Hardin County >> 1883 Index

History of Hardin County, Iowa
Springfield, Ill: Union Publishing Company, 1883.

Jackson Township

W. H. H. Adams is a native of Ohio, born in Coshocton county, January 22, 1841.  His parents, Henry and Sarah (Mills) Adams, were both natives of Bedford county, Pennsylvania.  In 1845 the family migrated to Green county, Wisconsin.  Here W. H. H. Adams was reared on a farm, received a good common school education, and, February 23, 1862, married Miss Eunice A. Sanders, born in Shenango county, N. Y., January 11, 1844.  In 1869, he came to Hardin county, and, in 1877, purchased his present farm.  Mr. Adams is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.  The children are, Jennie, Henry and Clarendon.

B. F. Bear is one of the most enterprising and wide-awake men in the township.  He came to Hardin county in the fall of 1864, and settled on section 13, Jackson township, where he now resides.  As a farmer, Mr. Bear has been a success, as he now owns 270 acres of well improved land.  His political relations are with the Democratic party, and he has held local offices.  Mr. Bear is possessed of more than ordinary intelligence, public spirited and highly respected wherever known.  He was born in Seneca county, N. Y., on the 13th day of February, 1832, his parents being Sam'l and Sarah Bear; and he resided in his native State until 1854, when he started westward, stopping about eighteen months in Carroll county, Ill.  He then came to Iowa, entered 200 acres of land in Buchanan county, and cultivated the same until he came to Hardin county.  He was married in 1855 to Miss Sarah Stewart, a native of Steuben county, N. Y.  They have had six children, four of whom are now living -- Francis E., Andrew J., James E. and Sarah H.

Gustavus Black was somewhat odd, but a good boy; made a good soldier; was mortally wounded, and died of his wounds at White river, Ark.

Clark A. Bliss resides on section 14.  He is a native of Erie county, Pa., born January 6, 1841.   His father, Henry Bliss, is one of the pioneers of the county, as he settled at Point Pleasant July 11, 1857, and is now a resident of Jackson township.  Clark A. Bliss, when five years old of age, went with his father to Sheboygan, Wis., but soon afterwards went with Mr. B. Dean to DeKalb county, Ill., with whom he lived twelve years.  He then returned to Pennsylvania and followed farming; also worked in the oil regions.  In January, 1863, he enlisted in Company C of the 111th Pennsylvania, and served three years.  After being mustered out of service, he returned to Pennsylvania, and about three years later came to Hardin county, Iowa.  He, however, subsequently spent five years in Illinois, and also followed railroading in Pennsylvania.  He located where he now resides in 1880.  Mr. Bliss, July 4, 1865, married Miss Mary E. Wheeler, a native of Erie county, Pa.  They have three children -- Willie J., G. S. and Bessie M.  In politics, he is a Republican.

David Bowers, one of the early pioneers who settled in Jackson township in 1854, is a native of of Stark county, Ohio, and was born on the 15th day of April, 1809.  His parents where Mathias and Catherine (Hawk) Bowers; both natives of Maryland.  Mr. Bowers resided in his native State until 1849, when he emigrated to Iowa, and after living five years in Cedar county, he came to Hardin county, and in 1855 located on section 23, Jackson township, where he now resides; and he now owns 120 acres of land, valued at about $30 per acre.  Mr. Bowers has been twice married.  In 1836, to Miss Elizabeth Golden, a native of Culpepper, Va.  She  died, leaving four children -- William J., Inmon H., E. Frances, now Mrs. John Swagard, and Mary M., now Mrs. John Curzy.  In 1874 he married Miss Catherine Dean, widow of Robert Dean.

Inmon H. Bowers, second son of David and Elizabeth (Golden) Bowers, was born in Licking county, Ohio, September 15, 1841.  He came with his parents to Iowa in 1850, and settled with them in Hardin county in 1854.  In 1861 Mr. Bowers responded to the call of his country by enlisted in Company A, 12th Iowa, and served until March 28, 1863, when he was discharged on account of disability, caused by a gunshot wound received in the left leg at the battle of Corinth, October 6, 1862.  He then returned to Hardin county, and has since followed farming.  He now owns 150 acres of land.  He is a Republican in politics, and has held local offices.  He was married in 1864, to Miss Hannah E. Speers.  She died in December, 1868, leaving two children -- Iva and George.  September 27, 1877, he married Miss Cassa Hurd, a native of Carroll county, Ill., born in 1861.  And by this union they have three children -- Cleopatra, Allie May and Maud.

Wilson Boyd was the younger brother of the teacher [J. M. Boyd].  He was light built, but a bright active young man; went with his brother in Company F, 32d Iowa, and in the campaign of South East Missouri, among the swamps of that region.  He was a brave soldier, was prompt and ready for his post, be that of danger or otherwise.  But, in the campaign against Little Rock, when the four companies of Infantry marched 500 miles with the advance Cavalry Division, under the weltering sun of July and August, he sunk with many other brave boys, beneath the hardships, and at Bramsville, Ark., he with three others of the young men of this Company, were laid to rest the same week.  He died August 14, 1863.

J. M. Bryant resides on section 17, and his post office address is Iowa Falls.  He is a native of Coshocton county, Ohio; born March 15, 1824.  His father, Nathaniel Bryant, was a native of Massachusetts; and his mother, Mary (Clark) Bryant, a native of Virginia.  Mr. Bryant was left fatherless when twelve years of age, but he continued to reside with his mother until he reached his majority.  He then went to Green county, Wis., where, in 1846, he married Miss Margaret Baughman, daughter of George and Ruhamah (Park) Baughman.  In 1864 he came to Iowa, and located where he now resides.  His wife died January 19, 1870.  she had had thirteen children, six of whom are now living -- Jefferson, Orren, Frank, Alonzo, Ada, now the wife of John R. Rinehart; and Ida, now the wife of J. E. McFarlin.

