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Floyd County >> 1882 Index

History of Floyd County, Iowa
Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co., 1882.

Ulster Township
submitted by Kathy Gerkins


Henry Achenbach Page 1030

Was born in Germany in 1851, came to America with his brother, Leonard Achenbach, in the year 1852; made their home in Lake County, Ill., for about thirteen years. At the expiration of this time they moved to Floyd County, Ia. Mr. Leonard Achenbach made his first purchase in Ulster Township of 260 acres, laying on sections 16 and 21. In the year 1875 Henry A. purchased eighty acres on section 21, and in 1880 he bought another eighty in same section. He was married in Charles City in 1875 to Sophia Wolf. They have four children – Clara M., Anna B., Louis L., and Henry C. Both Mr. and Mrs. Achenbach are members of the Methodist church. Politically he is a Republican. He has held the office of Township Trustee and Road Supervisor two years; is School Director, and is now serving his fourth year as Justice of the Peace.


John Ball Page 1031

Was born in Goshen, Orange County, N. Y., July 12, 1817. At the age of fourteen Mr. Ball moved with his parents to New Jersey, near Newark. He learned the carpenter’s trade with his father, and at the age of sixteen went to Newark to work. In August 1835, in company with his father, moved to Michigan City, Ind., where he remained one year, when he married Nancy Glover, who was born in Putnam County, Ind., Jan 4, 1816. After their marriage they moved to Lake County, Ind. Here they remained engaged in farming principally till the year 1853, when they emigrated to Iowa and located in Ulster Township, Floyd County, being the first settlers of the township. Here they still reside, alone as they started, having raised a family of six children, who have grown up, and are now out in the world tasting of its bitter and sweet, as they did forty years ago. In the year 1855 Mr. Ball was elected County Judge, and has many years filled its office of Justice of the Peace. Mr. Ball was elected on the first Board of Supervisors in 1860. Mr. and Mrs. Ball are both members of the Free Methodist church. Mr. Ball has held the license of local preacher ever since coming into the State. In the years 1861-’62 under the presiding eldership of John Gould, Mr. Ball traveled as a supply on the Forest City Circuit. Their family, consisting of three sons and three daughters, are all enjoying the religion of the gospel. Mr. Ball has certainly been a marked character and a moving power upon the frontier. During the war, though well up in years, he was determined to enlist and help Uncle Sam do his threshing, but was refused the job on account of his age. In spite of this rebuff he joined the Quartermaster’s Department and remained for a time, when failing health caused him to return. Besides being a man of daring spirit, he is one of public spirit, and encourages every enterprise tending to the good of humanity, and has furnished us valuable assistance in compiling this work. Mr. Ball settled on the northeast quarter of section 10, consisting of 113 acres at present; formerly owned 480.

Charles Bartz Pages 1031 – 1032

Was born in Germany in 1852; came to the United States in company with his father, Wm. Bartz, in 1854. They located first in Watertown, Jefferson County, Wis. Here they remained about fifteen years. In 1869 they became citizens of Floyd County. Charles Bartz made his home with his parent, in St. Charles Township five years after coming here. In 1874 he purchased 160 acres on section 25, Ulster Township, where he still resides, and built a fine house the following year. He was married in Wisconsin, April 30, 1869, to Miss Bertha Dangs, a native of Germany. They have three children – Matilda, Edward and Walter. He farms usually about 100 acres and keeps about fourteen head of cattle, thirty-five hogs and five horses. Politically he is, and always has been, a Republican; also his father before him; has filled the office of Township Trustee for more than a year.

John Bell Pages 1032 – 1033

Was born in Ireland in 1827. At the age of 21, in company with three brothers and five sisters, he left Ireland for Canada. While on the voyage they were taken with a disease called emigrant’s fever. Two of the youngest boys died at sea and two sisters died soon after reaching Canada. Mr. Bell was taken to the hospital, but at the expiration of ten days slipped away from the authorities. Going to the country he secured places for his brothers and sisters and himself, engaging as a hand in a tannery where he remained for three years, when he went to Dixon, Ill., where he hired with a company who were engaged in building a dam across Rock River; with them he remained a year and a half; he then went to Oregon, Wis., and worked till fall, when he returned to Canada and brought his brothers and sisters to Beloit, Wis., where he had previously secured places for them. While at work on Turtle Creek, Wis., repairing a dam he made the acquaintance of Miss Sarah E. Bagley, who became his wife Oct. 21, 1851. She was a native of New York State, being born there Aug. 25, 1831. The next spring they went to Rockton, Ill., where Mr. Ball worked five years in a paper mill. From there they moved to Clayton County, Iowa, where he remained two years, working as a hand among lumber principally, afterward moved to this county and farmed. In 1862 went to Pike’s Peak, but finding it unprofitable soon returned and moved to Charles City, Floyd County, Ia. In the following spring he rented a farm in Ulster Township, where he still resides. His family consists of two children – Ida May, now the wife of S. H. Matson, resides in Estherville, Emmett County, Iowa (Mr. Matson is editor of the Vindicator); Harry L., the second child, is sixteen and lives at home. Mr. Ball served thirteen years on the School Board, first year as Secretary, the balance of the time as President of the board; has served as Justice of the Peace two terms and married four couples, the only persons married by a justice of the peace in the town. He has always been a temperance worker, and at present is the Grand Worthy Assistant of the Sons of Temperance of the State of Iowa.

W. S. Briggs Page 1033

Was born in Tioga County, Penn., in 1842. At the age of twenty-three he came to Iowa, locating in Ossian, Winneshiek County. Taught the village school the first winter. Afterward engaged as bookkeeper for the firm of Brooks Brothers, hardwaremen; with them he remained a year and a half. At the expiration of this time he went into the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad office, where he remained about four years. Afterward he went into the employ of a grain dealer by the name of R. N. Sawyer; with him he remained about a year. At this date, being in 1872, he went to Michigan, locating permanently in Montcalm County, where he engaged in the lumbering business, remaining over four years. In the spring of 1877 he became a citizen of Floyd County, locating on section 8, Ulster Township, on a farm of 120 acres, which he purchased in 1866, paying therefor $400. He sold forty acres of it in 1878. In the years 1877 and 1878 he built himself a good house. He has his farm under a good state of cultivation. Mr. Briggs received his education at Knoxville Academy, Pa., afterward attending Osceola Academy, finishing at the State Normal School of Mansfield. Afterward took a commercial course at Binghamton, N. Y. Mr. Briggs was married in 1869 in Michigan to Miss Tina E. Hunter, a native of Michigan, being born in Lenawee County, in 1844. Their family consists of three children – Lora H., Lulu A. and an infant son not yet named. Briggs E. A. Mead, a sister’s son makes his home with Mr. Briggs, who expects to raise him. Mr. Briggs has been School Director and is now President of the board. Politically he is a Republican.

