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Floyd County >> 1882 Index

History of Floyd County, Iowa
Chicago: Inter-state Publishing Co., 1882.

Union Township
submitted by Kathy Gerkins


C. T. Ackley Pages 1080 – 1081

Was born in Pittsfield, Otsego County, N. Y., July 25, 1833. He was the sixth child of James and Nancy Ackley. Mr. Ackley made New York his home till 1855, when he came to Iowa, arriving in Union Township, this county, on the 24th day of November. The same fall he pre-empted the farm of 160 acres, where he still resides, on section 20, township 94, range 17, about two miles southwest of Marble Rock. The year following his arrival he built the first residence in Aureola, and was the first white resident of that place. Here they lost a child, Marian; at about the age of four months; this was the first death of the place. The high water caused considerable malaria, and Mr. Ackley and his wife were both afflicted with the malady, which caused them to change their location. He then moved to his farm, where he had just completed the building of a fine large frame house. This home they enjoyed till April 1860, when it was destroyed entirely by fire; the building was not the only loss. Having no granary he placed in this house all his grain, which was also lost, as well as the greater portion of his furniture. Though, Mr. Ackley has furnished us much interesting matter, we believe he could have furnished even more had he not lost in this fire a diary which he had kept since coming to this county. He at once erected a log house that served as a home till the year 1879, when he built one of the best residences in the county. His surroundings are beautified with shade and fruit trees, so that he has one of the finest homes and farms in the Northwest. On the 15th day of January 1861, he started with his family for New York; on account of snow blockades, it took them seventeen days to get to Dubuque; they shoveled snow most of the way. They returned in November 1862 to this county. In December 1863, Mr. Ackley enlisted in Company B, Seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Judge Reiniger, Captain. Served his country till the war closed, being discharged in July 1865. His life as a soldier was an active one, participating in many hard engagements; a few of the most prominent ones we give below. We can group them by saying he was in all the battles near Atlanta, Peach Tree Creek and Sherman’s march to the sea, Pumpkin Vine, Dallas, Jonesborough; here the color-bearer was wounded, and Mr. Ackley carried the colors till the close of the war. He was never wounded, but has stood touching elbows with men who where shot. A marvelous incident is related my Mr. Ackley, that we make note of here, illustrating how often death’s missiles, though their numbers are legion, are ineffective: At Jonesborough they were ordered to charge upon the enemy double quick; during this act the shot and shell and rifle balls rained down upon them like hail, and not a single man was wounded. They had scarcely made this charge till they were ordered to make a similar charge in another direction; this they did under as heavy a fire as before, and not a single man was hit with a missile of death. Of course this is not the rule but a marvelous exception. At the battle of Ray’s Ferry, Georgia, there were sixty-three men killed and wounded in his regiment in less than thirty minutes. The last three months of Mr. Ackley’s service he was in the rear, on account of sickness contracted by the exposure of army life. Part of this time he was in the hospital; we are sorry to have to add that he has never recovered fully from these troubles; it seems almost cruel in nature to furnish men with disease the balance of their lives, who have contracted it in the defense of their country. Since Mr. Ackley’s return from the army, he has resided upon his farm with the exception of three years, when he rented his farm and lived in Marble Rock. Mr. Ackley was married in New York State in 1863, to Miss Elizabeth Thayer, a native of Otsego County, N. Y. They have a family of three children – Leonora E., now the wife of Charles Morrison, and resides in Phillip County, Kan.; Elborn D., now twenty-one years of age; Merton I., twelve years of age. The sons are both residing at home. Mr. Ackley has been a life long Republican and Prohibitionist, voting first for J. C. Fremont. Has held the office of Assessor and Township Trustee several times, being among the first elected.

G. C. Ackley Page 1081 – 1082

Was born in Otsego County, N. Y., in 1827. He was the third child of James and Nancy Ackley. Here Mr. Ackley made his home till 1853, when he came to Floyd County, Ia., where he remained only a short time, when he went to Illinois and remained there three or four months; then he returned to this county, staid about six months, when he again returned to Illinois and staid till 1855, when he and the rest of the family came to this county, and have since resided. G. C. Ackley resides where he first settled with his parents, situated on section 20, Union Township. Mr. Ackley was married in this county in 1869, to Miss Lucinda Vanduzen. Their family consists of four children – Wm. Henry, Lilly Elmer, Charles E. and George M. Mr. Ackley is not only first among the citizens of this county in point of time, but in point of citizenship. Though not an aspirant for office he has always taken an active interest in the success of the Republican party. Mr. Ackley is another man, who, by his life, has demonstrated that it requires a man of energy and pluck to face these pioneer hardships.

James Ackley Page 1082

Was born in Otsego County, N. Y., March 12, 1799; married Nancy Brightman in New York, April 18, 1822. She was born in Rhode Island, August 18, 1797. Moved to Illinois in 1864. Came to Iowa Nov. 24, 1865, driving from Illinois with a team, and settled upon the farm where G. C. Ackley now resides, on section 20, township 94, range 17. Here he made his home till his death, which occurred Feb. 1, 1870. Mrs. Ackley is still living. Both were members of the Free-Will Baptist church. James Ackley’s family consisted of eleven children; nine grew to man and womanhood, six sons and three daughters, all of whom are still supposed to be living. Their relative positions with regard to age follow as their names are given below – David, died at the age of ten, by falling from a tree and severing the jugular vein on a snag that had been cut sharp with an ax; Nancy died at the age of two, accidentally scalded by pulling a kettle of hot water onto herself; J. M. and G. C’s sketches we have already in this work; Wm. H. came to Iowa in 1853, returned to New York in 1857; after visiting there a short time he took the train for the West again, as his friends supposed, but since that day has never been heard from; Sally E. married Henry Schermerhorn in New York State and came West in 1855; Mr. Schermerhorn died in February 1882; the widow resides in Scott Township with her daughter, Mrs. Henry Montrose; C. T. and Russel’s sketches are also in this work; Fannie married Egbert Davis, whose sketch will be found here; Judson, whose sketch will also be found in this work; Mary Jane married Sam Rex, whose sketch will be found in this work.

J. M. Ackley Pages 1082 – 1083

Was born in Otsego County, N. Y., in 1825. He is the oldest living child of James and Nancy Ackley. Mr. Ackley mad that State his home till he came to Iowa, which was in the winter of 1853, locating in Union Township, Floyd County. The first two years he was scarcely settle in this county, but spent a portion of it in Illinois visiting friends and working. The second year he returned to New York, and remained only about ten months, when he returned to Iowa in company with his brother C. T. and wife, and his own wife. At that date they could not go on the cars further than Dunliff; from there to Cedar Falls they staged it. From there they had to hire a conveyance, paying $12 for the pleasure of riding over the wild prairie. In 1855 Mr. Ackley and his brother C. T. pre-empted 320 acres of land, and built a long shanty. They had a partition through this building, each family living upon his own land, thus securing the clear title to the land under the law. Upon this land Mr. Ackley still resides, being situated on section 29, range 94 west, Union Township; has added to his first purchase, that that now he owns in all 215 acres. In the year 1872, or thereabout, he built himself a fine residence, being one of the best in the county. His home is nicely situated and presents a fine appearance. Mr. Ackley is now enjoying the fruits of life of ambition and energy and industry. He began at the stump, as some term it, and has raised himself to a position of independence. His start in this county was discouraging. On the way he and his brother C. T. each lost a large box of clothing, supposed to be burned up in the Chicago depot, the most of which was new and badly needed, for they were without a change of clothes and nearly out of money. These were indeed dark days. But for these stout-hearted pioneers the grand West, now swarming with busy people and waving with rich harvest, would be a desert still. Mr. Ackley was married in 1855 to Miss Julina Thayer, a native of New York. They have no family living; lost two children in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Ackley have been members of the Free-Will Baptist Church for the past twenty-five years. Mr. Ackley was never an office-seeker though he has been a life-long and solid Republican.

R. J. Ackley Pages 1083 – 1084

Was born in Otsego County, N. Y., in 1835. He was the sixth child of James and Nancy Ackley. When Mr. Ackley came to Iowa he was twenty years of age, it being in 1855. He located in Marble Rock, where he still resides. He spent the summer of 1855 traveling in Minnesota looking at the country; afterward clerked in a store nearly a year in Marble Rock; the year following worked at the carpenter’s trade. The winter of 1860 he taught school in Rock Grove, where he made the acquaintance of Mr. Gaylord. From this date till 1870 he was principally engaged in farming, though he worked at the trade of carpenter some of the time. In 1870 he went into the hotel business and ran the Marble Rock Hotel nearly a year. The year following he clerked for Shepardson & Beelar, dry-goods merchants. The year following he resumed farming, at the expiration of which time he assumed the management of the elevator and continued at it three years. He again engaged in farming and continued at it until 1879, when he took charge of the Beelar House and ran it nearly two years. At this date we find him still a resident of Marble Rock, enjoying a fine home and the society of his many friends. Mr. Ackley was married, July 6, 1861, to Miss Maria J. Baltimore, daughter of Ashbury Baltimore. They have a family of six children – Ella Irene, Viva Estell, Nancy Isabel, Ashbury J., Bertha May and Nellie Ethel. Mr. Ackley is a member of the Iowa Legion of Honor. Politically he is a Republican and Prohibitionist; has held the office of Town Clerk one year, Trustee two years, and Constable four years, and is at present a member of the Town Council.

S. J. Ackley Page 1084

Was born in New York State in 1840. He was the youngest so of James and Nancy Ackley. At age of twelve he came with his parents to Iowa, locating in Floyd County. He made his home with his parents about six years after coming to the county. In 1859 he married Miss Emily Rex. At this date he commenced for himself by renting land. In 1866 he lost his wife who left him three children – Ida V. makes her home with her grandmother; Garrison, married and a farmer; Desdemona A. makers her father’s house her home. Mr. Ackley married his second wife, Sarah J. Asper, in 1870. They have three children – Arminta P., Nellie Ann and Joseph H. Politically Mr. Ackley is a Republican.

J. D. Anthony Pages 1084 – 1085

Was born in New York State, March 30, 1833. Here he made his home till he was about twenty years of age, when he went to Illinois, where he remained about ten years, in Whiteside County. About six months after going to Illinois, his father, Peter, and mother, Nancy Anthony, joined him and made his house their home while he remained in the State. Mr. Anthony came to Floyd County in 1864, locating in Marble Rock, where he has since resided. Shortly after he left Illinois his father died, and his mother made her home with her son, A. P. Anthony, in Chicago, for about eleven years, when she came to Iowa, and again made her home with her son J. D. Anthony, till her death, which occurred in 1878, her remains lie in the Marble Rock Cemetery. In New York he learned the heavy brace carpenter’s trade. After going to Illinois he turned his attention almost absolutely to farm work, at which he worked most of the time while in the State, and since coming to Iowa has turned his attention principally to carpentering, doing the most of the building in Marble Rock. The fine school-house is a grand monument to his memory. He has built for himself one of the finest residences in the county. His surroundings are naturally beautiful and embellished without so that he has one of the grandest homes on the Shell Rock River. The house presents a grand view from its commanding position, overlooking some of the finest beauties of nature’s art up and down the Shell Rock. Mr. Anthony deserves great credit for the pluck and energy in his pioneer life, and its conflicts with hard times. He has raised a family of five children and keeps them in school constantly, and means to furnish each with a good education. Mr. Anthony was married Nov. 16, 1862, to Magdaline Clay. The names of the children are – John J., Clara C., Albert A., Nancy Bell, and Anna Edith.

W. H. Ash Page 1085

Was born in Wisconsin, in 1852. He is a son of W. D. Ash, a resident of Wisconsin. W. H. Ash made his home in Wisconsin till the spring of 1881, when he moved to Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, where he remained till September of the same year; at this date he became a citizen of Floyd County, locating upon the farm of 164 acres, where he still resides, on the Shell Rock River, about three and a half miles south of Marble Rock. He is a present cultivating about eighty acres. Mr. Ash was married Jan. 27, 1872, to Miss Martha Hales, a native of England, being born there in 1850, and coming to America at about the age of one year. She was a daughter of James Hales, who resided in Wisconsin. He died in 1864. They have one son – Leland, nearly three years of age. Politically he is a Democrat, though his wife’s influence is in favor of the Republican party. Mr. Ash is a member of the order of Freemasons.

A. J. Asper Pages 1085 – 1086

Was born in Summit County, O., in 1836. At the age of thirteen he commenced to do for himself by running a retail patent-medicine wagon in Ohio. At this he was engaged about four years. At the expiration of this time he went to Plainfield, Ill., and worked in a drug store with E. G. Wright about five years. In 1858 he became a citizen of Floyd County, locating in Marble Rock, Union Township, where he engaged in farming till 1863. In February 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry; served on the Atlanta campaign as far as Big Shanty, Northern Georgia; then was put into detached service with the Western Sanitary Commission, headquarters at St. Louis; operated at the front till Atlanta was vacated, when he returned to St. Louis and remained in the same avocation till he was mustered out in July 1865, when he returned to Marble Rock and engaged in the grocery business; this he continued about two years, when he sold out and engaged in buying and shipping grain, at which he continued about eight years. In 1880 he purchased an entire new stock of drugs, and is still engaged in that business. A work of comment being admissible, we wish to say he has a fine store and is doing a very good business. In Marble Rock, March 13, 1860, he and Miss C. S. Hawks were united in marriage. She was a native of New York State. They have a family of five children – Roderic R., Cora E., Nora M., Edith L, Blanche E., Carl J.

Russell Z. Bailey Pages 1086 – 1087

Was born in Bedford, Cuyahoga County, O., July 27, 1838. He was a son of David and Elmira Bailey, both natives of New England. Mr. Bailey lived in Ohio till he was twelve years of age, when he moved with his parents to DeKalb County, Ill., where he resided till August 1861, when he enlisted in Company A, Second Illinois Light Artillery served his country three years and was mustered out in September 1864, at Springfield, Ill. He was never wounded nor take prisoner, though he was in some of the hardest-fought battles of the Rebellion, among the more prominent of which were the siege of Vicksburg, battles of Coffeyville and Hickman, besides a host of sharp skirmishes. Immediately after his return from the army he came to Floyd County, Ia., and remained about six months, when he returned to Illinois and remained about a year, when, in the fall of 1866, he returned to this county to make his home. His first purchase was on section 21, consisting of 160 acres, where he lived three years, when he sold to Isaac Shultz, and bought the farm of 160 acres where he now resides, on section 27, about three miles southeast of Marble Rock. The railroad cutting off about forty acres on the west side, he has since purchased eighty acres on section 30, about three miles southwest of Marble Rock. He also owns 200 acres six miles west of Marble Rock, in Scott Township, making in all 440 acres, besides some property in the village of Marble Rock. He puts in crop yearly about 150 acres, besides keeping from thirty to forty head of cattle and horses, and from forty to fifty hogs. In 1870 he built one of the best farm houses in the county, the other buildings and surrounding being in keeping with the house. Mr. Bailey was married in Sycamore, Ill., in 1865 to Cora Robison, a native of New York State. They have four children – Loey R., Elroy B., Leon A., and Earl R., ages, fifteen, ten, eight, and three respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Bailey and their eldest son are members of the Baptist church.

