Mahaska County >> 1878 Index

History of Mahaska County, Iowa
Des Moines: Union Historical Company, 1878.

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MACKAMAN, ELIJAH, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Leighton; farm of 40 acres; was born in Carroll county, Ohio, in 1831, and came to this county in the spring of 1865; he married Elizabeth Pearch, a native of the same county, January 7, 1850; children: Mary A., William G., and Daniel H.

MAHASKA

Mahaska, the name of the county, was that of an Iowa chief, meaning, in our language, White Cloud. For the following interesting sketch of his life, we are indebted to a work in the State Library:

Life of Mahaska.

"Mahaska, or White Cloud, the elder, was the son of Mauhawgaw or the Wounding Arrow, who was principal chief of the Panhoochee or pierced nose band of Indians. Mauhawgaw emigrated, some hundred and fifty years ago, from Michillmacinac to the west bank of the Iowa River, and selected a position near its mouth, where his band kindled their fires and smoked their pipes to the Great Spirit. The name given to this river by Mauhawgaw, was Neohony, or the Master of Rivers.

"Having built his village, he was greeted with a salutation from the Sioux. A pipe was sent to him by that tribe, with an invitation to a dog feast, made in honor of the Great Spirit. He accepted the invitation and joined in the ceremony. Whilst at the feast, and no doubt reposing in the most perfect security, he was suddenly attacked; but though surprised he succeeded in killing one man and three woman, before he was slain. This outrage upon the national honor has never been forgiven.

"The Iowas, indignant at the conduct of the Sioux, resolved immediately on revenge. They raised a war party. Of this party, the son Mahaska was the legitimate chief; but being young, and having never distinguished himself in battle, he declined taking the command, but by virtue of his right he conferred upon a distinguished and tried warrior, the authority to lead his warriors against the Sioux - stating at the time, that he would accompany the expedition as a common soldier, and fight until he should acquire experience and gain trophies enough to secure to him the confidence of his people.

"Arrangements being made, the party marched into the Sioux country, and gained a great victory; taking ten of the enemy's scalps. The young Mahaska brought home, in his own bunch, the scalp of the Sioux chief, in whose lodge the life of his father had been so treacherously taken.

"Having thus shown himself a brave, he assumed the command of his warriors and of his tribe. His war adventures were numerous and daring. He was in eighteen battles against various bands, and was never defeated. In one of his expeditions against the Osages, with whom his conflicts were many, he arrived on the north bank of the Missouri, and while there, and engaged in trying to stop and effusion of blood from his nose, he espied a canoe descending the river, in which were three Frenchmen; wishing to cross over with his party, he called upon the Frenchmen to land and assist him. The Frenchmen not only refused but fired upon the Indians, wounding one of the White Cloud's braves. The fire was instantly returned, which killed one of the Frenchmen.

"White Cloud had so far taken no part in this little affair, but, seeing one of his braves wounded, he called for his gun, saying, 'You have killed one of the rascals, I'll try if I cannot send another along with him to keep him company to the Chee.' Chee means the house of the Black Spirit.

"As usual, the whites raised a great clamor against the Iowas, giving out all along the borders, that they were killing the settlers. A party was raised and armed, and marched forthwith against Mahaska and his warriors. They were overtaken - White Cloud, not suspecting their designs and being conscious of having committed no violence, was captured and thrust into prison, where he remained many months. He finally made his escape and succeeded in reaching his own country in safety. He then married four wives. It is the custom of the tribe, when husbands or brothers fall in battle, for braves to adopt their wives or sisters. White Cloud found, on his return, four sisters, who had thus been deprived of their protector, all of whom he married. Of these Rantchewaima, or the 'Female Flying Pigeon,' was one of the youngest.

"Often, after White Cloud has thus settled himself, was he known to express his regret at having permitted his warriors to fire upon the Frenchmen. Oh those occasions he has been seen to look upon his hand, and heard to mutter to himself, 'There is blood on it.' He rejoiced, however, in the reflection that he had never shed the blood of an American. And yet his father's death, and the manner of it, made him restless, and rendered him implacable against the perpetrators of that outrage, and their allies.

"Not long after his escape from prison and return to his home, and soon after his marriage, he planned an expedition against the Osages. He resolved to march with a select party of ten braves, to the Little Osage plains, which lie south of the Missouri river, and about two hundred and fifty miles above St. Louis. Arriving at the plains, a favorable opportunity soon offered, which was seized by Mahaska and the battle commenced. It was his misfortune, early in the conflict, to receive a rifle ball in his leg, just above the ankle. He had succeeded, however, before he was wounded, in taking three of the enemy's scalps, when he sought a retreat, and found one under a large log that lay across a watercourse. The Osages followed close upon him being guided by the blood which flowed from his wound; but they lost the trail on arriving at the watercourse; for Mahaska had taken the precaution to step into the water some distance below the log, by which stratagem he misled his pursuers, for they supposed that he had crossed over at the place where they last saw the blood. He remained under the log, which lay on the water, with just so much of his nose out as enabled him to breathe.

"In the night when all was silence, save the tinkling of the bells of the Indian horses in the plains below, Mahaska left his place of concealment, and coming up with one of the horses, mounted him and made off in the direction of his home, which was on the river Des Moines. Arriving at the Missouri he resorted to the Indian mode of crossing, which is to tie one end of the halter around the head or neck of the horse, and taking the other end between his teeth, he drives the animal into the water and unites his own exertions as a swimmer, to those of the horse, and is by this means carried over in safety.