Eugene S. Brown Page 1033

Was born in Hampshire County, Mass. He is a son of E. T. Brown, who was born in Worcester County, Mass., in 1806. In 1832 he married Miss Perses Alone, a native of Berkshire County Mass., born 1807. Their family consisted of five children, three sons and two daughters. Atherton was killed at the battle of Shiloh, at the age of twenty. He was a soldier in Company K, Third Iowa Infantry. In June 1854, E. S. Brown came to Charles City. At that time the cars only came west as far as Warren. There they took the boat to McGregor, and walked to Charles City. The year following, 1855, his father, mother, brother and adopted sister joined him. Mr. Brown remained in Charles City till 1875. He first engaged as a clerk, but afterward engaged as a farmer. In 1874 Mr. Brown purchased the farm of 140 acres where he still resides, on section 35, Ulster Township, built his house and made all his improvements. He enlisted in Company G, Twenty-seventh Iowa, Sixteenth Army Corps, August 1862, under the command of A. J. Smith; went up the Red River in assisting General Banks; was with Smith on the Meridian raid; at Nashville when Hood came, and previous to that followed Price through Missouri with Rosecranz; thence to a skirmish with Forrest at Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, where they had an engagement; started from Montjery, July 16; at Clinton Aug. 9. Mr. and Mrs. Brown and George Whitehead and wife were the first and only members for a while of the Baptist church, Charles City.

A. S. Brownell Page 1034

Was born in New York State, in 1835; made that State his home till twenty-nine years of age, when he came to Iowa, locating in Manchester, Delaware County, where he worked at his trade four years, he being a carpenter and joiner; afterward engaged in the stock and grain business about five years. In 1873 he became a citizen of this county. The first four years he spent in Charles City engaged in the stock business. In 1877 he moved upon his farm of 480 acres on sections 27 and 28, Ulster Township, which he had purchased in 1875. Here he has since made his home, and a pleasant one it is. Five years ago it was one unbroken wild prairie, but to a stranger it now bears the appearance of a long cultivated farm. It is all under a good state of cultivation, besides being beautifully situated in plain view of M. & St. P. R. R. and the village of Floyd, though seven miles away. Mr. Brownell has adorned and embellished this farm with shade trees, evergreens and fine buildings, so that we are safe in saying that this farm surpasses all others in the township, and cannot be excelled anywhere; has in crop over 400 acres, 205 acres of which is corn; has a complete set of farming implements including planters, mowers, harvesters, etc. In addition to his extensive farming he deals largely in stock, keeping usually from 130 to 140 head of cattle; though last year he wintered about 200 head and fattened fifty; turned off in the spring about ninety head. Keeps about 100 head of hogs, and nineteen head of horses. In the State of New York, in 1855, he and Miss Mary McDonald were united in marriage. She was a native of New York State. They have six children – Charles, Ada, Edwin, Carrie, Mary and Albert.

L. B. Clark Page 1035

Was born in Orange County, N. Y., Feb, 22, 18__? He was a son of Isaac Clark, who died when L. B. Clark was a mere child. His avocation was that of a laborer. When Mr. Clark was about twenty-nine years of age he left the State and went to Fond du Lac County, Wis., where he worked at the trade of mason, remaining about twelve years. He contracted and hired hands, a good share of his work being in Ripon. Failing in health, he determined to abandon his trade, and came to Ulster Township, Floyd County, and purchased 131 acres on section 18, paying $10 per acre. At this time it was all wild land, but he has brought it all under a good state of cultivation, and has made it is home. In the State of New York, in the year 1850, he and Miss Ann Amelia Ray were married. They lived happily together till she was removed by death in the year 1853, while they still resided in New York State. They had two children, but both died when small. Mr. Clark married his second wife in 1860. Her name was Carrie S. Orr, a native of Scotland, coming to this country when a child. She made him a good wife, till death with its silent tread again stealthily crept into Mr. Clark’s home, May 1, 1881, and removed the wife and mother, leaving a family of seven children – Edwin L., Nellie, Alice, May, Daisy Belle, Charles V., Ida Birda and Wm. Ernest. Mr. Clark is a man who has nobly fought the battle of life alone. In his present loneliness his children are keeping house, and trying to make home pleasant for him. Both Mr. and Mrs. Clark were members of the Baptist church in Wisconsin, and also after they came to Iowa. Mr. Clark still maintains the relationship.

Edward Crowell Pages 1135 – 1136

Deceased, was born in the town of Half Moon, N. Y., in 1807. When about six years of age he moved with his parents to Allegany County, N. Y., where he made his home till about thirty-six years of age. In 1828 he and Miss Esther Felt were united in marriage. They had five children – Elmina, George W., Andrew J., Phoebe and Helen M. Mrs. Crowell died in 1840. In 1841 he married his second wife, Mrs. Caroline (Persons) Capen. They had nine children – Edward, Abigail, James M., Silas R., John H., Oren L., Charles W., R. Esther and Lily L. Mrs. Crowell had two children by her first husband. Their names were Richard W. and Sylvia Capen. Of this large double family all are still living except Sylvia, who died in 1860, at the age of twenty-two and Esther, who died in 1881, at the age of 29. She was the wife of Sereno Whitney. In 1856 Mr. Crowell moved with his family to Ulster Township, this county, where he resided till his death, which occurred March 11, 1881. Mrs. Crowell still makes the homestead her abiding place. Of Mr. Crowell it may be said he was one of the pioneers who helped lay the very foundations of the history of Floyd County. Both Mr. and Mrs. Crowell were members of the M. E. church for thirty years. He was a member of the I. O. O. F., and started the order in this county.

Edward Crowell, Jr. Page1036

Was born in Centreville, Allegany County, N. Y., Dec. 16, 1840. In the year 1843 his father and family moved to Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wis., where they remained till 1856, when they came to Floyd County, Ia., and located in Ulster Township, upon a farm of 240 acres. Edward Crowell, Sr., had entered on sections 30 and 31 the year previous. This property the family called the old homestead. It is here the family grew to man and womanhood; it is here the father and mother lived happily together till death broke the ties by removing Mr. Edward Crowell, Sr., March 12, 1881; and it is here the mother still lives. At the age of twenty-one Mr. Edward Crowell, Jr., the subject of this sketch, enlisted in Company G, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He served his full term, being three years; was mustered out May 6, 1865, at Davenport, Ia.; was never wounded nor taken prisoner, but was a hospital patient about fifteen months; was very low with typhoid pneumonia and erysipelas, and we are sorry to have this fact to chronicle that he is still a sufferer from the effects. His army experience was that of the usual faithful soldier – hard marches, hot skirmishes, and short rations, and the usual exhausting and undermining camp life. After his return from the army he moved upon his farm of eighty acres, which he had purchased in 1863, on section 29, Ulster Township. Here he lived till the year 1880, when he sold and purchased eighty acres on section 31, same township, where he still resides. He has under cultivation about fifty acres, and has usually about fifteen head of cattle, four horses and thirty hogs. June 3, 1864, he and Miss Sarah Y. Porter were united in marriage. She was a native of Steuben County, N. Y., born in 1846. They have five children – Dora L., Clarence H., Clyde A., Guy E. and Ida C. Politically Mr. Crowell is a sound Republican. Is at present Justice of the Peace, which he has been for many years, and has held various township offices. He is a member of the I. O. O. F.

