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GERMAN FAMILY OBITUARIES
From Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language Newspaper
Published between about 1874 and 1920
These bios are from a special 25th Anniversary Edition of  September 20, 1899

A thru G

Translated & Contributed by David Reineke

 

I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 15 November 1895. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

B. H. Ahrling

On Tuesday the 5th of November, B. H. Ahrling died in Wheatland Township at the age of 86. The deceased leaves behind a son, Heinrich, and four daughters, Mrs. Benedict Determann, Mrs. B. Sanders, Mrs. H. Schulte, and Mrs. F. Scherbring. One daughter, Mrs. J. Herbers, and his own wife, predeceased him several years ago. Our deepest sympathies to the bereved.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 15 October 1909. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Clara Achatz

On Thursday, the 7th of October, Mrs. Clara Achatz died at the home of her son-in-law, John Jost, in the First Ward, after having received the Last Rights of the Roman Catholic Church.

The deceased was born on the 5th of December 1829 at Schlitstadt, Alsace-Lorraine. As a young girl, she immigrated to America with her parents in 1844. The family settled in Mendota, Illinois. In 1856, she married Mr. Herman Jos. Achatz. This marriage produced three children who are still living, namely: Maria, Mrs. Wilhelm Sonntag, residing in Kansas; Anna, Mrs. John Jost, residing in Carroll; and Katharina, Mrs. Carl Herman, also living in Carroll. Her husband died in May of 1892.

During the last 16 years, the deceased lived locally with her daughter, Mrs. John Jost, and family.

The funeral took place on Saturday at the local Saints Peter and Paul Church.

May she rest in peace.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 6 April 1894. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

[Halbur]
Peter Bellinghausen

Unfortunately, we must report the death of one of the citizens of Halbur, our dear friend Peter Bellinghausen. He had been sick since late last fall, but due to his exceptional strength and virility, even his fellow-citizens and friends did not suspect that this illness would cause his untimely death. According to the statements of several doctors, the illness was gallstones. It steadily became more severe from week to week, and despite the best care from family and doctors, no change for the better could be brought about. With the worsening of his condition, his confidence finally declined, and his proverbial cheerfulness turned into a still resignation. Several doctors advised the patient that his last and only hope was to have an operation, and, after he had received Last Rights from his spiritual advisor, Rev. Father Frey of Roselle, he decided to follow this advice. Therefore, he went to Carroll on 26 March in order to undergo the operation by the skilled surgeon, Dr. Wright. Although the difficult operation was a success, due to the progression of the illness, it did not have the desired result, and eight days ago today at 9:00 in the morning, he gave over his soul into the hands of his Creator. The loss is certainly great to his wife and two young children, as well as his parents-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. König, his brother Fritz living in Arkansas, and parents and siblings in Germany. All the residents of Halbur and the vicinity also mourn with the survivors over the loss of their honest friend. The funeral, one of the largest ever to occur in Halbur, took place on Sunday, the 1st of April, and the body was transported to Hillsdale [Roselle], where the deceased was interred in the local cemetery under the officiating of the Rev. Father Frey. A solemn requiem for the rest of the deceased’s soul was celebrated by Rev. Father Frey on Monday morning at 8:30 at the Catholic Church in Hillsdale.

NOTES: The Roselle cemetery records list Peter Bellinghausen, born 3 Nov 1852, and died 30 Mar 1894.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 29 December 1882. I have not changed the name or place spellings, and have added some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Theresia Berger

On Tuesday morning, Mrs. Theresia Berger, wife of Franz Berger, died in Kniest Township at the age of 77 years. The deceased was born in 1805 at Hercksheim near Landau, in the Bavarian Palatinate. In 1855, she and her husband immigrated to Illinois, and they came to Black Hawk County, Iowa in 1856, where they lived until 1870. In 1870, they moved to Kniest Township. She leaves behind a grieving husband and a large number of children and grandchildren. She leaves this life loved and respected by all, and she will be deeply missed by everyone who knew her. The funeral was Thursday.

NOTES: The town where she was born is probably “Herxheim bei Landau,” about 10 to 15 miles northwest of Karlsruhe. It is in the area of Germany called Rheinpfalz, or in English, the Palatinate. After 1815, the area was ruled by the King of Bavaria, so it is sometimes called the Bavarian Palatinate.



I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 27 March 1903. I have attached a scanned copy below. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added some notes at the end. It reads as follows:


Johann Bernard Brinks

Johann Bernard Brinks died at an advanced age last Monday in Roselle following an illness of nearly three months. The deceased was born near Coesfeld, Westphalia, Germany on 23 December 1814. He married in 1842, and in 1870 he immigrated to America with his family and settled in Ft. Atkinson, Winneshiek County, Iowa. Afterwards, he moved to Festina in the same county. In 1880, he came to Carroll County and lived on a farm in Pleasant Valley Township. About 15 years ago, he moved with his only daughter to Roselle, where he has lived since then. Here, his wife also preceded him in death about 11 years ago.