Patrick Burns landed in Hardin county in the month of September, 1853.  His native country is Ireland, where he was born in 1829.  At the age of fourteen years he bid home and friends farewell, and was soon on his way to the United States.  Upon arriving in the Land of the Free he first lived one year in the State of Vermont; then he migrated to Indiana, where he married Miss Jane Basham, who was born in Tennessee, but raised in Indiana.  In 1853 Mr. Burns concluded to seek his fortune on the Western frontier, and he accordingly took his wife and their one child (William) into a buggy and started for Iowa.  He arrived in Hardin county in the month of September, with only $60 in money, but an abundance of energy and good health.  He was unsettled for a few years, trading a little in land and working as best he could, until the fall of 1861, when he enlisted in Company A, of the 32d Iowa, and served three years.  He was with General Banks on the Red river expedition, and on April 9, 1863, was taken prisoner and remained as such, in Tyler Prison, Texas, fourteen months.  After being mustered out of service, he returned to his home with his health somewhat impaired, but he at once purchased his present farm, all of which was then a wild prairie.  This he has since improved, so that he now owns 140 acres valued at $35 per acre.  In 1882 Mr. Burns went to Dakota and took up a soldier's claim.  He is a Republican in politics.  His religious connections are with the Christian Church.  Their children are -- William, George S., Elizabeth and James.

Oliver Cessna, a prominent farmer of Jackson township, residing on section 17, was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, in 1820.  In 1824 the family removed to Coshocton county, Ohio, and, in 1845, Oliver Cessna, with his mother, migrated to Green county, Wisconsin.  Here, in December, 1847, he married Miss Martha Ann Baughman, daughter of George and Ruhemah (Park) Baughman, and, in 1865, he came to Iowa, and settled where he now resides.  He now owns 240 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre, and well improved.  Mr. Cessna is a Democrat, and cast his first ballot for James K. Polk.  Of the twelve children, ten are now living -- William, Mary, now Mrs. E. Sanders, George, Ruhemah, now Mrs. Joel Sanders, Eliza E., now Mrs. Wm. R. McFarland, John, Oliver M., Jewett, Charles, and Annie May.

Adam Crim, who came with the Kidwilers, was a native of Virginia.  He was a bachelor, and was of a miserly disposition.  He located a large quantity of land, and resided in the township until about the close of the war, when he removed to Missouri, and has since died.

E. C. Crippin

The first religious services in the township, now remembered by citizens yet living in the township, was in the fall of 1855, in the log school house erected on section 11.   The services were conducted by Rev. E. C. Crippin, a pioneer Methodist minister who located in the township some two years previous.  The memory of the early settlers must surely be at fault in this matter, as it is hardly possible that a minister with the piety and zeal of Mr. Crippin would suffer two years to pass before calling his neighbors together and preaching unto them the gospel of Christ.

Ethan C. Crippin was a native of Canada, who came to Iowa at an early date and located in Hardin county, in Jackson township, in 1853.  While not a scholar, in its generally accepted sense, he was well read in the theological literature of the day, especially of the Methodist Episcopal Church, for which he had great veneration.   While not regarded as a fine orator, he was an able and earnest defender of the gospel of Christ.  He was a plain man in every sense of the word, and cared little for dress.  He was always dressed in homemade, woolen clothes, made from the wool of sheep raised by himself, and spun and made into clothing by his wife.  In the pulpit he spoke plainly and to the point, calling things by the right name.  Without deceit himself, he looked not for deceit in others.  An invitation once given to one to partake of his hospitality, if not promptly accepted was never repeated.  An instance of this kind is related by J. M. Boyd.  While teaching school at Berlin, Mr. Bradfield and family, with Mr. Boyd, were invited to a supper at Mr. Crippin's.  The ladies of the party preceded the gentlemen to the house of Mr. Crippin, with the understanding that they should arrive in good time for supper.  Having some business to attend to after his school was dismissed, with regard to school matters, Mr. Bradfield being Treasurer of the School Board, the two were detained much longer than anticipated, so they did not reach Mr. Crippin's until about ten o'clock.  Just after school was dismissed the two took a lunch, which they thought would sustain them until they could get a good, warm supper.  When they arrived they found supper had been delayed on their account, and without further ado, Mr. Crippin invited them all out.  Mr. Bradfield, who considered it good policy, and quite the right thing to do, in answer to the invitation said: "Mr. Boyd and I have had one supper to-night."  Without a word, Mr. Crippin turned to the ladies and told them they would proceed to supper, and passed out to the dining-room, leaving two very hungry men, the one wishing that he had said nothing, and the other heartily re-echoing the wish, with a desire to inflict some punishment upon his companion.  Mr. Crippin died in 1863.

George A. Crocker lives on section 14.  He is a son of Calvin and Irene (Lawrence) Crocker.  He was born in Bangor, Maine, October 17, 1844.  In 1849 the family migrated to Illinois, and in 1866 George A. Crocker came to Hardin county.  Here in 1868 he married Miss Sarah Hiserote, daughter of A. J. Hiserote.  Mr. Crocker settled where he now resides in 1870.  The children are Clinton and Lee.  Mr. Crocker has always voted the Republican ticket.

Aura Cronk, son of Darwin and Jeanette (Eldred) Cronk, was born in Oswego county, N. Y., September 5, 1848.  He migrated with the family to Illinois, and in November, 1868, was married to Miss Alice Trumble.  In 1870 he came to Iowa, and, in 1871, located where he now resides.  His farm forms a part of the Jacob Kidwiler estate, and is therefore the oldest improved land in Hardin county.  The children are, Lillie and Myrtle.

Darwin Cronk was born in Rensselaer county, N. Y., January 25, 1818, and was raised in Jefferson county, in the same State, and, in the fall of 1861, emigrated to Illinois, where he was engaged in farming and cheese-making, and made the first dairy cheese in Kane county.  In 1870 he came to Iowa and settled where he now resides.  Mr. Cronk has been thrice married.  His first marriage was in 1839, to Miss Jeanette Eldred, who died, leaving five children -- Ann J., John, Samantha, Aura and Minnie.  In 1875 he married Mrs. Mary (Widger) Cronk, widow of Henry Cronk.  She died in August, 1876, and in September, 1878, he married Mrs. Maggie (Horton) Parse, widow of Frank Parse.

R. J. Darling is a farmer on section 36, where he located in 1865, now owning 160 acres of land.  Mr. Darling is a native of Knox county, Ohio, born in 1828.  He resided in his native State until twenty-one years of age; then went to Brown county, Ind., where, in 1850, he married Miss Mary Jane Young, born in Knox county, Ohio, December 7, 1830.  In 1851 he removed to Illinois, and remained a resident of that State until 1860.  He then removed to Bourbon county, Kan.; but in the fall of the same year returned to Fulton county, Ill., where he resided until 1865, in which year he migrated to Iowa, and located where he now resides.  They have four children -- Alwilds, Elhannan W., Montroville and Martha Gertrude.