John H. Crowell Page 1037

Was born in Walworth County, Wis., in 1847. He is a son of Edward Crowell, who came from Allegany County, N. Y., to Wisconsin about 1844, remaining till 1856, when he came to Iowa, and located upon 240 acres which he had bought the year previous, on sections 30 and 31, Ulster Township, this county, where he made his home till his death, which occurred in March 1881. Edward Crowell, as will be seen by these dates, was one of Floyd County’s pioneers, and his position in those matters of early date shows that he was a man of public spirit, whose name will never be forgotten in the history of this county. The author of this work was one of his early friends and associates. An item of interest is well worthy of the space it takes here, and we give it as related by his son, J. H. Crowell: One day, when he and his little brother were in the field, W. P. Gaylord came and asked his father to accompany him that day. In answer to the boy’s inquiry as to where he was going, Mr. Crowell replied that they were going to set the most important stake in the county, it being the staking off of the court house ground. This spot was in the geographical center of the county and near the east line of Ulster Township. History shows that this place was one of some contest and contention, and after some hot spirit and solid voting it was placed upon record as the county seat, by a large majority. But afterward some of the Charles City people, and those whose interests centered there, concluded there was some discrepancy in the voting, and, without thoroughly testing the technicality, proceeded to locate the county seat at Charles City and erect public buildings. J. H. Crowell accompanied his father to this county, and made his home with him till he was twenty-one years of age. At this date he married Miss Libbie Pyatt, a native of New York State, being born there in 1852. Their family consists of five children – Jennie G., Burton L., Irving R., Granville P., and Charles G., aged twelve, ten, seven, four and one respectively. Both Mr. and Mrs. Crowell are members of the Congregational church of Ulster Township. In the year 1861 he purchased forty acres on section 31, Ulster Township, where he still resides, and also a forty of section 30, making a farm of eighty acres, all under good cultivation. He usually puts in crop of from fifty to sixty acres, and keeps in stock, all told, about forty head.

S. W. Crowell Pages 1037 – 1038

Was born in Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wis., in 1845. He is a son of Edward Crowell, who was one of Floyd County’s pioneers, and whose biography will be found in this work. S. W. Crowell became a citizen of Floyd County in 1856; made is first purchase of real estate in 1864. This was a tract of forty acres on section 30, Ulster Township; this he afterward sold and bought eighty acres on section 29, which he also sold. He again made a purchase of forty acres on section 31. This he also soon sold, each transaction yielding him a fair profit. In the year 1866 he purchased fifty acres on section 5, where he now resides. In 1873 he bought forty acres on section 31, adjoining his other land, making a farm of ninety acres. He usually puts in crop about sixty acres, and keeps about six head of cattle, two horses, and from fifty to seventy hogs. He was married in Charles City in 1871 to Esther A. Collins, a native of New York, born in 1841. They have two children – Ralph, aged five years, and Nellie, aged two. Politically Mr. Crowell is a Greenbacker; has held the office of Assessor for two years.

C. Dinkel Page 1038

Was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1839; came to America in 1856, locating first in Dodge County, Wis., where he spent about four years working as a farm hand; from thence he went to Marathon County, where he owned a piece of timber. Here he remained about eight years engaged in the lumber business as a hand. In the year 1868 he became a citizen of Floyd County; purchased same year eighty acres on section 14, Ulster Township, where he still resides; has since added to his original purchase eighty acres; forty was bought in 1872 and forty in 1874. The location and soil and improvements of this farm number it among the best in the county. He used to farm as high as eighty and ninety acres of wheat, but the crop proving an unprofitable one he now farms only about twenty-five. Has in corn fifty acres, and twenty-two in oats. In addition to farming, Mr. Dinkel makes stock-raising quite an item, and expects to go into it even more extensively. Keeps on an average about twenty-five head of cattle, and from thirty to forty hogs, and four head of horses. Mr. Dinkel was married in Wisconsin, in 1866, to Miss Paulina Kopplin, a native of Germany. They have eight children – Bertie, Mary, Anna, Carl, Otto, Clara, Lena and Huldah. Both Mr. and Mrs. Dinkel are members of the Lutheran church.

John Drager Pages 1038 – 1039

Was born in Germany in 1842, and came to the United States about the year 1868, locating first in Wisconsin, working on the farm as a had about five years, then rented a piece of land one year. In the fall of 1874 he became a citizen of Floyd County, Ia., and purchased a farm of forty acres on section 3, Ulster Township, where he still resides. He has since bought 105 acres, making a farm of 145, that is as good as the county affords; farms about sixty-five acres usually, putting out about ten acres of wheat, thirty-five of oats, and sixteen of corn. He farms in addition to this, thirty-four acres of corn, five of oats, and fifteen of wheat. He was married in Wisconsin in 1869 to Miss Augusta Grete. They have seven children, four boys and three girls – Amel, Frank, Emma, Elizabeth, Lena, Charles and George. Both Mr. and Mrs. Drager are members of the Methodist church.

Herman Eichmeier Page 1039

Was born in Germany in 1838. At the age of eighteen he came to America, locating first in Freeport, Ill., where he remained about thirteen years, engaged in farming principally, though part of the time he was engaged in making brick. In the year 1871 he came to Floyd County, Iowa, and purchased his present farm of eighty-three acres, where he now resides, in Ulster Township. In 1878 he made another purchase of eighty acres adjoining his other. For the first he paid $1,800; for the second $1,050, the last being unimproved land. Floyd County farmers have generally found both grain and stock farms to be the most profitable. This year Mr. Eichmeier has in crop twenty acres of wheat, seventeen of oats, forty-three of corn, and thirty of grass; keeps about twenty head of cattle, forty hogs and seven horses. Mr. Eichmeier was married in Freeport, Ill., in 1866, to Miss Caroline Bicker, a native
of Germany, being born there in 1847. Their family consists of five children – William H., Saimon A., Henry, Hermon and Anna Mary. Both are members of the Methodist church. He votes the Republican ticket.

F. W. Gabel Pages 1039 – 1040

Was born in Prussia, Germany, In 1839. In 1854 he came to the United States with his father and mother, John and Josephine Gabel. There was of the family nine children. Here in Wisconsin, Mr. F. Gabel spent the first fourteen years. A little instance of his life is well worthy of mention here, to illustrate how a man may start from nothing and by energy and perseverance wring from the hard hand of toil an independent fortune: At the age of sixteen he, in company with another lad of his own age, stated from home with a lunch between them, and only ten cents to bear expenses. This was the possession of Mr. Gabel. They walked to Rosedale, a distance of 35 miles. Failing to find work they returned, still holding on to the ten cents. These are remembered by Mr. Gable, as being the hardest times it has ever been his lot to pass through. In 1868 he became a citizen of Floyd County. The same year purchased eighty acres on section 14, Ulster Township, where he still resides. To this he has since added 320 acres, making one of the largest and best farms in the county. In 1875 he built the finest house in the township, and the county affords no better. He not only has its surrounding beautified with shade and evergreen trees, symmetrically arranged, but he has the inside beautifully furnished and ornamented with modern art. Of this large farm all is under cultivation except eighty acres of timber and pasture land. He puts in crops yearly 320 acres, besides keeping seventy-three head of cattle, and about 100 head of hogs and ten head of horses. Mr. Gabel was married May 5, 1868 to Miss Agnes Devilla. She was a native of Belgium, born there in 1847. They have four children – Devilla, John, George and Freddie. Both Mr. and Mrs. Gable are members of the Catholic church.

August Gelhaus Page 1040

Was born in Germany, July 5, 1847. In 1873 he came to America, locating first in Illinois. In December 1873 he became a citizen of Floyd County, purchasing his farm of eighty acres, on section 19, Ulster Township, where he still resides. He built a nice barn in 1877. In 1876 he purchased eighty acres on section 29, has in corn seventy acres, wheat twelve, oats thirty, hay twelve, and rye ten; has six horses, seventeen cattle and sixty hogs. Dec. 15, 1873, he and Miss Wilhelmina Winter were married. They have four children – August, Lydia, Clara and Matilda. Both Mr. and Mrs. Gelhaus are members of the Methodist church. Politically he is a sound Republican.