At his grave mourn four sons and a daughter, namely: Barney, residing near Ossian, Winneshiek County; Joseph, Henry, John, and Lizzie. The three latter sons are well-known and respected farmers in Pleasant Valley Township. The daughter Lizzie remained with her parents and cared for them with filial love.

The deceased was very beloved and respected by all who knew him. He was 88 years and three months old. His children were gathered around him at his death and he recognized them up to the last moment.

The burial took place yesterday, Thursday, at the cemetery in Roselle, with a large number of relatives and acquaintances in attendance.

NOTES: The article misspelled the last name. It should be spelled Brincks. I believe his wife’s name was Anna Elisabeth Baumann (born 1816, and died 1892). She is also buried in Roselle.



I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 25 June 1897. I have not changed the name or place spellings, and have added some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Clara Bruening

Mrs. Henry Bruening of Roselle Township died on Thursday morning at two o’ clock after she had received Last Rights. The cause of death is apparently old age, as the deceased was 78 years old. She was the mother of Mrs. Henry Kennebeck, as well as of Mrs. John Kennebeck who had preceded her in death. The funeral will take place on Saturday morning at nine o’ clock in Willey. Our deepest sympathies to the bereaved survivors.

NOTES: Clara Bruening was married to Henry Bruening. They were both born in Germany. They had at least two daughters, Mary, who married John W. Kennebeck in 1874, and Elisabeth, who married Henry Kennebeck in 1884. Clara Bruening’s tombstone in the Willey cemetery says she was born on 18 October 1812 and died on 24 June 1897.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 1 December 1893. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

[From Breda]
Elisabeth Brüning

Following a 10-week illness, the Lord of Life and Death has seen fit to call our respected fellow-citizen Elisabeth Brüning, at the age of 60 years, to be with him in Eternity. She passed away last Saturday evening at 8:00, in the company of her children, grandchildren and relatives. Her husband, Bernard Brüning, predeceased her on 11 May 1891. Both were born in Hannover [Hanover], came to America in their younger years, and lived 23 years in Grant County, Wisconsin, where their marriage was blessed with 10 children. When this town [probably Breda] was created, they first settled 16 years ago near Breda and later in the town. She is survived by four sons: Heinrich, Hermann, Bernard, and Franz, as well as two daughters: Mrs. H. Wübben, and Mrs. Joseph Gietz, all from here. Four children have already paved the way to the better hereafter. The solemn burial took place last Tuesday at the local cemetery, at which about 400 mourners took part. R. I. P.


I found the following obituary on line. It was originally published in November 1980 in the Lusk Herald, in Lusk, Wyoming.

Elizabeth Regina Bruch
(October 13, 1876 - November 4, 1980)

The Lusk Herald
November 1980

Elizabeth Bruch

Elizabeth Bruch, Niobrara’s oldest resident at the age of 104, died Tuesday at the Niobrara Nursing Home where she had been a resident for eight years.

Rosary is being held this Thursday evening and Mass for Christian Burial will be Friday.

Elizabeth Regina Bruch was born October 13, 1876, at Mt. Carmel, Carroll County, Iowa. She was the fourth of twelve children born to Anton Bruch and Bernadina Goedde Bruch. Both parents were immigrants to the United States from Germany, crossing the Atlantic Ocean in sailing ships.

Elizabeth received her early education at the Mt. Carmel rural school. Later, when the family left the farm and moved to Carroll City, she attended St. Peter and Paul Convent School where she became interested in singing in the church choir. She enjoyed this as long as she was able to sing.

In early spring, 1894, the family left Iowa and established a farm home near Oakdale, Antelope County, Neb. It was here that Elizabeth was first employed by Wolfe & Bros., as a salesclerk. Because shops at the time did not carry ladies ready-to-wear, there was need for seamstresses. Elizabeth became interested in sewing and she herself became an accomplished seamstress. On occasion Elizabeth would live with a family during which time she sewed for each family member. One person in particular that Elizabeth outfitted was the mother of Darrell Zannuch, a famous producer of silent movies in the 1920’s.

In 1906, the Bruchs moved to Sturgis, S. D. Elizabeth found immediate employment as a clerk in The General Store, and later became manager of the New York Store, a ladies ready-to-wear branch of the Deadwood store.

After store hours Elizabeth sewed for many of her customers. The wife of a doctor at Ft. Meade contacted her to make a complete summer wardrobe. The woman was going with her husband to the Panama Canal. He had been transferred there to help fight the malaria outbreak which took so many lives.