Ashbury Baltimore Pages 1087 –1088

Was born in Montgomery County, O., near Dayton, June 16, 1807. At about the age of twelve, he went with his father, Philip Baltimore, to Wayne County, Ind., where Mr. Ashbury Baltimore farmed for about thirty years, when he went to Michigan and farmed about five years. At the expiration of this time he returned to Indiana and farmed four years. June 29, 1853, he became a citizen of Floyd County, Iowa, locating in what is now known as Marble Rock, Union Township. Has been interested in farming principally ever since coming to the county. He was the second man who settled in the township. In those days he had to go to Cedar Rapids for provisions, and haul grain to Independence, Waterloo and McGregor. The price of wheat sometimes was so low as thirty-five cents a bushel, but usually ranged from seventy-five to eighty cents, while pork was from three to five dollars. He got one dollar for his first wheat and fifteen cents for his first pork, dressed. Mr. Baltimore owns 200 acres of land three miles from the pleasant village of Marble Rock, which he superintends still. He owns also a pleasant home in the village besides ten town lots nicely situated, that will soon be occupied as village homes. He was the first man in the county who ever got a premium on a wolf and wild-cat scalp, which he received in 1856. The first school in the township was taught in his house. Mr. Baltimore was married in Wayne County, Ind., Nov. 4, 1830, to Miss Sarah Ritter. She was also a native of Ohio, being born there Sept. 3, 1812. Their family consists of nine children, six of whom are now living. They all reside in Union Township except one son, who resides in Nebraska – Louisa, born Aug. 16, 1838, now the wife of Peter Vorhes; Maria, born Dec. 25, 1840, married R. J. Ackley; Sarah, born Feb. 7, 1843, married Laban Vorhes; John, born Dec. 5, 1844, married Tilla Palferd; Diantha, born Oct. 4, 1848, married Charles F. Beelar; Mary, born June 28, 1850, married William Bucklin. Of this large family we can but remark they are well worthy the pride of their father, since they are all acting well their parts in life, and are well to do. And they in return can be proud of a father who had the courage to face all the hardships of pioneer life in order to secure homes for his children. Mr. Baltimore is one of those few men who has by his own exertions wrung from the hard land of toil a property that makes him independent. He is one of those men, who has helped lay the foundation to Floyd County’s successful history. If the coming generation maintain the good order and society these stout-handed men did, they will be doing more than is expected of them. Mrs. Baltimore’s mother is still living with them at the advanced age of ninety-eight. An incident that will long be remembered by his family, who were nearly all present at the time, we make note of here, as almost a miraculous draft of fishes. One of the severe winters not long after coming to this county, he conceived the idea that there might be some fish caught by cutting through the ice. This was done with great success, securing about a wagon-load of beautiful fish. While they were engaged in this they heard the dogs running a deer, and presently a large one came sliding and slipping on the ice, and fell not far from them. Mr. Baltimore seized the grand opportunity and slaughtered him then and there. Venison and fish were a plentiful article of food at the Baltimore house for some months afterward.

George Barth Page 1088

Deceased, was born in Canada, Aug. 12, 1836. He remained in Canada, engaged in farming, till the 9th of March, 1872, when he came to Floyd County, Ia., and bought a farm where the family still resides, on section 2, Union Township, about three miles northeast of Marble Rock. His first purchase was three eightys; he afterward bought the balance of section 2, making the only full section farm in Union Township. Upon this farm was a small building. This he added to and rebuilt, so that now it is a large farm-house. This farm was all wild land except 150 acres. It has since all been cultivated, except 160 acres, which is kept for pasture and timber. Upon this farm Mr. Barth lived until his death, which occurred March 20, 1878. He was married in Canada, July 9, 1863, to Mary Harbert, who was born in Germany, Feb. 29, 1843, and went to Canada with her parents when she was about four years of age. The family consists of seven children – Mary, Margaret, George, Lydia, John, Daniel and William. Mr. and Mrs. Barth were members of the Lutheran church, and Mrs. Barth is still a member of the same.

C. F. Beelar Pages 1088 – 1089

Was born in Missouri, Nov. 13, 1838; came to Iowa with his father, Jacob Beelar, when a mere child, and has since made this State his home, stopping in Lee County about six years, and about six years in Bremer County. At about the age of thirteen he became a citizen of Floyd County, and has since that time resided here upon the bank of Shell Rock River, where the pleasant little village of Marble Rock now stands. He has been more or less identified with its growth, though he has given considerable attention to farming. He in company with Mr. Shepardson engaged in the mercantile business two years in Marble Rock, it being about the year 1870. In 1871 he engaged in the hotel business, at which he remained about eight years. Since then he has rented it part of the time. He built the hotel and barn himself, which reflects considerable credit upon the town and upon his own enterprise. In 1880 he and N. H. Ostrander built a creamery in the village, which is quite an accession to the village. It is run by the water-power of a lively little brook, through the auspices of a livelier eleven-inch turbine wheel, which furnished an abundance of power. Its capacity for making butter is, easily, 800 pounds, per day. He owns in addition to this town property about 230 acres adjoining the village, which occupies a portion of his attention. Politically we find Mr. Beelar a Republican, and awake to the live issues of the day, as his bold energy in behalf of the Amendment will illustrate; has held the office of Constable and Town Clerk, and is now filling the office of Justice of the Peace. In 1863 he and Miss Diantha Baltimore were united in marriage in Marble Rock. She was a native of Indiana. They have two children – Oscar and Maudie, ages thirteen and ten respectively. Of Mr. Beelar we beg leave to say he is not only one of the first men of his township in point of time of settlement, but in point of citizenship.

Jacob Beelar Pages 1089 – 1090

Deceased, was born in Tennessee, Feb. 22, 1789, where he made his home with his father, who was a farmer, till he was about twenty years of age, when he went to Indiana, and remained there till about the year 1838, when he came to Iowa, locating first in Lee County, where he remained about six years; thence to Bremer County, and stopped about six years, and in February 1852, he became a citizen of Floyd County. He took a Government claim of 600 or 700 acres, the land not being then in market, but soon as it was made possible he entered about 480, upon which he resided till his death, which occurred Jan. 25, 1858. This property was situated where Marble Rock now stands. A 16 x 16 log house was the first building erected in the township. This he built in 1851, the year previous to bringing his family into the county. In 1852 he built another log house, 20 x 30. Neither of these houses now stand, the larger one being destroyed only six or seven years ago. Mr. Beelar was the first settler in this township, and remained about one year without a single neighbor. He married his first wife in Indiana, and by her he had six children. He married his second wife, Caroline Fisher, a native of Germany, in Crawfordsville, Ind., by whom he had six children, four still living; their names are as follows: Cynthia Ann, who is now the wife of Abram Johnson, and resides in Homer, Hamilton County, Iowa; C. F. Beelar is the next oldest, who is married and resides at Marble Rock, upon the old homestead; Jesse Mc., also married, and living in Verndale, Minn.; Dartha, now the wife of Jacob Rex, residing at Puget Sound, Wash. Ter., where Mrs. Beelar is living with his daughter, at the advanced age of seventy-six. Mr. Beelar was a man of perfect physical organization and health, being five feet and ten inches tall, and weighing about 240 pounds. He was identified with the war of 1812.

S. P. Bissell Pages 1090 – 1091

Was born in Aurora, Portage County, Ohio, in 1825. Here he made his home till about twenty eight years of age; he was reared on a farm, and received a good common school education; at the age of twenty-one he entered the Twinsburg Academy, where he remained two years, during part of which time he was an assistant teacher. At the age of twenty-four he married Harriet L. Griffith, daughter of James Griffith, one of Floyd County’s pioneers. Shortly after his marriage he went to Wisconsin and engaged in farming one season; afterward returned to Ohio and remained about three years. In his twenty fifth year he commenced to learn the blacksmith’s trade, at which avocation he was employed till he came to Iowa in 1854. He located first in Nora Springs, where he remained about two years; his first work in this county was to iron off a saw mill at Nora Springs, after which he taught the first singing school in Floyd County. While he resided at Nora Springs he worked at his trade, but the population was so scarce that he was unemployed three fourths of the time, though farmers came as far as 100 miles to get a plow layed; he had many customers from Minnesota. At the expiration of this two years he moved to Floyd, where he resided six or seven years, engaged in blacksmithing and teaching occasional classes in vocal music, after which he moved to Fayette for the purpose of having his family avail themselves of the opportunities afforded by the college; here he remained three years, which time he was wholly employed in teaching vocal music in that part of the country; a part of the time he was a teacher of music in the college. In 1868 he became a citizen of Marble Rock, where he continued his profession as teacher of vocal music, and was agent for a life and fire insurance company, till the fall of 1880, when he abandoned teaching on account of his impaired health. In 1881 he again resumed his trade, at which we find him engaged. With all due respect to Mr. Bissell, we wish to say, in one sense of the word, he appears out of his place in a blacksmith shop. Not that he is not proficient, but he seems better calculated to fill a position where muscle is not absolutely king. As a music teacher, he certainly is an eminent one. Since he was seventeen years of age, a twelve months has scarcely passed but he has taught more or less. The truth of the statement will be seen when we say that he has taught over 100 terms of school. Mr. Bissell was married Feb. 28, 1849, in the city of Cleveland, Ohio; his family consists of two children living – Frankie is now the wife of E. A. Rosenkrans; Fred is engaged with the mining speculations of Idaho. In 1878, Mr. Bissell lost his third child, Elmer E., at the age of eleven, by drowning in the Shell Rock River, close to the village.

T. W. Boon Pages 1091 –1092

Was born in Washington County, Ohio, May 10, 1843. He is a son of Thomas and Eunice Boon, who are now both deceased. The mother died about the year 1855. His father died in April 1879. When T. W. Boon was about ten years of age, he went to Illinois in company with his father. They spent about two years in DeKalb County, while the two older brothers, W. M. and S. M., were breaking up prairie and building houses on land his father had previously purchased in Union Township, Floyd County, Iowa. It was in the year 1856 that Mr. Boon became a citizen of Floyd County, where he has since resided, with the exception of two years spent in Clay County and three years in the army. He enlisted in July 1862, in Company G, Thirty-second Iowa Volunteer Infantry; was never wounded or taken prisoner, but was on three different occasions taken to the hospital as a patient, remaining only a short time, the longest stay being about thirty days. He participated in some of the hardest engagements, among them Cape Girardo, Little Rock, Ark., Lake Chico, Memphis, Tenn., the battle of Tupelo, besides the many skirmishes connected with Price’s raid on St. Louis, known as the Iron Mountain. The last battle he was in was at Nashville, Dec 15 and 16, 1864. He was mustered out at Memphis, Tenn., May 25, 1865. Mr. Boon learned the mason’s trade when about thirteen years of age, and has worked at it for about twenty years. He was married Dec. 30, 1866, to Maggie Sherman, a native of Michigan. They have three children – Emma J., Daniel and Harry E. Politically Mr. Boon is a Republican.

George Bowers Page 1092

Was born in Hillsboro County, N. H., in 1822. He was a son of Jonathan S. and Elizabeth Bowers. At the age of fourteen he engaged as a sailor on a whaling vessel. This avocation he followed till he was twenty-two years of age. During this time he sailed around the world, spending the most of the time among the South Sea Islands; spent nine months on Ascension Island, Carolina Group, it being the capital of the Group. After he abandoned the sea he returned to New Hampshire, and worked in a town about two years; afterward worked in a cotton mill in Chicopee, Mass. At this he engaged nine years. He returned to New Hampshire and farmed about three years. In 1857 he went to Illinois, where he spent about nine years as a farmer. From there he moved to Iowa, locating in Floyd County, and purchased the farm of seventy acres where he still resides, in Union Township, about one and three-quarter miles East of Marble Rock. Mr. Bowers was married in 1846 to Miss Nancy Lawrence, a native of Warren, Maine. She died in 1852, leaving two children – Alfred and George, who died shortly afterward, both being very small. Mr. Bowers married his second wife Sept. 16, 1861. Her name was Bridget Heartt, a native of Ireland. They have no family.

C. W. Bowman Page 1092

Was born in Indiana in 1836, where he made his home till he was about fifteen years of age, when he moved with his parents to Allamakee County, Iowa, and resided till Sept. 20, 1868, when he became a citizen of Floyd County, thus identifying himself as one of our county’s first settlers. At this time he purchased 160 acres where he still resides, on section 28, Union Township. Has since added forty acres, making a fine farm of 200 acres. He has a nice home, with its beautiful surroundings and fine location. Every foot of the farm is under first class cultivation. He crops yearly about 160 acres, keeping horses sufficient to carry on his farming. Mr. Bowman was married in Allamakee County, in 1860, to Miss Sarah A. Callender, a native of Ohio. They have no family. Mr. Bowman is a member of the order of Freemasons. Though never an aspirant for office, he has always taken an active interest in politics, and votes the straight Republican ticket.

A. M. Brown, M. D. Page 1092 – 1093

Was born Sept. 3, 1845, in Woodstock, Vt. His father, Dr. Alfred Brown, filled the chair of demonstrator of anatomy in the Vermont Medical College about two years, practicing medicine at the same time. About the year 1846 he moved with his family to Waukesha, Wis., where he practiced only one year when he died with Asiatic cholera. He left a family of four children, three daughters and one son – Helen, the oldest, is the wife of W. S. Rowe, a car manufacturer of Waukesha; the second, Edna A., is the wife of Prof. D. C. Hall, of Boston, Mass., extensively engaged in the manufacturing of musical instruments; Cornelia O., the third daughter, married C. H. Rice, of Adel, Dallas County, Ia., proprietor of the Island farm; A. M. the youngest child and only son, the subject of this sketch, lived upon a farm from his ninth to his fourteenth year, in Waukesha County, Wis.; from this date till the year 1863 he was engaged in making musical instruments. Aug. 30, 1863 he enlisted in Company A, First United States Veteran Volunteer Engineers; served his country over two years, and returned home without a scratch from the enemy’s bullets, though he participated in the hard fought battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn., besides numerous skirmishes. He was discharged Sept. 25, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn. He returned to Boston and resumed his avocation of making musical instruments about one year, when he went to Waukesha, Wis., and commenced the study of medicine with V. L. Moore, a homeopathic physician. He attended lectures at Iowa City, one term, and graduated at Rush Medical College in 1877, through he had been practicing several years previously, having begun in Scranton, Green County, in 1871, where he practiced till 1879, when he went to Rockford, this county, and practiced two years. Feb. 21, 1881, he formed a co-partnership with Dr. C. J. Clark in the allopathy practice of medicine in Marble Rock. He was married Nov. 30, 1875, to Miss Nellie D. Hunt, a native of Illinois. They have one child – Eva L., born Oct. 31, 1876.

Charles C. Brown Pages 1093 – 1094

Was born in Indiana, Oct. 6, 1831, where he remained with his father John Brown, till he was fourteen years of age, when the family moved to Rockford, Ill., and remained about six years, when the family again moved, this time to Lafayette County, Wis. Mr. C. C. Brown spent about sixteen years in this part of the country, dividing his time between Wisconsin and Illinois, residing not far from the State line any of the time. Feb. 24, 1865, he enlisted in Company C, Fiftieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry; served his country six months, when he was discharged on account of poor health; was mustered out Aug. 2, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth, Kas. Mr. Brown became a citizen of Floyd County in 1870, locating in Marble Rock, where he remained about two years on a farm near the village, when he went to Nora Springs, where he remained about five years, farming part of the time; the balance of the time he was in the hotel business. In 1877 he returned to Marble Rock, and has since made this his home. Since returning he has been occupied in various ways, some of the time on the railroad, and some in a blacksmith shop, having learned that trade in Scales Mound, Ill. Mr. Brown was married in Lafayette County, Wis., in 1855, to Miss Julia E. Stevens. They have three children – Alma A., John F. and William H.

Michael Brunner Page 1094

Was born in Canada, in 1842, he was the son of Jacob and Margaret Brunner, both natives of France. At about the age of twenty-four, he came to the United States, locating in Winneshiek County, Ia., where he remained ten years, engaged in farming. In 1876 he became a citizen of Floyd County; purchased at that time the farm of 160 acres, where he still resides, on section 13, Union Township; upon this farm he build a fine farm residence the year he came, and the two years following he built a good barn. He has turned this farm from a wild raw prairie into a thoroughly cultivated farm. His surroundings are adorned with nicely arranged shade trees, so that he has one of the nicest homes in the county. This farm he carries on himself, putting in crop each year about 100 acres, and besides twenty acres he rents, besides keeping about nine head of horses and nineteen cattle, and from forty-five to ninety head of hogs. Mr. Brunner was married in 1865, to Catharine Ruffridge, a native of Canada. They have a family of eight children – Jacob, Anna, Maggie and Mary (twins), Evalina, William, Katie, Antonia. Both Mr. and Mrs. Brunner are members of the Lutheran church.