E. H. Hanchett Pages 1040 – 1041

Was born in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., May 18, 1830. At the age of four he moved with his father to Cuyahoga County, O., where they remained ten years. From there they moved to Walworth County, Wis., where E. H. made his home about twelve years, engaged in farming. At the expiration of this time E. H. Hanchett came to Iowa, locating upon a farm of eighty acres, which he purchased of the Government in 1855, section 29, Ulster Township. Here he has since resided, making him one of Floyd County’s pioneers, and one of the very first settlers of Ulster Township. Has added to this first purchase five acres of timber. Built himself a good farm house in 1870. With the exception of a few oak trees he set out all that now so beautifully surrounds his house. He has indeed a nice farm and pleasant home. Has under cultivation about sixty acres. In Walworth County, Wis., Feb. 25, 1858, he and Miss Caroline Bessee were united in marriage. She was a native of Michigan. They have five children – Allen, Lanson, Lucinda, Silas and Nellie. Of Mr. Hanchett we are pleased to say he is not only one of the first men in this county in point of time, but one of the first in society and in the interest of agriculture and the county generally.

G. F. Heitz Page 1041

Was born in Jo Davies County, Ill., Dec. 11, 1855. He is a son of John Heitz, who, in the year 1868, purchased 183 acres on section 2, Ulster Township, Floyd County, were G. F. Heitz and his brother, John Heitz, Jr., now reside. In the year 1876 G. F. Heitz came to Ulster Township and worked about one year on a farm. That fall he returned to Illinois, there he remained till the following March, when he, in company with his father and family, moved to Floyd County, Ia., where his father still resides. In the Fall G. F. returned to Illinois, and the 19th of February was married to Miss Mary Haas, who was also born in Joe Davies County, Ill. This same spring he and wife moved to Charles City, remaining only a short time, when he moved on to the piece of land formerly purchased by his father in Ulster Township; he and his brother each buying a half of 183 acres. In the year 1869 Mr. Heitz built himself a pleasant residence. His farm is one of the good ones of Floyd County. Up till the present he has turned his attention principally to farming, but recently has turned his mind toward stock raising. This year he has thirty acres of corn, eighteen acres of oats, fifteen acres of wheat, and twenty-eight acres in hay. Has on hand fifty head of hogs, eight head of cattle, and four horses. His family consists of two children – John William and an infant daughter. Is a sound Republican. Is at present the Constable of Ulster Township.

John Heitz, Jr. Pages 1041 – 1042

Was born in Jo Davies County, Ill., Jan. 30, 1852. He is a son of John Heitz, Sr., who is now a resident of St. Charles Township, Floyd County. In the year 1875 John Heitz, Jr., left Illinois and came to Floyd County, and worked the first summer for Mr. Blunt, near Charles City. The spring following he moved upon the north half of the 183 acres his father had previously purchased on section 2, Ulster Township. This same spring he purchased this tract of land from his father. In the fall previous to moving upon the farm he built himself a pleasant residence, where he still resides. His farm has the appearance of thrift and of being under the care of a model farmer. He makes farming his principal avocation. This year has in crop fourteen acres wheat; oats, twenty; corn, thirty-five; one-half acre potatoes; has five head of cattle; usually keeps twenty-five or thirty hogs and three horses. He was married in 1876 to Anna Sabina Toepfer, a native of Germany, born May 6, 1850. Their family consists of three children – Henry John, Anna Elizabeth and Emma Louisa. Both Mr. and Mrs. Heitz are members of the Methodist church. Politically he is a Republican.

Mathias August Hirsch Page 1042

Was born in Grant County, Wis., March 4, 1853. He is a son of Fredric Hirsch, who emigrated to this country in 1847, from Germany, locating in Illinois; moved to Grant County, Wis., the following year, where he remained till his death, which occurred in the year 1866, leaving a family of five sons and one daughter. In 1875 M. A. Hirsch married Emma Stoeber, a native of Grant County, Wis., being born there in 1854. The family consists of three sons – Irving S., Henry W. and Charles A. Mr. Hirsch owns a nice place of forty acres which he purchased in 1874, all under fine cultivation and improvements, his building and surroundings surpassing many older homes and in older counties. Mr. and Mrs. Hirsch are both members of the German M. E. church. Mr. Hirsch is an old time sound Republican.

C. W. Hudson Page 1042

Was born in Rochester, N. Y., in 1830. When a young man he received a common school education. He remained in New York till about twenty-four years of age engaged in farming, principally in Steuben, Wayne and Oneida counties. In the year 1855 he went to Ogle County, Ill., where he worked by the month and day as a farm hand, remaining about four years. In the winter of 1859 he became a citizen of Floyd County, thus making him one of its pioneers. Located in Ulster Township. The first season rented a piece of land on section 30. Afterward rented for two years the farm of 140 acres which he now owns and where he resides, section 30, Ulster Township. This purchase was made in the fall of 1865, paying $1,090. Has since erected good farm buildings; has a splendid barn, built only last summer, 36 x 60. He used to put out twenty-five and thirty acres of wheat; oats, fifteen; and from sixty to seventy acres of corn. His farm is about the same now, with the exception of wheat, which he does not find profitable to raise. Of late years has turned his attention more to stock, keeping about twenty-five head of cattle, and from sixty to eighty hogs. In Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., July 5, 1858, he and wife Susan Hellman, were united in marriage. They have no family. He votes the Republican ticket, and has several years held the office of Trustee. Though he never learned the trade he built his own barn, never drawing a draft.

Thomas W. Johnson Page 1043

Was born in England in 1826; came to the United States in the fall of 1877; spent the first two years in company with his son, George W., and his wife, upon the farm of his deceased brother, Wilbert G., an account of which is given in the biography of W. R. Johnson. In the spring of 1880 Mr. Johnson bought eighty acres of R. M. Curry, on section 26, Ulster Township, where he still resides. Besides this eighty, he and his son, George W., farm the adjoining eighty. Mr. Johnson’s farm is well calculated for stock; near a herd yard, and plenty open prairie. He has a nice house and pleasant surroundings. In England Thomas W. Johnson was married to Miss Mary Capaw in the year 1854. They have seven children – Anna Mary, Jane Annetta, George Willis, Elizabeth Chapman, Zilpah Lydia, Henry Theophilus, and Nellie. Mr. Johnson’s wife and family are still in England, except George W. (who married Alice Jane Napels, a native of England; they keep house for his father; they have two children – Florence Anna and Julia Annetta), and a daughter, Jane Annetta, who married Oren Bowen, a son of Mr. Bowen, of Rockford Township. They reside in Fargo, Dak. Previous to coming to America Mr. Johnson had been connected with the dry goods and shipping business in Manchester, England, for about twenty years, with one of the largest firms of the city A. & S. Henry & Co., who shipped large quantities of goods to New York, Boston and Philadelphia. Thirteen millions of sterling in amount of goods were sometimes shipped in twelve months. Mr. Johnson returned to England in the fall of 1882 to see his family and mother, who still resides there at the advanced age of eighty-five. He is her only surviving child of a family of five children.

