Hardin County >> 1883 Index

History of Hardin County, Iowa
Springfield, Ill: Union Publishing Company, 1883.

Union Township

J. Q. Adams, who is among the oldest settlers of Hardin county, was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, on the 20th day of June, 1820.  His parents were David and Jane (Caruthers) Adams, father of Irish and mother of Scotch descent.  Her grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and served seven years.  He was honorably discharged, and lived to be nearly one hundred years old.  When ninety-nine he made a speech at a Fourth of July celebration.  In 1839 his father emigrated to Warren county, Illinois, where he remained until 1854, when he came to Hardin county, and settled on the farm where Gifford now stands.  Mrs. Adams died in 1870, and Mr. Adams in 1874.  They were members of the Presbyterian Church.  The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received a liberal education. In the fall of 1844 he went to Galena, Illinois, at the time of the great mineral excitement, where he married Jane Patterson, a widow of Dr. James Armstrong.  Mr. and Mrs. Adams have been blessed with eight children, six of whom are living -- Louisa, Nellie, Edmund, William P., John W. and Lewis.  In about 1854 he came to Hardin county, where he engaged in farming near Gifford.  In 1862 he sold his farm and purchased land in Grundy county, and in 1882 engaged in the livery business.  In April, 1882, his first stable was burned to the ground, nine horses perishing in the flames, besides buggies and harness, being a heavy loss.  He is at present doing a good business.

Rev. T. F. Babcock was born in Otsego county, N. Y., September 27, 1836.  He is the son of Sandford and Desire (Spencer) Babcock, natives of New York, who were the parents of seven children, who lived to be adults.  In 1853, in company with his parents he emigrated to Minnesota, locating near Winona, where his father purchased land and made a home; also erecting a mill where he did coarse grinding.  His father died in 1864, but his mother is still living in Minnesota at the advanced age of eighty-two.  T. F. Babcock is a self-made man.  When twenty-two years of age he commenced his ministry, and in 1861 was ordained.  October 5, 1859 he married Miss Cordelia Peat, a daughter of Benj. S. Peat, born in Otsego county, New York, April 22, 1842.  By this union there are two daughters -- Rosetta, wife of Edison Green of Filmore county, Minnesota; and Flora May.  The Reverend gentleman is an ardent worker in his Master's cause.

H. H. Barnes was born in Iowa county, Iowa, January 6, 1856.  In 1879 he married Miss Rosa Bates, a daughter of Wm. Bates, of Minnesota.  She was born in Hardin county, march 10, 1861.  One child has been born unto them -- Cady B.

Mark Barnes, a son of Grant and Mary Barnes, of Union, was born in Iowa county, Wisconsin, October 14, 1850.  In 1869 he came to Hardin county.  In 1870 he married Annie Knudson.  She was born in Wisconsin in 1851.  By this union there are two children -- Orvie and Clyde.  Mr. and Mrs. Barnes are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

William Bates, a retired farmer and one of the early settlers of Union township, was born near Herfordshire, England, April 30, 1834.  William was educated in his native country, attending school nights and Sundays.  In 1849, then a boy of sixteen, in company with his brother Benjamin, he left home and came to America, where he spent a few months at Glehams in a woolen factory, when he went to Morris, Grundy county, Illinois, where he was employed in farm labor.  In March, 1853, he started for California, arriving on the 24th day of August.  Her was there employed in the mines, and driving pack teams, making hishome at Little York, Nevada, or Bear river.  On the 5th day of October, 1855, he left California via Isthmus, coming via New York to Morris, Illinois, and the following March came to Hardin county, Iowa, where he purchased land.  March 14, 1858, he married Miss Minerva J. Valentine.  She was born in Henry county, Indiana, September 23, 1839. By this union there are twelve children, seven of whom are living -- Rosa, wife of Herschel H. Barnes, Elizabeth, Addie, Hattie, Nina, William H. and Seth.  William Bates purchased 215 acres in Union township, the place where Greenberry Haggin first settled, valued at $40 per acre.  In 1860, at the time of the cyclone, his house was blown away, and himself with two children escaped by getting into the cellar. 

H. J. Benson, one of the enterprising business men of the county, was born in Delaware county, Iowa, February 7, 1851.  He is a son of John and Amanda (Greene) Benson.  Mr. Benson is principally a self-made man, being raised on the frontier.  In January, 1878 he married Miss Clara Lockwood, a daughter of L. H. Lockwood, one of the pioneers of the county.  She was born in Hardin county, Iowa, in 1857.  They have one child -- Claude.

John Benson, one of the early settlers of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Saratoga county, New York, on the 18th day of April, 1796.  In early life he followed the lumber business and building mills.  On the 4th day of March, 1830, he married Miss Almeda Green, a daughter of Job Green, of Herkimer county, New York, where she was born March 3, 1810.  Mr. and Mrs. Benson were the parents of ten children, nine of whom are living -- three sons and six daughters.  In 1844 Mr. Benson left Ohio with teams; Mrs. Benson driving one team.  They stopped one year in Muscatine county, Iowa, and in the meantime Mr. Benson was looking up a location.  In 1845, removed to Jackson county, Iowa, where he embarked in manufacturing fanning mills.  In 1852, removed to Delaware county, Iowa, where he built a saw-mill and again embarked in the lumber trade, which business he followed for nineteen years.  Mr. Benson in 1855-6 came to Hardin county, Iowa, where he purchased a large tract of land and built a saw-mill, one of the first in the county.  In 1865 the family removed to this county, where Mrs. Benson and a portion of the family still reside.  In politics he was an Old Line Whig, but at the time of the organization of the Republican party, united and affiliated with it until the time of his death, which occurred August 29, 1866.  While in Delaware county he was elected County Judge in 1841, which position he filled with honor.  He was also elected School Fund Commissioner in 1849.  Mr. Benson died, leaving a widow and large family to mourn his loss.  He was an upright, honest man, and was universally respected.

J. A. Boyer was born in Canada, on the 14th day of July, 1846, and is a son of John and Mahlon Patterson Boyer, natives of Pennsylvania.  J. A., when nine years of age, went to Saranac, Michigan, where he was reared on a farm and received his education.  When twenty-two years of age, he was employed as clerk, continuing in that employment two years.  He then went to Chicago, where he secured a clerkship in the wholesale clothing establishment of C. P. Kellogg.  In the spring of 1870 he came to Hardin county, when he embarked in his present business.  In 1871 he married Citney M. Doty.  By this union four children were born -- Freddie, Joseph E., Mabel and George A., who died July 21, 1882.  Mr. Boyer is a member of the I. O. O. F., Industry Lodge of Union, and also of the A. O. U. W.

Robert Campbell was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, on the 9th day of October, 1827.  He is a son of James and Rebecca (Gardner) Campbell, natives of Pennsylvania, and who were there married.  They were the parents of nine children, six sons and three daughters, seven of whom are living, viz. -- William K., James, Robert, Leah, wife of Jacob Kline; Josiah R., Elizabeth J., wife of Geo. Kline; Sarah A., wife of Eli Heckard, and Benj. F.  In 1832 Mr. Campbell emigrated from Pennsylvania to Crawford county, Ohio, where he made a home and remained until his death, which occurred in 1852.  His widow is still living on the old homestead.  Robert received his education in the Pioneer School.  In 1850 he married Mary David.  She was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1827.  By this union there were four sons and four daughters, viz. -- Albion L., Samantha J., Rebecca E., James R., Wm. A., Sarah D., Andrew C. and Sidney J.  In the fall of 1855 the family came to Cedar county, Iowa, and the following spring to Hardin county.  Mr. and Mrs. Campbell came to the county poor, being $30 in debt.  He has now a beautiful farm of 265 acres of land under a high state of cultivation, valued at $40 per acre.

H. F. Carter was born in Hendricks county, Indiana, July 4, 1856, and when three months old his parents emigrated to Marshall county, Iowa, where he grew to manhood and received his education.  In 1880 he married Miss Lora French.  She was born in August, 1853.  They have one child -- Grace.  Mr. Carter is a member of the Society of Friends.

L. M. Carter was born in Hendricks county, Indiana, June 12, 1842.  He is a son of Wm. and Mary W. (Hodson) Carter, of North Carolina, who were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living -- two daughters and four sons.  The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm, and received a liberal education.  On the 26th of August, 1870, he married Miss Charity Hadley, a daughter of J. S. Hadley.  She was born in Morgan county, Indiana, January 24, 1846.  By this union there were two children -- Clare and Vesta.  July 6, 1878, Mrs. Carter died, leaving a husband and two children to mourn her loss.  She was member of the Society of Friends, a Christian, and respected by all.  Mr. Carter has 80 acres of land under cultivation, beautifully located, and valued at $50 per acre, and 8 acres of timber, valued at $30 per acre.  In politics, he is a Republican, and has held the office of Township Clerk for the past four years.

O. J. Carter, one of the pioneers of Union township, was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, on the 31st day of January, 1825.  He was one of eight children, seven of whom are living, viz.: John S., Oliver J., Jane, Paris C., Louisa, Elizabeth, William H.  In 1838 his parents emigrated from North Carolina to Hendricks county, Indiana, and settled in a dense forest.  They cleared up a farm and remained on it for nine years, when they sold out and came to Marshall county, Iowa, where his father died on the 1st of June, 1865.  The elder Carter left North Carolina for the reason that he did not desire to bring up his family in a slave State.  His prayer was that, he should live to see the negro free.  His mother died in 1869.  They were members of the Society of Friends.  O. J. was schooled in the primitive log cabins of Indiana, under the tyrant rule of hickory.  In 1853 he married Minerva Wick.  She was born in Hendricks county, Indiana, on the 4th day of April, 1834.  Mr. and Mrs. Carter are the parents of four living children -- Harvey F., Maggie J., Annie L., and Eva May.  On the 8th day of December, 1867, Mrs. Carter died.  She was a niece of Judge Wick, of Indiana, author of the code of that State.  Mr. Carter again married in 1868, taking as a wife Rebecca A. Hinshaw, a daughter of John Hinshaw and Anna (Rauff) Hinshaw.  She was born in Henry county, Indiana, March 8th, 1841.  There were three children by this union -- Emily F., William H., and John B.  In the fall of 1856 they came to Marshall county, locating in Bangor township, where he purchased a small farm, and lived there until the fall of 1865, when he removed to his present place.  Mr. and Mrs. Carter commenced in the west poor, but they now have a comfortable hom, with 80 acres of land valued at $45 per acre.  They are members of the Society of Friends.

William H. Carter was born in Hendricks county, Indiana, April 15, 1840.  He is a son of William and Martha (Chipman) Carter, natives of North Carolina.  His father emigrated to Marshall county, Iowa, in the fall of 1857, where he purchased a farm, and remained until his death.  The subject of this memoir came to the State when when he was seventeen years old, and has grown up with the State.  In 1865 he married Miss Anna Sawin, a daughter of David Sawin, of Hardin county, Iowa.  She was born in Kane county, Illinois, in 1849.  By this union there were seven children, six of whom are living -- Joseph G., Litta M., Annie J., Hattie E., Rutherford H., and Ida W.