"In all these difficulties he took care not to part with either his gun or his scalps. On arriving at home he paraded his trophies, and ordered the scalp dance to be danced. Not being able, on account of his wound, to lead the dance himself, he placed the scalps in the hands of Inthehono, or the 'Big Axe', who, being the first brave of his band, was entitled to the distinction. Mahaska accompanied the presentation of the scalps to Big Axe with these words: 'I have now revenged the death of my father. My heart is at rest. I will go to war no more. I told Manshuchess, or Red Head (meaning Gen. Clark), when I was last at St. Louis, that I would take his peace talk. My word is out. I will fight no more.'

"In the year 1824 Mahaska left home, being one of a party on an embassy to Washington, leaving his wives behind him, their number having increased to seven. When about one hundred miles from home, and near the mouth of the river Des Moines, having killed a deer, he stopped to cook a piece of it. He was seated, and had just commenced his meal, when he felt himself suddenly struck on the back. Turning round, he was astonished to see Rantchewaime standing before him, with an uplifted tomahawk in her hand. She thus accosted him: 'Am I your wife? Are you my husband? If so, I will go with you to the Mawhehunneche (or the American big house), and see and shake the hand of Incohonee' (which means great father). Mahaska answered: 'Yes, you are my wife. I am your husband. I have been a long time from you. I am glad to see you. You are my pretty wife, and a brave man always loves to see a pretty woman.'

"The party arrived at Washington. 'A talk' was had with President Monroe. The present of a medal was made to Mahaska, and a treaty was concluded between the United States and the Iowas ...

"On his return to his country and to his home, Mahaska began in earnest to cultivate his land. He built for himself a double log house, and lived in great comfort. This, he said, was in obedience to the advice of his great father.

"Soon after his return to his home it was his misfortune to lose his favorite wife, and under very fearful circumstances: They were crossing a tract of country. Mahaska having reason to apprehend that hostile bands might be met with, kept in advance. Each was on horseback, the 'Flying Pigeon' carrying her child, Mahaska the younger, then about four years of age. Turning at a certain point to look back to see what distance his wife was from him, he was surprised, his position being a high one, enabling him to overlook a considerable extent of country, not to be able to see her.

"He rode back, and sad to relate, after retracing his steps some five or six miles, he saw her horse grazing near the trail, and presently the body of his wife, near the edge of a small precipice, with her child resting its head upon her body. The horror stricken chief, alighting near the spot, was soon assured of her death. Standing over her corpse, he exclaimed in his mother tongue: 'Wau-cunda menia-bratuskunee, shimgan-menia-nanga-nappoo!' which, being interpreted means, 'God Almighty! I am a bad man! You are angry with me. The horse has killed my squaw.' At that moment the child lifted its head from the dead body of its mother and said: 'Father, my mother is asleep.'

"The inference was that the horse had stumbled and thrown her. The occurrence took place about four days' journey from his house. Mahaska, within that time, was soon returning to his lodge, bearing the body of Rantchewaime, with his child in his arms. He proceeded at once to dispose of the corpse. His first business was to gather together all the presents that had been made to her at Washington, also whatever belonged to her, and to place them, with the body, in a rude box; and then, according to the custom of the Indians of that region, the box was placed upon a high scaffold.

"In 1833 the son of an Iowa chief of distinction, named Crane, was killed by the Omahas. A party of Iowas applied to Mahaska to head them in the pursuit of the enemy. He replied: 'I have buried the tomahawk; I am now a man of peace.' He added: 'The treaty made with our great father provides for the punishment of such outrages.' The party, however, resolved that they would punish the aggressors. They made an incursion into the enemies' country, and returned bringing with them six scalps. The customary feast was prepared, and all was made ready for the scalp dance; but Mahaska refused to partake of the one, or participate in the other.

"The murderers having been, on both sides, reported to the Government, Gen. Clark was directed to cause the Iowas to be arrested. This duty was assigned to their agent, Gen. Hughes, who called on the chief Mahaska, to whom he made known the order. Mahaska answered: 'It is right. I will go with you.' The offenders were arrested and conveyed to Fort Leavenworth. While confined there, one of the prisoners called Mahaska to the window of his cell, and looking him full in the face said: 'Inca (father), if ever I get out of this place alive, I will kill you. A brave man should never be deprived of his liberty, and confined as I am. You should have shot me at the village.'

"Unfortunately for Mahaska, that Indian succeeded in making his escape from the prison. He forthwith went in pursuit of the object of his revenge. Mahaska was found encamped on the Nodaway, about sixty miles from his village. His pursuer and party attacked him with guns, tomahawks and clubs, and slew him. After he was dead, one of the party remarked that 'he was the hardest man to kill he ever knew'. This was in 1834, Mahaska being then about fifty years old. The tidings of Mahaska's death soon reached his village. One of the murderers escaped and sought refuge among the Ottoes; but on hearing the cause of his visit to them, they shot him in their camp. The other, with the utmost indifference, returned to the village of the murdered chief. Young Mahaska, now the successor of his father and principal chief of the nation, on hearing the news of his father's death, and that one of the murderers had returned to the village, went immediately to his lodge, killed his dogs and horses, and with his knife cut and ripped his lodge in every possible direction. This last act, especially, is an insult, to which no brave man will submit. Having hurled this defiance at one of the murderers of his father, and expressed his contempt for him under every possible form, he turned to the assassin, who had observed, in silence, the destruction of his property, and looking him sternly in the face, said: 'You have killed the greatest man who ever made a moccasin track on the Nodaway; you must, therefore be yourself a great man, since the Great Spirit has given you the victory. To call you a dog, would make my father less than a dog.' The squaw of the murderer exclaimed to her husband, 'why don't you kill the boy?' He replied, 'he is going to be a great brave; I cannot kill him.' So saying he handed the young chief a pipe, which he refused, saying, 'I will leave you in the hands of the braves of my nation.' To which the inflexible murderer replied, 'I am not going to run away; I'll meet your braves to-morrow.' The Indian knew full well the fate that awaited him. He felt that his life was forfeited, and meant to assure the young chief that he was ready to pay the penalty.