W. R. Johnson Pages 1043 – 1044

Was born in Ulster Township in 1858. He was a son of W. G. Johnson, who came from England in 1856 and purchased a farm of 380 acres in Ulster Township. Upon this farm he made many improvements – hauled brick from Waverly, a distance of fifty miles, and built a two story brick house, 16 x 20, with a one story L, the base of which was nearly as large as the two story part; he also built a log stable, 18 x 28. Here he and his wife made their home about four years, when Mrs. Johnson was killed by lightening while standing in the stairway of her house. Shortly after this event Mr. Johnson and his son, W. R. went to Chicago to live, renting the farm; returned in 1867, and lived here till the fall of 1869, when they both returned to Yorkshire, England, and there Mr. Johnson Sr., died in 1876. In the fall of 1877 Mr. Johnson, accompanied by an uncle and cousin, returned to America to look after his interest in the West. During his absence the place has been lying idle, and he found that the neighbors had hauled the house almost entirely away. The scarcity of brick of course made a valid excuse, but the stealing of the log stable and log house in the woods in the midst of timber scarcely excuses the act. His uncle and cousin assisted in the care of the farm till 1880, when W. R. assumed control, and has since that time been manager and proprietor of three fourths of the farm, having a sister in England. He has 140 acres under cultivation. While in England he spent eighteen months on the sea; visited Australia and San Francisco in a sailing vessel, touching Ireland on the return voyage. In 1881 he again visited England. He as married in the spring of 1881, in Charles City, to Miss Mary Blunt.

August Koch Pages 1044 – 1045

Was born in Germany, in 1841. He was a son of Christian Koch, a native of Germany, who died there in 1875. At the age of twenty-eight August Koch came to the United States, locating first in Wisconsin, where he remained about two years, working as a farm hand. At the expiration of that time he became a citizen of Ulster Township, Floyd County, Ia., where he spent the first summer as a farm hand; afterward rented a farm and continued as a renter for about four years. In 1876 he purchased eighty acres in Union Township, where he remained one year, when he sold it at an advance of his purchase price. In 1877 he purchased eighty acres where he still resides, on section 17, Ulster Township. The same year he built himself a good residence, and put the farm under a good state of cultivation. His surroundings are very pleasant, and he now owns one of the good farms and enjoyable homes of Floyd County. In January 1880, he purchased a nice piece of timber of five acres. He used to put out from fifty to sixty acres in wheat, but late years only eighteen or twenty acres. At present he has about thirty-two acres of corn, oats about ten; has about thirteen head of cattle, thirty-five hogs, and four head of horses. In Germany, in 1867, he and Miss Minnie Sthal, a native of Germany, were united in marriage. Their family consists of six children – Minnie, John, Emma, Albert, Otto and Herman. Both Mr. and Mrs. Koch are members of the Methodist church. Politically Mr. Koch is a Republican, and is at present Constable in Ulster Township; has held the office of Supervisor and School Director. Of Mr. Koch we are pleased to say we find him one of Floyd County’s model farmers, and a man of energy. He has by his own exertions brought himself from the position of dependence to that of independence.

August Koehler Page 1045

Was born in Germany in 1838; came to America in 1865, locating first in Wisconsin, where he remained two years working as a farm hand. Afterward he rented a farm, which he ran about eight years. In 1874 he came to Floyd County, and rented a farm in St. Charles Township one year. In 1875 he purchased the farm of eighty acres where he still resides, on section 17, Ulster Township. In the year 1882 he repaired his house, making indeed a pleasant home, surrounded by a fine grove. He owns one of the good farms of Floyd County, and has it under a fine state of cultivation. He has in wheat twenty-five acres; oats, sixteen acres; corn, twenty-two acres, besides twenty he is working on another farm. His stock consists of two horses, fourteen head of cattle and eighteen head of hogs. In 1866, in Wisconsin, Mr. Koehler and Miss Amelia Koehler were united in marriage. Their family consists of seven children – Ida, William, Minna, Henry, Albert, Mertie, and an infant daughter not yet named. Both Mr. and Mrs. Koehler are members of the Methodist church. Politically he is a Republican.

Henry Koehler Page 1045

Was born in Prussia in 1840. At the age of twenty-six he came to the United State, locating in Wisconsin and remaining there four years. In 1870 he purchased the farm of 150 acres where he still resides, on section 3, Ulster Township, Floyd County, Ia., In 1870, in Wisconsin, he married Miss Louisa Otterstine, also a native of Prussia, being born there in 1848. She came to Wisconsin at the age of eight years. Their family consists of six children – Emma, Emil, Frank, Charles, Bertie and George. Both Mr. and Mrs. Koehler are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Koehler has been Supervisor and is now School Director. Politically he is a Republican. In 1862-’63 he was a private in the Prussian army.

Henry Koehlstaedt Pages 1045 – 1046

Was born in Germany in 1842, and came to America in 1860. The first four years in this country were spent near Frankfort, Ill., where he worked as a farm hand. One of the strongest inducements his mother had to leave the old county, was to free her sons from the army requirements. But to her astonishment, all of her three sons enlisted in the war for the Union. Henry Koehlstaedt enlisted Jan. 16, 1864, Company C, Forty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served his country two years; held the office of Corporal the last six months; was never wounded, taken prisoner nor in the hospital a day in his life. After his army life he returned to his Illinois home and farmed two years. Purchased eighty acres on section 16, Ulster Township, this county, in August 1868; moved upon it in October. He added to his first possessions till now he owns 165 acres of as good land as lies in Floyd County. Puts in a crop of usually twenty acres of wheat, but formerly raised high as sixty and seventy acres; has forty-five in corn and twenty in oats; has thirty-two head of cattle, seventy-five hogs and five horses. Was married in Illinois in 1866, to Miss Caroline Venneolt, a native of Germany; came to this country with parents when she was one year old. They have seven children – William, Martha, Emil, Ida, Samuel, Henry and Sarah. Both are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a local preacher in the same.

Simon Koerner Page 1046

Was born in Germany in 1841; came to America Sept. 4, 1873, locating first in Stephenson County, Ill., where he purchased forty acres of land and farmed two and one-half years, when he sold his farm and came to Floyd County, Ia., and bought the farm of 160 acres where he still resides, in Ulster Township, section 7. In 1878 he built one of the finest houses in Floyd County and built a fine barn in 1881. Has always found stock- raising and farming, run together, the most profitable. Heretofore he has raised usually from fifty to sixty acres of wheat, ten to twelve acres of oats and sixty to seventy acres of corn, He usually keeps about twelve head of milch cows and about the same number of young cattle, fifty head of hogs and five horses. His motto is that “well-fed stock pays the best.” Mr. Koerner was married in Germany in 1869 to Miss Wilhelmina Gelhaus. Their family consists of six children – Charles, Emil, William, Edward, Minna and an infant son not yet named. Both Mr. and Mrs. Koerner are members of the German Methodist church. Their children can all read and speak both the English and German languages. Of Mr. Koerner we are pleased to say he has by industry wrung from the hard hand of toil one of the finest farms and homes of Floyd County. Has held the position of Supervisor. Politically he is a Republican.

Charles A. Lenz Pages 1046 – 1049

Was born in Germany in 1822. In 1841 he came to America, locating in Wisconsin, where he remained three years, at the expiration of which time he moved to Floyd County, Iowa. He purchased the farm of sixty acres where he still resides, in Ulster Township. Built a fine residence in 1874, the year after he moved upon his land. Mr. Lenz was married in Germany, in 1847, to Miss Doratha Koehler. The family consists of six children – Fred W., Ernest H., Caroline, Amelia, Henry and Augusta. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lenz are members of the Methodist church. Politically he is a Republican. His children all speak and read English.

