charles City, Ia.; she was born at Fairfield, Vt., and was a daughter of Henry and Ann (Sharkey) Ingram, natives of Ireland, and members of the Catholic church. Mr. and Mrs. Teeling are members of the Congregational church, and have had two children, viz.: Clara J., born May 16, 1861, and Jessie, Dec. 30, 1870. Mr. Teeling is one of the oldest settlers now living in Floyd County; he came to Charles City when it was in its infancy, and has seen its rapid growth. In politics he is a Republican, and is one of the enterprising representative men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1856; he was formerly a member of I. O. O. F., and at present a member of the Good Templars Society, and was one of the first that organized this lodge; he is at present Alderman of the Fourth Ward, and voted for the amendment in 1882, and presented the present prohibition ordinance of Charles City in April 1882.

Joseph S. Trigg Pages 780 – 781

Mayor of Charles City, and partner in the firm of White, Trigg & Co., proprietors of the Elm Spring Creamery, is a native of Hertfordshire, England, born April 8, 1841. His parents, Joseph S. Trigg, Sr., and Susannah nee Wilkerson, were likewise of English nativity, and had a family of six sons and three daughter, of whom Joseph S., Jr. was the eldest. He received his education in his native shire, and when twelve years of age came with his parents to the United States, landing in New York City, thence to Fond du Lac, Wis. They engaged in farming there until 1859, then removed to Freeborn, Minn., and settled on a farm. In August 1862, Mr. Trigg enlisted in Company E, Tenth Minnesota Infantry, and bravely defended his county’s cause until the close of the war, when he was mustered out at Memphis, Tenn. He returned to Fond du Lac and was there married on Oct. 3, 1865, to Laura M. Spafford, a native of Vermont, and daughter of David and Olive Spafford. Five children have been born unto them – Mable E., Gertrude L., Olive B., Frank E., and Elsie L. After his marriage Mr. Trigg settled on a farm in Freeborn County, Minn., where he resided until 1870, when he located in Floyd County. He farmed in St. Charles Township, until he was appointed Deputy County Auditor in January 1872. In April 1874 he was elected Auditor of Floyd County, and by subsequent election held the office until January 1882, and the following April was elected Mayor of Charles City, for which position he has shown himself to be eminently fitted. He is a member of Charles City Lodge, No. 153, A. O. U. W., and politically favors the Republican party. The Elm Springs Creamery was established in May 1880, by H. D. White and J. S. Trigg, the present owners. The creamery has a capacity of manufacturing 2,100 pounds of butter and 1,500 pounds of cheese daily. They have $5,000 invested in the building, machinery, etc., and the cost of operation is about $200 per day. It is one of the principal manufactories of the city, giving direct employment to fourteen men. The butter, owning to its superior quality is greatly in demand in the Eastern markets, while the cheese finds a ready sale at home.

W. G. Tripp Page 781

Of the firm of W. G. Tripp & Co., dealers in groceries and drugs, Charles City, was born in the town of De Ruyter, Madison County, N. Y., on Nov. 13, 1839. His parents were Israel and Eliza A. (Whitcomb) Tripp, he a native of New York, and she of Vermont State. They were members of the Presbyterian church and had a family of three children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the eldest. When he was four years old his parents moved to Boone County, Ill., and he attended school there and at Belvidere, Ill., until he was seventeen years old, and then clerked for different parties in Belvidere until 1860, when he went to Colorado and engaged in mining there two years. From there he went to Memphis, Tenn., where he was chief clerk in the Government ordinance department two years, then returned to Belvidere, Ill. He engaged in mercantile business there until the spring of 1867, when he came to Charles City and embarked in his present business. He is the recipient of a large and lucrative trade, and is classed with the prominent and influential business men of the city. On June 10, 1868, Mr. Tripp was united in marriage with Mary A. Gardner, at Belvidere, Ill., where she was born. Her father, Cephas Gardner, was a native of Vermont. They have one child, a daughter, Alice G., born Aug. 21, 1872. Mr. Tripp is a Mason and a member of St. Charles Lodge, No. 141, and Almond Chapter, No. 53. Politically, he is a Republican. He was elected a member of the City Board in March 1882.