O. B. Chapin, one of the prominent farmers and business men of Union, was born in Berkshire conty, Massachusetts, November 23, 1830.  He is the son of Paul and Beulah (Barker) Chapin, who were the parents of three, two sons and one daughter.  Mr. Paul Chapin was a farmer by occupation.  In 1856 he emigrated to Marshall county, Iowa, where he remained until his death, which occurred October 3, 1875, his consort dying in the same year.  They lived together as husband and wife for fifty-seven years.  Mr. Chapin was a deacon in the Congregational Church for many years, always giving liberally of his means in building up the church.  O. B. was raised on a farm, and received his education in his native State.  In 1858 he married Ellen Hunsdon.  She was born in 1836.  By this union there were two children -- Henry C., and Jennie A.  In 1859 they came to Hardin county, and lived in a log cabin of the rudest kind.  In the fall of 1876 they came to their present place.  Mr. Chapin came to the county in limited circumstances, but by judicious management has accumulated a fine property and pleasant home, and today is one of the staunch farmers of the county.  He has 500 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre and 160 in Marshall county, valued at $40 per acre.  In politics he is a Republican, and was supervisor for six years.  In 1874 he was elected to the State Legislature from his district.  Mr. Chapin is a member of the I. O. O. F., Industry Lodge No. 225.

Jacob Claus, one of Hardin county's energetic and prominent farmers, was born in Hesse Damstadt, Germany, October 3, 1833.  He is the son of Ernest and Elizabeth Claus.  His mother died at the age of thirty-two, leaving a family of eight children to mourn her loss.  In 1847 his father came to the United States, locating at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1860.  Jacob Claus located in Rock Island county, Illinois, where he worked on a farm as a laborer.  In 1861 he returned to Pennsylvania on a visit to his friends.  On the 12th day of August, 1862, he enlisted in the 102d Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Company C.  He participated in the battles of Ressaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Marietta, Peach Tree Creek and battles around Atlanta.  He was also with Sherman on his March to the Sea, and in Grand Review at Washington.  He was always found on duty, never spending a day in the hospital.  After being discharged he went to Mercer county, Illinois.  December 27, 1866, he married Miss Ellen Davis.  She was born in West Virginia.  By this union there were four children, three of whom are living -- John M., Edwin V. and Maud M.  In 1867 he left Illinois and came to Hardin county, where he purchased some raw prairie land, which he has transformed into one of the finest farms in the county.  Mr. Claus started out with one dollar in his pocket when twenty-one years of age.  He is now one of the well-to-do farmers of the county.  He has now 160 acres of land under a high state of cultivation, valued at $65 per acre, and 10 acres of timber, valued at $30 per acre.  He is a member of the Lutheran Church.

William D. Cundiff, farmer and stock grower, was born in Stark county, Illinois, September 28, 1844; son of John and Ruth (Stiles) Cundiff.  He is one of a family of eleven children, seven living -- William D., John B., Ellen M., George A., Jacob H., Ada E. and Sidney S.  His parents were among the early settlers of Stark county.  His father died in Hardin county in 1873, while his mother is still living.  William D. enlisted, in 1864, in the 148th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Company I, and was stationed on the Chattanooga and Nashville Railroad, remaining there until the close of the war.  He was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, and discharged at Springfield, Illinois.  In September, 1868, he married Miss Lettitia Taylor, a native of Pennsylvania, where she was born December 2, 1840.  Four children blessed this union -- Arthur H., born July 14, 1869; William Frederick, born July 7, 1871; Ella M., born March 24, 1874; Jesse D., born October 2, 1880.  In the fall of 1870 Mr. Cundiff, with his family, left Illinois and came to Hardin county, where he purchased his present place.  He has 160 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  Mr. Cundiff is a member of the M. E. Church; Mrs. C., of the Christian Church.

James A. Dawdy was born in Barrow county, Kentucky, July 19, 1819.   In 1839 he married Eliza Robinson.  She was born in the same county June 26, 1818.  Mr. and Mrs. Dawdy were the parents of six children, five of whom are living -- James A., born July 5, 1842; Wm. M., born February 17, 1843; Louisa F., born January 14, 1845; Thomas M., born April 10, 1849; Mary J., born November 12, 1851.  In an early day Mr. Dawdy and family emigrated to Tazewell county, Illinois, from which place they removed to Knox county, in the same State, and in 1848 to Keokuk county, Iowa.   In 1850 they came to Hardin county, where Mr. Dawdy purchased wild land and made a farm, and where he remained until his death, which occurred in May, 1864.  He was a member of the Christian Church, a kind husband and an indulgent parent.  At the time of his death he had accummulated a fine property, thus leaving his wife and children in comfortable circumstances.  He had a farm of 248 acres, mostly under cultivation.   Mrs. says that often she has had to grind buck-wheat in a coffee mill for a large family, and pound corn in a stump burnt out for that purpose.

Captain John Devine

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Captain John Devine, one of the pioneers of Union township, was born in Ireland, December 24, 1824. When four years old he was sent to live with an uncle, Wm. J. Burns of Union county, Ohio, but before arriving at his destination his uncle died. He then went to live with an aunt, but not finding it agreeable, left, and then lived with Martin Roseman, in Guernsey county where he remained until he was fifteen years old. In company with a young Doctor he subsequently started for Texas. The Mexican trouble had then commenced. Arriving at Louisville, Kentucky, he enlisted under General Chambers, and was sent with other recruits to Galveston, Texas. While enroute there was an election of officers, and he was made Orderly Sergeant. Arriving at Labacca General Huston took charge of the recruits' train, then went to Montery via Matamoras and Rio Grande, where they were engaged with the Mexicans. After the expedition of Monterey he was elected Captain of a Militia Company; was sent against the Indians to protect the frontiersmen. He remained in that capacity for twoyears, when the company was disbanded. He then joined the Texas Rangers under Colonel Jack Hayes, and was used as a scout. He held a commission as 2d Lieutenant. He remained in this service but a short time, when he resigned his commission and returned to Ohio, where he married Mary L. George of Maryland. By this union there was a family of eight children -- Aderesta J., John C., Agatha E., Winfield S., Randall A., Edwin, Florence, Frank and Sigle. Mrs. Devine died in 1861. In the fall of 1862, Mr. Devine enlisted in the 32d Regiment Infantry, Company F, and was elected 1st Lieutenant. He was mustered in at Dubuque. The first engagement was at Cape Girardeau, Missouri; then at Pleasant Hill, where he was wounded, causing the amputation of one of his legs. After being wounded he lay on the field from 9 o'clock till 2 the following morning before being found. In August, 1865, Captain Devine married Laura H. Hall, by whom there were three children -- Edward T., Clara May and Estella J. In the spring of 1857 he came to Hardin county, Iowa and located on the place where he now resides. Captain Devine has traveled extensively over the western country, visiting Pike's Peak twice, and was the first man who struck a pick in what is now known as Leadville. The Captain has 211 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. In politics he is a Republican, and the family are members of the M. E. Church.

L. S. Frazer was born in Randolph county, Indiana, April 17, 1832.  He is a son of Henry and Mary (Otwell) Frazer, natives of Guilford county, North Carolina, where they were married and three children were born -- Ann, Jerusha and Fanny.  In about 1821 the family emigrated to Randolph county, Indiana, and settled in the heavy timber, clearing up a farm, and where seven more children were born -- Bronson, Matilda, Abe, L. S., Heber, Elzina and Curtis O.  In 1855 L. S. Frazer came to Henry county, Iowa, bringing his parents with him, his mother dying on the road.  He remained in Henry county one year, when he removed to Marshall county, Iowa.  In 1853 he married Miss Phoebe Hixon, a daughter of John Hixon.  She was born in Preble county, Ohio, in 1834.  In 1857 Mrs. Frazer died.  She was a Christian, and respected by all who knew her.  Mr. Frazer was married in 1860, to Miss Emma Bunch.  She was born in Wayne county, Indiana, April 7, 1840.  There were three children, two of whom are living -- Arthur and Josie.  Mr. Frazer, when he came to this country, had but $5 of ready money in his pocket.  He has now a fine property and farm, with 70 acres of land under a high state of cultivation, valued at $45 per acre.  Mr. Frazer is a member of the Society of Friends.

John Galoway, a pioneer of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Butler county, Ohio, on the 11th day of December, 1832; son of Jacob and Sarah (Brosier) Galoway.  There was a family of nine children, five of whom are living.  His father is still living in Ohio.  John, when at the age of seventeen, learned the trade of a cooper, which he followed a few years.  In 1856 he married Miss Lydia Haas, a daughter of John Haas.  Mr. Galoway left Ohio in 1857, and came to Hardin county, locating on the place where he now lives.  In 1860 he removed to Grundy county, where B. S. Parish now lives.  He experienced the effects of the cyclone which is so well remembered by the old settlers.  His house was blown away with everything in it.  There were fourteen persons in the house, and four in the cellar.  Not a person was killed, but several were badly hurt, Mrs. Galoway being blown out on the prairie some distance from the site of the house, but was found in a slough. The building was a frame structure, and when the storm was over there was not two boards found nailed together.  It seemed a miracle how so many of them could go through such a storm without losing their lives.  In 1857 Mr. and Mrs. Galoway came to the county poor, and at a time when if a man had a dollar in his pocket he was not sure it would be good for anything in the morning.  The county was then thinly settled.  By hard work and good management they have accumulated a fine property.  They have 200 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  Mrs. Galoway and son are members of the Christian Church.

C. T. Gifford the founder of Gifford village, was born in Otsego county, New York, on the 3rd day of April, 1836.  He is a son of Henry and Clarissa (Robinson) Gifford.  He was one of a family of six children, five of whom are living.   He was reared on a farm, and received a limited education, being what might be termed a self-educated man.  In 1856 he commenced preaching the gospel.  In 1857 he married Miss Martha A. Morris, a daughter of George and Elizabeth Morris, of Washington county, New York.  She was born in Ontario county, New York, October 19, 1834.   In 1875 Mr. Gifford came to Hardin county, Iowa, where he laid out the original town, giving it the name of Gifford.  The family are members of the Society of Friends, and also the temperance organization.  When Mr. Gifford came to the county he began in the mercantile business, but was burnt out in 1876, losing from $1,600 to $1,800.

A. Grimsley

Mr. Grimsley located on section 10, where he opened a farm, and did blacksmithing under an old oak tree, in the spring and summer of 1851.  He subsequently erected a small shop.  He was the first blacksmith, and it is supposed that the coal used from the Hardin county mines was used by him in his forge in 1851.  Samuel Smith, Jr., relates that in the spring of 1851 he went with Mr. Grimsley down the river near where the mines of Moran & Buckner were afterwards located, and from the bottom of the Iowa river dug out a load of coal, which they hauled back to be used by Grimsley in his business.  In fording the river near the house of the latter, the wagon box was detached, and the whole load went to the bottom.  Mr. Grimsley died in 1852, and was doubtless the first death in the township.

Greenberry Haggin

The first settlement made in what is now Hardin county was in 1849, and to Greenberry Haggin belongs the honor of being the first white man who drove his stakes, erected a cabin, and made for himself a home in what is now one of the finest and best counties in the State.  Mr. Haggin was from Keokuk county, and a native of Kentucky.  He was a typical pioneer who felt it his duty to get out upon the outskirts of civilization, where, with pure air, a wholesome climate and plenty of room, he could grow up with the country.  For some cause he remained here but a few years, but long enough to see several towns spring up and the country being rapidly settled by a thrifty and enterprising race.