M. F. Lessin Page 1049

Was born in Germany, Oct. 25, 1837; came to this country in 1865, and stopped the first four years in Wisconsin. In the spring of 1869 he came to Floyd County, and worked on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad during the summer. In the fall he purchased sixty acres in Ulster Township, where he still resides. In the fall of 1875 he purchased fifty-four acres adjoining his other land. Here he has lived since first coming into the State with the exception of the years 1873-'75. He traveled as preacher in the German Methodist church; was at Shell Rock, Iowa, and on the Mountain Lake Circuit, Minn.; was a local preacher twelve years. In the year 1865 in Germany, Mr. Lessin and Miss Minna Swartz were united in marriage. She only lived about one year, leaving one child – August Fredric, now fifteen years of age. Mr. Lessin married his second wife in Wisconsin in 1869, her name was Louisa Sette. She was also born in Germany and came to this country with her parents at about the age of thirteen. By this union they have seven children – Augusta Amelia, Charles Fredric, John Henry, Emiel Ernest, Bertie, Rosena and Lydia Emma. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lessin are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically he is a Republican.

John Lines Pages 1049 – 1050

Was born in Warwickshire, England, May 3, 1834. In the spring of 1852 he came to America, locating first in Ogle County, Ill., where he remained about one year; moved then to De Kalb County, and remained about two years, working as a farm hand all the time. In the month of April 1855, he became a citizen of Floyd County, working by the month the first two years. In the spring of 1855 he pre-empted eighty acres in Ulster Township, bought ten acres of timber in Union Township. In 1857 he commenced improving and farming this place. In 1876 he built upon it a good farm house and other buildings. Has added to his first purchase eighty acres, making one of Floyd County's best one-quarter section farms. Has always found stock more profitable than farming, keeps about seventeen head of cattle; hogs, eight head and horses, ten head. In former years he used to put out fifty acres of wheat, but finding it an unprofitable crop has this year only thirteen acres with corn seventy-five, oats forty, and fifteen of meadow. In 1859 he and Mrs. Fanny Hillman (widow of James Hillman, deceased) were united in marriage. Their family consists of five children – John William, Jennie M., Charles Henry, Mary E. and Lizzie D. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lines are members of the Christian church. Politically we find Mr. Lines a sound Republican, aspires to no office, though he does his share of holding township positions in school affairs.

O. McEwen Page 1050 – 1051

Was born in Ulster County, N. Y., May 18, 1833. At the age of twenty three he came to Iowa, locating on Flood Creek, Ulster Township, section 32, where he had, two years previously, entered 200 acres at Government price, being $1.25 per acre. This he improved and afterward disposed of a portion. At present he owns 200 acres of choice farming land, well improved, and supplied with buildings surpassing many in older counties. Mr. McEwen has principally been engaged in farming. In 1881 he started a creamery, working up the milk of about 500 cows into butter. He expects to add to it a cheese apparatus. Mr. McEwen has not only been a man who could look well after his own business, but has most of the time since coming to the county held some office of trust for the people; viz., Township Clerk, Trustee, etc., besides holding the position of Sunday school Superintendent for the past twenty years. Nov. 29, 1857, he and Phoebe Crowell were united in marriage. She was also a native of New York State, being born in Allegany County in 1836. Their family consists of four children – Elbridge O., Fred H., Rena and Gertie, ages twenty-three, twenty-one, fifteen and six respectively. Both Mr. and Mrs. McEwen are members of the Congregational church. They not only enjoy the respect of their neighbors, but the love of their children, and a hope in the world to come as well as a pleasant home here.

W. L. McEwen Page 1051

Was born in Ulster County, N. Y., Jan. 19, 1831. In May 1856 he, in company with two brothers, came to Iowa. W. L. McEwen located upon a piece of land in Ulster Township which he had entered two years previous, his brother, O. McEwen, securing the Government deed. On this tract of land Mr. McEwen still resides, being situated on section 32. He received a practical business education in the East, and has most of the time since coming West been engaged in teaching school, which avocation, we are pleased to state, we found him engaged in, assisting in laying broad and deep the future history of the West. Nov. 30, 1853, he and Harriet Rhinehart were united in marriage. She was also a native of New York State, being born in Ulster County, July 4, 1832. Their family consists of three sons and one daughter – John Howard, Charles Eugene, Elmer Elsworth and Florence May; ages, twenty-six, twenty-four, twenty-one and thirteen respectively. Howard is married, and keeps the Putnam House at Rockwell; Eugene also married and has been a partner in the firm of Eggert & McEwen, publishers of the Rockford Reveille. The other children are at home. Both Mr. and Mrs. McEwen are members of the Congregational church. Mr. McEwen was elected Township Clerk at the first election, and has held that position will within the last two years; is at present Township Secretary. He was born with the Republican party.

Jacob Metz Pages 1051 – 1052

Was born in Ohio in 1849. He was a son of Mr. John George Metz, who moved with his family to Wisconsin in 1854. Here Jacob Metz made his home till Sept. 28, 1876, when he became a citizen of Floyd County. At this date he purchased forty acres on section 9, Ulster Township; has since purchased twenty-two acres, making in all sixty –two acres. He built a good house in 1877, and has made many improvements, till now he has indeed a good farm and pleasant home. He has about seven acres in wheat, two in oats, eighteen in corn, besides fifteen he farms outside. He was married in Wisconsin in 1869 to Betsy M. Liske, a native of Germany. She came to this country when a child two years of age. They have five children – Emma M., William G., Anna M., Martha and Lilly. Both Mr. and Mrs. Metz are members of the Lutheran church. Politically he is a Democrat.

John Moll Page 1052

Was born in Mechlenburg-Schwerin, Germany, June 17, 1832. In 1857 he came to America, locating first in Columbus, Wis., where he worked by the day and month for about five years. Afterward handled wheat in a warehouse for buyers about four years, then teamed for himself about five years, which he found quite profitable. In Columbus he built himself a good home, which he sold in 1870, and came to Ulster Township, Floyd County, and purchased 120 acres, where he still resides on section 28. He commenced improving his land, and soon had it under cultivation and adorned with shade tees, etc. In 1875 he purchased an adjoining eighty acres, on section 27. He used the splendid wheat crop of 1878 to build himself a fine residence and barn. Again, in 1882, he purchased another eighty acres, which joined his farm on the north, on section 28. We have had the pleasure of seeing this property, and must say that when the fine house and barn and its beautiful surroundings are considered, together the beautiful laying land, and under such prime cultivation, with fine looking crops, that it is not only one of the finest farms and homes in the State, but one of the grandest that it has ever been our privilege to behold. He raises about forty acres of wheat, forty-five acres of corn, and thirty-nine of oats, and cuts from fifty to sixty tons of hay. Keeps from thirty to forty head of cattle and about one hundred head of hogs and seven head of horses. Was married in Wisconsin, Jan. 10, 1861, to Miss Ustina Spicker, a native of Germany. They have five children – Mary, Henry, Frank, Lena and Benjamin. Both Mr. and Mrs. Moll are members of the Methodist church. Mr. Moll is politically a Republican.

H. H. Myers Pages 1052 – 1053

Was born in Orange County, N. Y., in 1843, where he made his home till he was twenty-one years of age. At this date he started West to see what it promised; spent the year 1864 in Michigan and Wisconsin. In 1865 he purchased eighty acres on section 32, Ulster Township, where he has since resided. Of this eighty he sold forty acres, and purchased eighty more on section 29. In the year 1867, at Rockford, Mr. Myers and Miss Emma J. Piatt were united in marriage. She was a native of Otsego County, N. Y., born there in 1849. They have a family of four children – John G., Nellie A., Maude A. and Jerome P. Both Mr. and Mrs. Myers are members of the Congregational society of Ulster Township. He is a good sound Republican, but says he likes farming better than politics.