"The next day a general council was convened; the case was submitted to it; the unanimous voice was 'he shall die'; it was further decreed that young Mahaska should kill him, but he declined, saying, 'I cannot kill so brave a man', whereupon he was shot by one of the principal braves. His body was left on the ground to be devoured by wolves, as a mark of the disgust of the tribe, and of their abhorrence of the assassin of their chief.

"It is customary among the Iowas and the Neighboring tribes, for their wives and children of the deceased to give away everything which had belonged to him and his family. This custom was rigidly adhered to on the occasion of Mahaska's death. His squaw went into mourning and poverty. The mourning was kept up for six months, and consists, in addition to the blacking of the face, in much wailing and in the utterance of long and melancholy howls. At its expiration, the tribe present the mourners with food and clothing and other necessaries if savage life. One of Mahaska's widows, however, named Mis-sor-ah-tar-ra- haw, which means the 'female deer that bounds over the plains', refused to be comforted, saying her husband 'was a great brave and was killed by dogs', meaning low, vulgar fellows. Mahaska was six feet two inches in height, possessed great bodily strength and activity, and was a man of perfect symmetry of person, and of uncommon beauty."

MARIS, H., farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. New Sharon; born in Pennsylvania, in 1829; came to this State in April, 1851; owns 100 acres of land; has held office of school director; he married Miss Martha Bonsall, in 1856; she was born in Pennsylvania; has six children, Mary D., Annie O., Emma J., Lizzie P., Josie M.; lost two, Ellis and Martha J.

MARIS, L. D., farmer, Sec. 29; P.O. Flint; born in 1827; came to this county in 1851; owns 80 acres of land; has held offices of justice of the peace and school director; he married Miss Salinda Randalls, in 1858; she was born in Ohio; has seven children, Susanna, George, Hannah, John, William, Elwood and Martha.

MARKS, N. WHEELER, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Oskaloosa; born in Hardin county, Ohio, August 11, 1845; when seven years old came to Iowa by wagon with parents; located in Washington county, in 1853; lived there four or five years, and came to this county; he enlisted in the Eighth Regiment Iowa Infantry, Company H, in August, 1861; was in the battles of Shiloh and Vicksburg, both battles of Jackson, Spanish Fort, and many other fights and skirmishes; was slightly wounded in the head at Vicksburg; he was in the service four years and nine months, until May, 1866; after the war he returned and engaged in farming; married Miss Cynthia Ingales, from this county, in October, 1873; they have two children, Ada and Ernest, and have lost one daughter.

MARTIN, WM., farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Lacey; owns 320 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1829; came to Iowa in 1854, and settled on his present farm; he married Emily Nash in 1851; she was born in England in 1833; they have seven children, Caroline, John W., Ida A., Otis A., Nelson A., Cora J., and Frank E.; they are members on the M. E. Church. Republican.

MASTELLER, JACOB, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Lacey; owns 340 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre; born in Northumberland county, Pa., in 1815; came to Iowa in 1855; married Ellen Plaine in 1840; she was born in Northumberland county, Pa., in 1820; they have nine children, Jonathan, Curtis, Mary, Anna, Jane, William, Richard, Carrie, Elmer; lost one son, George B., who enlisted in Co. C, 7th Iowa Infantry in 1861, and died in 1862; are members of the U. P. church.

MATTISON, JAMES, flour dealer, Oskaloosa; born in Westmoreland, England, Nov. 19, 1838, and came to America in 1844, and located in Stark county, Ohio; after living there twelve years, he came to Cedar county, Iowa, in 1856, and lived there until 1865, when he came to Oskaloosa and engaged in the grocery trade, also, in the grain and produce business. For the past three years has been engaged in flour. He enlisted in the 47th Regiment Iowa Infantry, Co. G, one hundred day's service, and was at Helena Arkansas. He married Martha Mendenhall, from Columbiana county, Ohio, November, 1873; they have two children, Charles Wesley and Eva Meriam.

MATTOX, C., farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Ferry; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre; born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1819; came to Iowa in 1845, and located on his present farm; married Harriett Lee in 1838; she was born in Ohio in 1822, and died in 1872; had thirteen children, nine sons and four daughters; was married again to Hannah Walker in 1873; she was born in Logan county, Illinois, in 1849; has one child, Ina L. Democrat.

MATTOX, HENRY, dealer in groceries and provisions, Oskaloosa; born in Logan county, Ohio, December 27, 1827; he was brought up there and learned the trade of brick mason; he came to Iowa, and arrived in this county, at Oskaloosa, Saturday evening, July 29, 1854; he began working at his trade and continued in it many years. He has lived in this county over twenty-four years. He has been engaged in the grocery business since 1873; he has held the office of city councilman. He married Miss Letitia A. McBeth, from Logan county, Ohio, March 18, 1852; they have three children, Laura Alice, Lucy Ann, and Mattie J; and have lost two children.