H. D. White Page 782 – 783

Of the firm of White, Trigg & Co., proprietors of the Elm Spring Creamery, Charles City, is a native of New York, and was born in Groton, Tompkins County, June 6, 1852. His parents were M. C. and Philena (Ingram) White, natives of Massachusetts. She was a member of the Baptist church. They had a family of seven children, six sons and one daughter. The subject of this sketch was the youngest, and when five years of age he removed with his parents from New York to Kenosha County, Wis., settling on a farm near Kenosha. He attended school and worked on his father’s farm, also learning the cheese and butter manufacture, and during this time he made some cheese that took the medal at the Centennial of 1876. When eighteen years of age he took charge of different cheese factories of Wisconsin, until 1877, when he came to Algona, Kossuth County, Ia., and was superintendent of eight cheese factories of that county, until the spring of 1880, when he came to Charles City, Ia., and established his present business. Mr. White married Miss Jennie E. Ferguson, at Charles City, Ia., Nov. 5, 1879; she was born at Fort Atkinson, Ia., a daughter of D. M. Ferguson, ex-Sheriff of Floyd County, and proprietor of the Lewis House, Charles City, and Malinda (Franz) Ferguson. Mr. White is a member of the Iowa Legion of Honor, and he and his wife have one daughter, Edna T., born July 15, 1880. Mr. White is one of the leading manufacturers of Charles City. In politics he is a Republican. His family is of the old Puritan stock, his father being a descendant of Peregrine White, who came from England in the “Mayflower” and landed at Plymouth Rock. Mr. White’s grandfather was in the war of 1812.

Waldo Wait Pages 781 – 782

Retired farmer, residing in Charles City, is one of the old settlers of Floyd County. He was born in Hebron, Washington County, N. Y., April 13, 1801. His parents were Benjamin and Ann (Waldo) Wait; he was a native of Rhode Island, and she of Connecticut. They were members of the Baptist church, and had a family of seven sons and six daughters. Waldo, subject of this sketch and one sister were twins, and the youngest in the family. There are but two of the family now living, viz.: Archibald Wait, a retired Baptist minister, residing in Chicago, Ill., and Waldo, subject of this memoir. He attended school in Hebron, N. Y. until fifteen, when he removed with his parents to a small village near Auburn, N. Y., for two years, then to Leeds County, Canada West, and they settled on a farm twelve miles north of Brockville. Waldo was married here to Miss Rose Ducklon, May 28, 1826; she was born in Elizabethtown, Leeds County, Canada West, Oct. 10, 1810; she was a daughter of Stephen and Harriet (Freell) Ducklon. Mr. and Mrs. Wait resided on their farm in Canada until the fall of 1856, when they came to Floyd County, Ia., and soon after purchased a farm in St. Charles Township, where they resided until 1865, when Mr. Wait sold his farm and purchased a home in Charles City, where he has since lived, retired from active business. Mr. and Mrs. Wait are members of the Baptist church and have been members of this church for the past fifty years. They have had two sons, viz.: William H., born in Canada West, July 21, 1845; he enlisted in Company C, Fourteenth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and died May 9, 1864, from disease contracted during his service in the army. Henry M. Wait was born in Canada West, May 20, 1851; he married Miss Ida Pratt. They reside in Charles City and have had three children, viz.: Howard W., Henry W., and Miss Mamie Wait. Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Wait are of a few old settlers now living. They came to Charles City when it was in its infancy, and have lived to see the various changes of the county and city since that time; they are true representatives of Floyd County pioneers.