T. Pippin Page 1053

Was born in Shelby, Chittenden County, Vt., in 1845. He is a son of Joseph and Matilda Pippin, both natives of Canada, and emigrated to Vermont about the year 1837 or 1838. Here Mr. Pippin remained till his death, which occurred in 1879, in the month of September. His widow still resides in Chittenden County. At the age of seventeen, T. Pippin, the subject of this sketch, enlisted in Company D, Tenth Vermont Volunteers, July 23, 1862; served his county till July 4, 1865, when he as discharged. He was in thirteen general engagements, as follows: Locust Grove, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Tolopatamy Creek, Cold Harbor and Petersburg, Va.; Monocacy, Md.; Opequon Creek, Fisher’s Hill, Cedar Creek, capture of Petersburg, and Sailor’s Creek, Va. His principal marches were: October 1863 when Lee drove the army from Culpepper, Va., to Washington; the march through the Wilderness, and the marches of Sheridan. The last march was to Appomattox, at the capture of General Lee. Mr. Pippin was one of the profitable soldiers; he was always on duty with the exception of a week he was in a hospital with typhoid fever; was never taken prisoner nor wounded; was shot with a spent ball from a spherical case, but received no injury. After his return from the army he went to California, remaining one summer, engaging in the dairy business. In the fall he went to Silver City, Nev. Here he remained three years and a half, working in the quartz mills. In April 1870, he returned to Shelby, Vt., where he remained only about four months, when he went to Columbia County, Wis., where he purchased ninety acres of land, and farmed about two years, when he sold his farm and returned to Silver City, Nev., and worked three years and a half in the quartz mills. Then he went to Iowa in search of a home, and settled in Floyd County, purchasing ninety acres on section 7, Ulster Township; now owns 100 acres. This year he has in corn thirty acres; oats, eight acres. Has in a crop on an adjoining 160 acres belonging to Miss Mary Wright, oats, fifty; wheat, twelve, and corn, fifty acres. His stock consists of eight cows, ten head of young cattle and four horses. Aug. 15, 1870 in Burlington, Vt., he and Miss Julia Edwards were united in marriage. She is a native of Vermont. Their family consists of two children – Agnes and Florence. Mr. Pippin is a sound Republican, but holds a lively contempt for office.

B. F. Porter, Jr. Page 1054

Was born in New York in 1850. At the age of sixteen he came with his father, B. F. Porter, Sr., to Iowa, and located in Floyd County, St. Charles Township, where he still resides. In the year 1876, B. F. Porter, Jr., purchased the farm of eighty acres, where he still resides, on section 36, Ulster Township. Has made all the improvements, which are many; has planted fruit and shade trees, and built himself a good house. Mr. Porter was married in 1871 to Miss Joana M. Hunter, a native of New York State. They have three children – Geneva, Nellie and Ralph.

M. Prall Page 1054

Was born in Allegany County, N. Y., in 1831; made that State his home till thirteen years of age, when he moved with his father, Edward Prall, to Pennsylvania, where he lived eighteen years, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he spent about one year. From here he went to Minnesota, and remained three years, engaged in farming 160 acres which he had purchased. In 1860 he sold this farm and moved to Nebraska, and remained nine months, when he went to Howard County, Ia., and farmed three years. At the expiration of this time he went again to Wisconsin, remained eighteen months and returned to Iowa, locating at Winneshiek County, where he bought forty acres, and farmed nearly two years. In 1868 he became a citizen of Floyd County, purchasing 160 acres on sections 23 and 27, Ulster Township, where he still lives. Of this farm and home we can but say that it is indeed beautifully located and situated, being in full view of the M. & St. P. R. R., five and one half miles from Floyd, and four from Rudd, and only eight from the county seat. Has his farm all under a fine state of cultivation; has usually in crop about 100 acres. Keeps about fifteen head of cattle and forty-five head of hogs, and seven head of horses. He was married in 1857 to Mary Raymond, a native of Vermont. They have two children – Eliza Jane and Clinton Edward, ages twenty-four and eighteen respectively. Of Mr. Prall we are pleased to say that we find him a very pleasant man, enjoying life, and the owner of one of Floyd County’s good farms, as every early settler deserves.

William Roschen Pages 1054 – 1055

Was born in Germany, July 10, 1846; came to America in 1865, stopping in New York City the first six years; was engaged at the carpenter’s trade five years, working the most of the time in factories. The sixth year he studied veterinary surgery. In 1871 he became a citizen of Floyd County. Since coming here he has been engaged in buying and improving farms; has owned some eleven farms in all. In 1875 he bought eighty acres on section 28. Built a nice house in 1874, which was destroyed by fire in 1879. He immediately rebuilt, placing a fine house upon the ruins of the old one. Has just completed a splendid barn. Has beautified his surroundings with shade and fruit trees and flowers, till now he has one of the finest farms and pleasantest homes in the county. In the city of New York, in 1867, he and Miss Mattie Hanins were united in marriage. They have two children – Rebecca and Martha. Both Mr. and Mrs. Roschen are members of the Lutheran church. At this writing we find Mr. Roschen engaged in the building of a large barn for his neighbor, Zwack. Most of his time is engaged as a carpenter. He is the veterinary doctor of the township.

James Roberts Page 1055

Was born in Sullivan County, N. Y., Sansburg Township, April 15, 1832. Till about twenty-five years of age he made his home with his father, Thomas Roberts, who was engaged in the lumbering business principally. In the year 1857 James Roberts went to Wausan, Wis., where he engaged in the lumber business about two years. At the expiration of this time he went to Ripon, Wis., where he engaged in farming, remaining about six years. At this date he became a citizen of Charles City remaining about one year, engaged in farming. At the expiration of this time he purchased 130 acres for $10 per acre on section 32, Ulster Township, where he still resides; has since added to his farm till he now owns 240 acres, all under good cultivation, and one of the good farms of Floyd County. June 7, 1862, Mr. Roberts and Miss Louisa Shafer were united in marriage. They have a family of six children – four sons and two daughters. Both Mr. and Mrs. Roberts are members of the Methodist church. Politically he is a Republican.

William Schunemann Pages 1055 – 1056

Was born in Germany in 1832. In 1862 he came to America stopping five years in Lowell, Wis., where he bought a small farm. Afterward bought a farm near Columbus, Wis., and lived six years. In 1873 he became a citizen of Floyd County. Bought a farm of eighty acres where he still resides on section 17, Ulster Township. In 1877 he bought eighty acres on section 8, same township. In 1880 he built himself a nice residence, etc. Put out the first year twenty-five acres of wheat, sixty-six acres of corn, twenty-three acres of oats, and twenty of hay; has five horses, twenty-four head of cattle, and fifty-four hogs. In Germany, in 1858, he married Augusta Koehler. They have four children living – Augusta, Lizzie, Amelia and Mary; lost two sons, ages seven and four, in 1877 – Freddie and Henry. Both Mr. and Mrs. Schunemann are members of the Methodist church.