Weekends were a busy time roaming the beautiful Black Hills and exploring the many caves located in the hills.

In 1910, the family moved further west. This time to homestead in the newly established Niobrara County which had formerly been a part of Converse County.

When the family arrived there was no Catholic church. Mass was said twice a month at the Oddfellows Hall with a priest from Douglas officiating.

In 1911, a year before St. Leo’s was built, Father Ignatuis Berna assisted in forming the first Altar Society of which Elizabeth was a charter member. Elizabeth was quite active in church affairs and sang in the church choir for years.

Life on the homestead was quiet, so many hours were spent doing needlework, much of which was donated to the church for bazaars and other fund raising projects.

Elizabeth had many hobbies which included textile painting and photo tinting. She spent endless hours working with her garden and flowers and still found time to be an active member of the Divide Tumbleweed Extension Club. The club was established in 1936 and Elizabeth was a charter member.

During the ten presentations of “The Legend of the Rawhide” Elizabeth played a prominent role as an Indian squaw. She helped with the preparation of the presentation.

Until eight years ago Elizabeth made her home at the Bruch ranch east of Lusk. However, following injuries incurred in a fall, Elizabeth has been a resident of the Niobrara County Nursing Home.

Rosary is being held this Thursday, Nov. 6 at the Peet Mortuary Chapel at 7:00 p.m. Mass for Christian Burial will be Friday, Nov. 7, at St. Leo’s Catholic Church with the Reverend Bernard Bianco officiating beginning at 10:00 a.m.

Minerva Watson will be organist, while Jeroldine Waldock sings “Ave Maria” and “Panis Angelicus”.

Interment will be in the Lusk Cemetery. Pallbearers are Chuck Bruch, Joe Bruch, Gregg Bruch, John Bruch, Bernard Bruch, and Joe Bruch. Honorary bearers are Paul Pfister, Harry Austin, William Miller, Ernie Hansen, Bill Bredthauer, Albert Ruffing and Leslie ZumBrunnen.

Elizabeth is survived by two brothers, Albert, Cheyenne, Carl, Lusk; and one sister, Pauline, also of Lusk and many nieces


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 25 October 1895. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Maria A. Brüning

On Monday night at 10:30, Maria A. Brüning, whose maiden name was Arts, passed away after having received the Last Rights of her religion. She was 56 years and 6 months old. The deceased was born on 11 April 1839 in Jo Davis County, Wisconsin.

She married Clemens Brüning on 25 November 1856, and the marriage produced six sons: Herm. J., Bern. J., Franz, August, Anton, Georg, and six daughters: Mrs. J. Bohnenkamp, Mrs. J. H. Gnam, Christina M., Emily A., Annie, and Julia. Herm., Bernh., Christina, and Emelia [sic] preceded her in death. Although we are deeply pained to report this death, we may openly and happily say that the deceased was a dear mother and wife in the fullest sense. She was always concerned for the physical and spiritual well being of her family. She was a support to her husband, a model to her children, and a Christian family-woman to her neighbors. Although the Lord blessed her with abundance, she was always careful and modest. Such a wife and mother can and may hope for God’s mercy, and may the Lord grant her eternal rest. The funeral celebration took place under the direction of the Rev. Father Schulte in the Catholic Church with numerous siblings, relatives and friends in !
attendance.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 27 March 1903. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Maria Gertrud Bült

Mrs. Maria Gertrud Bült died last Sunday in Roselle a the age of 65. The deceased was born on 6 July 1837 in the parish of Ankum, County of Berkenbrück, Westphalia, Germany. She married her husband in 1863. The family came to America in 1889 and purchased a farm close to Roselle, where the elderly couple had lived up to now.

The deceased leaves behind her spouse and five children, namely: Katharina, Mrs. August Sibbel; Anna, Mrs. Henry Loxterkamp; Heinrich; Herman; and Theodor. Heinrich married a daughter of Anton Soppe and lives east of Templeton. Both of the other sons still live with their father on the farm.

The burial took place yesterday in Roselle, with a large attendance by neighbors.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 5 February 1909. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Herman Heinrich Bült

On Tuesday, Herman Heinrich Bült died in Roselle Township as a consequence of old age after receiving the Last Rights of the Roman Catholic Church.

The deceased was born in October 1827 in Ankum, Hanover, Germany.

In 1864, he married Miss Maria Gertrude Hetzler [or possibly Hessler]. In 1889, he immigrated to America with his family and settled on a farm in Roselle Township where he lived up to the present.

