Visit the IAGenWeb!Visit the USGenWeb! Carroll County, Iowa
IAGenWeb  Project
Carroll County Genealogy

If you have information to share, please contact the  County Coordinator.

 

WWI: From the Press
News of Carroll County Boys & Important Local Issues

 

Transcribed and contributed by Joe Conroy.

[Coordinator's Note: Some of these transcriptions contain
language as it was written at the time and by today's
standards is not considered to be politically correct.]

 

The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

3 Oct 1918
Page 1

No Use to Expect Help From Camps

Granting of Furloughs for Farm Help Made Impossible By the Influenza Epidemic.

The farmers of Iowa will do well to make arrangements for harvesting their corn crops with such help as is now in sight, according to present appearances. The epidemic of Spanish influenza which is sweeping over the country has necessitated the quarantining of the various army camps, and therefore it will not be wise to depend too much on the chances of the boys in service getting home for corn husking. Furloughs can be granted in the usual way, because many men could be spared from the caps under normal conditions, but if the men are not to be allowed to leave the camps their furloughs will do them no good.

It was originally planned to release a large number of men for a few weeks to assist with the corn harvest, but this is now declared to be impossible at the present time, and it is not thought likely that it will be possible to raise the quarantine in time to be of any assistance whatsoever. The influenza is raging more fiercely from day to day, and while the government doctors have it well controlled so far as fatalities are concerned, it is by no means checked to the point where any definite date for raising the quarantine can be named.

Shipments of troops to France is said to have been stopped temporarily. The disease started in that country, first among the German soldiers and then among the Allies, but it has been checked to the point where army officials do not wish to take the risk of sending it back again, neither do they wish to assist in its spread among the civilian population by releasing men from infected camps. Therefore, farmers will do well not to depend much on getting help from the camps for corn husking.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

3 Oct 1918
Page 1

Camp Dodge Call Stopped By "Flu"

Entrainment of 106 Men From This County Is Cancelled

Camp Is Quarantined

Many Cases of Disease Reported There and No One May Enter or Leave Without Permission — Men Go Soon as Disease is Checked.

The call for the entrainment of 106 Carroll county boys for service at Camp Dodge between October 7 and October 11 has been cancelled. Spanish influenza is the reason given by Provost Marshal General Crowder, who has cancelled all calls for military service until the plague shall have been checked in the various army cantonments, where it is now said to be raging.

Camp Dodge is reported to be in extremely bad condition in this respect, and a few deaths there and elsewhere in army camps have been reported. The Great Lakes naval training school at Chicago is also said to be suffering severely. Camp Dodge was placed under quarantine Monday until the ravages of the disease can be checked, and no one may pass into or out of the camp without special permission from the commanding officer. Persons planning on making visits to the camp should bear this in mind.

The influenza is said to be an exceptionally bad case of the grippe in its nature. It runs its course in most cases in from three to five days. It is fatal in many cases, and even after the patient has recovered from the direct attack he is said to be in great danger of contracting pneumonia unless extreme precautions are taken to safeguard against this disease.

The men from this county who were included in the call may reasonably expect to receive another call as soon as the situation is cleared up. By that time, however, it is hoped that some of the other counties will have more Class One men and that they will be able to fill their proportionate share of the call and thus reduce Carroll county's proportions somewhat.

The official announcement of the cancellation of the call was made through the newspapers last Friday, and was received oficially by telegram in Carroll Saturday.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

3 Oct 1918
Page 1

First 24 Men in New Registration

Order Number Determined — Big Lottery Held Monday

Wilson Draws No. 322

That Number Held in Carroll County by Gerd Jansen, of Wheatland Township — Order Numbers of All Men Not Known at Present Time.

The big lottery to determine the order of service for the September 12 registrants was held in Washington on Monday of this week. President Wilson himself drew the first capsuls out of the box. It contained the number 322, which affected every registration district in the United States.

That number in Carroll county is held by Gerd Jansen, of Wheatland township, who receives his mail on Route 2, Wall Lake. Mr. Jansen, however, is 42 years of age and will not be affected by the call at present as only those from 19 to 36 are to be called at the present time. The next effective number in Carroll county is 1027, which is held by John Zurn, of Carroll. Wheatland township had the honor of being the home of the man who held the first number in the first registration, in June 1917.

Several thousand numbers were drawn, in order to accommodate those registration districts with the heavier populations. There are but 2373 men registered in Carroll county, and only those numbers below that figure apply in this county. Of the first hundred drawn at Washington, only 24 affect men in this county.

The full list of numbers is not at present known. Only the first hundred drawn were telegraphed to the newspapers, and the remainder will be mailed out to the local boards. These are expected to arrive within the next week or so. Up to the present time the only men in this county whose status can be obtained are as follows:


322 — Gerd Jansen, Rt., Wall Lake.
1027 — John Zurn, Carroll.
1697 — Henry Frahm, Manning.
438 — Jos. J. Haverkamp, Arcadia.
904 — John Selzer, Jr., Carroll.
1523 — Otto Behrens, Carroll.
1240 — Charles A. LaPort, Glidden.
1907 — William Steen, Manning.
20 — Alfred Dillavou, Glidden.
1255 — Allison G. McMullen, Glidden.
2132 — Thomas Warner, Dedham.
739 — Edward J. Scott, Carroll.
535 — Joseph Beyer, Carroll.
219 — George Huegerich, Carroll.
625 — Joseph B. Axman, Carroll.
72 — Geo. M. Stevenson, Lanesboro.
832 — M. A. Hoyt, Carroll.
964 — Harry F. Hannasch, Carroll.
348 — Herman E. Obmann, Breda.
4 — William Brown, Lohrville.
1961 — Martin Dozler, Templeton.
134 — Fred C. Mohr, Lake City.
395 — Tony L. Wand, Breda.
657 — Albert M. Copp, Carroll.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

17 Oct 1918
Page 1

Total Deaths From Flu At Camp Are 213

Community of 30,000 People Has Small Proportion — No Cause for Alarm.