During the winter of 1849-50, Mr. Haggin was the sole resident of Hardin county.

Greenberry Haggin, a perfect type of the old style pioneer, one who preferred to live on the outskirts of civilization, to be the connecting link between the savage and civilized life, in 1849, with his family, came into this unbroken wilderness, and, building a cabin on section 23, there sought to live the retired but independent life of a pioneer.  Mr. Haggin had several sons, all of whom took up claims on sections 10, 14 and 23.  The old gentleman and some of his family remained here but a few years, and then took up their line of march to Minnesota.  The Haggin's families were the only ones that located here during the year 1849.

N. Hallett was born in Steuben county, New York, on the 11th day of December, 1825.  He is the son of Elijah Hallett, who was born February 2, 1793, and Elizabeth (Moore) Hallett, born February 1, 1796, who were the parents of eight children, four sons and four daughters, three of whom are living -- Nelson, Lorenza and the subject of this sketch.  His father died February 21, 1832, and his mother March 27, 1873.  N. Hallett was married in 1850 to miss Harriet Smith, a daughter of T. J. and Margaret (Gilchrist) Smith.  She was born February 14, 1831.  Their children were, Estella J., born May 23, 1852; died April 16, 1880; Myra E., born April 1, 1861; died January 12, 1864; Vinnie E., born September 27, 1867; and George S., born October 26, 1870.  In the fall of 1852, Mr. Hallett left Steuben county, New York, and emigrated to Whiteside county, Illinois, where he engaged in farming.  In 1865 he came to Hardin county, Iowa, and located where the town of Gifford now stands, remaining there until the fall of 1867, when he purchased his present place.  Mr. and Mrs. Hallett came to the West in an early day in limited circumstances, but by industry and economy, have secured a pleasant home.  They have 80 acres of land under a high state of cultivation, valued at $35 per acre.  The family are members of the Society of Friends.

Isaac Harris, one of the prominent farmers and early settlers of Hardin county, was born in Henry county, Iowa, February 18, 1848.  He is the son of Cornelius Harris of North Carolina, who, in an early day emigrated to Indiana where he formed the acquaintance of Patience Pearsons, to whom he was married, and by whom he had two children in Indiana -- David and Hannah.  In about 1839 his father left Indiana and removed to Henry county, Iowa, where he remained a few years, and where three more children were born -- Isaac, Mary and Maria.  In about 1850 the family removed to Marshall county, Iowa, where the father of Isaac took up Government land and made a farm, and where he lived for a number of years, when he sold out and removed to Winneshiek, Iowa, selling out there he removed to Marshall county, where he died March, 1865.  There were two children born in Marshall county -- Isom and Patience.  Mr. and Mrs. Harris were members of the Society of Friends.  The subject of this memoir was reared on a farm, and received his education in the Pioneer School Houses of this new country.  In 1864 he enlisted in the 45th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Company E; after being discharged from the army he returned to Iowa.  He married Miss Loram Humphrey.  She was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, April 1, 1855.  Two children bless this union -- Minnie L. and Guy F.  Mr. Harris has 160 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.

T. N. Hauser was born in North Carolina, on the 13th day of September, 1822.  He is the son of George and Catherine (Shores) Hauser.  There were a family of nine children -- five sons and four daughters.  In 1823 the father of Mr. Hauser left his home in North Carolina with his family for Indiana, where he arrived in due time.  He purchased land and made a farm, and in connection with this farm ran a general store and dealt in live stock.  He was a man of strict integrity, and an active business man.  He died in Marshall county, Iowa, in 1866, his wife dying in 1844.  They were members of the Christian Church.  T. N. Hauser, the subject of this sketch, was reared on his father's farm and received a common school education.  August 6, 1844, he married Miss Nancy (Bayles) Hauser.  She was born in North Carolina March 23, 1825.  In 1850 they emigrated to Iowa, coming through with teams, camping out, and finally locating in Hardin county, where they now reside.   Their first cabin was 12x14, made of round poles, without windows, and for light a log was cut out, over which was pasted greased paper.  Mr. Hauser purchased his claim of a man by the name of Haggin, paying for the same a horse and $15 in money.  Being in straightened circumstances he contracted to split 2,000 rails for a man by the name of Smith for 50 cents per hundred, and during the same winter split enough to fence his own farm, and also hewed timber for a new house, which he erected the following spring.   the furniture with which his cabin was supplied was made by himself from native timber.  The spring and summer of 1851 is known as the wet season.  Everything in this new country was very scarce.  For six weeks Mr. Hauser was compelled to borrow corn from his more fortunate neighbors, and not being able to get to mill on account of high water, there being then no bridges, he was forced to pound it into meal.   Mr. Hauser has now been identified with the county a third of a century; he has seen an unbroken wilderness settled by a thrifty and enterprising people, and almost the entire county under a high state of cultivation.  He has accummulated a competence and possesses 360 acres of fine land, while such of his children as are married are also comfortably situated.  In politics he is Republican and has been honored with several local offices.  When the Old Settlers' Society was organized in 1874, he was its first President.  Mr. and Mrs. Hauser are the parents of ten children -- Elijah J., Sarah J., David, William, Hattie, Nelson, Leonard, George, Carrie and Pauline.

H. H. Hendryx was born in Linn county, Iowa, on the 8th day of August, 1847.  He is the son of Caleb Hendryx, a native of Ohio, and Mary Hemphill, of the same State, who were the parents of nine children -- five sons and four daughters.   In the fall of 1835 his father left his home in Ohio and came west to Muscatine county, Iowa, where he remained a short time; when with a sack of corn meal on his shoulders he started out for Linn county, Iowa.  Crossing Cedar river, he erected a log cabin on the site of the present city of Cedar Rapids, being the second building erected in the town.  Here he remained through the winter, subsisting on the corn meal and wild honey he found in the timber.  Here he made a claim where the beautiful city of Cedar Rapids now stands, which he afterwards traded for a balky mare and an old set of harness, the whole value not being more than $25.  He then returned to his home in Ohio on a visit, where he remained a short time, and again came to Linn county and located in Grant township, where he erected the first cabin in that township.  The Hemphill's came to Linn county in 1844, and located in Otter Creek township.  Caleb Hendryx and Mary Hemphill were married in 1845.  In 1846 Mr. Hendryx traded for a farm in Otter Creek township, where he remained until his death, which occurred in February, 1876.  Mr. Hendryx [sic, Mrs.?] is living on the old homestead, which has never changed hands since the patent was issued.  H. H. Hendryx, the subject of this memoir, was married in 1871 to Miss Elizabeth Arnett, a daughter of Andrew Arnett, of Ohio.  She was born in Cedar county, Iowa, February 15, 1846.  Two children blessed this union -- Martin B. and Ethel M.  Mr. Hendryx is a member of Industry Lodge I.O.O.F.; also of the A.O.U.W.  In politics he is a Republican, and is at present Mayor of the town.

David Ingrum, farmer and stock-grower, was born in Wayne county, New York, November 24, 1834. He is the son of Eliphalet and Maria (Doggett) Ingrum, who were the parents of five children.  David was reared on his father's farm, and received a common school education.  When nine years of age his parents emigrated to Elkhart, Indiana.  In 1858 he married Miss Eliza Jane Mabie.  She was born in Huron county, New York, October 27, 1831.  There were nine children, four living -- Zipporah, Rosilla, Ona and Sarah.  In January, 1862, the family left Indiana and came to Marshall county, Iowa, locating in Liberty township, and in 1864 came to Hardin and settled on the place where they now live.  Mr. and Mrs. Ingrum came to the State in limited circumstances.  They have now 227 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre.  Mr. and Mrs. Ingrum are members of the Baptist Church.  Mr. Ingrum was a soldier in the 13th Iowa Volunteer Infantry.

J. Q. Irvin, one of the energetic farmers and early settlers of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in East Tennessee, on the 4th day of September, 1830.  He is a son of S. L. and Elizabeth (Crouse) Irvin, who were married in North Carolina, where two children were born -- Sarah and Nancy.  In an early day they emigrated to Tennessee, and in 1830 to Russell county, Kentucky, when J. Q. was a babe.  They were members of the Baptist Church.  In 1844, while on their way from Kentucky to Illinois, Mr. Irvin died in Hosiertown, Owen county, Indiana.  Being unable to go any farther, the family remained there some eight years, when Mrs. Irvin married Lawrence Arney, and is still living in Indiana.  In the fall of 1851, J. Q. left Indiana for Hardin county, Iowa, where he made a claim of 240 acres of beautiful prairie land, and in 1853 entered the same, and now has one of the finest farms and homes in the county.  In 1850 he married Miss Eliza R. Hauser, a daughter of George Hauser.  She was born in Owen county, Indiana, in January, 1831.  Mr. Irvin came to this county in limited circumstances, but went to work, and by judicious management has accumulated a fine property, and today is among the large and prosperous farmers of the county.  He has 400 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre.  Mr. and Mrs. Irvin are members of the Christian Church.  He was instrumental in building up the Christian Church in Union, and at present in building a church in Whitten.

W. S. Lane, a son of Dr. R. Pl and Mary (Brice) Lane, was born in Rockford, Illinois, September 1, 1856.  He was educated at the Mt. Vernon Military Academy, at Princeton, New Jersey.  After leaving school, he was engaged on the road as traveling agent, and also was employed by the Rockford Insurance Company up to 1882, when he came to Whitten, where he has since been engaged in the grocery business.  He was married September 1, 1880, to Miss Maud Buman, a daughter of A. C. Buman, of Rockford, where she was born March 22, 1862.  They have one child -- Nannie M., born October 23, 1881.  Mr. Lane's father was the founder of the Rockford Insurance Company, and is now President of the same.  He is also President of the First National Bank of Rockford, Illinois.

J. W. Lawrence, one of the enterprising business men of Union, Iowa, was born in Hart county, Kentucky, on the 10th day of November, 1842.  He is a son of William W. Lawrence, a native of Virginia, and Jane Johnson of Kentucky.  There were nine children, four of whom are living, viz. -- Martha J. W. Harlington of Cloud county, Kansas; J. W., Nancy, wife of Andrew Tyser of Union, and William H.  In 1857 his parents emigrated to Hardin county, Iowa, and lived here until 1875, when they removed to Kansas, where his father died in 1878.  His mother died in Union in 1879.  She was a member of the Baptist Church, and lived as she died a Christian.  The subject of this memoir received but a limited education in early life, and is principally a self-made man; coming to Hardin county he worked on a farm until nineteen year of age, when he went to the southern part of the State, where he dealt in wood and timber.   In 1862 he enlisted in the 2d Iowa Cavalry, Company A., and participated in several engagements -- Water Valley, Mississippi; Coffeeville, Holly Springs, Ripley, Jackson, Tennessee; Tupelo, West Point.  He was recommended by the Colonel of his regiment to raise a company of negroes, which he did, and had them under drill for two months, but there being some misunderstanding in reference to the commanding officers, got disgusted and returned to his old command.  Soon after returning, he was detailed to the quartermaster's department, where he remained a short time, when the command was sent to the army of the Cumberland, and participated in the battle of Nashville.  He was soon after made Orderly Sergeant.  He was mustered out at East Port, Mississippi, August 2, 1865.  After retiring from the army he was employed at various occupations until 1873, when he embarked in the implement trade as salesman.  In October of the same year, he purchased the business which he run for two years, when he formed a partnership with Cady Sawin, adding Hardware; two years later he took in H. T. Benson, and opened up a branch at Eldora, remaining one year, when the business was divided up, Mr. Lawrence taking the hardware.  In 1881 he took in as a partner, H. C. Chapin; they carry a stock of $7,000 to $8,000.  In 1867, Mr. Lawrence married Miss Julia E. Shephard.   She was born in Stephenson county, Illinois, in 1847.  By this union there are six children, five living, viz.-- Callie T., Charles E., Herbert S., Cora L. and Cady O.   In politics he is a Republican, and has held several local offices of trust; is at present a Justice of the Peace.  Is a member of the I. O. O. F. Industry Lodge No. 225.