R. B. Wilson Pages 783 –784

Proprietor of the Charles City Foundry, established his present business in 1877. The foundry was first started by Woolley & Snyder in connection with their plow factory. It is a building 100 feet long, the main room, blacksmith and carpenter shops being 38 x 36 feet, two stories in height, and the machine shops 26 x 24 feet, two stories, and the molding-room 36x 26 feet. This is the first and only foundry in the city, and is one of the leading manufacturing interests. R. B. Wilson is a native of Vermont, and was born in Hinesburg, May 3, 1844. His parents were George W. and Mary (Oucher) Wilson; he was a native of Massachusetts, and was born at Concord, Middlesex County, and she was born in France. They had one son, viz.: R. B. Wilson, subject of this sketch. He was but eighteen months old when his mother died; then went to live with his grandparents near Montreal, Canada, until five years of age, when he went to live with his father, who was a woolen manufacturer. They traveled over the New England States, and settled at Westfield, N. Y., in 1851, where his father engaged in various pursuits. R. B., attended school until seventeen, when he enlisted in Company G, Seventy-second New York Infantry Volunteers; was mustered into United States service July 25, 1861, in what was called Sickles’ Brigade. Mr. Wilson remained in that company until expiration of his term of service, when he was mustered out at Washington. He was wounded at the battle of Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862 – a compound fracture of the right arm, the ball passing into the right side, where it sell remains; another ball struck the right shoulder blade, and another passed under his chin, cutting the flesh from the chin and passing through his neck, coming out close to the jugular vein. He was in the hospital at Fortress Monroe and Philadelphia, Pa., returning to his regiment the summer of 1863. He was then transferred to the Regimental Quartermaster’s Department; then in January of 1864 was transferred to the Nineteenth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, doing duty in the City of Washington until he was mustered out; he then went to Westfield, N. Y., and began to learn his trade; worked in Western New York until August, 1868, when he came to Osage, Mitchell County, Ia., and remained in this vicinity until 1877, when he located in Charles City, and established his present business. Mr. Wilson married Miss Alzina M. Frazier at Hampton, Franklin County, Ia., Jan. 1, 1873; she was born in Allamakee County, Ia.; she was the daughter of D. D. Frazier, a farmer. Mrs. Wilson is a member of the M. E. church, Charles City. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have one daughter, viz.: Miss C. Buena Wilson. Mr. Wilson is a member of National Lodge, No. 165, I. O. O. F., at Charles City, Ia., Legion of Honor, Hope Lodge, No. 76. In politics Mr. Wilson is a Republican. He is of Scotch and French descent. He is one of the enterprising, representative men and leading manufacturers of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1877.

F. R. Woolley Page 784

Senior partner in the Charles City Plow Company, is a native of the town of Weathersfield, Rutland County, Vt., born Dec 23, 1825, a son of John B. and Annis Woolley, nee Rice, also natives of the Green Mountain State. His father was a blacksmith and manufacturer of all kinds of edge tools; he died in 1849 in his sixtieth year. F. R. was the fourth son of a family of seven children, and when he was some five years old his parents removed to Genesee County, N. Y.; thence to Cattaraugus County, and from there to Trumbull County, O. F. R. resided there until 1853, when he went to Rockford, Ill.; manufactured sickles and machinists’ tools there until the fall of 1855, and in the spring of 1856 he located in Charles City, Ia.; he worked at the blacksmith’s trade here until 1859, when he engaged in the manufacture of plows; he built a factory in 1862, which he operated until 1876, when the present establishment was erected. Owing to the rapid increase of their business the company are building a much larger factory, wherein they can meet the demand of their extensive trade. Mr. Woolley was untied in marriage in September 1849, to Ammy Hull, who was born in Chenango County, N. Y., and was a daughter of Joseph and Mercy Hull, nee Briggs. They have one child, a daughter, Grace, wife of George M. May, who is workman of the furniture manufactory of this city. Mr. Woolley is one of the early settlers of Floyd County, and has ever been active in the advancement of her interest, morally and financially. He adheres to the principles of the Republican party.