Michael Carbiener Pages 1094 – 1095

Was born in France in 1833. He was a son of George and Catharine Carbiener. At about the age of twenty he came to America, locating first in Indiana, where he resided about two years, when he went to Illinois, near Frankfort; there he lived about seven years. At this date he came to Iowa, locating in Floyd County, purchasing his farm of 300 acres, where he still resides, on section 15, about one and one-half miles southeast of Marble Rock. This farm is one of the finest in the county. It is beautifully situated, presenting one of the grandest views of the surrounding county we ever saw. Mr. Carbiener has, by his own hard labor, cleared the farm of rocks and grubs, and turned it from a wild, raw prairie, to a beautiful farm, all being under a splendid state of cultivation. He built a fine house and barn, and with nicely arranged shade trees has his surroundings beautified so that he has one of the nicest homes in the Northwest. He puts in crop, yearly, about 270 acres. A portion he farms himself, and rents a part, besides keeping from eight to ten head of horses and colts, and from twenty to twenty-five head of cattle, and from forty to fifty head of hogs, some years even exceeding this number. Mr. Carbiener was married in 1860 to Mary Hammon, a native of France. They have ten children – Mary, married to William Theman, and resides five miles west of Marble Rock; Sarah, George, Margaret, Jacob, Elizabeth, Michael, Lewis, Fredrick and William. The nine younger children still reside at home. Both Mr. and Mrs. Carbiener are members of the German Lutheran church. Politically, we are pleased to say that Mr. Carbiener always votes for the best man, if he knows him, but when it comes to State or United States election he votes the Democratic ticket. Mr. Carbiener is among those men who helped lay the successful and solid foundation to the history of Floyd County. He is a man who has been very successful, and has by his own exertions placed himself among the sound, able and wealthy farmers of our county. Not only this, but he has the best word and wishes of all his neighbors and is social and pleasant to all, and has a host of friends.

Andrew Carney Pages 1095 – 1096

Was born in Pennsylvania in 1821. He was a son of Andrew and Barbara E. (Swagart) Carney. Mr. Carney spent his childhood days and many years of his manhood in Pennsylvania, being fifty-one years of age when he left the State. While there he made farming his principal avocation, though he was engaged for a short time in the lumber and shingle business. Nov. 9, 1872, he came to Iowa, locating in Floyd County, purchasing the farm of 160 acres where he still resides, on section 22, one and one-half miles southeast of Marble Rock. To his first purchase he has added 245 acres, making a farm of 405 acres lying all in one body. This is one of Floyd County’s best farms, being of the best quality of soil, and under a splendid state of cultivation. His residence is also beautifully situated, being located upon the public thoroughfare, and within a few rods of the railroad track, where the daily passing trains relieve the usual monotony of farm life. Mr. Carney was married in Pennsylvania in 1847, to Mary A. Shook, a native of Pennsylvania. Their family consists of nine children living and two deceased – Mary Elizabeth, died at the age of nine years and nine months, Nov. 5, 1860; Sarah J., now the wife of David Eikenberry, resides in Butler County; Clarissa Violetta, died in 1865, at the age of eleven; Harriet, married John Flora, resides also in Butler County, Ia.; Clara Emma, now visiting friends in Pennsylvania; George A., Albert W., Miles B., David C., Daniel C. and Andrew. The seven younger children still reside at home. All the family were born in Pennsylvania except the youngest son. Mr. Carney voted for James K. Polk for President when a young man, and has since adhered to the principles of the Democratic party. Mr. Carney has for the past twenty-eight years been a member of the Brethren church.

T. S. Clark Page 1096

Was born in Erie County, N. Y., in 1840. He was the sixth child of Job and Rhoda J. Clark. At about the age of twelve he moved with his parents to Jackson County, Iowa, where they remained about sixteen years, when they came to Floyd County, Iowa. Mr. Clark made his home with his father, farming his place till he was about twenty-five years of age. In the year 1864 he purchased forty acres, which crop paid for the land, breaking and fencing, with some money left. At this time he lived in Marble Rock. The year following he sold this land and ran his face again for 160 acres near the first place. Upon this he moved and lived twelve years. During this time he paid for his farm, but lost some money in trying to make money by running a threshing machine. In June 1879, he sold this farm and bought 560 acres where he now resides, four miles south of Marble Rock. His farming is principally corn, oats and timothy, having in crop usually 400 acres, keeping all the way from thirty-five to seventy-five head of cattle, and more hogs than we can count, sometimes has as high as 300 head. Mr. Clark was married in 1864, to Miss Mary Edna Wallace, daughter of John Wallace, one of Floyd County’s pioneers. Their family consists of five children – Dora Anna, Nellie, Mirtie, Job and George B. Mr. Clark is not only among the big farmers of the county, but is one of its early and highly respected citizens. Politically he is a Republican.

Dr. C. J. Clark Pages 1096 & 1099

Was born in Canada, June 15, 1834. When about two years of age his parents moved to Buffalo, N. Y., where Dr. Clark made his home till he was nineteen years of age. When sixteen years of age he entered the Abbilt Academy, and graduated at the age of nineteen. Upon the completion of his studies he at once commenced the study of medicine under the tutorage of Dr. T. T. Lockwood, at the time Mayor of the city of Buffalo. Dr. Clark attended medical lectures at the Ralph Medical College, Toronto, Canada. He commenced the practice of medicine in Hamilton, Canada, in 1856. Here he practiced till 1858, when he took a course of lectures in the Albany Medical College, N. Y. This done, he resumed the practice of medicine in New York, where he remained a short time, when he returned to Hamilton, Canada, and again commenced practice. Here he remained in a fine practice till 1863, when he went into the service of the Government as a contract surgeon. Here he remained till the termination of the war, when he came to Iowa, locating first in Dyersville, Dubuque County, where he practiced medicine three years. The year following he spent in Bremer County, Ia. In 1869 he became a citizen and practicing physician of Floyd County. The first year was spent at Nora Springs; the year following he moved to Marble Rock, where he is still doing a fine practice. Since coming here he has been in constant practice, except the college season of 1879 – ’80, when he was surgeon in charge in Bennett’s Hospital, Chicago, Ill. Here he also received a diploma of M. D. Dr. Clark was married in Canada, in 1853, and has three children – Lora B., married, is proprietor of a drug store in Marble Rock, the largest in the county; Mattie, now the wife of H. C. Darland, a resident of Marble Rock, formerly a school teacher and merchant; Mittie, a little daughter seven years of age. Dr. Clark is a member of the order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a Republican. In 1876 he lost his wife, and is now living with his second wife, formerly Carrie Van Myers.

Clark & Kendall Page 1099 –1100

Proprietors of the largest drug store in Floyd County, situated in Marble Rock; formed the partnership May 1, 1882. Mr. L. B. Clark, the former owner of the stock, opened a drug store in Marble Rock in 1878. This he ran only about six months, when he was unluckily burnt out, losing his entire stock, dwelling, household goods and photograph gallery, leaving him $500 worse than nothing. Just eleven days from this catastrophe he was again established in the drug business, by buying a drug store of J. W. Martin, in company with A. R. Van Myers, with whom he carried on business till his death, which occurred about eighteen months afterward. At this event Mr. Clark bought his partner’s interest in the stock, and continued in business alone till he took in his present partner. Mr. Clark was born in Canada, May 1, 1855, came to the United States, Sept. 1, 1865, locating first in Dubuque County, Ia. He became a citizen of Floyd County in 1870. Prior to engaging in the drug business he attended school principally. He was married Nov. 2, 1877 to L. A. Baldon. They have one son – Harlie R., six months old. J. P. Kendall was born in Wapello County, Ia., in 1858; became a citizen of Floyd County in 1870; was married in 1876 to Mary C. Mumford of Wisconsin. They have one child – Guy M., now five years of age.

U. A. Collison Page 1100

Was born in Canada, Sept. 2, 1844; here he made his home till the year 1862, when he went to Rockford, Ill., and remained till 1865, when he came to Marble Rock, this county, where he has since resided. He learned the blacksmith and wagon maker’s trade in Canada with his grandfather, John Shaver; he learned also the joiner’s trade in that country. These avocations he pursued there about six years. While in Illinois he worked in a sash and door factory eighteen months. After becoming a citizen of Marble Rock he engaged in the carpenter and joiner’s trade, and continued it for about eleven years, contracting and running a force of hands most of the time during the summer months; two years, during the winter months, found him in the cabinet shop of C. D. Kendley. In the year 1877 he again resumed his avocation of blacksmithing and wagon-making, at which we find him still employed, in company with C. Brown, whom he took in as a partner about 10 months ago. They not only do a large business in repairing, but turn out a great deal of new work in different styles of buggies and wagons. Mr. Collison is proficient in all there is of his trade. Think we are safe in saying he is the only man in the county who is the possessor of three trades. Mr. Collison is said to be doing the largest business of the kind in the county, his customers numbering over 300. Mr. Collison was married in Marble Rock, Dec. 27, 1865, to Miss Almina Johnson, who has been a resident of this county twenty-three years. They have two children – Kittie Gertrude and Charles A., aged fourteen years and fifteen months, respectively.

James Conner Page 1100 – 1102

Was born in St. Lawrence County, N. Y., in April 1826. He was the fifth child of James and Mary Ann Conner. Mr. Conner made New York State his home till 1864, when he came to Iowa, locating in Cerro Gordo County, where he remained about seven years, engaged in farming. In this county he bought two farms, which he still owns. They are situated two miles apart in Doherty Township, each containing 160 acres and under a fine state of cultivation and improvement. In the year 1875 he rented his farms and came to Marble Rock, where he has since resided, and has been mail conductor for the past five years, and has never missed a trip. Mr. Conner enlisted in New York State in 1862 in Company I, Scott’s Nine Hundred United States Volunteer Cavalry. For two weeks after his enlistment he was engaged as a recruiting officer and received the enlistment of twenty one solders.

When he reported at headquarters there was no transportation, and he took them to New York City at his own expense. For this exhibition of patriotism, together with many others of Mr. Conner, he was honored with the position of Orderly Sergeant, but of this he never accepted, for the reason that he felt all such honors would better become a man who had won them in actual service. Mr. Conner had scarcely been in the army two weeks when he was taken sick with the black measles; lay in the hospital about three months, when he was discharged. To show the severity of the disease we remark here that when Mr. Conner was taken sick his weight was 165 and his hair and beard were black as a raven’s wing; inside of thirty days his hair and whiskers turned as white as snow, and his weight when discharged and dressed in uniform was only 102 lbs. When he returned home he was a stranger, so to speak, to his nearest neighbors; many would remark that they had certainly seen him but could not place him. Mr. Conner was never expected back to the army, but after remaining at home about one year he felt himself sufficiently recovered to go back and fight rebels again. He enlisted in 1863 in Company H, Eleventh New York Cavalry. He remained in the army till the close of the war, it being about one year; was discharged at Memphis, Tenn., October 1864. Mr. Conner’s army experience was one indeed of great interest. It was so varied that we may say it ran from pleasantest to the most severe hardship. Those who are acquainted with the history of Scott’s Nine Hundred know that they were organized to protect the United States Capital. So choice were they in the selection of these troops and horses that the men were nearly of one age, while each company’s horses were of the same weight and color. Mr. Conner’s company had jet black horses, without a single white hair, and all weighing 1,100 pounds, not varying five pounds. This was indeed a brief military holiday. They were dressed in the best the Government could afford, and with well blackened boot and clean brushed clothes they spent several pleasant weeks, which of course, aroused the envy of those less fortunate. By the judgement of the head officers they were sent to the front. They were ordered to Texas, but upon arriving at New Orleans they were ordered to hunt guerrillas, the most dangerous part of army life. The rest of their army life was spent in wading through swamps and jungles, placing themselves as a target for the sharpshooter. Mr. Conner related the circumstances of a raid he was on in connection with Sherman’s march to the sea. They numbered 30,000, and by a peculiar practice of military tactics they were kept wading the swamps in ambush as much as possible. They survived for four days without a bite to eat except leaves and buds of trees. Their horses became fatigued and died by the dozen, while many of them mired and drowned. Three hundred negroes followed them into this swamp. Their fate was fearful. At the end of the fifth day’s journey there were only two remaining with them, the rest either starving to death or drowning or miring. It is supposed that but few ever lived to get out. The most of these negroes were riding mules, but one by one they disappeared and the mules followed on, and came very handy to those who lost their horses. Mr. Conner was married in January 1847, in New York State, to Miss Rozilla Ingerson, a native of New York. They have only one child living – Amelia, married to John Stewart, and resides in Cerro Gordo County. It was not party spirit but true royal patriotism that caused him to fight for his county to tenaciously. He has been a life long Democrat, and a strong advocator of supporting the Constitution. For county officers he wisely votes for the best man.

F. Crocker Pages 1102 – 1103

Was born in Grafton County, N. H., April 9, 1834. He was a son of Benjamin S. and Eliza Jane (Howe) Crocker. At the age of eleven Mr. Crocker moved with his parents to Lake County, Ill., which he called his home till 1863, though for thirteen years he was a sailor on the lakes; six or seven years of this time he sailed before the mast; afterward promoted to second mate, then to first mate, which position he occupied about four years; at the expiration of this time he was appointed to take charge of the vessel. This position he continued in during the balance of the time. When he commenced this life he was but thirteen years of age, and was away from home three years on his first trip. In February 1863, he became a citizen of Floyd County spending the first two years on rented land, at the end of which time he purchased forty acres on Flood Creek, St. Charles Township, and resided on it about one year, when he sold it and bought another forty acres on the same creek, but in Union Township. On this he lived about one year, when he sold it and bought eighty acres, two and one-half miles northeast of Marble Rock. Upon this he built a house, and made it his home about eighteen months, when he sold and moved to Marble Rock, and rented a farm one year. In the year of 1869 he bought the farm of 120 acres where he still resides, two and one-half miles southeast of Marble Rock. This is one of Floyd County’s best farms, being all under good cultivation, and of the best quality of soil, and raises as good crops as are raised in the county. Mr. Crocker was married May 22, 1859, in the city of Kenosha, Wis., to Pathina E. Porter, a native of New York State. They have a family of three children living and one deceased – Frankie, the wife of James Reams, resides in Greene, Butler County; Willis and Willie were twins (Willis died at about the age of fourteen and one-half, July 22, 1879; Willie lives with his father); Birdie J., the youngest, now about six years of age. Mr. Crocker is a Republican and an out and out Prohibitionist. He is also a member of the order of Freemasons.

W. O. Crumb Page 1103

Was born in New York in 1838. At about the age of twelve, he moved with his father, E. Crumb, to Indiana, where W. O. made his home till 1862, when he came to Iowa. He spent the first fifteen years farming, the first five years as a renter, afterward purchased a farm in Scott. In 1880 he engaged in the restaurant business in Marble Rock, at which avocation we still find him, doing a pleasant business. Mr. Crumb was married July 26, 1856, to Miss Hannah J. Claypool, a native of Michigan. They have five children – Loretta A., Mary O., Irving O., Lydia L., and George L. Loretta married Godfrey Reihm, and resides in Scott Township. Mary is the wife of Robert Fletcher, residents of Scott Township. The rest of the children still make their father’s house their home. Mr. Crumb is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is politically a Republican. Was in an early day Constable and one of the first officers elected in Scott Township. One time he held five offices, for the reason there were more offices than men in the township, viz.: Assessor, Trustee, Sub-Director, President and Secretary of the Board of Directors.

Benjamin Darland Pages 1103 – 1104

Was born in Nicholas County, Ky., May 24, 1807. When about four years of age, he moved with his father, Isaac Darland, to Preble County, O. Here Mr. Darland made his home the majority of the time till he moved to Illinois, which was in 1836. Mr. Darland learned the hatter’s trade in Richmond, Ind. He afterward worked at the trade in Greenville, Ohio, three years, and eleven years in Fulton County, Ill. At the expiration of this time he moved to Kane County, Ill., and rented land about three years, when he purchased a farm and made it his home about five years. In 1855 he came to Floyd County, Iowa. In the spring of 1855 he entered 320 acres of land, upon this land he moved in 1856, where he made his home till 1873, when he sold, and has since made no permanent place his home, spending most of his time visiting friends in the East, making his home with his sons, in Iowa. Mr. Darland’s family consists of five children living, and five deceased; two died in infancy, their names were Isaac and Mathew, deaths occurring in Batavia, Ill. J. W. is married and in the dry goods business in Marble Rock; Charles died at Marble Rock, in 1867, aged fifteen years; Frances is now the wife of J. L. Secor, and resides in Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, near Sheffield; Frank was killed at the battle of Blue Mills, Mo., Sept. 17, 1861, aged twenty one years; Catherine married Mr. Chas. F. Greenwood, and resides in DeKalb County, Ill.; Maria, wife of W. Brubaker, died in Chicago, April 14, 1879; Frank was killed in the army in 1861; Julia married Jesse Beelar, and resides in Verndale, Minn.; Henry, married and resides in Marble Rock. Of Mr. Darland we cannot refrain from speaking as those who know him best. He has not only been identified with this county’s interests from a very early date, but is interested still in the history whose foundations he helped lay. Has always been a life long Republican, though never an office seeking man. In Illinois he held the office of County Supervisor two years, in this county, has been a member of the Board of Supervisors two years; and was a member of the Iowa Legislature the year 1874; it being the Fifteenth General Assembly. These positions he acceptably filled besides others of his township and county, such as member of the Board of Trustees, Supervisor; etc. He is a man who always throws his influence on the side that has for its motto: The advancement of the country and the morality of its citizens, and was a decided friend to the Amendment.