J. N. DeGroff, one of the prominent men of Jackson township, is a son of J. T. and Lucinda (Smith) DeGroff, and was born in Cayuga county, N. Y., in 1839.  When he was six years of age he migrated with his parents to Carroll county, Ill., where he helped till the soil.  In 1861 he enlisted in Company I of the 12th Illinois Cavalry, and served three years.  He then returned to Illinois, and, in 1865, married Miss Eliza J. Knox, a native of Carroll county, Ill., born in 1839.  In 1869, Mr. DeGroff came to Hardin county and located on section 33, Jackson township, where he has since made farming a business, and now owns 160 acres of well improved land.  In politics, Mr. DeGroff is a Republican, and has held local offices; in religion, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  They have one child -- Alice E.

Henry Dersham is a native of Union county, Pennsylvania, born in 1830.  His parents were Henry and Mary (Linn) Dersham.  In 1842 the family removed to Ohio, and subsequently to Henry county, Illinois.  The subject of this sketch learned the carpenter's trade, and, in 1856, married Miss Barbara Rickel.  Two years subsequently, he emigrated to Iowa, and became a resident of Jackson township, Hardin county.  Mr. Dersham remained in Hardin county only two years, when he removed to Waterloo, and continued working at his trade until 1868.  He then returned to Hardin county.  The children are: Mary Ellen, John F., George W., Hattie G., Robert E., Etta M., and William H.

W. S. T. Doan, a son of Henry and Hannah Doan, was born in Clinton county, Pa., on the 7th day of June, 1844, and came with his parents to Hardin county in April, 1861.  Here he helped till the soil, and in 1857 married Miss Luella D. Steele, daughter of Edwin Steele.  He now owns 80 acres on section 27, 40 acres of which formed a part of the old homestead.  Mr. Doan is a well informed and enterprising farmer, a Republican in politics, and at present holds the office of Town Clerk.  Of the four children born, three are now living -- Henry E., Etta L. and Nellie G.

Samuel Fossler, the proprietor of the Eagle City Mills, is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Northumberland county on the 22d day of February, 1829.  His parents are J. A. and Elizabeth Fossler, the former being a native of Germany, and the latter of Pennsylvania.  In 1840 the family migrated to Ogle county, Ill.  Here J. A. Fossler built a custom flouring mill, and in this the son learning milling.  He also helped till the soil; and, as he was a natural born mechanic, he also worked at the wagon trade and labored some as a machinist.  In 1852 he engaged in business as a wagon-maker and machinist, and continued the same until 1856, when he came to Eagle city and purchased his present property.  Since settling in Eagle City, he has invented the "Iowa Rotary Churn."  Mr. Fossler was married in 1851 to Miss L. Jane Finney.  They have had seven children, four of whom are now living -- Alice, now Mrs. John McDonough; Emma Jane, now Mrs. E. Booth; Mary E., now Mrs. Newton Miller, and Lydia. 

J. F. Garrettson, the Berlin merchant, was born in Baltimore, Md., in 1821, but when about five years of age, he removed with his parents, Aquilla and Amelia (George) Garrettson, to Washington county, Pa., where he was bred to a mercantile life.  He also taught school, and at the age of 23 he engaged in a general mercantile business, and continued in the same for about nine years, but, as his health failed him, he sold out and spent several years traveling.  In 1869 he came to Hardin county and engaged in his present business.  In 1847 Mr. Garrettson married Miss Harriet B. McClelland.  She died in 1850, leaving two children, one of whom is now living -- William M., who now resides in Pennsylvania.

William Graham, who settled in Jackson township in 1856, is a native of Kentucky, born in 1804.  In 1825 he married Miss Nancy Turner.  She died in 1868, leaving six children, four of whom are now living.

Jesse Griffin was one of the pioneers of 1854.  He was born in Bradford county, Pa., in 1802; was reared on a farm and received a very limited common school education.  When seventeen years of age his father died, leaving him in charge of the family.  The duties pertaining to the head of a family he discharged faithfully.  In 1853 he came to Iowa, locating in Black Hawk county, where he remained one year, when he came to this county and located on section 10, Jackson township.  The next year he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he held until his death, and no man in all the northern part of the county was better known than 'Squire Griffin.  He was married in Bradford county, Pa., to Rachel Pratt, before coming West.  They reared eight children, only one of whom now resides in Hardin county -- Mrs. Morris Frisbie.  Mr. Griffin died in 1863, and his wife followed five years later.  They were pioneers whose memory will ever be kept green.

Alexander Gunn is one of the pioneers who came to Hardin county in 1856.  He is a native of Scotland, born in 1821, and resided in his native country until 1851; then came to the United Stated, and lived in Columbiana county, Ohio, until he came to Iowa.  In 1856 he purchased his present farm; then spent the summer at Iowa City, and in the fall went back to Ohio and remained until 1858, when he returned to his farm in Hardin county, where he has since lived.  Mr. Gunn was an unmarried man when he settled in this county.  He boarded with William Noble, a pioneer of Hardin county, and now a resident of Warren county.  In 1860, his sister, Isabelle Gunn, came to Iowa and took charge of his house until 1862, in which year (June 17) Mr. Gunn married Miss Margaret McKinzie, a native of Columbiana county, Ohio.  They have had five children, four of whom are now living -- Hugh J., George W., Belle M., now deceased; Bell Jennett and Katie May.  In politics Mr. Gunn is a staunch Republican.  Mrs. Gunn has been a member of the Presbyterian Church since the spring of 1862.