TERRY MAY, Farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Oskaloosa; born in Highland county, Ohio, August 6, 1820; lived in Ohio until nineteen years of age, and moved to Knox county, Illinois, and lived there ten years. He married Miss Phebe J. Haslett, from Indiana, in 1857; they came with their own conveyance to Iowa, and located in Jasper county; lived there two years, and came to Mahaska county in November, 1851, and located in Black Oak township, and made a farm; is one of the early settlers and has lived in this county twenty- seven years; they own a small farm, nicely located, just outside of the city limits; they have two children, William S., engaged in the drug business, in Oskaloosa, and Martha E., now Mrs. H. W. Fisher, agent of the C., R. I. & P. R. R. at Oskaloosa.

McAYEAL, REV. R. A., pastor of the United Presbyterian Church, Oskaloosa; born in Washington county, Pa., January 9, 1825, he was raised in Westmorland county, and received his literary education at West Geneva College, and entered Alleghany Theological Seminary; he was licensed to preach in August, 1855, and came to Oskaloosa, Iowa, in June, 1856, and assumed the pastoral charge of the church, where he has preached for the past twenty-two years, and is the only pastor here now that was here when he came, there being one other, and possibly two ministers in this State that have preached for twenty-two years to the same congregation. He was chaplain in the army of the Thirty-third Regiment Iowa Infantry one year during the war. He married Miss Mary E. Sharpe, from Delaware, Ohio, June 2, 1856; they have four children, one son and three daughters.

McCALL, FRANCIS W, proprietor of the Oskaloosa marble works, Oskaloosa; born in Galea county, Ohio, October 9, 1831; he came at an early age to La Salle county, Ill.; his father died when he was only seven years old; he worked out for four dollars a month; he was bound out to learn the wagon maker's trade; after serving his time, he married Miss Emma Woodward, from Taunton, Mass., in La Salle county, Ills., November 3, 1852; they came to Iowa by wagon, and arrived here in Oskaloosa; in May, 1855 engaged in wagon making and carpenter business; in 1862 he engaged in his present business; he had nothing when he began, and by energy and good management his business has grown, and in this line is one of the most extensive in the State, extending over this State, and beyond it. They have four children, Lewis H., Ella, Lilly and Charlie, and they have lost four children.

McCARROLL, ROB'T S., farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Kirkville; born in Harrison county, Ohio, December 16, 1819; he lived there until 1848, and then came to this county and located where he now lives; has a farm of 200 acres; he married Susanna English January 5, 1843, a native of the same county; they have four sons and five daughters, Jane E., James, Addie, Sella, Etta, Frank, William, Jason, and Lewis; they have lost three daughters, named Martha A., Rachel, and Mary S.

McConnel, J. Q., farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Oskaloosa; owns 272 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; was born in Posey county, Ind., in 1829; came to Iowa in 1846, and settled in Madison township; married Jane Dilley in 1856; she was born in Virginia in 1834; they have six children, Asa, Wiley, Quincy, Walter, Frank, Etta M.

McCOY, BEN, attorney, firm Bolton & McCoy, Oskaloosa; born in Jefferson county, Indiana, March 22, 1846; when nine years of age he removed with his parents to Mitchell county, Iowa, and came to Mahaska county in March, 1856. He received his education in this State, entered Cornell college at Mt. Vernon, in the class of "68"; he studied law in Seevers & Cutts of this city, and was admitted to the bar in 1871, and since then has practiced his profession here; he enlisted in Forty-seventh Regiment of Iowa Infantry, company C; has held office of city solicitor, and is a member of the school board; married Miss Mary M. Dixon, from Ohio, January 1, 1870; they have three children, Eva, John N., and Samuel R.

McCREA, F. M., physician and surgeon; born in Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1848; came to Iowa in 1850, and located in Oskaloosa; engaged in the practice of medicine in Eddyville in 1876.

McCULLOUCH, JAMES, of the firm of McMullin & Co., livery and boarding stable; born in Holmes county, Ohio, March 29, 1836, he was brought up and lived there until 1864, when he came to Iowa, and located in the county and engaged in farming and stock raising; he was also engaged extensively in buying and shipping stock. He owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres; he sold off most of his land and came to Oskaloosa and associated with Major McMullin in his present business; he has held office of city councilman; he married Miss Harriet Devers, from Ohio, in Jan., 1865; they have two children, Charlie and Vida.

McCurdy, J. A., farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. White Oak; owns 390 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born in Virginia in 1818; came to Iowa in 1856, and settled on his present farm; married Sarah M. Henry, in 1857; she was born in Indiana, in 1835; they have seven children: Frank, Oscar, Charlie, William, Stella, Addie, and Walter. Are members of Presbyterian Church. Republican.

McCURDY, J. F., of the firm of Versteeg & Co., of the city steam mills, New Sharon; born in Dearborn county, Indiana, in 1836; came to this county in 1875; he owns one-third interest in the above mills; he is a member of the city council; he enlisted in the 59th Illinois Infantry in the late war, and served four years; he married Miss Ann McCullough in 1869; she was born in Ohio.