E. B. C. Wright Page 785

Retired merchant, Charles City, is a native of Ohio, and was born in Vernon Township, Trumbull County, May 23, 1824. His parents were Adam and Rhoda (Clark) Wright; he was a native of Mercer, Mercer County, Pa., and was a merchant, and opened the first store in Vernon Township, Ohio; she was a native of Connecticut, born in 1800, and a member of the Baptist church. They were married in 1818, and had a family of twelve children. E. B. C., subject of this sketch, was the eldest son. He attended school in Vernon, Ohio, until twelve years of age, when his parents emigrated to Burlington, Ia., where his father died nine years later, and his mother returned to Ohio. E. B. C. remained in Burlington, clerking and attending school until twenty-three, when he returned to Ohio, and taught school until 1849, and in that year went to the city of New York, and engaged in the mercantile business until 1857, when he came to Charles City. In company with H. W. McNabb, a retired merchant of Osage, Mitchell County, bought out John Ferguson & Co., and engaged in the mercantile business until 1863, when he went to New York City. He was married there to Mrs. Caroline Mann, on Feb. 11, 1863; her maiden name was Caroline Barringer. Mr. Wright engaged in the mercantile trade in New York City until 1870, when he returned to Charles City, and he and his brother, B. F. Wright, engaged in the mercantile trade until 1879, when he closed out his business, and took the agency for canvassing the whole Northwest for the National Needle Co., of Springfield, Mass., the largest manufacturers of sewing-machine needles in the world. Mrs. Wright is a member of the Christian church. Mr. Wright is a charter member of St. Charles Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 141, and has been Master a number of years, and was the founder of the order of the Eastern Star, Excelsior Chapter. He is one of the old settlers of Charles City and the State of Iowa, having been identified with the State since March 1836, and Floyd County since 1857. He is one of the representative business men, and has always taken an active interest in anything that promises progression to the town. In politics he is a Democrat, and a strong supporter of that party. He is of German descent. There are but three brothers and two sisters living, viz.: subject of this sketch; Mrs. H. W. McNabb, of Osage, Mitchell County, Ia., Mrs. E. A. Mann of New York City; F. B. Wright, Postmaster of Charles City, and J. Z. Wright, farmer of Floyd County.

B. F. Wright Page 786 – 788

Among the widely known men of the county is B. F. Wright, Postmaster of Charles City, who has had the position since October 1869. But few men are so universally known in the county, and he has of late years acquired a State acquaintance by reason of his prominent association with the “prohibitory amendment.” Mr. Wright is the third son of Adam and Rhoda Wright, and was born in Vernon, Vernon Township, Trumbull County, O., Aug. 20, 1837. His father was of German descent, whilst his mother was of the old Connecticut Yankee blood. In appearance the subject of our sketch is decidedly German; height, five feet ten inches, stocky, stout, portly, weighing 245 pounds, whilst in mental qualities he displays those powers that have made Yankeedom famous. The family came to Burlington, Ia., in 1838. After the death of his father in 1843, the family returned to Vernon, O. Frank lived with his uncle, Aaron Clark, in Bloomfield, Hartford, and Vernon, until 1849, when it was arranged that he should live with his uncle, Henry Vernon, in West Williamsfield, O., until he was of age. His mother died in 1852, when Frank, through the assistance of his older brother, E. B. C. Wright, became a pupil of the Meadville Academy, Pennsylvania, and attended for several terms of school, one at Lane’s Corners and one at Randall’s Corners, in Crawford County, Pa.

In the spring of 1856 he went to New York City and engaged with Rockwell & Winton in a hat and cap house, with whom he remained until May 7, 1857, when he reached Charles City and entered the employ of John Ferguson & Co., which whom he had made business arrangements before leaving the East. The mercantile house of J. Ferguson & Co., was soon succeeded by the firm of Wright & McNabb, and B. F. was long identified with the mercantile interest of Charles City, up to 1872, since which time he has given his time to his official duties and the development of a stock farm in Pleasant Grove Township, in company with his younger brother, J. Z. Wright.