Wallen Hayden settled where he now resides in 1854.  He is a native of Pennsylvania, born May 9, 1826.  His parents, Nathaniel and Margaret (Miller) Hayden, were both natives of said State.  In about 1831 the family migrated to Ohio, where the subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and, in 1851, married Miss Rebecca Swearingen.  In 1854 the young couple, in company with Benj. Hayden and family, concluded to seek a home on the Western frontier.  They therefore, on the 31st day of May, loaded their worldly goods on a wagon and started on their long and tedious journey, which occupied until July 12, on which day they arrived at Hardin City.  Here they stopped, however, but a few days, when the journey was continued to Homer, Hamilton county, where Mr. Hayden left his wife, while he took the stagecoach (which was making its first trip) to Fort Dodge.  Benj. Hayden located in Hamilton county; but the land did not suit Wallen, who returned to Hardin county, and soon located on the northeast quarter of section 25, Jackson township; and here he has since resided.  Mr. Hayden, when he located in his new home, was what one might call well-off financially, as he had brought $1,000 in cash with him, and his land cost him but $400.  But Mr. Hayden was a poor man; for before coming West he had the misfortune to have one of his legs so badly crippled by a runaway horse as to compel him to use a crutch the remainder of his days.  Wallen Hayden was not the man, however, to feel downcast, as he at once erected a shanty, and when the time come to put in his crops, he took a bag of wheat on a horse and seeded his ground on horseback.  He would also ride a horse while harrowing the ground, and in this way, by being industrious, economical and ambitious, he made his life a success.  He now owns 689 acres of land, which is free of encumberance.  Mr. Hayden is a Republican in politics, and has held local offices.  A Free-Will Baptist in religion, and a man who is highly respected by his fellow men.  The nine children are -- Sarah Maggie, now Mrs. Thomas Platts; Andrew J., Elva, E. Gary, William R., Artie, Ada and Myrtie.  Since residing in this county, Mr. Hayden was never run in debt a cent at either store or blacksmith shop.

R. J. Heath was born in Erie county, Pa., December 10, 1837.  His parents, Joseph and Elizabeth (Richmond) Heath, were both natives of the State of New York.  In 1846 the family migrated to Illinois and settled in Carroll county.  Here the subject of this sketch received a common school education, learned the carpenter's trade, and followed the same until 1861, when he responded to the call of country by enlisting in Company K of the 15th Illinois, three-months' call.  He was transferred to Company A of the 34th Illinois, where he served until July 11, 1865, when he was mustered out as First Lieutenant.  After returning from service, Mr. Heath resumed his trade for one year, then followed farming until May, 1869, when he came to Hardin county.  Here he has devoted most of his time to his trade.  He owns 80 acres of land on section 31, where he has resided since 1880.  Mr. Heath is an independent in politics, and has held local offices for several years.  He was married in 1866 to Miss Mattie McNamer, a native of Illinois, born July 6, 1840.  They have had two children, one of whom is now living -- Fred.

Allen F. Hiserote

Among the brightest boys of that school [first school in village of Berlin] was Allen F. Hiserote.  He had the elements, with application, to have made a fine scholar.  At the breaking out of the war, he returned to the old home of his parents, in New York, and enlisted in Company F, 37th New York Infantry.  He was severely wounded at the first battle of Bull Run, but, with that pluck characteristic of the boy, stuck to the service, performing his duties as a brave soldier to the close of his three years, when he returned to his Iowa home, and now fills a soldier's grave in the Berlin Cemetery.

William H. Hiserote is the oldest son of A. J. Hiserote, and was born in Columbia county, N. Y., November 4, 1836.  He came to Hardin county with the family, and on the 6th day of December, 1860, married Miss Anna Lininger, daughter of John and Ann (Hayworth) Lininger, the former a native of Germany, and the latter of Pennsylvania.  They settled in Jackson township in 1857, and reared a family of seven children, two sons and five daughters.  The father died in 1858 and the mother in 1873.  William H. Hiserote, after marriage, took charge of the homestead, and six years subsequently purchased the same.  He now owns 100 acres, all of which is well improved, and valued at $40 per acre.  Their children are Fred, Ella, Frank, Annie, Melvin and John.

William P. Hiserote was three times wounded at Pleasant Hill, La., but still he would not give up, and even would not down, when "Down! down!" was the order.  But at last over-powering numbers took him prisoner.  But he wouldn't stay taken, for back he came to the Union lines, without any reverence or even respect for the rebel authorities.  He still linves, and, as a delegate to the late Congressional Convention, he would vote, and did vote, for his brave Colonel, John Scott, for Congress.

Jeremiah Hubbard, the Eagle City blacksmith, was born in Clinton county, N. Y., October 31, 1818.  At the age of fifteen years he bid adieu to farm life, and commenced work at his trade, which he followed in his native State until 1861, when he went to Fon du Lac City, Wis., where he continued his trade, with the exception of six months spent in the United States service as blacksmith.  He remained here until 1870, when he came to Iowa, near Iowa Falls, where he engaged in farming and blacksmithing until 1878, when he came to Eagle City, where he now resides and carries on the blacksmith business.  Mr. Hubbard was married October 2, 1842, to Miss Joanna Brown, also a native of Clinton county, N. Y.  They are the parents of ten children, nine of whom are now living -- Everett, Emmett (now deceased), Edmond, Lillias, Agnes, Anna, Edith, Jessie, Nettie, Lyle.

Thomas Huff was from Kentucky.  He made a good neighbor and citizen while residing here.  It was at his house the first election in Morgan township, which then comprised all the north part of the county, was held.

A. Huffman resides on section 20, and owns 280 acres of land, all of which is well improved; he is therefore an important factor in the farming community.  Mr. Huffman was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, on the 12th day of April, 1823.  His parents being Jacob and Elizabeth (Jones) Huffman.  In 1845 the family removed to Green county, Wis.  Here Mr. Huffman on the 31st day of July, 1853, married Miss Mary Jane Baughman, daughter of George and Ruhamah (Bark) Baughman, and continued farming until 1866; then came to Iowa, and located where he now resides.  Of the fourteen children born in this family, ten are now living -- Ruhamah, now the wife of Philip Keopple; Clara, now the wife of Geo.  Buchanan; Francis, Olive, Addie, William, Maggie, Martha, Samuel and Charlotte.  Mr. and Mrs. Huffman are members of the M. E. Church.  Mr. Huffman is a Democrat in politics.

Solomon Huffman was always respected, and was a strictly honest and conscientious Christian.  His religious relations were with the M. E. Church, and he has served that society as a local preacher for about eleven years.  He was a Democrat, but took little interest in politics.  Mr. Huffman was a native of Coshocton county, Ohio, where he was born on the 28th day of January, 1836.  In 1846 the family migrated to Green county, Wis., and came here on the 20th day of August, 1854.  Mr. Huffman married Miss Sarah Baughman, daughter of George and Ruhamah (Park) Baughman.  In 1860 he went to California, across the plains, and there followed the trade of shingle-making about four years.  He then returned home by way of the Isthmus.  In February, 1864, he removed his family to Hardin county, Iowa, and, with the money he had saved while in California, he purchased a home.  In 1867 he went to Montana Territory, and remained there about eighteen months.  In 1876 he went to the Black Hills, where he remained about three months.  The remainder of his life Mr. Huffman spent at his home and with his family.  His death took place May 19, 1882, after a lingering illness of several months.  Of the seven children, four are now living -- Mary E., now Mrs. Frank Kessler; George, Absalom and Frank.