McCURDY, JONAS B., firm of J. B. McCurdy & Co., furniture dealers, Oskaloosa; born in Franklin county, Ohio, August 4, 1843; he lived there eleven years, and came to Iowa in 1854; lived in Cedar and Poweshiek counties; was in the army; enlisted in the 28th Regiment Iowa Inf'y, Co. C, August 14, 1862. On account of ill-health was on detached service in V. R. C.; was discharged July 5, 1865; after the war he came to Oskaloosa and was connected with the woolen mill; they put in the first woolen machinery. He has been engaged in the furniture and undertaking business for the past eight years; has held the office of city councilman; married Miss Marcella P. Moore, from Morrow county, Ohio, in September, 1872; they have two children, Lena A., and Ralph B.

McDONOUGH, JAMES, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Bucyrus; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born in Harrison county, Ohio, in 1827; came to Iowa, in 1849, and settled in this county; married Frances Abbott, in 1847; she was born in Carroll county, Ohio, in 1830; have ten children, John, Lot C., Jane, Andrew, Matilda, Marcey, Frances, James, Thomas R and Susie; enlisted in Co. I, 7th Iowa Infantry, in 1861, and discharged in 1865; was wagon- master. Republican.

McFADDIN, WILSON, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Cedar; has a farm of 210 acres; born in Harrison county, Ohio, January 18, 1830; lived there until 1852, and then came to this county and located in Cedar township; has lived on his present farm since 1862; he married Miss A. C. Wellslager, May 29, 1856, from Richland county, Ohio; they have two daughters, Elanora, and Emma Carrie.

McFALL, G. B., farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Concert; was born in Bartholomew county, Indiana, in 1823; he lived there until November, 1847, and then came to this county and located on the place he now lives; has a farm of 131 acres - he entered 252 acres; he married Miss Newsom, January 16, 1845, a native of the same county; they have two sons and five daughters, Lottie M., William O., Mary E., Emma E., Clara E., Gideon B., Jr. and Jennie L.; was a member of the board of supervisors one term, has been a member of the school board twenty years, treasurer about sixteen years.

McFALL, SAMUEL, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Fremont; was born in Harrison county, Kentucky, in 1803, he lived there until ten years of age; his parents then moved, to what is now Switzerland county, Indiana; he lived there until 1821, and then went to Bartholomew county, Indiana, where he lived until 1830, and thence to Iroquoise county, Ills., he came to this county in March, 1844, and located where he now lives; he married Miss Elizabeth Barbee, February 14, 1828; born in Ross county, Ohio, February 11, 1804; they have two sons and four daughters, Sarah, Elizabeth, Samuel T., Martha, Nancy, and Joseph.

McFALL, W. O., physician and surgeon, Fremont; was born in Cedar township, Mahaska county, May 23, 1851; at the age of twenty-one, he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Hoffman, of Oskaloosa, where he continued for two years and six months; he then attended the Bellvue medical college, of New York City, where he graduated March !, 1876, and has been located in Fremont since March, 1877; he married Miss Sarah Lloyd, December 21, 1877, a native of Meigs county, Ohio. No family.

McGREGOR, H., dealer in lumber; born in Orleans county, N. Y., in 1824; came to Iowa in 1776; he married Catharine Roberts, in 1854; she was born in Wales, in 1834, and died in 1877; had three children: Mary M., Charles. and Addie. Is a member of Presbyterian Church. Republican.

McKINLEY, WM., farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Oskaloosa; born in Alleghany county, Pa., in 1826; came to this county in 1851, his father having purchased the land on which he now resides; he has held the office of school director; he married Miss Mary Vankirk in 1852; she was born in Pennsylvania; has five children, Ada N., Mary B., Samuel W., William E., and Charles N.

McLANDSBOROUGH, ANDREW, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Oskaloosa; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born in England in 1822; came to Iowa in 1850, and settled on his present farm in 1856; he married Nancy McDonough in 1846; she was born in Ohio in 1828; they have seven children, Elizabeth, Sarah A., Jane, James, Catherine, Thomas, and Ida. Republican.

McMAINS, G. W., farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Mauch Chunk; owns 125 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre; born in Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1833, came to Iowa in 1847; married Mary McMains in 1856; she was born in Indiana, in 1832; have three children: Jefferson, Van Evrie and Grace; Mr. McMains has been constable one term. Democrat.

McMAINS, JOHN, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Union Mills; born in Owen county, Ky., January 18, 1815; in 1825 he removed to Indiana, where he remained until 1836, when he came to Cedar county, Iowa, where he remained eight years; he then returned to Indiana, remaining three years, and came to this county in 1847; he settled on the land he now owns, and has lived there ever since that time; he owns 676 acres of land; has held offices of township trustee and school director; married Jane Goddard in 1837; she was born in Kentucky, and died in 1858; he afterward married Rachel Chidester, Jan. 1, 1861; she was born in New York; has eight children, Elizabeth, Ann, Mary E., Isaiah, William, Oliver, Ida and Erastus; one son, Robert, enlisted in the 8th Iowa Infantry, and was killed at Corinth.

McMILLAN, WOOSTER, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Oskaloosa; owns 107 acres of land valued at $40 per acre; born in Cattaraugus county, N. Y.., in 1834; came to this state in 1860; married Sarah A. Myers in 1860; she was born in Ohio in 1838; they have five children, Minnie Ida, Almira Ada, Clarence, Adella, Astella; they are members of the Society of Friends.