E. M. Lepley, one of the enterprising farmers of Union township, was born in Knox county, Ohio, July 13, 1844.  He is a son of John and Mary Lepley, who were the parents of twelve children, six of whom are living.  His father was a farmer by occupation, and died in Knox county.  The subject of this memoir married Miss Katy Cramer, a daughter of John Cramer, one of the pioneers of Hardin county, who was killed in 1873 by being run away with by a team.  She was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, March 19, 1848.  Mr. and Mrs. Lepley are the parents of six children, viz:  Elliott, Irwin, Samuel, Ross, Eddie and Peter.  In 1864, Mr. Lepley came to Hardin county, where he remained a couple of years, returning then to Ohio, where he remained until 1868, when he again came out and purchased his present place, which was then wild prairie land, and commenced to make a home.  He has now 115 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre, and also 4 acres of timber.

Geo. Lepley, a farmer and stock grower, and one of the early settlers of Hardin county, was born in Knox county, Ohio, January 26, 1831, and is a son of Jacob and Margaret (Hoyman) Lepley, natives of Pennsylvania.  The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, receiving his education in the common schools.  On February 19, 1874, he was married to Miss Catherine Kemmer, who was born in Knox county, November 4, 1838.  By this union there were two children born -- Samuel and Oscar.  Mr. Lepley has a beautiful home, and a farmof 116 acres in Union township, under a high state of cultication, valued at $40 per acre; also 80 acres in Concord township, valued at $15 per acre.  Mrs. Lepley is a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Lepley enlisted in the 32d Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry.

Peter Lepley was born in Knox county, Ohio, January 31, 1826.  He is the son of John and Mary (Carmery) Lepley.  In 1859 he married Elizabeth Hardinger.  She was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, July 3, 1833.  Three children blessed their union -- May, wife of Albert Rowan; John and Joseph.  In 1854 Mr. Lepley emigrated to Hardin county, Iowa, where he took up 120 acres of land, and commenced to make a home, since which time has has added 80 acres, making 200 acres of farming land, and also 20 acres of timber, valued at $50 per acre.  Mr. Lepley is a practical farmer, and has succeeded in accumulating a fine property, and today is one of the well-to-do farmers of the township.

George W. Lockard was born in Champaign county, Ohio, July 25, 1844.  He was reared on his father's farm, and educated in the pioneer log cabins of Hardin county.  When eighteen years of age he attended the Albion Seminary for a year and a half.  On July 4, 1867, he married Miss Jennie Hauser, a daughter of T. N. Hauser.  She was born in Owen county, Indiana, October 16, 1841.  Two children are the fruits of this marriage -- Theodore E., and Nellie E.  Mr. Lockard came to the county when a boy, and has since been identified with its interests.  Mr. Lockard has 360 acres of beautiful prairie land, under a high state of cultivation, which is valued at $40 per acre.

Wm. Lockard was born near Williamsport, Va., March 24, 1814.  He is a son of Isaac and Sarah (Miles) Lockard, who emigrated to Ohio, Champaign county, when William was a small boy.  The subject of this sketch married Elizabeth Steenberger, a daughter of George and Nancy Steenberger, who emigrated to Ohio when it was a territory.  The country was then occupied by Indians, and often were the family forced to leave their homes and go to forts for safety.  She was born in Champaign county, Ohio, February 24, 1817.  Mr. and Mrs. Lockard were the parents of eight children -- Mary Ann, John, who enlisted in the 6th Iowa Infantry, and was shot at the battle of Shiloh, and died while on his way home; Philander, who was a member of the same regiment, and died with typhoid fever at St. Louis, Missouri; Philip, George, Thomas, Isaac, Ira.  In the fall of 1851 Mr. Lockard and family left Ohio with teams, camping out and doing their own cooking.  They stopped in Benton county, Iowa, while Mr. Lockard looked up a home.  They remained there a year and a half, when they moved to Hardin county, where they still reside.  Mrs. Lockard says they moved into a log cabin, in which they could not stand up straight, and where she did cooking for eight to ten years, in an old-fashioned fireplace.  While in Benton county they lived in a log cabin without any windows, and often covered the roof with carpets to protect them from the storm.  Mr. Lockard has hauled wheat to Waterloo and sold it for 30 cents per bushel.  In 1860, at the time the cyclone passed over this county, the storm blew out every window and the roof from their house.  Mr. and Mrs. Lockard came to the county in limited circumstances, but today are reaping the reward of a life of toil.  They have 260 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre.  They are members of the United Brethren Church.

Lyman H. Lockwood, one of the energetic, go-ahead American type, and an early setler of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Franklin couty, Ohio, January 21, 1821, son of Oliver and Lydia (Maynard) Lockwood, who were the parents of eight children.   The elder Lockwood emigrated to Marshall county, Iowa, in April, 1855, where he purchased wild land and made a home, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1872.  Lyman H. was reared on his ather's farm.  When eighteen years of age he commenced the mercantile business, clerking until he was thirty years old.  On March 9, 1850, he married Miss Theresa A. Tait, of Virginia, who was born September 25, 1825.   They had eight children of whom are living -- James A., Ella A., Clara M., Eliza, Angie, Frank M. and Florence.  Mr. Lockwood came to the county poor, but by good, judicious management, has accummulated a fine property and home, and to-day is among the large and well-to-do farmers of the county.  He has 160 acres of valuable prairie land, valued at $50 per acre, and 80 acres in section 19, valued at $30 per acre.  In politics he is a Republican, and has held several local offices of trust in the gift of the people.

Daniel Long, one of the first furniture dealers of Whitten, was born in Hampshire county, Virginia, July 5, 1831.  He is a son of James and Susan (Leatherman) Long, who were the parents of seven children, four of whom are living -- Daniel, Catherine, David and Mary.  His father emigrated to Hardin county in the spring of 1854, where he engaged in farming, and where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1865.  His mother is still living in Waterloo, Iowa.  In politics, his father was an old line Whig, but, at the time of the organization of the Republican party, he united with, and has since affiliated with that party.  Daniel Long was reared on a farm, and received his education in the log cabin of Virginia.  He came with his parents to Hardin county, where he married Mary A. Wood, a daughter of Franklin Wood, of New York, who emigrated to Dodge county, Wisconsin, in 1849.  She was born in Washington county, New York, April 25, 1842.  By this union there were two children -- Maria Ellen, now the wife of Jacob Shillinger, was born February 4, 1863; Efffie Arrena was born September 10, 1871.  Mrs. Long's father, Jonathon F. Wood, died November 9, 1863.  Mr. Long is one of the large and successful farmers of the Northwest.  He has 400 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  The family are members of the Society of Friends.  Mr. Long is at present engaged in the furniture business at Whitten, and carries a stock of $2,000.

A. A. Lounsberry was born in Richland county, Ohio, on the 5th day of October, 1841.  He is a son of J. W. and Percilla (Gayer) Lounsberry, and was thirteen years old when his parents emigrated to Iowa City, where they lived until 1856, when they removed to Eldora, Hardin county.  Mr. A. A. Lounsberry worked on the farm until he was of age, when he saw the necessity of a more thorough education, and therefore attended Albion Seminary two terms.  He was married to Miss Martha Whitney, a daughter of George Whitney, by whom he has five children, two sons and three daughters, viz:  Emma, May, Rosa, Rufus and an infant.  Mr. Lounsberry has 150 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  Mr. and Mrs. Lounsberry are members of the Congregational Church.

Joel G. Lounsberry was born in Windsor, Boone county, N. Y., September 12, 1833.  He is the son of J. W. and Esther (Guernsey) Lounsberry, the latter dying when he was but two years of age.  In early life Joel learned the trade of millwright with his father and afterwards took up the carpenter trade.  In 1850 he came to Hardin county, Iowa, locating in Eldora, where he subsequently embarked in the carpenter trade, employing as high as six men.  In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the 1st Iowa Cavalry, Company G, and was mustered in at Burlington.  He participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Little Rock, Black River Bridge and others, serving three years and two months.  He was injured at Prairie Grove.  He was promoted sergeant of the company, and in 1856 he married Miss Martha E. Edgington, a sister of Colonel Edgington, of Eldora.  She was born March 18, 1835.  By this union there was one child, which died in infancy.  Mrs. Lounsberry died in 1860.  For his second wife he married Jane Whitney, a daughter of George Whitney.  She was born in Stephenson county, Illinois.  They are the parents of of four children, three of whom are living -- Willie G., George W., and J. Clement.  Mr. Lounsberry has a beautiful farm of 210 acres under cultivation, and valued at $40 per acre.

Joshua W. Lounsberry

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Joshua W. Lounsberry was born in Broom county, New York, on the 18th day of February, 1809.  In 1831 he married Ruth (Guernsey) Lounsberry.  She was born in the county.  By this union there were three children -- Mary, Joel G. and Nathaniel L.  In 1835 he emigrated to Trumbull county, Ohio; moving with teams.   He there remained a short time, and finally settled in Loraine, Richland county, where he became personally acquainted with Governor Kirkwood, and Clark, a brother-in-law.   Mr. Lounsberry by trade is a millwright.  He built some of the large steam saw and grist mills in Ohio, and followed the business up to 1852, when he was employed by Hall & Allen, of Mansfield, Ohio, as general agent for portable engines and mill gearing.  In 1854, he came West, traveling through the different States looking at the land, and finally selecting the place where he now resides.  In the spring of 1855 he went to Iowa City, where he built a mill for Kirkwood & Clark.  In the following fall he moved his family and resided there until 1856, whe hecame to Eldora, remaining one year, when he built his present home, into which they moved and have lived for twenty-six years.  Mrs. L. died in Trumbull county, Ohio, in February, 1836.   He subsequently married Percella Gayer.  By this union there were seven children.  His second wife died January 1, 1855, and he afterwards married Sarah Bird.  One child blessed this marriage -- Ella.  Mr. Lounsberry has been identified with the county for many years, and has lived to see the broad prairies transformed into beautiful farms.  Coming to the county a poor man, by judicious management he has accummulated a competency.  Mr. and Mrs. Lounsberry are members of the Congregational Church.