J. W. Darland Pages 1104 – 1106

Was born in Greenville, Ohio, Sept. 10, 1833. He is a son of Benjamin Darland, whose sketch will be found in this work. At about the age of three he moved with his parents to Fulton County, Ill., where he resided about ten years, attending school most of the time. At the expiration of this time the family moved to Kane County, and remained about four years. Here he assisted his father on the farm. They then moved to DeKalb County, Ill., where Mr. Darland spent three years upon his father’s farm. Oct. 5, 1855, his father’s family moved to Marble Rock, this county. Mr. Darland made his home with his father, and worked upon his farm till 1860, when he went to Muscatine and taught school the winter of 1860, near Muscatine. The following summer he spent upon a farm. In September 1861 he enlisted in Company G, Second Illinois Light Artillery; was mustered out at the end of three years, but immediately re-enlisted at Columbus, Ky., in same company, and remained till the close of the war, being mustered out Oct. 4, 1865, at Springfield, Ill. He was indeed one of the Government’s most faithful and profitable servants; was never taken prisoner, nor in the hospital, nor wounded, though he participated in ten hard fought battles – Union City, Tenn.; Coffeeville, Miss.; Tupelo, Miss., Old Town Creek, Miss., Brownsville; Siege of Vicksburg; two days’ battle of Nashville; Spanish Fort; Tallahachie, Miss. He returned home from the army to Marble Rock and clerked the following six months for Hiram Rosenkrans. In the spring of 1866 he went into the mercantile business himself, in Marble Rock, which he continued two years, and then went to Aureola, and remained in the mercantile business two years, when he returned to Marble Rock, and continued in the same business till 1878, when he sold his stock and went to Chicago, and engaged in the grocery business, remaining in the city about one year, at the expiration of which time he returned to Iowa, locating in Greene, Butler County, where he engaged in the hotel business about one year. Sept. 1, 1880, he returned to Marble Rock, and opened up a fine general store, which business we find him still pursuing, very successfully indeed. He has all his life made friends, and is today enjoying the highest respect of the community as a straight forward and honorable business man. Mr. Darland was married Dec. 22, 1866, to Josephine Frost, daughter of Robert Frost, one of Floyd County’s first pioneers, coming to the county in 1854. ‘Twas he who built the first saw mill in Union Township. It served its day as a good mill, but is lately neglected for want of timber. It stands today on the east bank of Shell Rock, at Aureola, as a monument of early days. Mrs. Darland was born in Kane County, Ill., in 1843, and came to Iowa at the age of eleven. Their family consists of three children – Charles A., Harry C., and Clarence, ages fourteen, twelve and ten respectively. Mr. Darland is a member of the Odd Fellows and Freemasons. He is Master of the Masonic lodge, which position he has been elected to for five years. Politically he is a Republican – never votes any other ticket. His first vote was for John C. Fremont. Mr. Darland enlisted as a private; at the end of six months he was promoted to Corporal – then to Quartermaster Sergeant – then First Sergeant, and was promoted to the commission of Second Lieutenant Aug. 22, 1864, which position he held till he was mustered out.

Egbert Davis Page 1106

Was born in New York State in 1831, where he remained till he was twenty-three years of age, engaged in dairying and farming. He was the seventh child of Philip and Katurah Davis. In 1854, Mr. Davis went to Illinois, where he remained one year, when he came to Floyd County and has since resided, with the exception of three years, which he spent in Hamilton County. He resides on section 20, Union Township, upon a farm he purchased in 1870. Mr. Davis was married in Union Township, this county, in the spring of 1857, to Miss Fannie M. Ackley, a native of New York State. Their family consists of six living children – Jennette Amelia, married Alven Harden, and resides near Mason City, Ia; James A., Nina A., E. S., Charles E., and Rutherford B. Hayes still make their father’s house their home. Though never an aspirant for office he has always taken an active interest in politics and votes the straight Republican ticket.

H. Garber was born in Shelby County, Ohio, in 1838. At about the age of fourteen he moved with his father, Joseph Garber, to Clayton County, Iowa, where he made his home till Aug. 20, 1862, when he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry; served his country three years lacking twelve days, being mustered out Aug. 10, 1865, at Clinton; was in the hospital only twenty days during this time; was never wounded nor taken prisoner. He and his brother Joseph and three cousins enlisted in the same company and at the same date, and all came out unscathed except his brother, who was discharged in about six months after enlistment, and returned home and died finally of disease contracted in the army. Mr. Garber's army life was the experience of a faithful soldier. Participated in many engagements; a few we give below: Little Rock, Ark.; Fort Derussa, Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, Tupelo, battle of Nashville, Fort Spanish and Fort Blakely at Mobile, Ala. After his return from the army he joined his father's family who, in the spring of 1865, moved to Floyd County, where H. Garber has since resided with the exception of the year 1874, which he spent in Clayton County. Mr. Graber was married July 31, 1867, to Miss Electa A. Wallace, daughter of John Wallace, of Marble Rock. They have two children living - - Max and Louella, ages five and three respectively.

Charles Gates Page 1107 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in Germany in 1830; came to America in 1852, stopping the first three years in Rochester, N. Y.; Sept. 17, 1855 he landed in Marble Rock and has since been a citizen of the county. He made Marble Rock his home till 1860, when he went there the town had just been laid out, and was all in timbered brush. Mr. Gates helped to clear it, and lay the first foundation to its history and prosperity. In 1856 Mr. Gates entered forty acres in Union Township, which he farmed till 1860, when he sold, and purchased eighty acres, where he still resides, about three miles south of Marble Rock; in 1860 he moved upon this farm, and has since made it his home. Mr. Gates has, in several different purchases, added to his first, till now he owns 640 acres, besides eighty acres he gave to his son Charles, who now resides in Greene. The number of acres and the natural fine location and the splendid state of cultivation and improvement which the farm is under, make it one of the largest and best farms in the county. Mr. Gates is one of the few pioneers of this county who has started at the bottom round in the financial ladder, and by his own exertions and prudence earned for himself a property that makes him independent. And, in addition to this, he has given by his life a lesson to young men that is well worthy of imitation. He bears the highest respect of all his acquaintances and neighbors, and has raised a family that is a credit to any father. Mr. Gates was married in Rochester, N. Y., in 1855 to Miss Julia Kasy, a native of Ireland. The names of their children are: Charles, a merchant in Green; Henry is a farmer in Union Township; George, a merchant in Greene; Albert makes his home with his father, and is engaged in farming. Mr. Gates is a member of the Presbyterian church, and politically is a sound Republican.

John Gates Pages 1107 - 1108 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in Germany in 1827; came to America in 1850, spending the first four years in New York State. In 1854 he became a citizen of Floyd County, locating at Nora Springs, where he spent six months; thence to Marble Rock, where he worked at the blacksmiths trade about five years. While residing in Marble Rock he purchased eighty acres, where he now resides, about two miles southeast of Marble Rock; has added to his first purchase till he now owns 400 acres of Floyd County 's best land, principally under cultivation. He has put in crop usually about 370 acres. Besides this farm he owns about 200 acres, in addition to 160 acres he gave his son. Mr. Gates usually keeps from forty to fifty head of cattle and twenty head of horses, and 200 head of sheep. Mr. Gates was married in 1852 to Jane Hoy, a native of America. They have three children - Fredric E., married Cora Russel, and farms in Union Township; Katie A., and Ella, both single and at home. Politically Mr. Gates is a Republican; has held in Union Township the office of Township Cashier, and is now the Justice of the Peace, and has been for the past six years, besides other minor offices. He is a member of the Protestant Evangelical church.

Martin Gates Pages 1108 - 1109 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in Germany in 1828; came to America in 1851, locating first in New York State, where he remained about three years, working as a farm hand. In 1855 he came to Iowa, and located in Marble Rock, where he spent the first four years. Those years were spent in working by day for the neighbors. In 1856 he entered forty acres of Government land at $1.25 per acre. Not being satisfied with the land, he sold it at an advance of $2.75 per acre. In 1859 he bought ninety acres along Shell Rock River, in Union Township. To this farm he added different purchases till he owned 250 acres. Upon this farm he lived till the fall of 1881, when he moved to Marble Rock, the spring previous having sold it entire to Mr. Benjamin Bowman for $6,000. The same summer he bought a farm of 120 acres in same township, near his old farm. He also owns eighty acres on section 31, same township, and only one-half mile from his 120 acre farm. The 120 acres is farmed by his son-in-law, William Preston. The eighty Mr. Gates farms himself, with the assistance of a hand. Mr. Gates does what is considered a mixed farming, keeping about one dozen cows and about fifty hogs, through he has kept as high as 200 hogs. In June 1881, he purchased an entirely new stock of hardware, and opened a fine hardware store in Marble Rock. It has been our pleasure to visit the store, and must say it presents a very good appearance, embracing every seeming want of the farmer, from nails and tools to any farming implement they might desire. Mr. Gates was married in New York State in 1854, to Miss Catharine Casy, a native of Ireland. They have three children - Andrew, married and in the hardware business with his father; John, also in the hardware business; Eliza, the only daughter, married William Preston. Of Mr. Gates we cannot refrain from speaking in the following language: He is a man who has started from the lowest financial round in the ladder, and has, by his own exertions, wrung from the hard hand of toil a home and business and independence well worthy the pride of any man, and has by doing given an example quite worthy of imitation, besides rearing a family of children who promise to make the best of citizens. He has the good words and best wishes of all who know him, and those who know him best are loudest in their praises.

Diebold Gerhard Page 1109

Was born in Germany in 1826. He was a son of John and Lizzie (Kohlman) Gerhard. At about the age of twenty-seven he came to America, stopping in Wheeling, W. Va., and remaining about five months; from thence to Illinois, where he made his home about eleven years. In 1866 he came to Iowa, locating in Floyd County. The first three years he rented land of John Gates. At the expiration of this time he bought the farm of eighty acres, where he still resides, on section 26, Union Township, paying $10 per acre. Has since bought forty additional acres joining his original eighty acres; for this he paid $25 per acre. Upon this farm he built himself a fine house in the year 1870, and a nice barn in 1877. His farm is all under good improvement and first class cultivation. They have indeed a beautiful home. The buildings and surroundings are such that he has one of the grandest homes in the Northwest. He does his farming principally himself, and usually has it all in crop, besides keeping about twenty-three head of cattle and about forty head of hogs, and horses enough to carry on his farming. Mr. Gerhard was married in Illinois, in 1860, to Frederica Hoffman, born in Germany in 1830, and came to this country in 1860. She was a daughter of Paul and Lena Hoffman. Her father died in Germany in 1859. Her mother came with her to America. Mr. Gerhard's family consists of three sons and two daughters - Chrisena, married John Maxson and resides in Union Township; William is a clerk in Greene; Julia, George and Nicholas are single, and reside at home. Mr. Gerhard is a member of the Lutheran church, and Mrs. Gerhard of the Methodist church. Politically he is a Democrat.

John Goodmiller Pages 1109 - 1110

Was born in Illinois in 1844. Here he made his home till he was about twenty-eight years of age. He was a son of Michael and Doratha (Keck) Goodmiller, both natives of Germany. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, Forty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, the Old Lead Mine Regiment; served his country three years, participating in many hard battles; a few of the more prominent ones we give: Vicksburg, Jackson, the Atlanta campaign, with Sherman on his march to the sea; was wounded in the left forearm with a gunshot at the battle of Vicksburg, siege of forty-eight, and was off duty with the same about three months. After his return from the army he resumed his avocation as a farmer, where his prominence as a good and worthy citizen was appreciated by his fellow men, by electing him to the offices of Justice of the Peace, Collector and Township Clerk. In 1873 he became a citizen of Floyd County. The first five years he rented land. In 1878 he purchased the farm of 100 acres, where he still resides, about one mile south east of Marble Rock, beautifully situated and located, and under a fine state of cultivation. Mr. Goodmiller was married in 1868 to Miss E. M. Pulley, a native of Ohio. They have six children - Wellington G., Arthur M., Homer, Preston, Elmer and Lorey. Politically he is a Republican.

Byron P. Greenwood Page 1110

Was born in De Kalb County, Ill., Sept. 26, 1855, where he made his home on the farm with his father, Charles F. Greenwood, till he was twenty-three years of age, when he came to Marble Rock, this county, where his father purchased a stock of dry goods in company with J. W. Darland. Under the firm name of Darland & Greenwood, they continued in business about six months, when Mr. C. F. Greenwood purchased his partner's interest. B. P. Greenwood has since been conducting the business alone under the name of C. F. Greenwood. He has a fine, clean stock, and an assortment that should please the most fastidious, and is doing a business of $8,000 yearly. His live and let live principles, together with his prompt dealing, have won for him a reputation worthy the pride of any young man. Mr. Greenwood was married in Marble Rock, Jan. 14, 1880, to Miss Minnie Winchill, a native of Iowa. Politically we find Mr. Greenwood Republican.

Isaac Halstead Pages 1110 - 1111

Was born in Indiana in 1833. When only a child his parents moved to Michigan, where he lived till he was twenty-one years of age, when he married and moved to Lynn County, Ia., and stopped about six months, when he came to Floyd County. He moved upon a farm that he purchased in Union Township, about one mile east of Marble Rock. Here they resided till the year 1857, when their residence was destroyed by fire. Instead of rebuilding on the farm they built a fine residence in the present village of Marble Rock. Here Mr. Halstead resided and carried on his farm till his death, which occurred in 1877. He was married in Michigan, in 1854, to Miss Eliza J. Denewd, a native of Indiana, but a resident of Michigan. They raised one child - Florence Idel, married to Julius Haynes, a merchant in Marble Rock.

E. B. Haynes, M. D. Page 1111

Was born in Guilford, Windham County, Vt., Aug. 9, 1827, where he made his home till he was about twenty-four years of age, when he went to Massachusetts and spent about four years in the pursuit of an education principally. At this date he went to Wisconsin, where he remained about ten years, dividing his time between farming and the practice of medicine. He became a citizen of Floyd County, April 3, 1866. He located in Marble Rock, Union Township, and at once commenced the practice of medicine, which avocation we find him very successfully engaged in still. Dr. Haynes commenced the study of medicine under the instructions of an eminent physician in Chester, Vt., named Dr. Chase, with whom he remained three years, studying and practicing medicine. He attended medical lectures at Comstock, and commenced the practice of medicine in New Chester, Wis., in 1856. The Doctor practices under the eclectic system, having previously acquainted himself with the allopathy and homeopathy systems. Of Dr. Haynes as a physician and gentleman we can but speak as his neighbors, that he is always found equal to the emergency, and by his faithful care has won a position in the hearts of his neighbors and friends that will scarcely be eradicated by time. Dr. Haynes was married in Bernardston, Mass., Nov. 7, 1848, the day Zack Taylor was elected President of the Union States, to Miss Julia J. Hunt, a native of Vermont, born March 7, 1832. They have a family of three sons - Julius E., now thirty-two years of age, married and in the dry goods business in Marble Rock; Jewett S., now twenty- three years of age, married and in business with his brother, and Justine H., a bright eyed boy of thirteen years of age, who makes things lively at home. Dr. Haynes is a member of the order of Freemasons.