In every development of the city and county Mr. Wright has taken an active and prominent part, and is said by all to be a fast friend and vigorous opponent of the Ben. Wade order. The adoption by 30,000 majority of the prohibitory amendment to the constitution of Iowa by its electors, June 27, 1882, is undoubtedly the most remarkable event in the line of prohibitory temperance which has ever occurred. Its praises are sung in churches and schools; its triumph is published from thousands of eloquent rostrums, while family and pulpit altars will never cease to “Praise God from whom all blessings flow” for its adoption. To those who conceived, planned and executed this great measure the public are interested in knowing the details of the work.

In August, 1878, Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, widely known in Iowa as the head of the W. C. T. U., was conducting a Congressional session of that temperance organization in Charles City, and while the guest of Rev. A. N. Clute, of that place, Mr. Wright called upon her and endeavored to interest her in the matter of uniting all temperance efforts of the State in a single line of amending its Constitution. At first she was not favorably inclined to the project, but subsequently changed her mind. Mrs. Foster, in the December State session of the W. C. T. U., at Burlington, as their chairman on the legal phases of the question, presented the new idea of a constitutional amendment, but stated in her able report that she ‘did not claim it as original, as it had been first suggested to her by a gentleman in Floyd County.” Up to this date the matter had received but little public agitation.

In February 1879, Mr. Wright attended the State Reform meeting at Waterloo, and in a series of resolutions urged as the plan of work the constitutional amendment. His address on that occasion, the great debate of the convention on the subject, and their practical adoption of the scheme, and the effect of bringing the project prominently into newspaper discussion of the State, especially in the Dubuque Daily Times, edited by M. C. Woodruff, and the Iowa State Register, by the Clarkson brothers.

In 1879, at the Republican State Convention, Mr. Wright, in company with Col. Nate Reed, who at that time was editor of the Northwestern News, at Davenport, and editor of the Evening News in Chicago, secured a suite of rooms at the Abom House, in the city of Des Moines, and began a systematic effort of consultation with every prohibitionist on every county delegation from all parts of the State. Hon. John H. Geer was a candidate for re-nomination for Governor by the Republican Convention. In the previous election he received a majority vote, and desiring to be U. S. Senator, he was most anxious to fill the executive office by a clear majority vote of the State, and greatly desired that the temperance element of his party should be harmonized and reconciled. Mr. Wright sought an interview with the Governor, and secured in him a staunch ally for declaring in favor of a non-partisan vote to be taken on a prohibitory amendment.

The eleventh plank of the Republican platform of Iowa was substantially adopted and framed at a caucus of the temperance element of the Republican party in that suite of rooms, and B. F. Wright was the chairman and Nate Reed the secretary of that caucus. The plank was unanimously adopted the next day by the Republican Convention. The temperance hosts of Iowa have had a State temperance committee patterned after the Republican and Democratic parties, a member in every Congressional district. Aaron Kimball, of Cresco; B. F. Wright, of Charles City, and J. A. Harvey, of Des Moines, have been for two years respectively President, Secretary and Treasurer, and the newspapers of the State have spoken of Mr. Wright as the father of the late prohibitory amendment.