A. B. Hughes, one of the men who came to Hardin county in 1859, was born in Jacksonville, Morgan county, Ill., in 1825.  His parents being Allen P. and Elizabeth (Tilton) Hughes; at eighteen years of age Mr. Hughes went to Platsville, Wis., where he followed mining, afterwards worked at his trade as blacksmith and wagon maker.  In 1849 he returned to Illinois, and in 1854 located with his parents in Carroll county, at which time there were but fifteen families.  In 1852 he married Miss Laura Wheeler, a native of Bradford county, Pa.  In 1859 he came to Hardin county, and first settled at Berlin, Jackson township, where he continued his trade, and at the same time improved his present farm which he purchased in 1858.  In those days the marketing had to be done at Iowa City, a distance of over one hundred miles, or Cedar Falls, a distance of forty miles.  The latter trip occupied three days, during which time he had to camp out at night.  The average price of wheat being about thirty cents per bushel.  We will give an account of but one trip, this was made in 1864, when Mr. Hughes loaded forty bushels of wheat into a sleigh, and started for Cedar Falls, for the purpose of getting provisions and clothing for winter.  Soon after starting out a heavy snow commenced falling, and the roads became so blockaded, that Mr. Hughes required eleven days to make the trip, and when he returned to Eldora, he found his net proceeds consisted of thirty cents, this he gave to Joseph Furry, a merchant of that place, whom he was owing sixty cents, and had agreed to pay on his return.  In those days it took two bushels of wheat to buy one pound of tobacco.  Mr. Hughes is an honest and upright man, who is highly respected.  He owns 160 acres of land which is well improved.  Is a Republican in politics, but takes little interest more than to perform his duty as a citizen.  The children are -- Andrew S., Rollin, Ruth A., wife of Mr. Robt. Ringle, and Mary L., wife of Mr. Harvey Bradfield.

Andrew S. Hughes is the oldest son of A. B. and Laura Hughes, and he was born in Illinois in 1849.  He came with his parents to Hardin county, and resided with them, tilling the soil, threshing grain, ditching, etc., until 1875, when he married Miss Elnora R. Adams.  They have three children -- Mattie May, Henryetta E. and James Allen.  Mr. Hughes is a man who thinks for himself, and is the inventor of several useful machines.

H. P. Hughes, one of Jackson's well-to-do farms, is a son of Allen P. and Elizabeth (Tilton) Hughes, and was born in Morgan county, Ill., in the year 1826.  Mr. Hughes was reared on a farm, received a common school education, and in 1854 married Miss Henrietta Stewart.  In 1864 he came to Iowa and located where he now resides.  He owns 200 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre.  Mr. Hughes has been in poor health for years, and has therefore traveled some.  He made one trip to California, and was gone seven months.  He now rents his farm, while he is enjoying the fruits of his past labors.  Mr. Hughes is a Republican, but takes little interest in politics more than to perform his duty as a citizen.  He is highly respected by his fellow men.

William Johnson was born in Indiana in 1832, and was a resident of said State until 1853.  He then came to Iowa, and first settled in Wapella, Louisa county.  Here, in 1857, he married Miss Louisa C. Cheneworth, and they now have nine children -- Clara E., Arthur, Anna, Maggie, Solomon, Cora A., Eldan, C. Garfield, Daisy and Lutricia.   Mr. Johnson became a resident of Hardin county in 1871, and he now resides on section 13.  His post office is Hardin City.

W. S. Johnston, a native of Canada, was born January 2, 1850; but when only about three years of age he was brought by his parents (S. P. and Susanna (Shoup) Johnston) to the United States, and then resided in Carroll county, Ill., until 1871, since which time he has been in Iowa, and located on section 23, where he now owns one quarter-section of land.  Miss Clementine Wick, of Whiteside county, Ill., became his wife in 1875.  They have had one child -- Elsie May.

Jacob Kidwiler (1806-1863) submitted by Char Mazurik

One bright day in the month of October 1850 several wagons, drawn by five yoke of oxen and one span of horses, halted upon the banks of the Iowa River, on section 2 of what is now known as Jackson Township. The wagons contained Jacob Kidwiler, wife and nine children; Adam Crim and Francis Mitchell, uncles of Kidwilers They had just completed their journey from Crawfordsville, Indiana. and now became the first settlers of Jackson Township, and among the first of Hardin County, Iowa. They at once erected a shanty, and in this they all lived until the following spring. Their nearest trading point being Iowa City, it was very seldom they could go to a store. But it was not necessary, as they had brought some provisions with them, to which they added fish, turkey, venison, duck, coon and other wild game, and, therefore, had enough to last them until spring. The corn they ground in a wooden mortar made by Mr. Kidwiler, The Indians never troubled them, as Mrs. Kidwiler often gave them bread and meat, thereby retaining their friendship. Mr. Kidwiler made one trip to Oskaloosa, and found that town fortified against the Indians. The people there tried to persuade him to go immediately and bring his family, as they would surely all be massacred by the Indians; but he informed them that he was on good terms with the red men, and not afraid to have them as neighbors. And thus time rolled on. In the spring of 1851, Mr. Kidwilder erected a double log house, and in this he resided until his death, which took place in January 1863. His wife died in the same month, only one week later.