Jacob Hoffman Pages 1111 - 1112

Was born in Owen County, Ind., March 8, 1838. He was a son of Wm. And Katie (Houwk) Hoffman. When Mr. Hoffman was fourteen years of age he came to Iowa, locating in Buffalo County, where he made his home twenty years. He was among the very first to settle that county. In the fall of 1882 he became a citizen of Floyd County, and bought at that time 160 acres where he still resides. At this date it was raw prairie. He has since brought it under a fine state of cultivation and the best of improvements. His house and surroundings are indeed pleasant. It can be said of Mr. Hoffman, that he has caused the desert to blossom as the rose. He sold forty acres of this before improving it, at considerable of an advance of the price paid. Mr. Hoffman carries on quite a stroke of farming besides keeping considerable stock; keeps about twenty head of cattle and seven head of horses, and usually keeps from forty to sixty, has kept as high as 160. Mr. Hoffman was married in 1864 to Clarinda Kendell, immediately after his return from the army. He enlisted in 1861, in Company D, Fifteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. Colonels Reed and Bellknap were the commanding officers; Captain Madison was his first Captain. Mr. Hoffman was wounded at the battle of Atlanta on the morning of the 22nd of May, receiving a gun shot wound in the right groin the ball passing clear through, another lodging in his right leg just above the knee; another lodged in the left arm above the elbow, while another cut its depth across the top of his shoulder. At this charge he had fourteen bullet holes pass through his clothing in different places. He had his musket shot out of his hands, three balls passing through it at once cutting it off at each side of the bands. Through the effects of these wounds he lay in the hospital as a patient for about one year, under the care of physicians. For five months he lay with ice water dropping upon him to prevent mortification. He participated before this in fourteen hard fought battles. Mr. Hoffman veteraned and returned to the army and accompanied Sherman on his march to the sea. He was mustered out the fall after the close of the war. Mr. Hoffman's army life, consisting of three years and three months, was one indeed long to be remembered. He certainly deserves the highest respect and admiration of every patriotic man, woman and child. He is a man of no boastful qualities, but takes his position as a humble citizen. Mr. Hoffman has always been a Democrat, though he votes for the best men of county officers.

Christopher Hofmeister Pages 1112 - 1113

Deceased, was born in Germany, May 6, 1810. On the 18th of June 1847, he came to America, stopping for a few days in Milwaukee, thence to Dodge County, Wis., where he lived about seventeen years. In 1864 he moved to Chickasaw County, Ia., where he remained till 1869, when he became a citizen of Floyd County. His first purchase was in Ulster Township, where he lived about eighteen months. In 1871 he bought the farm where his son Henry now lives, on section 3, Union Township. There was in this farm, at the original purchase, 240 acres, but he sold an eighty about two years after his purchase. He repaired the house and made what improvements the farm possesses today, and made it his home till his death, which occurred July 29, 1879, leaving a family of four children, and one deceased - Fredric, who resides in Kansas, married and has a family; Christian died in the army in 1864, at about the age of twenty-five; he was single; Johannah married C. H. Stapher and resides in Chickasaw County, Ia.; Christopher W., is a resident of Kansas; Henry, the fifth child, bought the old homestead, and there resides; he was married in 1880 to Emma L. Ponto, a native of Wisconsin. They have one child - Lydia, now fifteen months of age. Mr. H. Hofmeister was born in 1855, and Mrs. Hofmeister in 1862. Both are members of the Methodist church. Politically we find Mr. Hofmeister a Democrat. Mrs. Christopher Hofmeister is still living and resides in Kansas, at the advanced age of seventy-one.

I. M. Hutches Page 1113

Was born in Steuben County, N. Y., in 1840. Until his father's death, which occurred in May 1860, he was engaged principally in the pursuit of an education. From this date till about 1869 he remained on the farm, and engaged in the stock business, in connection with farming. At the expiration of this time he went to Livingston County, and engaged in the milling business, in a mill in which he had purchased a third interest. In the fall of 1873 he came to Iowa; stopped first in Cedar Falls, and came to Marble Rock the following spring, where he purchased a half interest in an elevator, with George Luce, and continued in the grain business about five years. In 1879 a joint stock company was formed in the business between J. B. Shepardson, George B. Vansun and I. M. Hutches, which firm is still in existence and doing a good business, handling in the neighborhood of 200,000 bushels yearly. I. M. Hutches has the entire control of the business in buying and selling. He was married in New York, in 1861, to Miss Cynthea King. They have one child - James L., now nineteen years of age. Mr. Hutches is a member of the I. O. O. F.; has been a life-long Republican and a sound Prohibitionist. Though not an aspirant for office, he has been elected Township Trustee and Alderman of the town.

H. C. Inman Page 1114

Was born in Kane County, Ill., in 1836, He was a son of Lorain and Lucy (Carpenter) Inman. Mr. Lorain Inman died at Marble Rock in 1878. Mrs. Inman is still living, and makes her home with her son, H. C. Inman. Mr. H. C. was the oldest of the family of eight children; Joseph, the second son, died in the army at Memphis, Tenn., in January 1862, at the age of twenty-two; Alonzo, the third son, resides in Union Township, Ephraim, the fourth, resides also in Union Township, this county; Marinda resides in Brainerd, Minn.; Dora married Mr. S. H. Waist, a resident of Minneapolis, Minn. Two children died in infancy. This family was one of Floyd County 's first settlers, coming to Marble Rock in 1858, where the most of them have since resides. Since coming to Iowa Mr. H. C. Inman has turned his attention considerably to farming, though he has taught several terms of school, and held the office of County Surveyor five years. For about three and a half years he owned a half-interest in the Osceola Grist Mill, which time he was engaged to some extent in running the mill. The confinement and heat was quite detrimental to his health, which was the principal cause of his selling the property and moving upon the farm. Though in impaired health somewhat, we find him very pleasantly situated on a farm of 160 acres, within about one and one-half miles of Marble Rock. Mr. Inman was married in 1867 to Miss Sarah E. McCallom, of Amesville, Ohio. They have no family. He is a member of the order of Freemasons and Odd Fellows, and was for many years a member of the Good Templars. Politically Mr. Inman is a Republican, and though not an aspirant for office, always has taken an active interest in the political issues of the day; is the present Assessor of the township, and has held that position three fourths of the time since coming to Iowa. Mr. Inman has been a member of the Free Baptist church the past twenty-eight years. Has held the office of Secretary of the School Board for about fourteen years.

E. Inman Page 1114

Was born Sept. 1, 1846, in Kane County, Ill. He was the fourth son of Lorain and Lucy (Carpenter) Inman, came to Floyd County, Iowa, with his parents in 1858, locating near Marble Rock, Union Township, where he has since resided; is now residing upon the old homestead. Mr. Inman was married in 1867, in Charles City, to Miss Harriet Clay. They have five children - Lewis J., Harry E., Harvey E., Nellie L. and Lucy. Mr. Inman is a member of no secret society. Politically he is a Republican.

A. Inman Page 1115

Was born in Kane County, Ill., June 24, 1842. He was the third son of Lorain and Lucy (Carpenter) Inman, who came to this county in 1858, where most of the family still resides. Mr. A. Inman was married in October 1869, in Charles City, by Elder Casbier to Miss C. E. Waist, a native of Vermont. They have two children Lorain W. and Martha Esther, ages twelve and six respectively. Mr. Inman bought his farm of eighty acres, where he resides, about two miles southwest of Marble Rock in 1870. He has recently made a purchase of eighty acres, adjoining his original farm. This is one of Floyd County 's good farms. The natural fine drainage and good quality of the soil cannot be excelled anywhere. Though not an aspirant for office himself, he has always taken an active interest in politics, and voted the Republican ticket. In the day of Good Templars he was an active member. Mr. Inman is a member of the Free-Will Baptist church and has been for the past twenty years.

Judge W. H. Johnson Pages 1115 - 1116

Deceased, was born in Deersville, O., Feb. 29, 1824. He received a collegiate education, and read law in that State. When about twenty-eight years of age he went to Michigan and engaged in the practice of law a short time. About the year 1854 he went to Boylan's Grove, Butler County, Ia., and remained a short time, when he came to Floyd County, locating in Marble Rock, where he remained in the practice of law till his death which occurred June 14, 1879, his disease being consumption. Judge Johnson lived an energetic and useful life, and had the best wishes of the community always at heart. As an attorney he was always found to be manly strong, and honest, securing the utmost confidence of his clients and respect of his opponents. As a notary public his papers of conveyance and transfers are invariably reliable and correct. As a politician he was a straight forward Republican, and took an active interest in the live issues of the day though never an aspirant for office himself. In the year 1862 he was elected County Judge, which position he filled acceptably. While a resident of Michigan, in the year 1854 he married his first wife, Susan Sly, who died in January 1863, leaving a family of four children, one of whom has since died. The names of the surviving ones are Josephine, married John Ryan, a telegraph operator at Riverside, Ia., Kelso W., single and at this writing residing in Rockford; Cleopatra, now the wife of Charles Smith, a dry goods clerk at Riverside. Judge Johnson married his second wife, Mrs. Clarissa Miller, in Marble Rock in the year of 1867. To them was born one daughter - Florence M., now thirteen years of age. Mrs. Clarissa Miller, Mr. Johnson's second wife was married to Mr. Elias G. Miller in 1856. He enlisted in Company G, Thirty-second Iowa Volunteer Infantry, in August 1862. He served his country as a faithful soldier, till he was taken away through the hardships of army life, his death occurring at Benton, Ark., Dec. 12, 1863; it being the day his youngest son was two years of age. He left a family of three children - Lizzie the eldest, married Maurice Bunnell and resides at Osceola, Clarke County, Ia.; the second child, Minerva, married Elvin Tape, a jeweler of Rockford; David E. is in the mining business in Colorado.

William A. Judd Pages 1116 - 1117

Was born in Strafford, Orange County, Vt., July 9, 1817. Here he made his home with his father, Ira Judd, till he was nineteen years of age, when he started out to face the world alone. He went to Lowell, Mass., with the view of working in the woolen factory, but found the town overrun with people hunting work. He had only about twenty-five cents in his pocket, but finally got a chance to work for his board, and sell picture frames at night. At this he was engaged the most of the winter, and cleared about $10 in all. The next spring he engaged to work for a gardener seven months. The following winter he went to school. In the spring he tried the tanner's trade, but found it quite incompatible for his health, and returned home after working at it about two months. He helped his father through with his summer's work and started to seek his fortune in the West, stopping in the State of Illinois. The first fourteen years he was interested in farming, working rented land the first year and after that his own. In the year 1852 he engaged in the mercantile business in Brooklyn, Lee County, at which he continued till 1856, when he boxed his goods and shipped them West, sold his real estate and other property and came to Floyd County, Ia. The first ten weeks after coming he boarded at the Beelar House. Then he bought a log building of Mr. Beelar and kept tavern and store in it for about eighteen months, when he bought out John Wallace, who was also in the dry-goods business. They exchanged places of business, and Mr. Judd kept store here two years. In 1860 he rented another building and commenced lowering his stock on account of his poor health and some discouraging features in trade. This state of affairs having no change, he abandoned the enterprise of merchandising, closed his store and boxed his goods, and has since nearly exhausted them by selling and using them in his family. Before coming to the State he bought 200 acres, sight unseen. This he kept several years and sold it, doubling his money. He owns eighty acres of land in Union Township that requires the most of his attention, in connection with some town property. Though he has had his share of the pioneer's rebuffs, he would still be an active business man were it not for the feeble state of his health, which has been impaired for the last twenty years or more. Politically he has always been a Republican, and has always taken an active part in every enterprise demanding the attention of good citizens. He was the first President elected in the organization of the first temperance society called the Washingtonians. He, in company with three others, formed the society of Good Templars in Marble Rock; has held the office of Justice of the Peace several years and was President of the School Board several years. Dec. 23, 1844, in Lee County, Ill., he and Miss Elizabeth Melugin were united in marriage. She is a native of Tennessee and is still living at the age of fifty-four. They have three children - Alice Adelaide is now the wife of W. E. Truax, and resides at Fort Ripley; Eliza Adalette, is the wife of Martin E. Bridgeman, and resides in Cass County, D. T., Mary T., single and resides at home. Mr. Judd is a member of the Freemason's. While he was a resident of Illinois he was County Commissioner, Town Treasurer and Constable for many years, and Deputy Sheriff for a term. In early days Mr. Judd attempted to rescue two young men who had been capsized in the Shell Rock River during high water. The fast-rising stream and floating ice made it quite hazardous. The people on shore tied ropes to an Indian canoe and he attempted to reach the young men, who were perched upon a tree, many rods off. They were already nearly perished with cold, the day being quite cold; overcoming many difficulties Mr. Judd at last reached the spot, but just before he made his landing his canoe was swept from him and he had to cling to a tree that had lodged near by. Here the three awaited the assistance of those on shore, who, of course, seemed to them to move slow. At last the tree Mr. Judd was on became detached and moved off. He told the young men he must leave them, but to have courage and all would come out well. This was after dusk. Mr. Judd again had a lodging place, one half mile down the river. At last with boats all were rescued, amid considerable excitement.

Conrad Keister Page 1118

Deceased, was born in Germany in 1824. He came to America when a small boy. After coming to the United States he lived most of the time in Lake County, Ind. In September 1861, in Indiana, he married Mary Waltz, a native of Germany, born in 1840, and came to the United States when four years old. Mr. Keister and wife came to this county in 1865 and bought forty acres, where she still resides, about two and a quarter miles east of Marble Rock. To this they have since purchased forty, making a farm of eighty acres. Upon this farm, Mr. Keister resided till his death, which occurred in the fall of 1876. He was threshing with a side gear machine when the gearing caught his sleeve and front of his shirt, drawing him around against the side of the machine, and finally caught his left arm and tore it from the body at the shoulder. He lived about six hours. He left a family of five children. The oldest is Andrew, who carries on the farm; Mary, the second child, married James Clark, and resides in the Northwest; Anna and Julia reside at home; Nelly died at the age of three years, in 1873. Since the death of Mr. Keister the family have all been kept together and prosperous by the frugality and industry of Mrs. Keister. Since then Mrs. Keister and her son have built a good house and have carried on the farm. To Mrs. Keister's credit we are pleased to say she has helped all through the harvest, and pitched every sheaf for stacking, besides binding quite an amount. In 1878 Mrs. Keister married John Wulf, who died in October 1880, leaving one child, Ida Wulf, now three years of age.

Charles E. Lamb Pages 1118-1119

Was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., July 15, 1843. At the age of seven he left the State in company with his father, Smith Lamb, and went to Madison County, Wis., where they remained two years. From here Mr. Lamb moved with his family to Bureau County, Ill. Here they remained as a family till 1861, when they moved to Lee County, where Charles E. Lamb made his home principally till 1880, when he came to Marble Rock, this county, and purchased stock of livery from Philip Shultz, in which business we find him still engaged and doing well. We say it, not to the discredit of any others, but the truth is that he has the finest lot of horses we have seen in the county, and carriages and buggies equal in quality to any first-class livery stock. He is a genial, whole-souled man, and with his live and let live principles has won for himself many friends, not only in Marble Rock, but with the traveling public. Mr. Lamb was married in 1870 to Miss Jane E. Shultz, a native of Pennsylvania. They have one child - Everett, now eleven years of age. Politically he is a Republican, and is a member of the Masonic order.

W. D. Lamb Page 1119

Was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., in 1846; when very small moved with his father, Smith D. Lamb, to Wisconsin, where the family remained four years, and then moved to Illinois. Here W. D. Lamb made his home till 1868, when he came to Marble Rock, Union Township, Floyd County, Ia. The first two years after coming he teamed for J. B. Shepardson, who was then in the dry-goods business. The five years following he ran a lumber yard for him. The following four years he was in company with him in the stock business, and spent one year in buying and selling horses and collecting notes and accounts. In August 1881, Mr. Lamb became the proprietor of the Beelar House, which position we find him filling with a competency that reflects great credit. It is truly the traveler's home, and the tired and hungry man's favorite resort. In a word, he is a model landlord, and is adding every day to his already large trade. Mr. Lamb was married in 1879, to Miss Ella S. Wallace, a native of Wisconsin. They have one child - William E., a bright boy, eleven years of age. May 2, 1863, Mr. Lamb enlisted in the Seventh Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, and served his country over two years, being mustered out at Springfield, Ill., Dec. 5, 1865; was under the command of Major General Hatch.

Dennis Manchester Page 1119

Was born in New York State, Nov. 10, 1826. Here he made his home till 1865, when he came to Iowa, landing at Marble Rock the day following the assassination of President Lincoln. He learned the carpenter's trade when a young man and worked at his trade most of the time, though he farmed a couple of years and worked in a wagon shop two years. Many good evidences of his workmanship can be found in Union and Scott townships, while Franklin and Cerro Gordo counties bear evidence of him as a carpenter. Mr. Manchester was married in New York in 1857, on Christmas Eve, to Eliza M. Schemerhorn. Their family consists of three living children - Theron G., Essie M. and Dorr.