His wife died on 22 March 1903. Likewise, one daughter died at a young age. The deceased is survived by his sons, Heinrich Bült of Templeton, Herman of Halbur, and Theodor in Roselle, as well as two daughters, Katharina, Mrs. Aug. Sibbel of Washington Township, and Anna, Mrs. Heinrich Loxterkamp, of Roselle. Since the death of his spouse, he had lived with the family of his son Theodor, who had purchased his father’s old homestead.

Mr. Bült was a devout Catholic, an attentive father, and a good citizen, who enjoyed the highest respect of his acquaintances.

The funeral took place on Friday morning, at about 9:30 at the St. Schutzengel [Guardian Angel, today called Holy Angels] Church in Roselle, and his earthly remains were laid to their final rest in the Catholic cemetery beside his wife, who had predeceased him. May he rest in peace.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 20 October 1909. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Katharina Caspary

On Wednesday morning, the 27th of October, Mrs. Katharina Caspary died at her home in Maple River, after having received the Last Rights of the Roman Catholic Church.

The deceased, whose maiden name was Mönch, was born in Altenahr, District of Koblenz, Rhineland, on the 1st of January 1829. She married Mr. Jakob Caspary in Altenahr on the 20th of September 1853. This marriage produced 11 children, of whom the following are still living: Karl Caspary, in Maple River; Friedrich Caspary, in Los Angeles, California; Louise, Mrs. L. Simons, in Herrick, South Dakota; and Helena, Mrs. Engelbert Rust, of Arcadia Township. She is also survived by 19 grandchildren.

In September 1880, Mr. and Mrs. Caspary immigrated to America and settled in Maple River, Iowa, where their sons, who had already immigrated to America, had prepared a home for their parents. Her husband died 5 years ago at the advanced age of 79 years. Since then, the deceased had lived with her son Karl Caspary.

Due to her uprightness, honesty, and gracious and calm manner, the deceased enjoyed universal respect and popularity.

The direct cause of her death was apoplexy, with which she was stricken on Saturday. Since she had already passed her 80th year, her constitution was too weak to recover from this attack, and she died on Wednesday morning.

The funeral will take place on Saturday morning, the 30th of October. A Requiem will be held at 8:00 a.m. in the Saint Francis Church in Maple River, after which the remains will be taken to the Saints Peter and Paul Church here. After a Low Mass here, the body will be interred at the Saints Peter and Paul Cemetery beside her husband and two grandchildren who predeceased her.

May she rest in peace.


I translated the following obituary of Henry Dopheide from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 21 February 1902. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added some information in brackets and some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Henry Dopheide

Early on Sunday morning, Henry Dopheide, an old settler of Carroll County, died suddenly in Roselle Township. He always had a robust health for his age. He went to bed in the evening, and around midnight he complained of severe pain in his left side. His elderly wife wanted to cook him some warm tea, but he declined, thinking the pain would soon subside. Around three o’clock, his wife heard that he was having difficulty breathing. When she looked in on him, he was already nearly in the better life beyond. The deceased was born on 28 October 1822 at Ankum, District of Osnabrueck, Hanover, Germany, and was therefore 79 years, 3 months and 19 days old. He immigrated to America in 1868 and came to Dubuque County, Iowa. He remained there until 1873, when he and his family moved to Carroll County, where he had since resided on his farm in Roselle Township. He leaves behind a wife and six children: Henry, living in the Indian Territory; Herman, living on the farm n!
ear Templeton; Gerhard, also living on a farm near Templeton; Marie, married to John Bierl; Johann; and Bernard. He achieved prosperity through hard work on his farm. He was still a robust man for his age, and no one would have believed that his life would have ended so soon. He was buried on Wednesday, with a large number in attendance, in Roselle. Peace to his soul.

NOTES: The town of Ankum is in the northwestern part of Germany, about 15 or 20 miles north of Osnabrueck.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 21 December 1894. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added some information in brackets and notes at the end. It reads as follows:

H. F. Garrels

H. F. Garrels of Wheatland Township died last Saturday following a short illness at the advanced age of 72 years. The deceased was a very respected man who had gained many friends due to his love of justice and integrity. He leaves behind eight children: Mrs. G. von Glan, Mrs. Frank Younker, Mrs. John Gaiz, and two other daughters who live in Illinois, as well as sons William and Herman in Wheatland Township, and a son in Arkansas. In 1876, the Garrels family moved to Wheatland Township from Freeport, Illinois, and since that time they have lived here in Carroll County. The burial takes place today, Friday, on the same day that he would have become 72 years old. Our sympathy to the survivors.

NOTES: Cemetery records list his date of birth as 21 December 1822, and his date of death as 16 December 1894. The 1880 census lists his birth place as Germany.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 29 March 1895. I have not changed the name or place spellings, and have added some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

 





 

 

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