McMULLIN, JAMES W., firm of Mullin & Co., livery, sale and boarding stable; born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, December 29, 1827, and when ten years of age removed with his parents to Dark county Ohio; lived there and in Piqua, Miami county, until 1855, when he came to Oskaloosa; he went in the army; enlisted in the 7th Regiment Iowa Infantry, and was commissioned Captain Co. C; was in the battles of Ft. Donelson, Pittsburg Landing and the advance on Corinth, and the battles of Iuka, Corinth, and in the whole advance from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and others. He was wounded in the battle of Corinth, and lost his horse. He was promoted and commissioned Major at battle of Pittsburg landing. After the war he returned here and has been engaged in business here ever since. He married Miss Carrie E. Munsell, from Miami Co., Ohio, April 24, 1855; they have one daughter, now Mrs. J. R. Noble, of Fort Madison.

McNEILL, H. W., Muchakinock. The subject of this sketch was born in Peoria, Peoria county, Ill., June 18, 1847; his parents moved to Frostburg, Maryland, two years later, where he lived until he became of age; at the age of seventeen he attended the University of Virginia located at Charlestown; during his junior year the university was closed by the rebels; from there he went to the Rock River Seminary, in Ogle county, Illinois, and went through the course of the graduating class of 1865; from 1865 to 1868 he took a law course in Ogle county; in 1869 he went to Springfield, Ill., and was admitted to the bar; he left there the same year and came to Iowa, locating in Hardin county; he there formed a partnership in the practice of law with Gov. E. W. Eastman, of Eldora, where he continued until 1871; he then accepted the general agency of the Iowa Central Railroad; he remained with the above company until 1873; he then embarked in the coal business, organizing the Iowa Central Coal Company, and was its president until it was absorbed by the Consolidation Coal Company, two years later, of which company he is still general manager; he is also president of the Muchakinock Coke and Fire Clay Company; he married Miss Lizzie Phillips, a native of Frostburg, Maryland, in 1870; they have one daughter, Annie by name, lost one son, Charles G.

McWILLIAMS, W. N., farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Beacon; born in Highland county, Ohio, July 1, 1821; he was brought up and lived there until he came to Iowa and located in this county, in 1856; after one year he located where he now lives, and engaged in farming and stock raising; he owns a farm of one hundred acres; he has held school offices most of the time since he came; he married Miss E. J. Broadwell, from Clermont county, Ohio, in March, 1846; they are connected with the Presbyterian church of Oskaloosa, though they attend the Union church because of its convenience; they have eight children, E. John, Ellen J., Charles L., Tirzah S., Phillip A., Albertiss, Ada, and Reece H.

MEANS, J. E., proprietor of Pacific House, Rose Hill; born in Bedford county, Penn., in 1843; came to Iowa in 1863, and settled in Oskaloosa; removed to this village the first of July, 1878; married S. C. Dryden, in 1873; she was born in Ohio, in 1841; have one child, Lillie M; are members of U. P. Church. Democrat.

MENDENHALL, MOSES, retired, Oskaloosa: born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in 1808, and when ten years of age, removed to Columbus, Ohio, and was brought up there. He was connected with iron interests in Belmont county, Ohio, and operated the first blast furnace within a section of one hundred miles; he yet retains an interest in the iron works. He came to Iowa in 1871, and located in Oskaloosa; he owns a farm of two hundred and forty acres in Marshall county. He was elected to the State Legislature in Ohio, in 1855. He married Sarah Johnson, from Fayette county, Pennsylvania, in 1843; they have five children, and have lost three.

MERRILL, JESSE J., tonsorial parlors, Oskaloosa; born in Harrison county, Ohio, in 1848; when seven years of age he came with his parents to Iowa and located in Jasper county, in 1855; came to Oskaloosa in 1871 and engaged in the insurance business with Cook & Hunt; has been engaged in his present business for the past five years. He married Miss Alta L. Orvis, from Wisconsin, June 10, 1877; she was principal of the school at Beacon, and was engaged in teaching for a long time.

MIDDLETON, I. C., Sec. 35; P. O. Oskaloosa; owns 9 acres of land valued at $1,600; born in Center county, Pa., in 1830; came to Iowa 1840, and settled in Washing- ton county; removed to this county in 1867; married Mary A. Bryan in 1868; she was born in Greene county, Ohio, in 1843; they have one child, Caloway.

MILLEDGE, ISAAC, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Peoria; born in 1854; owns 88 acres of land

MILLEDGE, O., farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Peoria; born in Pennsylvania in 1821, came to this county July 3, 1854; owns 310 acres of land; he married Matilda Runyan in 1844; she was born in Virginia, and died in August, 1872; he married for his second wife Mrs. Mary Heminger in 1873; has three children by first marriage, Isaac, Otis and Zalra.

MILLER, A., farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Peoria; born in Starke county, Ohio, in 1824; came to this county in 1856; owns 227 acres of land; has held office of constable; he married Miss Sarah Stokes, in 1867; she was born in Ohio, and died in 1869; he afterward married Miss Susan Turner, who was born in Maryland; has one son: Ellis.

MILLER, D. D., farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Eddyville; farm contains 315 acres; born in Trumbull county, Ohio, January 5, 1829; he lived there seventeen years, and came to this county and located where he now resides; married Mrs. Mary, widow of Wm. Selers, September 5, 1856, a native of Monroe county, Indiana; have four children, Ina, Emma, Laura E., and Harry.