J. W. Martin Pages 1119 - 1120

Was born in Bennington County, Vt., in 1841. He was the sixth child of William W. and Mary Martin, both natives of Vermont. Mr. Martin made Vermont his home till he was twenty years of age, when in 1861 he went to Strawberry Point, Clayton County, Ia. Here he remained only about one year, when he went, in company with some others, by land, to Virginia City, Nev., where he spent three years, most of the time engaged in silver mining. It being the year following the discovery of the mines, of course a hard class of citizens gathered before law and order came on the ground. Upon his return he took the steamer at San Francisco, and returned via Nicaragua route, landing at New York. The following winter he spent with friends in Vermont, and in the spring returned to Clayton County, where he spent another year; at the expiration of this time he went to Nora Springs, and remained about eight months. In the spring of 1870 he moved to Marble Rock, where he has since resided. Upon coming to Marble Rock he engaged in the drug business, and continued it till 1879, when he traded his stock for a farm in Union Township. Has for several years been a partner in a company engaged in the grain business in Marble Rock. Mr. Martin, when a young man, took up the Republican principles inculcated by his father, and has been a life long supporter of that ticket, and though not an aspirant for office, always takes an active interest in the live issues of the day. Mr. Martin was the first Mayor of Marble Rock, and has held the office of Justice of the Peace for several years. Mr. Martin was married in January 1870, in Dubuque to Miss Gertrude Cragin, a native of Vermont. They have one child --Minnie, now eight years of age.

W. K. Martin Pages 1120 - 1121

Was born in Quebec, Lower Canada, in 1824; came to the United States when three years of age, locating in Chester County, Pa., where his father purchased a farm. Here he resided till 1844, when he enlisted in the United States army; was first sent out to build Fort Atkinson, Winneshiek County, Ia., (then Iowa Territory ). After this event his company went to Corpus Christi, Texas; then went clear through the Mexican campaign, when he received three flesh wounds. After his discharge, Aug. 25, 1849, at Fort Brown, Texas, he went to Allamakee County, Ia. There he bought a small farm, and engaged in farming till he came to Floyd County, which was in 1876. In 1874 he purchased a farm of eighty acres which he gave to his son, C. B. Martin, a teacher in Sioux Falls, D. T. In 1876 he bought 320 acres, where he still resides, on section 33, Union Township. He farms about 225 acres in grain; the balance is in meadow and pasture. Mr. Martin was married in Allamakee County, Ia. in 1850, to Miss Temperance Bowman, a native of Indiana. This was the first marriage ever consummated in Allamakee County. Mr. Martin's family consists of seven children living and two deceased - Catharine, married Madison Blue, and resides in Leon County, Ia.; C. B. Martin, a teacher in Sioux Falls; Mary J., married James E. Miller, a resident of Union Township; Emma married Henry Gates, of Union Township, and died in 1881; Cassie A., single and at home; W. H. single, and in the livery business in Sioux Falls; T. B. and J. F., single and at home; Carolina died at the age of ten, in Union Township. Mr. Martin and his wife have been members of the United Brethren church for the past twenty-five years. Mr. Martin certainly has had an eventful career, passing through what but few ever live to see. Has been a pioneer all his life. Politically he is a Republican. He wanted to enlist in the late Rebellion, but was rejected on account of his wounds. Had a commission from Adjutant-General Baker, and raised and organized and sent to the field three companies, drilling them three months.

George Maxson Page 1121

Was born in Harrison County, W. Va., near Clarksburg, Nov. 20, 1811. He was a son of George and Elizabeth Maxson. At about the age of twenty-two, Mr. Maxson left that state and moved to Ohio; spent about twenty-five years in Allen County, that state, residing in the State about thirty years altogether. In the year 1868 he became a citizen of Floyd County, purchasing at the same time the farm of 160 acres, where he still resides, on section 11, Union Township, two and one-half miles northeast of Marble Rock; also 160 acres in section 14, where his son John F. resides, and fifty-four acres in St. Charles Township. This land he still owns except, the fifty-four he sold, and has sold to his sons 160 acres, leaving 160 acres of a homestead. Mr. Maxson was married in Allen County, Ohio, in 1842, to Rachel Harbut, a native of Harrison County, W. Va. They have a family of seven children living, four sons an three daughters - Martha, married S. K. Sheafer, and resides in Union Township; Sarah, John T., George Nelson, Charles H., Silas and Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Maxson and the whole family, are members of the regular Baptist church. This is a circumstance we have not met before in the county, but it is certainly worthy of imitation of other families, and reflects great credit upon the parents for the good example taught the children. Politically Mr. Maxson and his sons are all Republicans and substantial Prohibitionists, and temperance men. Mr. Maxson taught school twenty-five terms in Ohio, and one term in School District No. 2, Union Township, the second winter after coming to this county.

John Mills Page 1122

Was born in New Jersey, in 1825. At the age of seventeen he moved with his father, John Mills, Sr., to Pennsylvania, where he made a stay of about seven years. From there he came to Floyd County, Iowa, in 1851. He took a claim of 300 acres where he still resides, one mile and a half west of Marble Rock. He owns 400 acres of Floyd County 's best land. Has his farm all under the best of improvements and cultivation; it is all fenced and spaced into fields with board and wire fencing. About the year 1864 he built himself a fine barn. In the year 1875 he built the best house in the township, if not in the county; it is 30 x 36, two stories high, ten feet between floors, containing ten fine large rooms. He has not neglected the inside of his house, as is sometimes the case, but has it furnished entire with choice furniture. His surroundings are ornamented and beautified with shade trees and ornamental shrubs, so that it presents one of the finest scenes to the passer-by that can be met with a month's travel. When we take into consideration the beautiful location of the land, the number of acres and quality of soil, and pleasant residence, we fearlessly proclaim it one of the grandest properties in all the Northwest. Mr. Mills crops yearly about 180 acres himself, besides what he rents out. In addition to his extensive farming, he deals quite extensively in hogs and sheep. Mr. Mills was married in Butler County, Feb. 19, 1857, to Miss Eliza Phillips, a native of Ohio, but a resident of Iowa. They have a family of seven children living - Patience, married Samuel C. Kide, and resides in Scott Township; Katie, U. S. Grant, Tilla E., Truman A., Asa and Mamie.

Moore & Paddleford Pages 1122 - 1123

The firm of Moore & Paddleford was organized Sept. 1, 1878. Mr. William Moore and J. F. Paddleford purchased of Shepardson Brothers the yard and lumber, which amounted to about 250,000 feet of lumber, and 300,000 shingles, and 100,000 of lath. They have found the business rather pleasant and tolerably lucrative. They sell about 600 car loads a year, 10,000 feet to the car, besides about from 3,000 to 5,000 shingles, and about 400,000 lath, doing a business of about $40,000 a year. Mr. Paddleford, the junior partner of the firm, was born in Dodge County, Wis., in 1855. In 1865 he came to Floyd County with his father, Charles Paddleford, who was by avocation a farmer, and made his home at Nora Springs four years, when he moved to his farm in Union Township and remained till his death, with occurred in 1874. From this event till the date of his partnership with Mr. Moore, J. F. Paddleford was engaged in carrying on the farm and settling up his father's estate. On the 4th day of June 1878, Mr. J. F. Paddleford met with an accident that is not only a life-long sadness, but a harrowing thought to him still, as his mind reverts to it. He was placing a strap upon a fast-running wheel, in a grain elevator, when his right hand was caught by a projecting set screw and would round the shaft backward, crushing the bones of the hand and arm as it went. When rescued his right arm was severed from his body almost up to the elbow. Similar accidents have almost universally discouraged young men of his age, who have drifted, as it were, out to sea. But he has manfully made the best of all circumstances and schooled himself to write with his left hand, having already a good business education, we find him today among the first business men of Marble Rock.

W. M. Moore Pages 1123 - 1124

Was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., Aug. 11, 1830. He was a son of Wm. and Catharine Moore. At the age of twenty-five he went to Dodge County, Wis., where he engaged in the milling business, and remained about twelve years, running a saw and grist mill about ten years of the time. In the year 1867 he became a citizen of Floyd County, locating in Nora Springs, where, in company with Charles Paddleford, he bought the town site of Nora Springs, and erected the grist mill which is still extant and in good order. The year following they built a double store, and rented it to parties who engaged in the mercantile business. Prior to the erection of these buildings the town contained only three or four residences, but after this event the town began to grow rapidly, and soon became a lively village, the railroad soon passing through the place. In this project Messrs. Moore & Paddleford were deeply interested, being among the chief donators to the county. In 1869 they sold the mill, and Mr. Moore moved to Marble Rock, where we find him a citizen at this writing. The first four years in Marble Rock were spent by him in the mercantile business. The three years following were spent at Moose Lake, Minn., in the manufacture of shingles. At the expiration of this time he returned to Marble Rock and engaged in the lumber business, in company with Fredric Paddleford, a son of the Mr. Paddleford with whom he was in partnership in Nora Springs. An account of their business will be found in this work. In connection with the lumber business, Mr. Moore formerly owned 1,000 acres in Floyd County, but has sold the most of it, reserving about 160 acres adjoining the town of Marble Rock. He owns a beautiful town property. He has for the past four or five years been interested in the elevator company. Mr. Moore is a man of large business experience, and his business career has had a decided effect upon the town of Marble Rock, as well as the county. He has been one of the drive wheels of the business community. He was always ready to invest his money wherever it promised a good investment for the advancement of the town and community. In a word, we may say Mr. Moore deserves the credit of being the prime mover in the best interest of the pleasant village of Marble Rock, and as he bids the town goodbye, and takes up his abode in California his loss will be deeply felt by his fellow townsmen, and his labors be fully appreciated by those who remain behind. Mr. Moore was married in New York State in 1851 to Christine Harroun, a native of New York State. She died in 1854, leaving no family. He married his second wife, Cynthia Sweet, in 1857. They have only one child - Charles, now twenty years of age. He has been a life long Republican and is a sound Prohibitionist.

A. Moore Pages 1124 - 1125

Was born in Oswego County, N. Y., in 1836. About the year 1838 his parents moved to Du Page County, Ill., where they remained till their death. At about the age of twelve Mr. Moore commenced to do for himself, his parents both being dead. When about nineteen years of age he went to Nebraska in company with Ralph Mathews, where they took up a claim, which they soon after released and returned to Iowa, locating in Rockford in 1856. In 1857 he clerked in a store for a Mr. Mathews of that place, and worked some on his farm. In 1858 he purchased eighty acres in Rockford Township, which he afterward farmed for about four years, when he came to Marble Rock and engaged in the mercantile business, which he followed two years, when he took J. B. Shepardson in as a partner. The style of the firm remained Moore & Shepardson for two years, when Mr. Moore bought his partner's interest, and has since been conducting the business alone. Besides the store business he owns four cultivated farms, consisting of in all of 320 acres, which he superintends, though worked by renters. He has recently sold eighty acres, breaking a nice block of 400 acres. For twelve years he was Postmaster, and has held several township offices, though he has never aspired to office, having always a good business of his own to look after. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and Freemasons. He was married in Delaware County, Iowa, to Miss Margret Baldan, a native of Indiana. They have had eight children, seven living - Jennie E., Ralph Mathews (deceased), Hattie E., Oscar E., Frank B., Fred I. And Henry Arthur. Mr. Moore has one of the grandest homes in the State. They have not neglected the inside of the house through extravagant outside improvements, but Mrs. Moore, with her natural ability as an artist, has adorned the walls and beautified their home.

Henry Neel Page 1125

Was born in 1821, in Greene County, Pa., on the Monongahela River. Here he lived till he was about thirteen years of age, when he moved with his father, Thomas Neel, to Knox County, Ohio in 1834. Here he remained till 1849, when he moved to Lee County, Ill., and remained there till the spring of 1882, when he became a citizen of Floyd County, moving upon the farm he purchased of Mr. Bucklin, the old Baltimore farm, March 13. Mr. Neel was married in 1845 to Margaret Austin, a native of England, but a resident of Illinois, where her father still resides, at the advanced age of eighty-three. Mr. Neel's family consists of eight living children, two died when nearly man and woman grown - Mary Jane, now the wife of Phil. Shultz, and a resident of Union Township; Martha Ellen, married William Daers, and lives in Saline County, Neb.; Sarah Ann, married Frank Bemar, and resides in Adams County, this State; Matilda Nora, married Robert Barr, and resides also in Saline County, Neb.; Adel, married James Barr, a resident of Union Township; John Henry, Margaret Elizabeth and Louella are single and reside at home. Mr. Neel has recently been introduced as a citizen of our county, but we welcome him heartily, and feel already an acquaintance through his representatives, his children, married and scattered through the West and this county. Mr. Neel has been a pioneer all his life. In Ohio log huts greeted him, and many were extant at his departure. In Illinois the broad wild prairie with wide stretched arms offered him a home. And now in this county, while in its infancy as it were, we find him joined hands and interest with those who in future years shall be known and read of as strong-handed men of early days.

Mathias Nixt Pages 1125 - 1126

Was born in Germany in 1831. He was a son of Paul and Susan Nixt, both born in Germany. At about the age of twenty-seven Mathias Nixt came to America, locating in Dubuque, Ia., where he spent about seven years; a part of the time he was in Clayton County. In 1865 he became a citizen of Floyd County. The first two years he rented land in Pleasant Grove Township. In 1864 he and his brother John bought 160 acres on section 1, Union Township. Upon this he moved in 1867, dividing it at about the same date. He built a good house and barn, and has changed the farm from raw prairie to a well-cultivated place. To this first purchase he has added different purchases, making in all 240 acres of Floyd County 's best land. He has by his own exertions made his own property. He has wrung from the hard hand of toil and independence that places him among Floyd County 's well-to-do and sound farmers. He was married in 1831 to Margaret Spelis, a native of Germany. They have five children - Anna, John, George, Katie and Maggie, all of whom are at home, except Maggie, who lives with his brother John. Mr. Nixt lost his wife in 1871, and married Terrace Adolph in 1875. They have a family of five children - Lena, Joseph, Simon, Nicholas and Mathias.

James O'Hair Pages 1126 - 1127

Was born in Dumfries, Scotland, Feb. 11, 1836. When a mere child he moved with his father, John O'Hair to Glasgow where the family remained till 1849, when they came to America, spending the first four months in New York City. From there they went to Utica, N. Y., where John O'Hair went into the dry goods business and James O'Hair clerked for him about two years. In the fall of 1851 they moved to Michigan, and bought a farm, where they lived about two years. At the expiration of this time the family again moved, this time to Illinois, near Rockford, where they bought a farm, and made that their home only about two years, when James O'Hair and his father came to Iowa, and bought the Eaton farm in St. Charles Township, this county, now owned by A. W. Cook. Here the family made their home till 1861, when they moved to Charles City, where his family still reside. In 1871 Mr. O'Hair opened a saloon in Marble Rock, where he is still in business. Mr. O'Hair was married in June 1857 to Miss Elizabeth Hill, of Rockford, Ill. They have a family of seven children living - Belle, a school teacher; James, Jr., also a school teacher; Mary Etta; Charles, a barber in Charles City; Anna, Lizzie and George. The younger children and Mary Etta are attending school. Mr. O'Hair believes firmly in education, and has furnished his family with the same, so that they are abundantly able to take care of themselves as soon as grown up. Politically Mr. O'Hair is a Democrat, and takes a live interest in the politics of the day. His influence is strong, but not prevailing in a country so thickly settled with members of the opposite party.