A very fateful disease has made its appearance in Jackson Township. The person is taken with chills followed by fever, very similar in character to lung fever, but has so far proven among the adult population almost as fatal as cholera. Esquire Jesse Griffith, Jacob Kidwiler and his wife and one or two others have died of this disease within the past three or four weeks and others are suffering with it, of whose recovery there is little hope. The patients all die after the crisis seems over and when they appeared to be getting well—The Hardin Sentinel

Jacob Kidwiler was of German descent, but he was born in the state of Virginia, April 27, 1806. He was reared on a farm, and about the year 1834 married Miss Mary Longbreak. They raised 10 children, 9 living at the death of there parents: Catherine (Mrs. Michael Williams), Michael, Elizabeth (Mrs. Solomon Livengood), Mary (deceased) who became Mrs. Jacob Lambright), Charles, Jane (deceased), Jacob, Rachael, (deceased) Adam, and Joseph H. Kidwiler, the latter being the first white child born in Hardin County. He was born in June 1851. Joseph resided with his parents until there death, helping till the soil and attending school,. On May 25, 1865, he, in company with several families, started for Oregon. The trip was made in "prairie Schooners," and occupied five months. Mr. Kidwiler remained in Oregon and Washington Territory until 1871; then returned to Hardin County, remaining, and until 1877, dealt in wood, etc. He erected a building and started a mercantile store at Eagle City. During the summer of 1882, he made another trip to Oregon. Mr Kidwiler was married on March 12, 1874 to Miss Marilla Scott, a native of Wiinnebago County, Iowa, born February 4,1857. They have two children: Don C. and Chester L.. Don born May 26 1876 and Chester was born January 19, 1878.. As a man the subject of the above sketch, as a citizen, is independent in politics,and is now post master at Eagle City. As a man, he is plain and unasumming in his manners, aand highly respected by all who know him.

M. M. Lamb, a resident of Eagle City, is a son of William and Mary (Millikin) Lamb, both natives of Pennsylvania, and now residents of Robertson, Hardin county.  Mr. Lamb was born in Stephenson county, Illinois, December 15, 1854.  When fourteen years of age, he came with his parents to Hardin county.  Here he received a common school education, and helped till the soil until the fall of 1881, when he entered the store of Joseph Kidwiler, as clerk, and, in March, 1882, became a partner in the business, which partnership was dissolved September 1st, the same year.  In April, 1882, Miss Hulda C. Smith, daughter of James and Mary Smith, became his wife.

Jacob Lambright came to Hardin county with his parents in 1863, and settled on section 2, Jackson township, where he now resides.  His father, Henry Lambright, died in 1869, leaving a wife and seven children.  Jacob Lambright was born in Jefferson county, Va., February 4, 1841, and when thirteen years of age he migrated with his parents to Henry county, Iowa, and one year later to Adair county, Mo., from which place he came to Hardin county.  He was married in 1864 to Miss Mary Kidwiler.   She died in 1866.  In 1869 he married Miss Sarah Ball, and they now have three children -- Bertie, Paulinda and Stella.  Mr. Lambright owns 324 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre.  He is a Democrat in politics, but takes no further interest than to cast his ballot.

Oscar F. Loomis lives on section 35, and his postoffice in Eldora.  He was born in Chenango county, N. Y., on the 3d day of November, 1839.  His school days were in winter, as during the summer he worked on the farm.  In 1864 he came to Hardin county, and in 1867 married Mary A. Vannote, born May 7, 1847, in Stark county, Ind.  In 1869 he removed to Richland Center, Richland county, Wis., but this country did not suit him, and he therefore returned to Hardin county, and, in 1877, purchased his present farm, which contains 80 acres.  The children living are, Clara M. and William F.  Mr. Loomis is a Democrat in politics.

Ferdinand Perkins, oldest son of John and Harriet (Parkins) Perkins, was born in Freeport, Ill., May 6, 1850.  He came with his parents to Iowa in 1855, and in 1856 to Eldora.  Here he was educated, and helped till the soil until he reached his majority.  His father then gave him a farm of 80 acres in section 36, Jackson township, and this he cultivated.  On December 25, 1879, he married Miss C. J. Kennedy, born in Ellis township, May 31, 1857.  He then followed farming one year in Ellis township, after which, in march, 1881, he moved on his farm, where he now resides and owns 160 acres of land.  They are the parents of two children -- Sarah E. and John Rezin.

Rev. John Price came to Berlin from Columbiana county, Ohio, in the spring of 1857, as a missionary of the Old School Presbyterian Church.  He made his headquarters at Berlin, then supposed to be a place of some future importance.  He also preached at Eldora, Hardin City and other points.  On the 30th day of October, 1858, he organized a church at Berlin of five members -- Mrs. Margaret Ann Russell, Mrs. Jane Noble, Mrs. Janet Price, John Russell and J. M. Boyd.  The last two were elected Ruling Elders.

Mr. Price was a Welshman by birth, a man of some talent, some oddities and peculiarities, and while he might have been useful in an old settled church, he had neither the taste nor energy for a missionary in this new field.  In the spring of 1859 he left the little flock for still newer fields in Nebraska, and what remained of them afterwards united with the Church at Eldora.

John S. Quiggle, a farmer on section 33, is a native of Clinton county, Pa., born in 1838.  His parents being William and Ann Quiggle.  In 1850 the family migrated to Stevenson county, Ill., and in 1861 John S. Quiggle came to Hardin county, Iowa.  Here, in July of the following year, he enlisted in Company A, 32d Iowa, and served until the close of the conflict.  He took part in six hard-fought battles, besides numerous skirmishes; was twice wounded; once in the right hand, losing two fingers, and once in the abdomen.  After being mustered out of service he returned to Hardin county, and has since followed farming.  He was married in 1866, to Miss Jennie Millslagle.  THey have had five children, three of whom are now living -- Jacob H., Annie E. and Ella M.  Mr. Quiggle is a Republican, and is at present a Justice of the Peace.

Francis Redinger, a farmer on section 11, is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born on the 14th day of July, 1843.  His parents where John and Maria Redinger.  The subject of this sketch was left motherless while yet in his infancy, but the father soon married again, and in 1847 the family migrated to Ohio, six years later to Stephenson county, Ill., and in 1860 to Monroe, Green county, Wis.  In 1861 Francis Redinger returned to Freeport, Ill., and on October 8 enlisted in Company G of the 46th Illinois Infantry, and served four years and twenty-two days, participating in many hard-fought battles, besides numerous skirmishes.  After service, Mr. Redinger returned to Monroe, Wis., and in 1866 married Miss Rebecca Butler.  In 1872 he came to Iowa and settled where he now resides.  He owns 40 acres of land.  The children are Anna, William, Gilbert, Perry, Norman, Samuel and Rosamond.

A. J. Ripley was severely wounded at Pleasant Hill, and while life lasts must be a cripple and sufferer from his wounds.

Jacob S. Ripley is readily remembered as one of the oldest scholars of the school [first school in village of Berlin], a tall young man of noble bearing, a fine specimen of a true soldier.  In Company A, 12th Iowa, he was the first of the school to give his life for his country; killed at the battle of Corinth.  His young brother, Lewis, a mere stripling, stepped bravely into line, but his constitution gave way under the hard campaign, and he too soon filled a soldier's grave.