James Madole, one of the early settlers of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Manchester, England, April 29,1831.  In 1845, when a boy fourteen years of age, he came to America, stopping at Plainfield, New Jersey, where he was employed driving coach for Captain Tucker for some time.  He then was engaged in the butcher business, which he followed for a number of years.  From Plainfield he went to Kingston, Canada, in 1855, where he was employed by a man by the name of Campbell, an Attorney-at-Law, to drive coach.  He subsequently went to Toronto, where he drove coach for the Clerk of the Crown.  From there he went to Sandwich, Illinois, where he embarked in the butcher business.  In the spring of 1860 he came to Hardin count, Iowa, where he was initiated by being visited by the cyclone which passed over the county in that year.  In December, 1860, he married Miss Lois Gifford.  She was born in Madison county, New York, June 23, 1840.  Six children blessed this union -- Flora Bell, Matilda J., Thomas R., Albert E., Mary E. and Sylva C.  Mr. Madole has a fine farm of 140 acres, with a comfortable home.

William Martin, a pioneer of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Harrison county, Kentucky, January 27, 1818.  When he was ten years old his parents emigrated to Vermilion county, Illinois, where he became acquainted with Miss Lucinda Parish, a daughter of Meredith Parish, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary war.  She was born in Franklin county, Ohio, February 20, 1827.  They were married July 21, 1841.  There was a family of nine children, eight of whom are living -- Martha J., Celinda A., Sarah E., Angie L., William B., Edward P., Mahlon C., and Minnie L.  In 1855 they left their home, with teams, and started for Hardin county, Iowa, locating in Eldora, where he engaged in the grocery business for one year, when his health failed him, and his physician advised him to go on a farm.  He rented for a couple of years, but in March, 1859, purchased the place where Mrs. Martin now lives.  Mr. Martin died at his home, July 4, 1872.  In early life he was a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Martin was a man with a large heart, always found on the side of the down-trodden, and was liberal to a fault.  He was a kind husband, an indulgent parents, and was universally respected by all who knew him.  At the time of his death he had accumulated a fine property, thus leaving his widow in comfortable circumstances.

Levi Marshall, farmer and stock-grower, was born in Henry county, Indiana, July 22, 1835.  He is a son of Jesse and Mary Marshall, natives of Tennessee, where they were married and two children were born -- Jane and Wm.  In 1832 they emigrated to Indiana, where ten children were born, five of whom are living.  The father died in Indiana, but the mother is still living.  Levi was educated in the pioneer schools.  September, 1857, he married Arrena Pearson.  She was born in Henry county, Indiana, October 17, 1841.  Ten children bless this union, five sons and five daughters -- Jesse W., Eunice E., Francis E., Charles V., Orpha J., Albert S., Annie L., Minnie M., Fred R. and Estella M.  In 1861 he removed to Iowa, locating in Winneshiek county. In 1868 he came to Hardin county, Iowa, where he purchased his present place.  He has 160 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.  The family are members of the Society of Friends.

T. M. Middleton, who came to the county in an early day, was born in North Carolina, December 31, 1824.  When quite young he removed to Green county, Indiana, where he subsequently became acquainted with Mary J. Littlejohn, and was married in 1849.  She was born in Green county, Indiana, December 16, 1831.  Eight children blessed this union, seven of whom are living -- Harriet, born May 9, 1851; Eliza E., born February 22, 1853; Charles, born September 20, 1855; Caroline M., born January 16, 1858; William P., born August 7, 1861; John A., born June 17, 1865, and Paulina E., born March 23, 1868.  In 1863 Mr. and Mrs. Middleton with their family came to Grundy county, Iowa.  He died February 25, 1871.  He was a member of the Christian Church, and always took an active interest in support of the same.  He was a kind husband, an indulgent parent, and was respected by all who knew him.  Mr. Middleton died, leaving his family in easy circumstances, with 145 acres of land under cultivation, valued at $50 per acre.

D. B. Miller, one of the large and influential farmers and stock growers, was born in Williams county, Ohio, June 17, 1843.  He is one of a family of nine children, seven of whom are living -- William, Sabina, Harriet, Herman L., D. B., Lydia and Ellen.  The subject of this memoir was reared on his father's farm, and was educated in his native State.  In the fall of 1865 he left Ohio and came to Hardin county, his father having previously purchased a large tract of land, which he present to him, on condition he would come out and open it up.  Mr. Miller has broken and brought under cultivation one of the best farms in the county, which is finely located.  His dwelling house is a beautiful structure; his out-buildings large and commodious.  His main barn is 80 by 40 feet, with an addition of 20 feet, and a hay barn 25 x 100.  His granary has a capacity of 5,000 bushels.  Mr. Miller has 660 acres of land under a high state of cultivation, valued at $40 per acre.  He feeds a large number of head of stock.  In 1867 he married Miss Amanda Lancaster.  She was born in Boone county, Indiana.  Two children have blessed this union, one of whom is living -- Evaline.  Mrs. Miller died in 1877.  Mr. Miller married Miss Elva Coffin in October, 1879, a daughter of Jesse and Emily Coffin.  She was born in Richmond, Wayne county, Indiana, January 4, 1855.  They have one child -- Clement C.

Jacob Miller was born in Macon county, Illinois, March 11, 1827.  He is a son of David Miller, of North Carolina, and Jane (Cooper) Miller.  Jacob came to Hardin county in the fall of 1850.  His education was received in the pioneer school house, traveling from three to four miles through the woods, each day to school.  He was married in Marshall county, Iowa, to Harriet Ballard, a daughter of Philip Mallard, of Kentucky.  She was born in Indiana, November 18, 1828.  The family consisted of eleven children, nine of whom are living, viz: Henry R., William J., Robert E., Charles F., Lewis A., Martha A., John W., Mary M., Rosella E.  Immediately after marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Miller moved to Hardin county and located where they now reside, moving into a log cabin, 14 by 16, with a puncheon floor.  At that time no family lived north on the river.  They had to go to Cedar Falls for their milling, many times pounding their corn into meal for the family use.  There was then plenty of game.  Mr. Miller came to Iowa a poor man, with nothing but his hands and a good constitution.  He went to work to make a home, and, by good management, has accumulated a fine property, and to-day is one of the well-to-do farmers of the county, having 280 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre.

Wm. Montz was born in Frederick county, Maryland, on the 25th day of February, 1813.  He was one of eighteen children, and was reared on a farm.  When four years old he went to Ohio with his parents, where he was educated in the Pioneer School House of that State.  In 1849 he married Susannah Miller, a widow of Henry Sufall.  She was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1825.  By this union there were six children, five of whom are living, viz. -- Nancy C., wife of Elijah Walton; Annie S., wife of Frank lamer; Martha M., wife of Albert Meyers; Willie H. and Sophia F.  In 1843, Mr. Montz left Ohio and came to Cedar county, Iowa, where he was employed in a saw mill for some years.  In 1850 he came to Hardin county and located on section one.  Mr. Montz is at present living a retired life at Whitten.  He has 240 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre, besides property in Whitten, valued at $800.

John Moore was a native of Kentucky, and came to Hardin county and settled in Union township.  In 1840 he was engaged in the lead mines in the vicinity of Galena and Dubuque.  Three years later he married Eliza J. Adams, daughter of David Adams, of Warren county, Illinois.  She was born in Ohio, May 26, 1824.  There was a family of nine children, seven of whom are now living -- Samantha R., born June 30, 1844; William H., born September 26, 1846; John D., born April 7, 1849; Oscar, born August 21, 1852; Lucius, born April 20, 1855; Etna F., born May 10, 1858; Albert O., born June 4, 1860, died October 28, 1879; George F., born June 3, 1867, died June 22, 1871; Emma J., born January, 1869.  About 1850, in company with James H. Drain, he went to California, crossing the plains and Rocky Mountains by the slow, tedious and dangerous mode of travel of those days, in search of golden fortune.  He returned like many others, to his family the next year, and sought other employment until 1855.  During the first and early years of his life here, he spent the time not necessarily employed on the farm at the trade of carpenter and joiner.  He was always characterized as an honest and industrious man, always temperate and mild in his habits, a good neighbor, a kind and affectionate husband and father, and a true and sympathizing friend.  Mr. Moore died on the farm which he originally settled, June 13, 1880.

A. H. Morris, one of the early settlers of Hardin county, was born in Wayne county, North Carolina, August 19, 1818.  He is a son of Zachariah and Rebecca Morris.  When A. H. was five years old his mother died, and his father married his first wife's sister.  In 1833 his father left his home in North Carolina, and emigrated to Park county, Indiana, where he is still living at the age of eighty-four; but his step-mother died in Indiana in 1850.  His father again married, taking as a wife a widow of David Lewis of Illinois.  The subject of this memoir was reared on a farm, and received a common school education.  In 1841 he married Miss Martha R. Morris.  She was born in North Carolina, May 22, 1827.  Seven children blessed this union, three of whom are living -- Elizabeth, Zachariah and Harriet.  In 1842 the family emigrated to Henry county, Iowa, where they lived in a log cabin 14x15, made out of round poles with mud chimney.  He remained in Henry until 1851, engaging in farming and merchandizing, when he returned to Indiana, where he was engaged in the merchandize and milling business.  In 1867 he came to Hardin county, where he has since followed various occupations.  In politics he was originally an Abolitionist and a Conductor on the underground railroad.  He was instrumental in giving many a poor negro his liberty.  He is at present a Republican, has held several local offices of trust in the county.

Willis Newby was born in North Carolina, September 9, 1808, and is a son of Nathan and Leah Sanders, who were married in North Carolina, where seven children were born.  His father died in North Carolina, and his mother subsequently married Jacob Lamb.  In 1831 Willis removed to Ohio, where he spent a short time, and then went to Jackson county, Indiana, where he made a claim in the heavy timber.  In 1832 he married Miss Milicent Newby, no relation.  She was born in North Carolina, November 11, 1814.  This marriage was blessed with eleven children, nine of whom are living, viz: Samuel, Joseph W., Jacob L., John H., Leah E., Martha J., Thomas R., Benj. P. and Micajah H.  In August, 1867, Mr. Newby came to Hardin county, and purchased a farm in Union township, on which he remained until 1877, when he came to Union village, where he has since remained.  He has 152 acres of beautiful land in Union township, valued at $40 per acre.  He also has 20 acres of timber, valued at $15 per acre.  The family are members of the Society of Friends.

William Nicholson, one of the pioneers of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Venango county, Pennsylvania, March 17, 1804.  In 1826 he married Nancy Graham, by whom he had eight children, five of whom are living -- Mary J., Margaret, James, Elizabeth and Artmusa E.  Mrs. Nicholson died in 1867.  Mr. Nicholson again married, taking as a wife Susan Jones, the widow of Joel Jones, in 1870.  They have three living children -- Oliver, Lillie Ann and Melinda.  Mr. Nicholson came to Marshall county, Iowa, in 1858, where he remained a short time, when he came to Eldora township, Hardin county, where he took up 300 acres of land.  In 1869 he sold his place near Eldora, and came to this township.  Mr. Nicholson has 509 acres of land in Hardin county, valued at $25 per acre.  He worked on the first canal that ever floated a boat in Ohio.  While in Ohio he worked as a laborer splitting many thousand rails, and made several trips to New Orleans on flat-boats.  At one time he walked from McLean county, Illinois, to his home in Pennsylvania, 1,052 1/2 miles, making an average of 45 miles per day.