A. Palmateer Page 1127

Was born in Andes, Delaware County, N. Y., Dec. 19, 1817. Here he made his home till he was about thirty-eight years of age, principally engaged in farming. Those were early days even in New York, and his school advantages were very much limited, though those who are acquainted with Mr. Palmateer would never think but he was well educated. But unlike many men, he has taken advantage of every opportunity to inform himself, and is today in advance of many who started out with fine opportunities. While in New York State he worked in a saw mill quite a good deal, which required considerable writing and figuring. This gave him quite an opportunity in the way of a business education. From New York State he moved to Buffalo Township, Ogle County, Ill., where he resided about seventeen years. From there he came to Iowa and became a citizen of Floyd County in 1871. On the 15th day of May, the same year, he bought the fine farm of 160 acres where he still resides, about two miles northwest of the pleasant village of Greene, in Butler County. Upon this farm he has since lived, and has indeed a pleasant home. Mr. Palmateer was married in Delaware County, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1842, to Miss Henrietta McKeel. Their family consists of nine children, four sons and five daughters, all still living - Electa married O. C. Roberts and resides in Butler County, near Greene; Emeline married Jacob Potter, and resides in Butler County, also near Greene; Horace is married, and resides in Kansas; Salvenus, married and resides in Todd County, Minn.; Ransom is married, and resides in Butler County, east of Greene; Sarah is the wife of Leet Buts, who is farming Mr. Palmateer's place on shares; Eva married Lewis Hart and resides in Butler County, about a mile and a half southwest of Greene; Jesse and Mary, the two youngest children, are both single and at home. Politically he is a sound-headed, and life long Jackson Democrat. Is morally opposed to all secret societies. Of Mr. Palmateer we wish to speak, as he is known to be a man of solid worth and substantial principles; has broad and clear views upon all live issues of the day, and is not afraid to advance and defend them. He was what might be called a pioneer all his life, beginning in New York, through seventeen years in Illinois, and the remainder in Iowa.

John B. Pooley Page 1128

An Englishman, was born in Davenport, Devonshire, England, Jan. 23, 1854; his parents names were John and Mary (Blake) Pooley. His early life was that in common with all English working lads, and when old enough, longings for a new and free country, where a poor man has equal rights with a rich. And so, in 1870, when in his seventeenth year, he came to the United States, and staid for eight years in Rockford, Ill.; he moved to Floyd County in 1878, to his present locality. He married a daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth J. Fiddick, her son marrying his sister, Rebecca Pooley, and all living on adjoining farms. A pleasant life must be theirs. Mr. Pooley is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Greene. He is cropping an average of corn, oats and tame grass, and we see no reason why Mr. Pooley may not regard his emigration in the light of a wise and profitable movement upon his part.

S. Rex     Page 1129
Was born in Summit County, O., in 1834; made his home with his father, Rudolph Rex, till he was twenty-one years of age, when he came to Floyd County, Ia., in the fall of 1856. He came into possession of 160 acres of land through the gift of his father, who had purchased, in 1856, 1,200 acres in Union Township, this county. This he exchanged for 115 acres near Marble Rock, which he still owns and is farming. The first year after coming to this county he worked for his father, the next twenty years he was either a township or county officer, holding the positions of Constable and Deputy Sheriff. During this time he managed his farm and carried on quite a stroke of agriculture through kind help. In 1858 he purchased a half interest in a steam saw mill in Marble Rock, and ran it two years, when he sold out, and turned his attention principally to farming, till the railroad came through, when he bought and shipped stock two years. Since then, and in fact, we may say since 1857, he has been engaged in farming, but has coupled with it various branches of business. In November 1881, he formed a partnership with N. Rosenkrans in a meat market, in which business they are still successfully engaged. Mr. Rex was married in Marble Rock, October 1859 to Miss Mary J. Ackley, a native of New York State. She is a daughter of Mr. Ackley, who came to this county in an early day. Their family consists of nine children, four sons and five daughters. Politically Mr. Rex has been a Republican since his first vote, which was for John C. Fremont, in favor of temperance and approved the Amendment.

E. A. Rosenkrans Page 1128 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in Luzerne County, Pa., in 1846. When about seven years of age he moved with his father, Abram Rosenkrans, to Illinois, where E. A. made his home, spending the most of his time as a dry goods clerk. In the spring of 1869 he became a citizen of Floyd County, locating in Marble Rock, where he has since resided. In the fall of 1870 he formed a partnership with J. W. Darland in the dry goods business. They continued in business eighteen months, when Mr. Rosenkrans sold his interest in the stock to his partner and bought a stock of goods from William Moore, and was alone in the business about two years, when he formed a co-partnership with his father, who had just come from Illinois; this partnership still exists, under the firm name of E. A. Rosenkrans & Co. They keep a general store, complete in all departments. Mr. E. A. Rosenkrans was married July 12, 1870, to Miss Frankie Bissell, a native of Ohio; came to Iowa at an early date. They have two children - Harry and Gracie. Politically he is a Republican. Though not an aspirant for office, he has had to serve as Town Recorder after the incorporation of the village of Marble Rock, and is at present Street Commissioner. Is a member of the order of Freemasons.

N. Rosenkrans Pages 1128 - 1129 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in Pennsylvania in 1843. When about twelve years of age he moved from that State to Illinois with his father, Abram Rosenkrans. Here N. Rosenkrans made his home till 1869, when he came to Floyd County, Ia., locating in Marble Rock. He purchased, in Union Township, 160 acres of land. Of this he sold eighty acres, and bought afterward forty acres, so that he now owns a farm of 120 acres, which he farmed till the year 1881, when he rented it and formed a partnership with Samuel Rex in the butcher and meat market business, in which avocation we find them still engaged. Mr. Rosenkrans was married in Floyd County in 1870 to Miss Emeline Comstock, a native of New York State. They have no family of their own, but have an adopted daughter, Hattie, who is now eighteen years of age and has made her home with them for the past ten years.

S. K. Shafer     Pages 1129 - 1130

Was born in Union County, O., in 1835. He was a son of Lemmiel and Jane (Kearney) Shafer. At about the age of sixteen he left the State of Ohio and went to Illinois, where he remained five years engaged in farming part of the time, and a while there engaged in the manufacture of wagons and carriages which trade he learned in that State. From Illinois he went to Missouri where he purchased a farm and made his home thirteen years. From thence came to Iowa, locating in Floyd County, purchasing the farm of 160 acres where he still resides, in Union Township, on section 23. Upon this farm he has made many improvements. He has turned it from a wild prairie, to a pleasant home and fine farm. Built himself a fine house and has beautified his surroundings so that he has one of the finest homes in the Northwest. Mr. Shafer has not only been what might be called a lifelong pioneer, but has had his experience with the people of Missouri at the breaking of the war. For a time they did not dare say their souls were their own, but finally the appearance of soldiers quieted matters to some extent, though fighting bushwhackers was a matter of daily occurrence. He has also had his experience on the plains with the red skins; was with one of Kit Carson's comrades for awhile. For about eight months Mr. Shafer was one of the Missouri home guards, one of the most dangerous positions a man was ever called upon to fill. He enlisted Aug. 12, 1862, in Company D, Twenty-seventh Missouri Volunteer Infantry; served his country about eight months, when he was taken sick and sent to a hospital and soon afterward discharged on account of disability. Mr. Shafer was married Jan 28, 1864, to Miss Clementine Kendell, a native of Indiana. She died in 1876, leaving four children - John I., A. J., Robert A. and Sarah C., all residing at home. Mr. Shafer married his second wife in 1878. Her name was Martha Maxon, a native of Ohio. They have two children - Helen R., and William H. Mr. Shafer has about all his life been a member of the United Brethren church. His first wife was a member of the same church. His present wife is a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Shafer is a member of the order of Odd Fellows. His first vote was for James Buchanan, but has since voted the straight Republican ticket. He was a warm friend and earnest supporter of the author of this work.

J. B. Shepardson     Pages 1130 - 1131

Was born in Chautauqua County, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1830. When about fourteen years of age he moved with his father, William Shepardson, to De Kalb County, Ill., where he resided till his death, which occurred July 24, 1882. J. B. Shepardson called Illinois his home for about eighteen years, though he spent three or four years in the lumber business in Wisconsin; while in Illinois he turned his attention principally to farming. For the past twenty-four years he has been identified with the interests of Floyd County, though he did not move into the county till 1864. The two years previous he spent in Butler County, six miles south of Marble Rock, where he moved in 1864, and is still residing. The first ten years in this place were spent in no regular line of business, though he to some extent engaged in several, and employed most of his time at something. He kept store and hotel and bought and sold lands, and might be considered a frontier speculator. In 1873 he opened the Marble Rock Bank, which his still running very successfully. He is also extensively interested in the grain business. The firm of J. B. Shepardson & Co. have been controlling the grain business of Marble Rock for the past three years. They handle some years as high as $300,000 worth of grain. In addition to Mr. Shepardson's businesses of various characters, he owns about 3,000 acres of improved land that requires considerable attention. The land is situated in Cerro Gordo, Butler and Floyd counties. He also owns a grist-mill on Shell Rock River. Mr. Shepardson was married in Wisconsin, July 22, 1860, to Miss Julia D. Bucklen, a native of New York State. Their family consists of two children - Helen E. and William, ages twelve and ten respectively. Mr. Shepardson has for the past twenty-five years been a member of the order of Freemasons. Is a sound Republican and Prohibitionist. Though not an aspiring politician, he has held many years different offices of trust; was a member of the County Board of Supervisors for about eight years; Justice of the Peace about four years; Postmaster and Supervisor, represented the county in 1876-1877, and is the present Mayor of the village of Marble Rock. It is with a great deal of frankness that we speak of Mr. Shepardson as a philanthropist and public benefactor. He is the friend of the poor man, and always stands ready to help an honest man and one who is willing to help himself. Mr. Shepardson has hosts of friends and but few enemies. Those who might be termed his enemies are invariably of that class who, in dealings with him, have either imposed upon the rules of decency in business, or have maliciously attempted to take advantage of the leniency extended to them, through the good heartedness of Mr. Shepardson.

Isaac Shultz     Pages 1131 - 1132

Was born in Columbia County, Pa., Sept. 5, 1806. He is the youngest son of Daniel and Elizabeth Shultz, both natives of New Jersey. Mr. Isaac Shultz made Pennsylvania his home for about fifty-two years, spending his time upon a farm. In that Sate he married and reared his family. In the year 1858 he moved with his family to Illinois, where they remained about twelve years. In 1870 he and his family came to Iowa, locating in Floyd County, where we find them at this writing. In 1872 Mr. Shultz and Miss Mary Margaret Stackhouse were united in marriage. She died in 1876, in this county. Mr. Shultz's family consisted of nine children, only four of whom are still living - Paxton, the oldest son, is now fifty-five years of age, has a family of five children and resides near Rockford; James, the second son died in the army in 1863, at the age of twenty-four years; Thomas died in 1859 at the age of thirty years; George, now forty-one years of age and resides about three miles southwest of Marble Rock, is a farmer and has a family of three children; Philip is thirty-eight years of age, has a farm in Union Township, this county, and has a family of four children; Elizabeth the oldest daughter, died in 1857, at about the age of twenty-seven (she was the wife of Hiram Shultz; left two children who are now residing in Pennsylvania); Jane died in Illinois in 1864, at about the age of thirty-one (she was the wife of Jefferson Malugin; left one child); Adaline died in this county in 1877, in the month of October, at the age of forty-one (she was the wife of John Malugin and left a family of seven children); Mary Margaret is now the wife of Daniel Miller, and resides in Illinois (she is about thirty-six years of age. They have seven children). Mr. Isaac Shultz married his second wife (Nancy Davis), Aug. 30, 1877. Mr. Shultz resides upon his farm of 147 acres, two miles south of Marble Rock, which he purchased in 1870. Mr. Shultz is a member of the United Brethren church, and is a Republican. He sent three sons to the army - George, James and Phillip, who enlisted at the opening of the war and fought like heroes and staid their time like patriots. George had the ends of three fingers cut off with a rifle ball. Philip went before he was of age, being only sixteen years of age. Mr. Shultz carried on his farm alone and let his boys go fight for the country.

Samuel Sours Pages 1132 - 1133 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in Summit County, O., Jan. 17, 1836, where he made his home till he was nearly twenty-one years of age, when he came to Iowa, it being in the last days of 1856. He settled in Marble Rock, Union Township, this county, and turned his attention to improving and working a farm of eighty acres they owned across the creek. Mr. Sours taught school the first winter he was in Iowa, it being the second school taught in the township. He turned his attention to farming principally till the year 1864, when in February, he enlisted in Company B, Seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry; he served his county till July 1865, when he was mustered out a Davenport, Ia.; was under Sherman's command, and was with him on his famous march to the sea, participating in all the battles known to that march, which are known to the historians as being numerous, the principal ones being Lay's Ferry, at Atlanta, the 22nd of July, and besides, a host of sharp and hard fought skirmishes all along the route; was one of the Government's profitable soldiers; was never in the hospital, nor wounded, nor taken prisoner. After his return from the army he again engaged in farming in this county; since then he has divided his time between Ohio and Iowa, farming some in each State. For the past six years he has made Iowa his permanent home. He owns 141 acres of land in Union Township which he farms with the assistance of his son-in-law, John Ritter. He usually has in crop about 100 acres, of which about sixty is corn, and balance in oats; has stopped raising wheat on account of its many drawbacks, though he has raised as high as eighty acres. Before moving to the farm he kept on it quite a good deal of stock, but has but little at present. Mr. Sours was married in Marble Rock, Feb. 8, 1857, to Miss Ann Maria Rex, a native of Ohio. They have a family of eight children - Ellen J., now the wife of John A. Ritter; John C., Samuel R., Phillip, Mary Ann, Louis H., William A. and Ray Lloyd. Mr. Sours is a member of the Legion of Honor; is a life-long Republican, and out-and-out for the amendment; is at present holding the office of Township Trustee.

R. C. Tift     Pages 1133 - 1134

Was born in Rhode Island in 1817. When about three years of age he moved with his father, Peter Tift, to Vermont. Here R. C. Tift made his home till he was twenty-eight years of age, seven years of which time he was employed in Enosburg, Vt., where he had charge of a mill. In 1845 he went to Parishville, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., where he bought a farm and made that his home a short time, when he took charge of a mill in Massena Village and remained about three years, at the expiration of which time he went to Baraboo, Sauk County, Wis., where he had charge of a mill some eight months; then went to Jefferson County, Wis., and had charge of a mill three years. From thence he went to Clifton, Wis., where he kept tavern four years. In 1862 he came to Charles City, Ia., and worked in the Charles City Mill about two years. May 10, 1864, he took charge of the Marble Rock Mill and has since been its manager. Mr. Tift was married in New York State, in 1846, to Miss Rosina Darland, who died in 1853 leaving two children - Phoebe J., married A. W. Hawks, and resides in Osceola; William resides in Casey, Guthrie County, Ia., a cabinet-maker by trade. Mr. Tift married his second wife in 1853, in Massena, N. Y.; her maiden name was Margaret J. Rankin. They have three children - the oldest, Ella, married H. N. Merrick and resides on the county line between Floyd and Cerro Gordo; Lebbie and Lillian May, both young ladies and reside at home. Mr. Tift is always pleasant to meet and has everybody for his friend. His long acquaintance here in the midst of Marble Rock has won for him many friends and no enemies. Has been a life-long miller and a good one, too. His varied experience with different mills and grain has given him advantages of learning his trade that but few possess.

C. E. Town     Page 1134

Was born in Illinois in 1838. He was the fifth child of Edmon and Sara Town. At the age of seventeen he came to Iowa, locating in Cedar Falls, where he remained eighteen months, teaming most of the time when he was not shaking with the ague. From here he went to Butler County and remained about six months, when he went to Bremer County and remained till the year 1868, when he became a citizen of Floyd County. For two years after coming to the county he rented land, at the expiration of which time he moved upon his farm which he had purchased in 1867. It is situated on section 19, two and a half miles southwest of Marble Rock. Here he has made his home for the past twelve years and it is a very pleasant location. Mr. Town was married in 1862, in Bremer County, to Miss Sarah Mullen, a native of Indiana. They have four children - Clarence J., Armetta, Roy and Nellie. He always takes an active interest in the Republican ranks in the political issues of the day. Mr. Town's mother died in Illinois in 1863. His father came to Iowa, this county, in 1869 and resided here till his death, which occurred in 1881.