S. P. Yeomans, M. D. Pages 787 - 789

Charles City, is a native of New York and was born in German Flats, Herkimer County, Jan. 23, 1822. His parents were Prentice and Margaret (McKinney) Yeomans, natives of Connecticut and members of the Universalist Church. They have a large family of children, S. P. subject of this sketch, being the youngest son. In 1837, when fifteen years of age, he came to Iowa; crossed the Mississippi River at Fort Madison, and settled near Mr. Pleasant, Henry County, where he followed farming, and attending and teaching school until eighteen, when he began to study medicine with Dr. J. D. Payne, at Mt. Pleasant, and graduated at the Rush Medical Collage, at Chicago, in 1854. He then practiced medicine at Agency City, Wapelo County, and Sheridan, Lucas County, Ia., and was elected to the Legislature from Lucas County in 1854. In 1855 he was appointed United States Register of the land office at Sioux City, by Pierce, and re-appointed by Buchanan, and held that office six years. At the outbreaking of the Rebellion he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the Seventh Regiment Iowa Cavalry, and remained with them until the close of the war; he then went to Clinton, Ia., and practiced medicine until 1879, when he came to Charles City, where he has practiced since. He married Clara Vale in November 1840. She was born in Vermont, and was a graduate of the Hahnemann Medical College, of Chicago, in 1870, and has practiced medicine since. Dr. Yeomans and wife are members of the M. E. church, and have had six children, two living, viz.: Margaret S., wife of Rev. N. O. McNiff, of Minnesota Conference, and George W., an attorney at Clinton, Ia. Dr. Yeomans is a Mason, and was formerly a member of Olive Branch Lodge, A. F. & A. M., Agency City, and member of chapter at Sioux City. He is one of the leading physicians of Floyd County. In politics he is a Republican. In 1861 he also graduated from the Hahnemann College, Chicago. He is a member of the Iowa State Medical Society, of Homeopathic physicians.

Professor James C. Yocum Pages 789 – 790

Superintendent of Charles City schools, is a native of Ohio, and was born in Mansfield, Ashland County, March 4, 1838. His parents were Elmore and Jane (Cameron) Yocum; he was a native of Pennsylvania, and a member of the Methodist church, and now resides at Sparta, Wis.; she as a native of Ohio, and also a member of the Methodist church. They had a family of three sons and two daughters. James C., subject of this sketch, was the eldest child. Then three years of age he removed with his parents to Wooster, O., remaining there six years; thence to Sydney, Shelby County, and two years afterward to Delaware, Delaware County, O. James attended the preparatory department of the Ohio Wesleyan University one year; then removed to Plattville, Wis., and entered the Plattville Academy, prosecuting his studies there four years; then removed to Appleton, Wis., and attended Lawrence University four years; then spent two years in the New England Conservatory at Boston, Mass. He taught instrumental and vocal music in Wisconsin two years; then took charge of the Mount Hope, Wis., Seminary one year, and the Bamson Collegiate Institute at Point Bluff, Wis., three years, and was for several years County Superintendent of Schools in Adams County, Wis. He was then appointed Principal of the Lodi, Wis., graded school, remaining there five years; thence to Boscobel graded school, at Boscobel, Wis., for two years; then came to Charles City, to accept his present position as Superintendent of Schools. He has charge of twelve schools, employing fourteen teachers. It was the Professor’s intention to devote himself to the study of music, but, circumstances preventing, he abandoned that, confining himself to teaching the public schools. Professor Yocum married Miss Mary Moore, at Point Bluff, Wis., Dec. 20, 1862; she was born at Zanesville, O., and was a daughter of Amos and Julia (Rice) Moore. Mrs. Yocum died in July 1863. Mr. Yocum married Miss Maria Newell, at Baraboo, Wis., May 1864; she was born in Pennsylvania, and was a daughter of Orange Newell and Anna (Woodmasee) Newell, native of Pennsylvania, and members of the Methodist church, and have had four sons and three daughters, Viz.: Genevieve, born July 15, 1865; Winifred, born March 9, 1867; Charles E., born May 23, 1870; Jessamine, born Aug. 5, 1874, James P., born Dec. 18, 1875; Donald C. and Wilbur F., born Jan 18, 1882. Professor Yocum is a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, Charles City National Lodge, No. 165, and Good Templars Lodge, No. 4, and V. A. S. fraternity. His is one of the enterprising, representative men and citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1876. In politics a Republican. He is of Scotch and German descent.