B. S. Parish was born in Vermilion county, Indiana, December 18, 1831.  He is a son of Meredith and Lucinda (Smith) Parish, natives of Kentucky.  He was reared on a farm, and received his education in the log cabin, going through the timbers for two and a half miles.  In 1856 he came to Iowa, spending one year near Des Moines, where he made shingles, which today cover some of the old residences of that place.  In the spring of 1859 he purchased the place where he now resides.  August 12, 1860, he married Miss Martha J. Martin, a daughter of Wm. Martin of Danville, Illinois.  Mr. and Mrs. Parish are the parents of three children -- Laura M., wife of A. W. Allen; Wm. M. and Ethel R.  Coming to the county poor, they moved into a cabin 15x15, which is still standing as one of the old land marks; but a large and commodious residence has been erected in which the family new reside.  Mr. Parish has a beautiful farm near Whitten of 160 acres, valued at $50 per acre, 35 acres of timber worth $15 per acre.

J. B. Parish, one of the energetic and prosperous farmers of Union township, was born in Clark county, Kentucky, June 4, 1833; son of Barnett J. and Tacy (Cummings) Parish, where were of Scotch descent, their grand-parents coming from Scotland and settling near Alexandria, Virginia, in about 1799.  There was a family of ten children -- four sons and six daughters.  J. B. was reared on his father's farm, and received a liberal education.  In 1859 he married Miss Lydia Parish, a daughter of Meredith parish.  She was born January 12, 1840.  They have one child -- Lulu.  In 1863 Mr. Parish came to Hardin county, Iowa, and in 1876 purchased his present farm of 165 acres, valued at $50 per acre.  He has also 200 acres in Wright county, valued at $20 per acre.  In politics he is a Republican, and has held several local offices.

Edwin Peat, one of the founders of the village of Gifford, was born in Otsego county, New York, on the 6th day of November, 1822.  He is the son of Isaac Peat, born September 29, 1788, and Ruth (Shore) Peat, born January 6, 197, who were married in Otsego county, New York, November 23, 1815.  They had a family of ten children, eight sons and two daughters, nine of whom lived to be adults, and five of whom are now living -- Benjamin S., Edwin, John T., Emma Ann, and Caroline.  Edwin Peat is a self-made man, and taught school a number of years.  On February 7th, 1850, he married Miss Charlotte Winchell, a daughter of Ephraim and Lola Winchell.  She was born in Greene county, New York, July 1, 1831.  By this union there were three children, one of whom is living -- Charles H.  In politics Mr. Peat is a Republican, and has held several local offices of trust.  Mr. and Mrs. Peat are members of the Presbyterian Church of Gifford.  Mr. Peat has a farm of 80 acres, adjoining the town of Gifford, which is valued at $50 per acre.  In 1875 he lost his home by fire, burning everything but the furniture in his parlor.  The loss was about $3,000, with an insurance of $2,000.

Jason W. Pickett, liveryman, of Union, Iowa, was born in Chautauqua county, New York, October 20, 1848.  He was one of seven children, four sons and three daughters.  His mother died when he was three years old.  His father married Miss E. Peck, by whom there are five children.  In about 1853 his father emigrated to Geauga county, Ohio, where he followed the trade of blacksmithing until his death, which occurred January 1, 1878.  The subject of this memoir when a boy ten years old, started out for himself, working on a farm for $3 per month for the first few years.  When fifteen years of age he came to Grundy county, Iowa, where he was employed by George Wells on a large farm in that county.  In 1869 he located at Steamboat Rock, where he was employed in getting out timber and railroad ties with his ox teams, and continued in that until, in 1871, he came to Union, and embarked in the livery business, trading his oxen for a portion of the stock. In 1872 he married Miss Susan M. Higenbotham.  She was born in 1851.  By this union there are three children -- Lena, May Florence, and Abbie.  Mr. Pickett came to the county a poor boy, but by close attention to business has met with good success in life.

George Pierce was born in East Tennessee, on the 24th day of November, 1847, where he remained until he was sixteen years old, when he came with his parents to Hardin county, Iowa.  His parents located in Providence township, where his father died, in December, 1879.  His mother is still living.  George, at the age of seventeen, learned the trade of carpentering.  In 1871 he patented the Hawkeye Seeder, which proved a success.

L. W. Price was born in Rush county, Indiana, June 30, 1830.  His parents were Jacob and Hannah (Bailey) Price, natives of Pennsylvania.  He moved to Rush county, Indiana in 1828, where the father died in 1846.  His mother is still living at the advanced age of eighty-two.  In the spring of 1851, Mr. Price came to Hardin county, Iowa, where he erected a log cabin, clapboard roof, puncheon floor, with furniture to match, cutting poles for bedsteads.  In February, 1859 he married Zilphia Shinn.  By this union there were six children, three of whom are living -- Eva A., Mary E. and Emma E.  Mrs. Price died in 1870, she was a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Price afterward married Paulina C. Hauser of Indiana.  She was born in Own county, Indiana, October 25, 1838.  There were four children, three of whom are living -- Claine W., Theron C. and Mabel L.  Mr. Price was visited in 1860 by the cyclone, which passed over the county.  He had a wagon which had just purchased, blown to pieces, costing $65 for repairs.  Mr. Price came to the county in limited circumstances, with 60 cents in his pocket, but with a brave heart started out to make a home, and by good management has accumulated a fine property and a home, and today is one of the well-to-do farmers of the northwest.  He has 140 acres, valued at $50 per acre.  Mr. and Mrs. Price are members of the Christian Church.

Lewis E. Rash, whose parents emigrated to East Tennessee, and thence to Keokuk county, Iowa, in 1847, was born in East Tennessee, April 24, 1834.  In 1856 he married Rachel Hammer, who was born in the same State, May 23, 1836.  There was a family of twelve children, ten of whom are living, viz. -- Alvah C., Columbus E., Nancy E., Flora Ann, Bennie J., Emma R., Solon L., Henry T., Bertha J., and Andrew S.  In 1857 Mr. Rash came to Hardin county, and locatred on the place where he now lives.  Mr. Rash came to the county in limited circumstances; but has accumulated a fine property.  He hwas 160 acres of land in Union township, which is valued at $35 per acre; 200 acres in Grant township, valued at $40 per acre, also 80 acres valued at $35 per acre.

James Reed, one of the early settlers of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Centre county, Pennsylvania, May 30, 1819.  When a small boy his mother came to Fairfield county, Ohio, where he was reared on a farm, receiving a limited education.  In October, 1844, he married Miss Isabel Hartinger, a daughter of John and Susan (Waters) Hartinger, of Pennsylvania.  She was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, July 12, 1826.  Eleven children blessed this union, nine of whom are living -- John, Catherine, Susan, Mary E., Margaret, Elizabeth, Martha I., Frank, and William.  Mr. and Mrs. Reed emigrated, with teams, in 1855, to Hardin county, Iowa, locating on the place where they now reside, moving into a log cabin 16x18 feet, without any window glass, with a clapboard roof, and a mud-and-stick chimney.  In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, 32d Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and participated in the following engagements: Cape Girardeau, Missouri; Ft. DuRessy, Louisiana; Pleasant Hill, Louisiana; Tupelo, Mississippi, and many others, among which was the capture of Fort Blakely, the last battle of the war.  He was mustered out with honor at Clinton, Iowa.  Mr. and Mrs. Reed came to the county, poor, commencing at the lower round of the ladder; but by hard work they have accumulated a fine property and home, and today are among the well-to-do farmers of the county.  They have 120 acres in the home farm, valued at $40 per acre; also eight acres of timber.  Mr. and Mrs. Reed are members of the Christian Church.

W. A. Reynolds, one of the energetic business men of Whitten, was born in Elizabeth, JoDaviess county, Illinois, May 2, 1852.  He is the son of Thomas and Mary E. (Sweetman) Reynolds.  His father is a native of England, and his mother of Ireland.  The family came to America in 1846.  His parents were married in Ireland, where four children were born -- John, Jane, Thomas and Sarah.  After coming to America five children were born -- George, Robert, William A. and Ellen.  The subject of this sketch was educated in the normal school at Galena, where he graduated in 1874.  He then followed the occupation of  school teacher for some years.  In 1872 he came to Grundy county, Iowa.  Mr. Reynolds is a member of I. O. O. F., Industry Lodge, No. 225.  In politics he is a staunch Republican, and in 1881 was appointed Postmaster of Whitten.

John Rogers, one of the early settlers of Hardin county, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, October 13, 1828, and is a son of Warner and Elizabeth (McGregory) Rogers, natives of Maryland, who were married in Holmes county, Ohio, about 1816, and were the parents of ten children, eight of whom are living, viz: Jane, William, John, Joseph, Warner, Elijah B., Hester A. and Wesley B.  Mr. Rogers' father left Maryland in 1810, and located in Harrison county, Ohio, where he learned the trade of miller, which occupation he followed in connection with his farm.  He remained in the same county until his death, which occurred in 1851.  His mother died in 1877.  The subject of this memoir was raised and educated in his native State.  In October, 1854, he married Miss Kate M. George, a daughter of Wm. George, of maryland, where she was born in 1833.  Six children blessed this union -- Adrienne N., Lillie V., Rowland S., Carl L., Halleck E. and Everman S.  In the fall of 1857 the family left Ohio with teams and emigrated to Hardin county.  Mr. and Mrs. Rogers came to the county poor, commencing at the lower round of the ladder, but by hard work have accumulated a fine property and have a pleasant home.  They have 460 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre.

M. V. Sayers was born in Champaign county, Ohio, February 10, 1812, and was educated in the Old Log School House of the early day.  His parents, John and Jane Sayers, were the parents of thirteen children, ten of whom lived to be adults.  His father died in 1836, and M. V. took charge of the farm.  In March, 1838 he married Jane Saylor.  She was born in Clark county, Ohio, September 13, 1818.  Five children blessed this union, four of whom are living, viz. -- Anzoletta, John C. wh enlisted in the 32d Regiment Volunteer Infantry, Company F, and conracted disease and died at Little Rock, Arkansas in 1863; and Mary J., Lydia and Rebecca.  In the fall of 1840 the family left Ohio in a Prairie Schooner, locating in Rock Island county, Illinois, where Mr. Sayers opened up a farm, and where they lived in a log cabin 16x16, of the rudest kind.  July 21, 1851, Mrs. Sayer died.  She was highly respected by all who knew her.  December 10, 1854, Mr. Sayers again married, taking as a wife Louisa McMullen.  She was born in Connorsville, Indiana, March 15, 1821.  In June, 1862 they came to Hardin county, Iowa and located on the place where they now live.  Mr. Sayers has a beautiful home which he has worked hard to secure.  He has 160 acres of land valued at $40 per acre.  Mr. Sayers has lived to see seven generations.  His great-grandfather, his grand-father, his mother, himself, his children, his children's children, and his children's children's children.

W. W. Scott, one of the early settlers of Union township, was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1825.  In 1837 his parents, Thomas and Margaret (Mathews) Scott, emigrated to Holmes county, Ohio, where his father purchased land in the heavy timber of that State, and cleared and made a farm.  In 1855 Mr. Scott came to Scott county, Iowa, and located in LeClaire, and afterwards removed to Princeton township, where he remained until 1871, when he came to this county.  He has been identified with the State for twenty-seven years, and has seen wonderful changes in that time.  Mr. Scott has 80 acres of land under a high state of cultivation, valued at $40 per acre.  He had two brothers in the Union army.