Merrit Towslee     Pages 1134 - 1135

Was born in New York State, Feb. 26, 1837. When only about four years of age he moved with his parents to Ohio where they resided about fourteen years, when the family moved to Clayton County, Ia., here he resided till 1864, when he came to Floyd County, Ia., and purchased the farm where he still resides, on section 6, Union Township. At the time he purchased only sixty acres, but has since added to it till now he owns 180 acres of Floyd County 's best land. He carries on quite a stock of farming and sufficient stock to consume the grain, putting in about 100 acres and cuts about twenty acres of hay; keeps thirty-two head of cattle, from fifty to sixty hogs, and five head of horses. Mr. Towslee was married July 24, 1863, to Miss Malissa Garber. They have two children - Cora Mabel and Irvin S., ages nineteen and twelve respectively. Mr. Towslee is a member of the order of Freemasons and has been for the past twenty-five years. Crossed the plains of California in 1859, where he spent three years in mining and lumbering with considerable success. Of Mr. Towslee we can but remark that he has been out in the world and knows what it is made of. He is clever and shrewd, and has by his own exertions placed himself among the wealthy men of our county.

Nathan Towslee     Page 1135
Was born in Chenango County, N. Y., in 1810, where he made his home till he was thirty-two years of age, engaged in farming. In 1842 he went to Ohio, locating near Cleveland, where he purchased a farm and lived fourteen years, at the expiration of which time, in 1856, he moved to Clayton County, Iowa. There he cleared up a large farm in Volga Township, and made that his home about thirteen years, when he came to Floyd County, and has since been a citizen. Bought a farm of forty-five acres on the Shell Rock River, but has since sold some of it, reserving a few acres, where he will make his home. During the war Mr. Towslee was through the South, in the employ of the Government, as a foreman in the carpenter department in building storehouses, etc. Mr. Towslee was married Oct. 10, 1831, to Miss Mahala Tillotson, a native of New York. Their family consists of six living children - Horace, now in Wisconsin; Merrit, a wealthy farmer of Union Township; Julia, the wife of Oscar Slosson, and resides in Washington Territory; Mary Etta, married Henry Stroud, and resides in Union Township; Helen, married John Porter, and resides in Charles City Township; Frank, a farmer in Clayton County. Of Mr. Towslee we wish to say, we find him in his seventy-third year, hale and hearty, and chuck full of good humor. He has been a pioneer most of his life and knows well what the world is made of. He has been a life-long Democrat, but believes in placing the best men in office.

A. R. Van Myers     Pages 1135 - 1136

Deceased, was born in Canada, July 8, 1834. He was a son of John and Hannah Van Myers. At the age of two years his parents moved to New York State, where he resided till about 1865, when he, with his wife and children, came to Union Township, Floyd County, and engaged in farming and milling till March 1879, when he, in company with L. B. Clark, engaged in the drug business, at Marble Rock, which avocation he pursued till his death, which occurred after a brief illness, and quite unexpected to his many friends, Aug. 18, 1880. Mr. Van Myers was a man who had many friends, and his loss as a citizen and a member of the I. O. O. F. was deeply felt. Mr. Van Myers was married in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence County, N. Y., April 9, 1856, to Jane J. Bell, daughter of Hugh and Susannah Bell, both natives of Ireland, where Mrs. Van Myers was born, Dec. 20, 1833, and came to the United States at about the age of twelve. Mr. Van Myers' family consists of four children living and one deceased - Caroline M., born Feb. 20, 1858, married Dr. J. C. Clark, July 19, 1877; Hannah M., born March 28, 1859, married Mr. John P. Wallace, Sept. 6, 1876, died March 8, 1882; Frances A., born July 22, 1860, married Charles A. Vickers, Jan. 22, 1882; Alexander R., born June 11, 1864; Susan E., born Oct. 1, 1866.

John Voelker Page 1136 submitted by Bob Hoy

Deceased, was born in Prussia, in 1830. When about twenty-five years of age he came to American and located in Watertown, Jefferson County, Wis., where he lived about three years, when he moved to LaCrosse County and lived about thirteen years. In 1872 he came to Floyd County and bought 170 acres in Union Township, where he lived till his death, which occurred May 6, 1874. He was married in 1858 to Elizabeth Shaifer, who was born in Germany in 1837. They were the parents of six children - Edward G., the eldest, died in 1879, at the age of eighteen; Emma C., William L., Ellen L., Frank F., and Lydia A., all reside with their mother. Mrs. Voelker was married to Charles Herz in September 1877. They have one child - Rosa M. Mr. Herz was born in Germany, and came to America when a young man.

R. S. Vorhes Pages 1136 - 1137 submitted by Bob Hoy

Was born in New Jersey in 1834. When quite young his father moved to Ohio, where they as a family lived about nine years, at the expiration of which time they moved to Indiana, where they resided about the same number of years. In 1855 they came to Iowa, locating in the southern part of the State, where his father, J. H. Vorhes, still resides. In May 1861, R. S. became a citizen of Floyd County, and purchased a farm in Union Township. In September 1874, he purchased a nice farm of eighty acres on section 33 north. He divides his attention between farming and stock raising. Was married Jan. 1, 1866, to Miss Sarah A. Baltimore, daughter of Ashbury Baltimore, one of Floyd County 's pioneers. They have no family of their own, but adopted a girl in 1878. Her name is Minnie, now seven years of age. Politically he is a Republican.

Henry Wadey     Page 1137

Was born in Sussex, England, near Brighton, May 19, 1814, a son of Thomas and Ann Wadey. The first thirty-eight years of his life was spent in that country. After he grew up to manhood he engaged in the carpenter business, till he came to the United States, which was in the year 1852. He located first in Belvidere, Ill., for two years. In 1854 he came to Floyd County, and settled upon the farm where he still resides, on section 31, northwest corner of the township. He built a log cabin upon this, and turned it from raw prairie to one of the good farms of Floyd County. He formerly owned 160 acres, but has sold all but twenty-eight acres, which he reserves as a homestead, and a pleasant home it is. In 1862 he built a fine stone house, and has his surroundings beautified with nicely arranged trees, etc. Mr. Wadey was married in Brighton, England, in 1842, to Adda Woolven, daughter of William and Maria Woolven. Mrs. Woolven died in England many years ago, and Mr. Woolven accompanied Mr. Wadey and wife to this country, and died about three years afterward. Mr. Wadey has no family. Of Mr. Wadey we are pleased to say he is not only first among the people of the county in point of settlement but in point of citizenship. He has been a life long Republican.

Wm. Wagnor     Page 1137

Was born in Centre County, Pa., in 1835. He was a son of Wm. and Julia Wagnor. He resided in Pennsylvania till the spring of 1854, when he went to Illinois, where he resided till the spring of 1856, at which date he came to Floyd County, Ia., locating in Marble Rock, where he spent about six years working at the carpenter's trade and running the steam saw mill most of the time. After leaving Marble Rock he rented land south of Marble Rock. In the spring of 1862 he bought thirty acres which joined eighty acres Mrs. Wagnor received through the will of her father. Upon this land they still reside, about three quarters of a mile southwest of Marble Rock. To this first purchase Mr. Wagnor has added some land, making in all 113½ acres. He was married in the fall of 1857 to Elizabeth Rex. They have six children - Martin resides in Minnesota and Ralph is in Scott Township; Lilly, Ona, Lydia and Ida. Mr. Wagnor has always voted the Republican ticket.

John Wallace     Pages 1137 1139

Was born in Ireland in 1818, though not of that nationality by descent. A story related of his grandfather's career, illustrating the circumstances by which his birth is marked in that country is well worthy of space here, and will at the same time show the noble stock from which Mr. Wallace sprang. In 1770 his grandfather, William Wallace, was known as a prominent man in Scotland, whose opinions were quite adverse to the English Government. In company with many others he had to flee from that county to the New England colonies of America. Here he became an active spirit among the Pilgrims, and under the command of General Washington he held the office of Major. His prominence in Scotland and his high position in this country made him quite a conspicuous enemy to the English Government, and he was branded as a rebel of the same, and his life was fiercely sought by his enemies on that account. His property (which was quite large) was confiscated, and his only son, John Wallace, was hunted like a tiger in the jungles. But the son was carefully secreted by a maiden aunt, who took him to Ireland, where he grew up and married a Highland Scotch woman. Of this union was born John Wallace, the subject of this sketch, whose life can be almost traced to Scotland instead of Ireland, from the fact that when a mere infant his parents moved to that country. When about twelve years of age, John Wallace, Jr., came to the United States in company with some elder brothers, and spent the first three years in Suffield, Hartford County, Conn., where he met some of the grandest people, he says, that it has ever been his pleasure to meet. At the expiration of this time he worked a year in a carriage shop in Newark, N. J. Finding the work too heavy for his strength he went to New York City and clerked in a general grocery store about one year. In 1840 he went to Roscoe, Winnebago County, Ill., and remained one year; then worked at his trade in Rockford and Beloit about two years, at the end of which time he settled in Beloit, which place he made his home about eleven years. During this time he was very prosperous, but through the treachery of a friend lost about $2,000, it being about $300 more than he was worth. In 1856 he came to Floyd County, Ia., with about $5,000, which he had afterward accumulated. At this date he purchased, in Union, 120 acres which he, two years afterward, sold at an advance of over $1,000. In those days he was one of the heaviest tax-payers of the county. But while he had twice proved himself wonderfully efficient as a money-maker, he with many others, has suffered considerable loss in land on the deceptive fluctuations of immigration and prices, and the uncertain tread of civilization. In Boone County, Ill., Mr. Wallace was married, Nov. 1, 1848, to Miss Electa A. Stevens, a native of Pennsylvania, and sister of Mrs. Elisha Wilcox and Charles Stevens, both of this county. Mrs. Wallace was the mother of twelve children, nine of whom are living, five sons and four daughters - Mary Edna, now the wife of C. D. Clark; Electa A., married Hezekiah Garber; Ella Sophia, wife of W. D. Lamb, the present popular proprietor of the Beelar House; Oren W., John P. W., Eva E., Garrett S., Charles S., and Asaph M. Of this large family, all are resident of Floyd County except Eva E., who is attending school in Matherton, Mich. Mrs. Wallace died Sept. 10, 1876; she was one of the best women God ever gave to the sons of men. Mr. Wallace married his second wife, Catharine Darland, Oct. 14, 1877. Politically he is a Republican of the Abolition stock. He was appointed Postmaster under the administration of Pierce; was elected County Coroner in 1862, and Justice of the Peace in 1872.

R. F. Wilke     Page 1139

Was born in Germany in 1849, and came to America with his parents in 1856. They located in Madison, Wis., where R. F. Wilke made his home till the year 1870, when he went to Charles City, this county, and worked as a journeyman at the harness trade for eight months. May 26, 1871, he became a citizen of Marble Rock, where he engaged in the harness business on his own capital, continuing in the same about eleven years. In 1876 he added to his harness trade a boot and shoe business, placing each branch on opposite sides of the store. In this form he carried on business till the spring of 1882, when he sold the harness department to Mr. J. Wiloth, who is now occupying a part of the store with him. The sales of this stock last year amounted to about $10,000, and since Mr. Wilke has turned his attention to boots and shoes alone he has even surpassed that amount of sales. This year it will not run far from $12,000. His stock is clean and complete. He carries about thirty-five different grades of men's boots, ten of boys, and over eighty different styles of ladies shoes, besides an endless variety of youths and children's boots and shoes. Mr. Wilke was married in Marble Rock in 1874 to Miss Minnie Grant, a native of Iowa. They have two children - William G. and Clyde, ages four years and three months, respectively. Mr. Wilke is a member of the I. O. O. F. In 1871 he commenced with a capital of $500, and today $10,000 will hardly cover his stock and capital.

James Welton     Page 1140

Was born in Canada in the year 1846. Here he made his home till 1869, when he became a citizen of Floyd County, by locating in Charles City. While in Canada he turned his attention to farming. Before coming to this county Mr. Welton had struck rock bottom, having only $2 in his pocket. He spent the first year in Charles City, working at what jobs might turn up. The year following he rented a farm. In the month of September 1871, he moved to Marble Rock, where he has since resided, turning his attention to farming some, but might be more properly considered a horseman than a farmer. When any one wants a good horse among his acquaintances he wants him to buy it; and if a horse is for sale they go to him also. He has dealt in horses more or less ever since coming to Marble Rock, and of late years has been buying and shipping. Last spring he took a car-load to Dakota. In 1873 he moved to a property of his own, west of town. We find him very pleasantly and comfortably situated; his home is in a natural grove that affords cool breezes in the summer and warmth in the winter. Mr. Welton was married in Canada, Feb. 20, 1867, to Miss Samantha McDonell, a native of Canada. They have one child - Anna Maud, now fourteen years of age.

C. E. Wood     Pages 1140 1141

Was born in Whitehall, Washington County, N. Y., Nov. 21. 1833. Here he made his home till he was twenty-one years of age. In the meantime he learned the harness maker and trimmer's trade. In 1854 he went to De Kalb County, Ill., where he engaged in farming, remaining nearly six years. At the expiration of this time he became a citizen of this county, locating in Union Township, where he has since resided. He farmed for about eleven years, when he engaged as clerk with Mr. Allen Moore, who then had the post office. Being with Mr. Moore in all about a year, he became familiar with the post office business and handling the mail, etc. The year 1873 he spent in the employ of Mr. Wilke in the harness making business. On the 20th of July 1874 he took charge of the Marble Rock post office as deputy, and in this capacity remained about three years, when in January 1878, he was appointed Postmaster. Mr. Wood has been identified with this post office longer than any other man. His ability as an accurate business man and his attentiveness to his duties make him, as it were, an indispensable man to the town and office. Mr. Wood was married to his first wife, Martha Baily, in Aurora, Ill., in 1864. She died in Marble Rock in 1876, leaving one child - Grant C., who is now about eighteen years of age. Mr. Wood married his second wife, Mary Elliott, July 23, 1879, in Cedar Falls. He is a member of the order of Freemasons and formerly took an active part as a member of the Sons of Temperance in New York State, also in the Society of Good Templars in this State. Politically Mr. Wood is a Republican, and always has taken an active part in politics, though never an aspirant for office; he has held the position of Township Collector three years, and Township Clerk for the past eight years, which he occupies still; is also Assessor of the village of Marble Rock.

George Worsfield     Page 1141

Born in England in 1831, was a son of John and Frances (Bonfield) Worsfield. When about twenty-one years of age he came to America, spending the first two years in Buffalo, N. Y., working at harness making. The following six months he sold goods on the road, in the western part of New York. At this date he went to Belvidere, Ill., where he remained two months when he joined his old friend, Henry Wadey, and came to Floyd County, Ia. His first purchase was in 1861, being the farm where he still resides, situated in the northwest corner of Union Township, on section 31. Here he built a small house which served as his home till 1873, when he built himself a very fine house. His home is pleasantly located, being about three and one-half miles from Marble Rock, and five and one-half from Rockford, and within a few rods of the railroad, where the daily passing trains relieve the monotony of country life. Mr. Worsfield has been unable, on account of his health a few years past, to carry on his farm, and has let it out on shares. He was married in 1869 to Miss Nancy Baltimore, daughter of A. Baltimore, an interesting sketch of whose life appears in this work. They have no family. Mrs. Worsfield died in 1878. He taught the first school in Marble Rock; made the first harness ever made in Floyd County, and took the first in the county on single and double harness, being a diploma, given by the Floyd County Agricultural Society, on each award, at its second annual meeting, Sept. 19, 20, 1860. He worked at the harness trade in England prior to coming to this county. He made a visit to England of about three months, four years ago. Politically he is a Republican and Prohibitionist. Has held the office of Township Trustee several terms, besides doing his part as School Director and Road Supervisor.

Samuel Yerrick     Pages 1141 1142

Deceased, was born in Pennsylvania in 1813. At about the age of seventeen he went to Ohio, where he lived till about 1845, when he moved to Illinois, where they made their home about eleven years, at the expiration of which time they came to Iowa, locating in Union Township, this county, it being the year 1856. Purchased the year previous the farm of 160 acres, where his family still resides, about two and one-half miles southeast of Marble Rock, on the Nashua Road. In 1839 Mr. Yerrick and Miss Ladisa Feller, a native of Pennsylvania, being born there Aug. 11, 1819, were married. Mr. Yerrick died Sept. 17, 1861, leaving a family of eight children - Oliver, married and is a farmer of Floyd County; Amelia is the wife of William Bedell, who is one of Floyd County's farmers; Mary, married William Comstock, residents of Kansas; Eliza, married Isaac Chamberlain, resident of Union Township; Sophia married Hiram Bailey, and resides in Howard County, Ia.; Adam, single and carries on the home farm; Lavina, married Frederic Larcher and resides in Floyd County; Melva, single and at home. Mrs. Yerrick is a member of the Methodist church.