MILLER, FENTON, furniture dealer, Oskaloosa. Born in Louden county, Va., December 27, 1826; he removed at an early age with his parents to Muskingum county, Ohio, and was brought up there and at Zanesville, and learned the chair making business; he left Zanesville, Ohio, March 20, 1854, and arrived in Oskaloosa April 5, 1854, and has lived here almost a quarter of a century; engaged in painting, and then was clerk in store for three years, and then went to work at his trade; he has been engaged in the furniture business for himself since 1866 and is the oldest furniture house here; married Cynthia J. Yerian, from Muskingum county, Ohio, near Zanesville, December, 1852; they have three children, Laura J., Harry and Cora, and have lost three children, two sons and one daughter.

MILLER, SOLOMON W., farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Lacey; owns 165 acres of land valued at $45 per acre; was born in Greene county, Ohio, in 1839; came to Iowa in 1875; married Emma Lupton in 1864; she was born in 1841; they have one child, Charlie; are members of the Society of Friends.

MILLER, V. B., farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Union Mills; born in Highland county, Ohio, in 1836; came to this county in October, 1872; has held office of school director; he married Miss Sarah Larkin, in 1860; she was born in Ohio; has three children, John, Charles and Frank; owns 157 acres of land.

MILLS, D. T., farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Concert; was born in Dare Co., Kentucky, in 1821, he lived in Kentucky until the fall of 1844, and then went to Park county, Indiana, where he lived until the fall of 1852; he then came to this county, and located where he now lives; owns a farm of 140 acres; he married Emily Bingham, of Mercer county, Kentucky, in the fall of 1842; she died May 26, 1856; he married again to Mary Torrance in July, 1857; have two sons and four daughters by first marriage, Sophia, Wm. T., Mary, Sarah, Martha and David; two sons and two daughters by second marriage, Jacob, Ella, Edward and Myrtle.

MITCHELL, C. R., farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Oskaloosa; born in Iowa in 1852; owns 143 acres of land; he married Miss Belle Stevenson in February, 1878. MITCHELL, JOHN, farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. New Sharon; born in Pennsylvania, in June, 1812; came to this county in 1855; owns 170 acres of land; he married Harriet Steen in 1837; she was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania; has seven children, Marion B., Nancy A., Mary J., Smith, Minerva, Juliette and John C.

MITCHELL, JOHN, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Oskaloosa; owns 1192 acres of land valued at $25 per acre; was born in Carroll county, Ind., in 1830; came to Iowa in 1851; married Eveline Hoover in 1861; she was born in Pennsylvania in 1833; they have nine children, Llewellyn, Elmer, Ollie, Jane, Anson, Amy, Addie, John, and Vexella.

MITCHELL, JOHN B., farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Oskaloosa; born in Ohio in 1847; came to this county in 1848; his parents were among the earliest settlers of the county, and entered the land on which he now resides as soon as it came in market; he owns 120 acres; has held office of school director; he married Miss Lizzie Broerman December 1, 1869; she was born in Pennsylvania; has three children, Flora, Etta, and Howard.

MITCHELL, R., farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. New Sharon; born in Pennsylvania, in 1826; came to this county in 1863; owns, with his son, 140 acres; has held office of school director; he married Ruth A. Cox, in 1849; she was born in Pennsylvania; has seven children, Milton, Louisa, Richard J., Rosaline, Mary B., Olive and Minnie.

MOGRAN, PROF. Wm. B., president Penn College, Oskaloosa. Born in Henry county, Indiana, December 2, 1830; he was brought up there receiving the advantages of a common school education, and then attended the Friends' Boarding School, now Ehrlan College, at Richmond, Ind. He afterward entered school at Haverford, Pa., and graduated there in 1853; after graduating there he was engaged in teaching at Westtown, Pa., and had charge of the classical department; while there he became acquainted with Miss Sarah Henley, from North Carolina, who was also engaged in teaching there, and they were married October 10, 1855; after teaching in Ehrlan College he entered the University of Michigan and took a course in engineering, and graduated; he was appointed professor of mathematics, in Ehrlan college, and continued for some years; he was professor of mathematics and engineering, in Perdue University, at Lafayette, and was afterward appointed governor of Ehrlan College; he was called to the presidency of Penn College in the fall of 1876; he has taken a high position as an educator, and the institution is prospering under his management; he has two children, William Earl and Jesse Henley.

Montgomery, John, farmer, Sec. 13, P.O. Oskaloosa; born in Madison county, Ohio, in 1818; came to this State in 1838, and in 1841 while the Indians occupied the country, he came to what is now Mahaska county, and staked out a claim on the Des Moines river and another on the site of where Oskaloosa now stands, April 15th, 1843; he came to the county to reside permanently, and found the site selected on the Des Moines, occupied and entered the one selected where Oskaloosa now stands as soon as he was permitted to; he owns 460 acres of land; he married Mary E. Jack, in 1853; she was born in Illinois, and died in 1857. He afterward married Frances A. Jack, in 1858; she was born in Illinois; has six children, Laura F., William J., Franklin P., Kittie, John and Jessie.

MOODY, JOHN, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Leighton; farm of 53 1/2 acres; was born in Carroll county, Ohio, January 12, 1829, and lived there until twenty-one years of age; he moved to Clayton county, Iowa, in 1850; lived there util June, 1872, and then came to this county; he married Miss Rebecca A. Laughlin, a native of the same county, February 2, 1854; they have four sons and four daughters: Mary O., William L., Rebecca E., John B., Adam E., Archie N., Sarah G. and Tinsey P.