John Shepherd was the first Surveyor of Hardin county.  He served until 1856, when he resigned the office. 

John Shepherd, the first Surveyor of Hardin county, is a Kentuckian by birth, first seeing the light of day in Breckenridge county, in that State, on the 25th day of November, 1802.  His parents, John and Lucretia (Patterson) Shepherd, were both natives of Kentucky.  Mr. Shepherd died when John was a small boy, and his mother married James Jones, and removed to Indiana, where she subsequently died.   John left Kentucky in 1827, when he was twenty-five years of age, and went to Indiana, where he remained a short time, and then went to the lead mines in Wisconsin, near Galena, Illinois.  In July, 1831, he married Tennessee Macomas, who was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, November 14, 1817.  By this union there were nine children, five of whom are living --  Benjamin, Lydia, Jane, Mary and Juliet.  In the fall of 1851 Mr. Shepherd brought his family to Hardin county, where he bought a claim on section 7, Union township, where he resided until 1875, when he removed to the town of Union, where he now resides.  At the first election, in March, 1853, he was elected County Surveyor, and re-elected at the expiration of his term, serving two terms.   The first cabin erected by Mr. Shepherd was of logs, with greased paper for window-lights, and was fourteen feet square.  Here lived his family of seven, and often did they entertain travelers who desired a night's lodging, making beds upon the floor for as many as could not be accommodated upon the bedsteads. His was truly a pioneer life, and honors heaped upon him and those who toiled with him in the early days are worthily bestowed.  In politics Mr. Shepherd was originally an old line Whig, but on the formation of the Republican party he cast his lot with it, and has since affiliated with it.  Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd are both members of the Christian Church, and live honorable and consistent Christian lives.  They have lived to celebrate their golden wedding, and see the rich fruits of their labor spread out all around them.

J. F. Sloan was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, on the 17th day of March, 1808.  He is the son of James and Mary (Hughes) Sloan.  Mr. and Mrs. Sloan were the parents of twelve children, seven sons and five daughters.  The subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm, and received his education in a log cabin with slab seats, and a log cut out and greased paper pasted over for lights.  October 1, 1835, he married Miss Elizabeth Law.  She was born in Ireland, her parents emigrating to this country in 1812, when she was an infant.  Mrs. Sloan was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and died a true Christian.  In 1845 Mr. Sloan emigrated to Rock Island county, Illinois, where he purchased land and embarked in farming, and where Mrs. Sloan died in 1849.  In 1860 he sold out in Illinois and came to Hardin county where he is at present residing.  Mr. Sloan is at present leading a retired life.  He is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

William A. Sloan was born in Derry township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, September 22, 1798, and was the first son of James and Mary (Hughes) Sloan, both of whom were natives of Westmoreland county, in the same State.  There were born near Hannastown, which was the first county seat of the first county organized in Western Pennsylvania.  They both died in Armstrong county.  Derry township was named by William's grandfather in honor of his native county in Ireland.  William remained with his parents until of age, helping his father upon the farm and occasionally attending the common schools of the neighborhood in winter.  When he reached manhood, he began working at the cabinet-maker and joiner's trade, in Brockfield, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, following the same for about ten years.  He was Treasurer of Jefferson county for six years, after which he went to Newbury, Ohio, where he engaged in the mercantile business for one year.  He then removed his stock of goods to Rochester, Beaver county, Pennsylvania, remaining there one year, and then moving back to his native county, where he continued in the mercantile trade three years longer.  In 1856 he sold out his stock of goods and came to Iowa, entering a large quantity of land in Grundy county, and returning to Pennsylvania, where he spent the following winter.  In the spring of 1857 he returned to Iowa, accompanied by his brother James F. Sloan.  Together they commenced the improvement of the land they had entered the previous year.  The winter of 1857-8 the brothers spent in Illinois City, Rock Island county, Illinois, and in Pennsylvania until 1860, when he located in Hardin county, about six miles south of Eldora, where he continued to reside till his death, which occurred September 22, 1881, on his eighty-third birthday.  He was twice married -- first, to Mary Hunter, who was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and who died in Brookfield, the same State.  His second wife was Charlotte Clark.  He was never blessed with children.  William A. Sloan was a man of sterling integrity of character, and was respected by all who knew him.  He held the office of Justice of the Peace in this county for many years.  He was, and had been for many years, a member of the Presbyterian Church, and was a consistent Christian.  On the organization of that body in Eldora, he was one of the organizing members and one of its first Elders.  He was a very liberal supporter of the Church.

Samuel Smith Sr.

In 1850 came James Austin Dawdy, William Robeson, Samuel Smith, Sr., with his two sons, Alexander and Samuel Smith, Jr., all from Knox county, Illinois.   Jacob Miller and a Mr. Grimsley, the former being from Illinois, while the native place of the latter is unknown, with Thomas N. Hauser, were also pioneers of 1850.    Of this number, Thomas N. Hauser, Jacob Miller and Samual Smith, Jr., are the only ones now living.

Samuel Smith, Sr., was a native of Virginia, and was born in Greenbrier county.  Here he grew to manhood, and was united in marriage with Caroline Shintaffer, by whom he had fifteen children, twelve boys and three girls, all of whom grew to be men and women, except one boy.  After his marriage, the family moved to Ohio, where they resided during the last war with Great Britain.  Mr. Smith enlisted, and was with Scott at Fort Meigs.  About 1824 the family removed to Indiana, and in 1837 to Knox county, Illinois, where they remained until 1849, and then came to Iowa and located in Keokuk county, remaining there until the spring of 1850, when they came to what is now Union township, in Hardin county.  Mr. Smith died in 1854, and Mrs. Smith in 1858, at advanced ages.

James Speer, wagon-maker, Union, Iowa, was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, June 25, 1824; son of Alexander and Eliza B. (Campbell) Speer.  His mother was a daughter of General Campbell, of the same county, and his father a cousin of James Buchanan.  James Speer is one of nine children, two of whom are living -- James and Nancy.  He emigrated with his parents to Columbiana county, Ohio, and when sixteen years of age was apprenticed to the trade of a carriage and wagon maker.  After serving his three and a half years apprenticeship, he went to Brady's Bend, where he worked at his trade, and afterwards entered the rolling mills at that place.  He was married in Armstrong county in 1847, to Miss Mary Wilson.  She was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1827.  By this marriage there were six children, three of whom are living -- Mollie, wife of J. W. Wickham, of Des Moines; John and Valonie.  In 1850 Mr. Speer left Pennsylvania and came to Muscatine, Iowa, where he remained a short time, when he removed to Cedar Rapids, then a small village of 200 to 300 inhabitants.  It being very sickly at that time, he removed to Marion, in the same county.  In 1855 he went to Albion, Iowa, at the time they were erecting the first house.  In 1862 he enlisted in the 32d Regiment, Iowa Infantry, Company K, serving three years.  He was in several battles, and took part in the Red River Expedition.  In 1873 he came to Union.  The family are members of the M. E. Church.

Daniel Spurlin was born in North Carolina, March 1, 1807, and in 1841 married Miss A. J. Swift, a daughter of Peter Swift, of Pennsylvania, where she was born May 20, 1818.  Her parents emigrated to Holmes county, Ohio, when she was four years of age.  When she was twenty-two years old they removed to Owen county, Indiana.  Mr. and Mrs. Spurlin were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are living, -- William Swift M., who enlisted in the 9th Iowa Cavalry, and was killed while on duty at Ashland Station, on the Red River Expedition; Zacahariah, Ellen J., Jeremiah, Samuel, Andrew, Daniel, Delilah, and Mary E., who died young.  In 1846 the family left Indiana and went to Mercer county, Illinois, where they remained five years, and int he spring of 1851 came to Hardin county, coming with teams over roads almost impassable, at a time well remembered by the early settlers as the wet summer.  They moved into a claim shanty 16x18 feet, with a four-light window.  Mr. Spurlin had, at the time of his death, a comfortable property, consisting in part, of 320 acres of beautiful prairie land.  In 1869 he was killed while returning from a religious meeting, by a runaway team, Mrs. Spurlin being badly injured at the same time.  Mr. Spurlin was a member of the Baptist church; was a kind husband and an indulgent parent, and was loved and respected by all.  An account of the sad affair in which Mr. Spurlin lost his life will be found in the Miscellaneous Chapter [this excerpt follows].

Miscellaneous Chapter, pages 982-983:

On Sunday evening, January 26, 1868, a terrible accident occurred in Union township.  The scene of the sad affair was near the residence of Mr. Ward.   A revival had been in progress, in the Lockhard school house, for some weeks previous, and the unfortunate man whose death is here recorded drove his family to the services with unfailing regularity.  On the evening which proved so terrible to him, he was returning from church.  His sleigh had some six persons in it, and was driven by Mr. Spurlin.  There were three teams in the string, all gaily prancing homeward and proud of the bells' chiming chorus.  When within a short distance from Mr. Ward's house, where the Union postoffice was then located, the last sleigh lurched into a deep rut, capsizing, and spilled its occupants into the deep snow.  Breaking from the driver's hands, the frightened horses flew past the middle sleigh, and, maddened with the cries of the women, blinded with uncontrollable fury, they leaped into the advance sleigh, in which were a number of men and women.  This stampeded Mr. Spurlin's team.  It ran fifty yards with furious speed, and dashed the sleigh with great force against the trunk of a large tree.  The sled was demolished, and its occupants scattered, maimed and bruised, in every direction, and one of their number killed.  Mr. Spurlin had been beaten on the head by the iron shod feet of the horses, which leaped in on his company.  A large stake was also driven in his head when thrown from the sleigh.   James Kirkham was cut and crushed in a dreadful manner, and all the others severely injured. 

Doctors Cusack and Underwood were immediately taken to the distressing scene, where all the sufferers were well cared for.  In spite of science and surgical skill, Mr. Spurlin expired after six hours of intense suffering.  The others in the party were Mrs. Spurlin, Mr. and Mrs. Pitts, James Kirkham and John Joins.   Mrs. Fannie Jewell, who was in the rear sleigh, had a narrow escape from death.   Daniel Spurlin, the deceased, was about sixty years of age, and was one of the first settlers in the county.

Willis Steenberger, one of the early settlers of Union township, was born in Champaign county, Ohio, August 27, 1810.  He was reared on a farm, and received his education in the log cabin of a new country.  January 8, 1834, he married Maria Anderson, who was born in Orange county, Virginia, January 21, 1816.  There were twelve children born to them, eleven of whom are living -- Elizabeth, Joseph, Mary, Nancy, Sarah, Emeline, Harrison, Amanda, Philander, Samantha and Delilah.  Mr. and Mrs. Steenberger have lived together as man and wife for forty-eight years.  Mr. Steenberger always takes his station in the harvest field, and the present season (1882) tended 24 acres of corn.  In the fall of 1852 he emigrated to Iowa and located near Albion, in Marshall county, coming through with teams, being seven weeks making the trip.  He there took up 160 acres of prairie land and 40 acres of timber.  He moved into a log cabin, 14 by 12, which had been used as a chicken house and calf pen.  Where was no floor or place for a window.  It being wet and sloppy, they gathered up some slabs and put down for a floor, to keep them out of the mud.  Mr. Steenberger built a log cabin on the land he had taken up.  In 1868 he sold his place in Marshall and came to Hardin county to his present home.  Mr. Steenberger has a beautiful home, with 185 acres of land under cultivation, worth $40 per acre.