Reports have been circulated in Carroll within the past few days to the effect that from fifty to sixty soldiers were dying every day at Camp Dodge from the influenza epidemic. These reports were no doubt spread as a result of the panic which has taken hold of the country, it being very easy to get an exaggerated view of things from misreading the reports in the daily papers.

It is very probable that someone innocently read in the Des Moines papers that from fifty to sixty new cases were being reported each day, and with the half attention that the public usually gives to newspaper statements interpreted the statement to mean that there were that many deaths. As a matter of fact, parents of soldiers at Camp Dodge have little to fear. The death rate there is much lower than it is in the city of Carroll, considering the number of people who have congregated there.

The government's official report issued Tuesday morning stated that in the 30 days previous there had been 213 deaths at the Camp from all causes — or less than seven per day. Take the average city of thirty to forty thousand people and compare it with these figures and one can see that Camp Dodge is in reality a very healthy place. The proportion of deaths in the city of Carroll has been greater than that during the past week, considering the relative populations of the two places.

The public is advised to refrain from becoming excited. The disease is under control in the army camps, and even in the city of Des Moines it is being definitely checked. There are fewer new cases each day, and the medical authorities believe that two or three weeks more will see conditions restored nearly to normal.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

17 Oct 1918
Page 1

Letter of Sympathy

The following letter of sympathy was received by Mrs. Nora Potter from Earnest B. Nelson, second lieutenant A. S. S. C., Commanding Headquarters, 628th Aero Supply Squadron:

Mrs. Nora Potter,

My Dear Mrs. Potter: The 628th Aero Supply Company wishes to express, through me, its sympathy to you and to Mrs. Carl E. Potter, for the loss of Private Carl E. Potter. We share his loss in common. He was a good soldier and an upright man, and served his country to the utmost.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

17 Oct 1918
Page 1

Albert Maneman


The body of Albert Manemann, son of John Manemann, of Breda, is expected to arrive in Carroll this evening. Mr. Manemann died while at sea, but no other particulars are available at this time.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

17 Oct 1918
Page 1

Carl Hamill Dead

R. J. Hamill received a telegram this morning stating that his son, Carl, had died at Nitro, West Virginia, where he was a student in the navy school. A letter received by the parents from Carl last Saturday bore news of a slight indisposition from influenza. Carl stated however that he was in the hospital and would be all right in a few days. Yesterday a message was received stating that Carl was in a critical condition.

The news of his death is a hard shock to the family and friends. Before volunteering for the navy Carl was employed in Strohm's store and was a favorite with the general public. No arrangements for the funeral could be made at the time of going to press.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

17 Oct 1918
Page 1

Death of Carl Potter

The remains of Carl Potter, of Aviation Field No. 1, who died last week at Hempstead, Long Island, arrived in the city Tuesday afternoon and burial was made Wednesday from the Mellott undertaking parlors. He was taken sick with influenza which developed into pneumonia, the whole length of his sickness being about two weeks. His mother, Mrs. Arthur Potter, of Jefferson, was with him at the time of his death.

Carl Potter was born in Iowa, November 3, 1889, and on the tenth of February, 1909, was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Stammeyer, of this city. Besides his wife he leaves two small daughters, Maxine and Margaret.

Mr. Potter volunteered his services to the government December 5, 1917, and was called into service on the fifteenth. He made advancement in the army and had it not been for his untimely death would have forged ahead in the service for his country.
His body was accompanied to Carroll by one of his close friends at camp and his company sent a beautiful wreath of roses.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

17 Oct 1918
Page 1

Ames Call Cancelled

The call for the entrainment of ten men for the motor mechanics school at Ames last Tuesday was canelled by the authorities. Ames is now under quarantine on account of the epidemic, and no more men will be received at the college until the quarantine is lifted. The call for the entrainment of 78 men for Ft. McArthur, California, had not been cancelled up to Tuesday noon, but there was some reason for belief that it would be before the end of the week.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

24 Oct 1918
Page 1

Private Fred W. Franzwa, who is stationed at the Great Lakes writes that he has successfully passed the examination for entrance into the Mechanical Scool of the Aviation. About half of the company to which he and Mr. Seyller belonged qualified for entrance. They expect to be sent to school in a week or two.


The Carroll Times
Carroll, Iowa

24 Oct 1918
Page 1

Call is Cancelled

The call for 78 men from Carroll county to entrain during the five-day period beginning October 21 was cancelled by wire last Friday on account of the influenza epidemic. However, the adjutant in cancelling the call advised the men included in it to hold themselves in readiness, as the call would be reinstated and the men sent as soon as conditions will permit.

Return to the Table of Contents

These pages were designed and are maintained by IAGenWeb, solely for the use and benefit of the IAGenWeb Project, a part of the USGenWeb Project.
Copyright 1997 by IAGenWeb & the Contributor of the specific information.   Rootsweb Please read the IAGenWeb Terms, Conditions, & Disclaimer  — all of which apply to Carroll Co.

Back to top of page                             Return to Carroll Co. IAGenWeb Home                             Back to top of page

Photo background collage is made from colorized penny postcards donated to the USGenWeb Archives