MOORE, DAVID R., clerk of the courts of Mahaska county, Oskaloosa. Born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1840; he was brought up and received his education there and prepared himself for teaching; he commenced teaching when seventeen years of age; he came to Iowa in 1865 and located in this county, and was engaged in teaching for some years; he was elected clerk of the courts of this county in 1874, and re-elected in 1876, and again re-elected in 1878; he married Miss Nora King, from Washington county, Ohio, October 26, 1869.

MOORE, H. C., dealer in lumber, Oskaloosa. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, October 23, 1831; he was brought up in that State and lived there until 1856, when he came to Iowa and located at Waterloo; removed to Waverly and was elected clerk of the courts of Bremer county and held that office for six years, and also held town and school offices; he came to this county in 1868; has been engaged in the lumber business for the past three years; married Miss Elizabeth L. Parkhurst, from Norwalk, Ohio, in March, 1858; they have one daughter, Ella L.

MOORE, JOHN, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Rose Hill; owns 400 acres of land, valued at $28 per acre; born in Vigo county, Indiana, in 1824; came to Iowa in 1849, and located in White Oak township; removed to his present farm in 1852; married Catharine Letsey, in 1849; she was born in Park county, Indiana, in 1830; have ten children, four sons and six daughters: Edward V., Elma, Louisa, Mary E., Lovada, George B. M, Albert, Nina, Alfred and Siddie. Republican.

MOORE, ROBERT, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Eddyville; born in Beaver county, Pa., October, 1828; he lived there until 1866, and then came to this county; he married Miss Cynthia Devenna in December, 1860, a native of the same county; they have one son and three daughters, Ella, Alice, Henrietta, and a baby not named; is assessor and has been seven terms, and is also justice of the peace.

MOREHOUSE, CHARLES, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Oskaloosa; born in Onondagua county, New York, October 1, 1825, and was brought up in that State, and came to Chicago, and from there came to Iowa by wagon, and arrived in this city October 26, 1854; located in Black Oak township, and engaged in farming and stock raising; he moved on his present farm March 1, 1866; he owns a farm of 145 acres; has held the office of justice of the peace; married Miss Charlotte Adams, from Onondagua county, New York, September 9, 1847; they have five children, Charles W., Belle K., Bennett S. A., Cora F., Anna E.; they have lost two daughters and one son.

MORGAN, A. L., farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. White Oaks; he owns 135 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre; born in this county in 1848; married Lucinda Cox in 1870; she was born in Indiana, in 1846; have three children, Absalom N., Mary Minerva, and Lewis Madison; are members of the M. E. Church.

MORGAN, C. C., farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. White Oaks; was born in Mahaska county; is a son of L. B. Morgan, who was born in Va., in 1811, and came to Iowa in '36; was married to Sarah A. Smith in 1836; she was born in Wilson county, Tenn., in 1819; have six children, Francinia, Lydia, A. L., S. K., S., and C. C.

MORGAN, Dr. J. W., druggist and physician, Oskaloosa. Born in East Tennessee, November 20, 1836, and lived there unlil twenty-four years of age, when he came to Oskaloosa, November 27, 1860. Being engaged to open Spring Creek Institute, he continued in the management of the institution for eighteen months, and on account of failing health was obliged to retire and removed to Warren county and went on a farm; his health becoming restored he studied medicine and attended lectures in Cincinnati, and after graduating practiced his profession in Warren county until 1876, when he removed to this city and engaged in the drug business; he married Miss Lizzie Cox, from Indiana, in 1862; she died in 1872; he married Mrs. Col. McCowan, from Illinois, in 1876; she has one daughter, Anna.

MORRIS, D. C., physician and surgeon, New Sharon; born in Jackson county, Indiana, in 1834; came to this State in 1856; owns 80 acres of land; has practiced medicine fourteen years; has held office of postmaster; he married Miss Mary Painter in August, 1855; she was born in Greene county, Ohio; has five children, Ogburn J., Benford L., Albert A., Mary A., and D. Russell.

MOTT, G. M., farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Lacey; owns 85 acres of land valued at $40 per acre; was born in Knox county, Ohio, in 1837; came to Iowa in 1849; married Mary Grimes in 1858; she was born in Maryland, in 1837; they have three children, Eliza, Charlie B. and Walter; Mr. Mott has been justice of the peace.

MUNSILL, E., farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. New Sharon; born in Licking county, Ohio, 1821; came to this State in 1841, and to this county in 1843; he owns 320 acres of land; he has served as school director and as member of the city council; he married Miss R. Schuyler, in 1842; she was born in Kentucky, and died in 1850; he afterward married M. Phillips in 1852; she was born in New York; has seven children, Elizabeth, Mary, Ephraim, Corydon, Cary, Albert, and Charles.

MYERS, J. L., farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Rose Hill; owns 200 acres land, valued at $40 per acre; born in North Carolina, in 1822; came to Iowa in 1852, and settled in Adams township; removed to present farm in 1865; he married Weltha Fuller, in 1852; she was born in Ohio, in 1829; have four children: Syrena, Mary A., Roenna, and Joseph; he has been justice of the peace, assessor, trustee, constable, etc; are members of the Christian Church.

MYRICK, E. W., farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Eddyville; owns 344 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Athens county, Ohio, in 1825; came to Iowa in 1850, and settled on present farm; Mr. M. has been twice married; in 1850 he married Mary Grant, a native of Meigs county, Ohio; they had six children, Mary Francis, Caroline, James L., Martha M., Helen and Charles L; married again in 1875 to Susanna Smith, a native of Decatur county, Indiana. Mr. M. is a member of the board of supervisors, elected in 1877; Republican.