George Robertson, a farmer on section 6, is a native of Scotland, born in 1822.  His parents, James and Isabelle Robertson, still reside in their native country, and have reached the advanced age of ninety-five and eighty-five years, respectively.  His grandmother lived to be over one hundred years of age.  Mr. Robertson, in 1843, married Miss Mary Mercer, and was subsequently engaged in contracting and building railroads, improving rivers, etc.  In 1865 he came to the United States, and after traveling over considerable of the Northwest, he located where he now resides; and he now owns about 400 acres of land.  The children are -- Agnes, Anna, James, Elizabeth, George, Kate, Jane, John and Maud.

William Shafer was from Kentucky.  During the rebellion he enlisted in the 32d Iowa Infantry, but was discharged before the expiration of his term of service on account of disability.  He then returned home, and subsequently removed to Nebraska, where he now resides.

H. B. Shattuck, superintendent of the County Poor Farm, is a native of Pennsylvania, born October 10, 1835.  In 1854 he came to Iowa, and first stopped in Franklin county, where he followed farming, and also spent one year as the first engineer in the first steam saw-mill in said county.  In 1859 he married Miss Martha M. Butterfield, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Butterfield.  He then removed to Illinois, but in 1865 returned to Iowa, since which time he has at intervals, resided in several different localities; but most of the time he has been a resident of Hardin county.  He took charge of the County Poor Farm in October, 1879.  The children are Alice and Chauncey.

Francis Harlow Simpson, youngest son of William and Nancy (Price) Simpson, was born in Delaware county, Indiana in the month of April, 1887.  He came with his parents to Iowa and located with them in Jackson township, where he soon became a prominent citizen.  His political career has been with the Republican party.  He has held local offices for many years, and is at present a member of the County Board of Supervisors.  Mr. Simpson has always taken an active interest in education, and has therefore been a member of the School Board for many years.  He was married to Miss Rebecca Rickel, born in Ohio, and raised in Illinois in 1859.  The children are -- Sarah Viola and Francis Marion.  Mrs. Simpson and the children are members of the Baptist Church.

Robert D. Simpson, one of the pioneers of 1852, is a native of North Carolina, born on the 7th day of June, 1828.  His parents were William and Nancy (Price) Simpson, both natives of North Carolina, and pioneers of Hardin county, having settled in Jackson township in 1855, where the mother died in 1859, and the father in 1861.  Of the five children born unto them, four are now living -- John, Robert D., Nathaniel and Francis H.  The subject of this sketch, removed from his native State with his parents when he was but four years of age to Delaware county, Indiana, where he helped till the soil until 1852.  He then with his brother, John, came to Iowa, and located on land in Hardin township, Hardin county.  He then went back to Indiana to spend the winter, but the following year again returned to Hardin county, and commenced improving his land.  In 1855 he again went to Indiana and married Miss Melinda Graham, daughter of William Graham, a native of Switzerland county, Indiana, and returned to his Western home, where he has since made farming a successful business.  He located where he now resides, section 9, Jackson township, in 1867, and he now owns 327 acres of land.  Mr. Simpson is a Republican in politics, and has held local offices.   His religious connection is with the Baptist Church.  Mrs. Simpson died April 28, 1877.  She had eleven children, eight of whom are now living -- Nancy J., wife of Mr. Geo. Bryant; William, John, Frank, Charity, Robert, George and Charles.

Henry Smith

In the summer of 1855 a log school house was erected on section 11, and in the winters of 1855-6, a school was held therein, taught by Henry Smith.  This was the first in the township.  Mr. Smith subsequently became one of the pupils of J. M. Boyd in his Berlin school, a sketch of which is given in connection, written by Mr. Boyd.  When the war broke out he responded to his country's call, and became a member of Company A, 32d Iowa Infantry.  He was taken prisoner at Pleasant Hill, April 9, 1864, and died in prison at Tyler, Texas.  He was a good soldier and universally esteemed by officers and men.

George H. Speers was a mere boy when he entered the 1st Cavalry, but full of energy and ambition.  He was always ready for every scout and skirmish through all the strangest pools and miasmatic marshes of the White River Country.  But the hardships of Steel's Little Rock campaign landed him with many others in a soldier's grave.  He sleeps at Little Rock.

A. Starr, a son of Barnett Starr, was born in Vermilion county, Illinois, July 23, 1832.  He removed with the family to Green county, Wisconsin, in 1844, and, February 22, 1855, married Miss Mary D. Peregoy.  She died December 15, 1863, leaving four children -- Melissa C., Emma J., Clarissa E., and John B.  In the fall of 1864, Mr. Starr returned to his native county, and, October 13th, married Miss Hannah C. Swank, born in Vermilion county, Illinois, December 30, 1846.  In June, 1865, he came to Hardin county, and, in 1875, located on section 20, where he now resides.  He owns 200 acres of land, well improved, valued at about $25 per acre.  By the second marriage, there are five children -- Anna E., Mary F., Ora P., Absolom, and Nina R.  Mr. and Mrs. Starr received a good common school education.  in politics, Mr. Starr is a staunch Republican.

Barnett Starr was born in Preble county, Ohio, in 1812.  His father, Absolom Starr, was a native of North Carolina, and his mother, Hannah (Harris) Starr, was a native of Kentucky.  In 1822 the family removed to Vermilion county, Illinois.  Here in 1830, Barnett Starr married Miss Rosaman Kidd, born in Winchester county, Virginia, in 1811.  In 1844 he removed to Green county, Wis., and in 1865 came to Hardin county, Iowa.  He located on section 15, where he now resides, in 1869.  There have been ten children in the family, eight of whom are now living -- Hannah, Absolom, Mary A., John, Martha J., Nancy, Rosamond and Susan.  Their family is quite numerous, having forty-one grandchildren, and ten great-grandchildren.