Amos Story, farmer and stock grower, was born in Morrow county, Ohio, January 1, 1823.  He is the son of Nehemiah and Nancy (Kitteridge) Story, natives of New Hampshire.  In about 1819 or 1820 his parents emigrated to Ohio, then a Territory.  Amos was reared in the wilds of Ohio, where he received his education in the log cabin.  In the fall of 1848 he married Miss Elizabeth David.  She was born in Center county, Pennsylvania.  By this union there was a family of seven children, six of whom are living -- David L., Reuben P., Stephen A., James R., Charles T. and Amos C.  In the summer of 1850 he emigrated to Cedar county, Iowa, and in 1866 came to Hardin county.  He has 260 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre.  Mr. Story has been identified with the State for 32 years, and has seen the wild prairies transformed into beautiful homes and farms.

A. B. Strauss, one of the first settlers of Whitten, Iowa, was born in Naperville, Illinois, December 25, 1848.  He is the son of Simon and Catherine (Butts) Strauss, natives of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania.  In 1846 his parents emigrated to Naperville, Illinois.  His mother died in 1853, and his father married Mary Trash.  The subject of this sketch enlisted in 1865, in the 156th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Company D, and remained in the service until the close of the war.  After the war he learned the trade of blacksmithing, which he has followed ever since.  After coming West he first settled at Blairstown, in Burton county, then to Grundy county, spending one year in Nebraska, and then to Hardin county.  Mr. and Mrs. Strauss are members of the M. E. Church, of Whitten.  Mr. Strauss was married in 1873to Rebecca S. Strauss.  She was born in Ohio in 1853.  By this union there are living children -- Sidney S. and Dema Viola.

Charles M. Warring was born in Sullivan county, New York, April 16, 1833.  He is the son of Josiah and Mary Jane (McEwen) Warring.  Charles M. remained on his father's farm until he was sixteen years of age, when he was apprenticed to the trade of jeweler.  In 1853 he removed to Clinton county, Iowa, where he embarked in the business.  In 1880 he went to Chicago, and from there to Whitten.  Mr. Warring is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

William M. Whitmore, one of the prominent farmers of Hardin county, Iowa, was born in Columbia county, New York, on the 20th day of January, 1800.  He is a son of Christopher and Catherine (Shofer) Whitmore.  His father was a soldier of the Revolutionary war.  His grandfather was also in the same war, and was wounded in Saratoga county, New York, at the time of the surrender of General Burgoyne.  His grandfather was of German descent, and, at the time of the Queen Anne rule, came to this country.  The first winter here, he dug a hole in the ground and lived in it.  The subject of this sketch was reaared on a farm, and received a common school education.  Mr. Whitmore has had four wives.  For his first, he married Mary Smith, by whom there were two children.  She died, and he married Fannie Van Reper, by whom he had one child.  She died, and he married Elizabeth Smith.  She died, and for his present wife he married Louisa Hughes, by whom he has had one child.  In 1847 Mr. Whitmore settled in Ogle county, Illinois, where he purchased land and opened up a farm.  He remained there until 1870, when he came to Hardin county.  Mr. Whitmore has 40 acres of land in Hardin county, valued at $40 per acre; 130 acres in Marshall county, valued at $30 per acre.  In politics, he was on old Jackson Democrat, but of later years has supported the Republican party.

George Whitney was born in Duchess county, New York, September 12, 1822.  When a child his parents emigrated to Upper Canada.  His father was Crosby Whitney, a native of Maine; his mother, Mary Cameron.  By this union there were two children -- George and Lydia.  The latter married Samuel Row.  Mr. Whitney died when George was four years old.  Mrs. W. subsequently married Caleb Tompkins.  By this union there were four children, two sons and two daughters, -- Eliza J., Sarah, Samuel and Caleb.  The subject of this sketch was married in 1846 to Miss Maria Row.  Seven children blessed this union, six of whom are living -- Martha E., Crosby, Henry, George H., Jane and Ulysses G.  In about 1834 Mr. Whitney left Canada and came to Stephenson county, Illinois.  In 1850 he made a trip to California, crossing the plains, and there engaged in mining and farming.  In 1854 he returned to Illinois, and in April, 1856, arrived in Hardin county and located on the east side of the river, in Union township.  They moved into a cabin 16x18, of the rudest kind, with a four-lighted window, clap-board roof, and puncheon floor; the door being hung on wooden hinges, and a dry goods box for a table.  Mr. Whitney is now living in Union village.  He has a beautiful farm of 275 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre.

Philip J. Wilcox was born in Cayuga county, New York, April 2, 1826.  He is the son of Daniel and Betsy (Burgduff) Wilcox, who were married in Cayuga county, New York, where a family of nine children was born, five of whom are living -- Mary E., wife of A. F. Wood; Jacob, Lafayette, Daniel and P. L.  In 1844 his parents emigrated to Carroll county, Illinois, and there Philip was employed on a farm by the month.  In 1857 he married Lucy Danes.  By this union there were four children, three of whom are living -- Clarisa, Charlie and Rosa.  In the fall of 1865 Mr. Wilcox came to Hardin county, purchased land, and, by hard work and economy, has made a comfortable home.  He has 85 acres of land, well improved, valued at $35 per acre.

J. A. Wilson, one of the early settlers of Hardin county, was born in Logan county, Ohio, May 1, 1832.  He is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Holt) Wilson, natives of Pennsylvania, but who were reared in Kentucky, where they were married.  Nine children blessed their union, seven sons and two daughters.  In about 1818 Mr. Wilson's parents emigrated to Ohio, where they took up a claim, and, afterward, made a farm.  His father was a soldier in the war of 1812.  Both parents died in Ohio.  Mr. Wilson was reared on a farm, and was educated in the common schools.  In 1855 he married Anzoletta Sayer, a daughter of Milton V. and Jane Sayer.  She was born in Logan county, Ohio, January 17, 1839.  By this union there were eleven children, seven of whom are living -- Mary E., William P., Elizabeth J., Deborah L., John A., Alma G., and Cora E.  In September, 1854, he left Ohio, and moved to Rock Island, Illinois, where he remained until September, 1860, when he came to Hardin county, Iowa, where he has since resided.  His first market was at Waterloo, where he hauled wheat, which he sold for forty cents per bushel.  Mr. and Mrs. Wilson came to the county in limited circumstances.  They have now 250 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre.  In 1862 Mr. Wilson enlisted in the 32d Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company F, and served with honor.

William G. Wilson, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Lewis county, Kentucky, September 2, 1814.  When a boy, his parents emigrated to Ross county, Ohio, where they remained five years, and then removed to Logan county, Ohio, where his father died in 1835.  His mother died in the same county in 1852.  His father was a solder in the war of 1812, under General Harrison.  Wm. G., in 1854, married Miss Millicent Davis, a daughter of Thos. Davis.  She was born in Ohio in 1822.  By this union there were three children -- Alma, Christina and John M.  In 1867 the family emigrated from Ohio to Rock Island county, Illinois, and in 1869 came to Hardin county, where they now reside.  Mr. Wilson has 127 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre.

A. F. Wood, one of the prominent farmers of Hardin county, was born in Cayuga county, New York, on the 6th day of January, 1829.  He is a son of Elijah Wood, who was born in Westchester county, new York, December 19, 1803, and Roxana Bouchton, born June 30, 1804.  They were the parents of five children, four sons and one daughter.  In 1844 the family emigrated to Carroll county, Illinois, where Mr. Woods remained until his death, which occurred in 1848.  Mrs. Woods is still living.  The subject of this sketch was married January 8, 1851, in Carroll county, Illinois, to Miss Mary Wilcox, a daughter of Daniel Wilcox, of New York.  She was born on the 31st day of August, 1833.  By this union there are nine children, viz.: -- Mary J., wife of A. J. Pelham; Adelbert and Ellen, now Mrs. Melvin Craig; Oscar E., James M., Nettie, Nellie G., Charles W., William W.  In the spring of 1856 Mr. Wood came to Hardin county, and being favorably impressed with the country, he concluded to bring his family.  They located at Berlin, where they remained until the spring of 1859, when they removed to the present place, adjoining Union Village.  In 1860 Mr. Wood took a trip to Pike's Peak, crossing the plains, remaining one year.  In August, 1862 he enlisted in the 22d Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Company F, and participated in several engagements, among which were Cape Girardeau, Pleasant Hill, and in all the engagements of the regiment.  In April, 1863, he was promoted to sergeant, and on the 23d day of August, 1865, received the commission of Second Lieutenant.  After coming from the war he was nominated for Sheriff of Hardin county and elected.  In politics he is republican and has held several offices of trust.  Mr. Wood came to the county in limited circumstances, but by fair dealing and judicious management has accumulated a fine property and home.  He has 342 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre -- 280 acres in Sherman township, valued at $16 per acre.  Mr. and Mrs. Wood are members of the Congregational Church of Union.

O. D. Wood is one of the enterprising business men of Hardin county, born in Cayuga county, N. Y., November 11, 1836.  When eight years of age, his parents removed to Carroll county, Illinois, where he was reared on a farm.  In 1857 he came to Hardin county, and, with his brother, purchased a steam mill at Berlin.  He remained there two years, when, having traded his mill for land, he came to this township, where he has since resided. In November, 1859, he married Hannah Hiserote.  By this union there were born four children, three sons and one daughter, viz: Elizabeth, Frank, Fred, and Dick.  Mr. Wood came to the county with nothing but a good constitution and a strong arm, and went manfully to work to make a home, and, by good management, has accumulated a fine property and home.  He is one of the well-to-do farmers of the county, having 80 acres of land adjoining Union village, valued at $50 per acre; also 160 acres in Wright county, valued at $15 per acre; also 80 acres in New Providence township, valued at $50 per acre.

Milton H. Worden

Milton H. Worden, one of the early settlers of Union township, was born in Ogle county, Illinois, January 13, 1842.  He is a son of Thomas and Maria (Nichols) Worden, natives of of Delaware county, New York, who emigrated to Ogle county, Illinois, at an early day, being among the pioneers of that county.  There was a family of four children -- Ira, William, Henry and Jane -- who were born in Delaware county, New York, and eight born in Ogle county, Illinois -- John, M. H., Ann, Sykes, Mayhew, Wayne, Harriet, and Newton W.  John, who enlisted in the 7th Illinois Cavalry, was taken prisoner, and was incarcerated in Andersonville prison for eighteen months.  Mr. and Mrs. Worden are at present living in Ogle county.  The subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm.  In 1862 he married Miss Jane Wilcox, a daughter of Stephen and Mary (Smith) Wilcox.  She was born in Cayuga county, New York, September 4, 1840.  There are three children living -- Lillie, Nellie, and Edward.  In the fall of 1863 the family left Ogle county in a prairie schooner, and wended their way to Hardin county, Iowa.  Mr. Worden has 80 acres of land, valued at $0 per acre.