H. E. Stout Page 1056

Was born in Centre County, Penn., in 1836. He is a son of John and Sarah (Kryder) Stout, natives of Pennsylvania. In 1848 Mr. Stout, in company with his parents, moved to Stephenson County, Ill., near Freeport, where he purchased a farm and resided until his death, which occurred February 1881. Mrs. Stout still makes the old homestead her home. After going to Illinois, H. E. Stout attended school at Rock River Seminary five terms. Afterward engaged in teaching town and district schools. Mr. Stout has been a teacher more or less for the last thirty years, and now returns to Illinois each winter and teaches school. While in Freeport he engaged as clerk in a dry good store; here he remained two years. This avocation he abandoned on account of his health and came to Iowa and located upon a farm in Ulster Township, section 5, which he had bought in 1857, paying $3.75. He has eighty acres with sixty under cultivation, fifteen of it being wheat, thirty corn, and oats fifteen; cuts about nine acres of hay. In the State of Illinois, in the year 1871, he and Miss Louisa M. Lawrence were united in marriage. She was born in Germany, 1851. They have two children – Lilian May and Kittie Genevieve, ages ten and two respectively, both born in Illinois. Politically he is a sound Douglas Democrat.

A. H. Strong Page 1056

Was born in Delaware County, N. Y., in 1829. At about the age of twenty-four he went to Ogle County, Ill., where he remained four years, engaged in a general jobbing business such as groceries, butchering, etc. At the expiration of this time he went to Charles City, Floyd County, Iowa; here he remained about ten years, engaged in farming, principally. At this date he moved to Ulster Township and purchased eighty acres of Floyd County’s good land in Ulster Township, section 36, where he still resides, engaged in stock-raising and farming. In 1851 he and Miss Hannah A. Judson were united in marriage. Their family consists of five children – Charter Adelbert, Fred E., Cora M., Charles Dwight and Otho.

Charles Vietmeier Pages 1056 – 1057

Was born in Germany in 1841. In 1868 he came to America, locating first in Illinois, where he worked as a farm hand eleven months. At the expiration of this time he came to Floyd County and purchased eighty acres of land in Ulster Township, where he still resides. Has since added to his purchase eighty acres, and ten acres of timber. For the first he paid $7.00, for the last $12.50 per acre. He started from the lowest round in the ladder, and has, by his own exertion, wrung from the hard hand of toil one of the finest farms in Iowa, all under first –class cultivation and improvement. He is to build a fine house the coming year; has always thought mixed farming the most profitable. An item worthy of mention here is, that when he purchased his last eighty he kept a perfect account of its cost, interest and expense of family one year. He raised from it 2,000 bushels of wheat, and came within $20 of paying for itself and paying all expenses. This year he has in corn, seventy acres; rye, twenty; wheat, eight, oats, eighteen; timothy, eight; balance, pasture land. Has eight cows, ten young cattle, five horses and two colts, and seventy head of hogs. In 1869 Mr. Vietmeier and Wilhelmena Komer were united in marriage. The family consists of six children – Lydia, Anna, Louis, Laura, William and Minnie. Both Mr. and Mrs. Vietmeier are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. When Mr. Vietmeier came here, he, in company with some others, organized a Sunday school of five members, which has now grown to about ninety, and the church, whose number was then only about four or five members, has grown to about 130 or 140. Mr. Vietmeier has frequently held the position of School Director and Supervisor.

J. G. Wiggins Page 1057

Was born in Maine, Oct. 6, 1814. Here he received a common-school education when a young man; also learned the carpenter’s trade, which avocation, in connection with farming, he pursued till he was about forty-three years of age. He made his home with his parents, and managed the home farm for them, and cared for their welfare during their lifetime. His mother died about the year 1841, and his father in the year 1852. His parents’ names were Asa and Abigail. In 1857 Mr. Wiggins came to Iowa, locating in Winneshiek County, where he bought 181 acres, and farmed seventeen years. In 1874 he became a citizen of Floyd County. He purchased, the same year, 180 acres in Ulster Township, where he still resides. This was prairie land, and cost $2,800. He has since brought it all under cultivation except thirty acres, which he keeps for grass land. In 1878 he built the finest residence in the township; there are few, if any, better in the county. His premises are beautified with symmetrically planted shade and forest trees, and he has indeed a pleasant Western home. Mr. Wiggins’
age forbids his working very much himself, but the farm’s interests are well looked after by his son, R. C. Wiggins. In Maine, in the year 1843, April 12, Mr. J. G. Wiggins and Miss Ann H. Morrill were united in marriage. She was also a native of Maine, being born Dec. 24, 1820. Their family consists of three children – Henry C., now thirty-eight years of age, married Miss Sarah Jane Demry, and resides in Ulster Township, Fredric M., twenty-seven years of age, married Jennie Prall, and resides also in Ulster Township; R. C., twenty-five years of age, married Carrie Wyman. Mrs. J. G. Wiggins died July 25, 1880. She was a member of the M. E. church for twenty years prior to her death. Mr. Wiggins and his three sons are all Republicans.

John Witzel Page 1058

Was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1841; came to America in 1855, with his father, Christopher Witzel, who located in Wisconsin, where he remained till his death, which occurred only two or three years after his arrival. Here the family remained several years, and Mrs. Witzel made it her home till 1879, when she came to Floyd County, Iowa, and made her home with her son John till her death in 1879. Mr. John Witzel became a citizen of the county in 1869, and worked land on the shares the first six years. In 1875 he purchased eighty acres of prairie land on section 28, Ulster Township, where he still resides. This he broke up and has now under a fine state of cultivation. In 1877 he bought twenty-four acres of timber land in Floyd Township. Mr. Witzel was married in Wisconsin in 1869, to Miss Minnie Anding, and native of Germany. They have six children – Lena, Clara, Minnie, Ella, Eddy, and an infant son not yet named. Both Mr. and Mrs. Witzel are members of the M. E. church. Politically he is a Republican; cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln.

Carl Woelfer Page 1058 – 1059

Was born in Germany, Kingdom of Prussia, Province of Saxony, in the year 1841. He came to America in 1870, stopping first in Aurora, Ill., and worked in a railroad shop about nine months; he afterward worked as a farm hand about three years. In 1874 he came to Floyd County and worked in Nora Springs about a year as a farm hand. At the expiration of this time he moved upon his farm, where he now resides, on section 18, Ulster Township. In 1873 he built an addition to the house already on the place. The farm consists of something over eighty acres, and is one of Floyd County’s good farms. In 1878 he purchased eighty acres of land on section 17, Ulster Township, which is also under good cultivation; has in a crop of thirty acres of wheat, twenty-four of oats, sixty-two of corn, twelve of hay, and twenty-six acres in pasture; has seven head of horses, twenty-one head of cattle, and seventy-five head of hogs. Indeed we can say he is one of the strong and successful farmers of the county. April 3, 1875, in Floyd County, he and Miss Minna Sann were united in marriage. They have a family of seven children – William, Carl, Fredric, Albert, Oscar, Huldah and Minna. Both Mr. and Mrs. Woelfer are members of the Methodist church. He is a Republican, and has for the last three years been a School Director.

Mrs. Eliza R. Young Page 1059

Was born in Scotland in 1827, and married Mr. Charles Young in Scotland in 1850; came to the United States the same year, locating first in Wisconsin, where they remained till 1875. In the year 1861 Mr. Young died, leaving a family of four children – Frank, who is in the lumber regions in Minnesota; Archibald R., in Fargo, D. T., working in a grist-mill; Charles B., working at Orlando McEwen’s; William, who makes his home with his mother. In 1874 Mrs. Young bought forty acres of land in Ulster Township, section 33. They have put in crop this year, thirteen acres of corn; have raised seventeen acres of oats.