John B. Starr, one of the best and most successful farmers in the township, resides on section 26.  He is a son of Barnett Starr, and was born in Vermilion county, Ill., on the 23d day of March, 1839.  John B. Starr, when six years of age, migrated with the family to Green county, where he helped till the soil, received a common school education, and in February, 1861, married Miss Christina Huffman, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Jones) Huffman.  He then followed farming in said county until 1864, when he sold out and came to Hardin county.  Here he followed farming until 1872, when he concluded to go to a better climate.  He therefore sold out and removed to Missouri, where he was well pleased with the climate; but, as the crops proved a failure for three consecutive years, he returned to Hardin county.  In 1874 corn was so scarce in Missouri that Mr. Starr was obliged to ship his hogs to Oskaloosa, Iowa, to have them fattened, as there was no rain in that State for five months subsequent to June 15.  Mr. Starr now owns 160 acres of the best improved land in the township, and no man in Jackson township can boast of a better farm house.  The children are Emma E., James, Addie M., Charles E., George A. and Susie.

Edwin Steele was a native of Pennsylvania, and in that State married Miss Polly Schrader; they then emigrated to Iowa; lived in Dubuque county until 1855, then came to Hardin county, and settled at Hardin City.  Here they engaged in the hotel business for several years, and subsequently engaged in farming.  Mr. Steele died February 10, 1880, leaving a wife and five children -- Jane H., Smith, Luella D., now Mrs. W. S. T. Doan, Seth and Edwin.

Edwin Steel, youngest son of Edwin and Polly (Schrader) Steele, was born in Cascade, Dubuque county, Iowa, June 18, 1852.  He came with his parents to Hardin City, and has since resided at that place, and is now making farming a business.

After his mill got fairly to running, Lewis Hayden erected a large two-story frame building for hotel purposes.  This was early in 1854.  He ran the house himself for over a year, and then sold the same to Edwin Steele, who continued it for a number of years.  Of Mr. Steele, the Eldora Ledger, of February 13, 1880, said:

"Edwin Steele was among the first to locate in Hardin City in 1854.  He was a Pennsylvanian, and brought considerable money with him to his new home.  A year later, next to Marietta, Hardin City was the largest town in Central Iowa.  For twenty-five years he was postmaster of the town, and for a number of years ran a hotel.  It has been said that in the early days he had as much as $30,000 in gold entrusted to his care in one night by travelers.  On Tuesday morning, February 10, 1880, Mr. Steele arose with the first gray streaks of dawn, built a fire in the kitchen stove, and indulged in a few whiffs of his pipe.  While breakfast was being prepared, he returned to bed.  About seven o'clock, when called, he gave no sign.  Examination proved him dead, lying on his die, with an unusually placid expression on the pallid face."

L. D. Swartwout was born in Jefferson county, N. Y., June 15th, 1854.  At the age of fifteen years he entered a store as clerk, and served in that capacity about four years.  The next six years he spent attending and teaching school, during which time, in 1873, he came to Iowa.  In September, 1877, he came to Hardin county, and located where he now resides.  The farm contains 355 acres, valued at $30 per acre.  Mr. Swartwout, on the 28th  day of January, 1879, married Miss Rose Steadman.  They have had one child, deceased.  Mr. S. is a Republican in politics, and a member of the M. E. Church.

Samuel J. Swartwout, though not a pioneer, is acknowledged to be a prominent citizen.  He was born in the State of New York, April 27, 1822, and when only eight years of age left home and commenced the battle of life alone.  On February 21, 1848, he married Miss Angeline Merrill.  He continued to reside in his native State until 1871.  He then traveled a few years; also dealt some in real estate.  In 1876, he purchased property at Mount Pleasant, and resided there one year.  In 1877 he came to Hardin county, and with two of his sons (L. D. and F. D.) he purchased the property where he now resides.  One son, F. D., has since withdrawn his interest from the property.  There are four children in the family -- George A., Lorenzo D., F. Dayton, and Rury, now Mrs. L. E. Hampton.

S. Syverson, an enterprising and intelligent farmer, is a native of Norway, and was born in 1835, his parents being Thore and Caroline Syverson.  In 1848 the family emigrated to the United States, and first settled in Green county, Wis.  The subject of this sketch learned the brick-maker's trade, and followed the same in various localities.  He also worked on the Government survey of Minnesota in 1853.  In 1869 he came to Hardin county, and two years subsequently located on section 28, Jackson township, where he has since resided and followed farming with marked success.  Mr. Syverson owns 80 acres of land, on which he has erected a neat farm house and made other improvements, so that it is now worth $50 per acre.  He takes a great interest in education, and is ever on the alert to make his home more attractive and pleasant.  In politics, he is independent, and has held the office of Township Trustee since 1878. Mr. Syverson was married in 1858 to Miss Harriet Mace, then of Green county, Wis., but a native of Ohio.  They have three children -- Julia, Charles and William.

C. H. Warn stands conspicuous among the citizens of Hardin county as an enterprising and well-to-do farmer.  His parents, John and Sarah Jane (Wyman) Warn, were both natives of the State of New York, and it was in Livingston county, of that old Empire State, that, on the 7th day of January, 1838, the subject of this sketch was born.  At the tender age of twelve years he left the parental roof, and for six years he followed the life of a sailor on the great lakes.  He then located at Chicago, Ill., and commenced work at the carpenter's trade, and pursued the same in said city about four years; he then removed to Henry, Ill., where he remained until 1862.  The next two years we find Mr. Warn engaged in farming in Bureau county, Ill., from which place, in 1864, he emigrated to Iowa, and first stopped in Etna township, Hardin county.  He, however, remained here only about eight months, then removed to Grundy county, purchased land and cultivated the same until June, 1873, at which time he sold out and returned to Hardin county, and located where he now resides.  Mr. Warn's farm, which contains 200 acres, is located on section 1, Jackson township, and that portion of section 31 separated from Etna township by the Iowa river.  On the portion last named, in 1882, he erected his present residence -- a two-story building, costing nearly or quite $2,000, being one of the best farm houses in the township.  Mr. Warn is one of those straight-forward men who do just as they agree.  He is a Republican in politics, and, while a resident of Grundy county, served as Township Trustee and Justice of the Peace.  His religious connections are with the Baptist Church.  He has been twice married.  His first marriage occurred January 1, 1862, to Miss Sarah Jane Cole, a native of Bureau county, Ill., who died on the 18th day of September, 1880, leaving six children -- John, Ada, Eva, Almeda, Elizabeth and Ida.  In September, 1881, he married Miss Etta (Thomas) Johnson, widow of Benj. Johnson.  She had eleven children by her first marriage, ten of whom are now living.