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GERMAN FAMILY OBITUARIES
From Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language Newspaper
Published between about 1874 and 1920
These bios are from a special 25th Anniversary Edition of  September 20, 1899

H thru M

Translated & Contributed by David Reineke

I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 12 July 1901. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Maria Halbur

As readers of the correspondence from Halbur have learned, the widow Halbur, who lived a few miles south of Halbur, died last Monday morning after having suffered a stroke on Sunday morning. She was born on the 17th of March 1848 in Cincinnati , and on the 3rd of October 1865, she married her husband, Heinrich Halbur, who preceded her in death a few years ago. In 1873, she came with her husband to Roselle Township where he purchased an 80-acre farm and erected the necessary buildings. Through hard work, the family increased its real estate to 480 acres. Mrs. Halbur was a dear wife to her husband. She was a sensible and wise mother who raised her children to be pious. And so her children clung to her with great tenderness. She led a quiet and domestic life because she found full happiness in the circle of her children. She leaves behind four grown children: Heinrich, Anton, Johann, and Anna. Peace to her soul.

NOTES: Roselle cemetery records list: Maria Halbur, died 8 July 1901, age 53 years, 3 months, 21 days; Heinrich Halbur, died 26 September 1898, age 61 years, 5 months, 28 days
 

I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 29 March 1895. I have not changed the name or place spellings, and have added some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Hans Jens Hansen

Hans Jens Hansen, who had reached the age of 80 years, one month and 16 days, died on Saturday afternoon around five o’clock at the home of his son, Mr. Jens Hansen.

The deceased was born on 31 January 1815 in Osterburgum, Schleswig, [in Germany] and came to America in 1872, where he settled at first in Clinton County. In 1883, he came to this area, where, with short breaks, he lived with his son. The wife of the deceased, whose maiden name was Ingeborg Edleffsen, preceded him in death in 1880. He leaves behind two sons, Jens and Soenke, and one daughter, Christine, who is married to Breder Hansen.

The burial took place on Monday afternoon, at two o’clock at the Manning cemetery, with a large number of people in attendance. The weight of the years had been heavy on the old gentleman, and toward the end he was always in poor health, until on Saturday he was called from his long pilgrimage and passed away gently into the Kingdom of Spirits. May the earth be light on him.

NOTES: I cannot find a town called Osterburgum, but today Schleswig is part of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein in the far northern part of Germany, bordering on Denmark.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 10 January 1896. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article. It reads as follows:

C. F. Herrmann

On last Saturday the worthy Pastor of the Lutheran Community in Arcadia was laid to his final rest. A large number of mourners assembled, and many admirers of the deceased even traveled from Carroll to Arcadia to pay their last respects to the deceased Pastor. Three brother pastors were present, namely: Reverend Pastor Studd from Lucerne, Iowa; Amstein of Charter Oak, Iowa; and Lothringen of Denison, Iowa. The Reverend Pastor Studd, who many years ago introduced his colleague to the ministry, delivered the sermon, which made a deep impression on the listeners. The deceased was born on 27 June 1843 in Sachsen Weimar, came to America in 1869, and pursued his studies in St. Louis Missouri. As a pastor, he worked initially in Benton County, Iowa, and in 1884 came to Arcadia in Carroll County, where he worked steadily since then. Just as he was eager in his service, never shying from the hardship of the weather to visit his district missions and preach the word of God, thou!
gh in recent times he was somewhat feeble and in failing health, so also was he respectful to everyone. He was a man of God who accumulated no wealth to be consumed by rust or moths, but all his effort went to earn treasure for Heaven, and so he died poor in worldly goods. At his grave mourn his grieving wife, 4 daughters, and a son-in-law, the Reverend Pastor Theis. One son preceded him into eternity. A mother of advanced age who still lives in Germany will hardly survive the painful death of her son.

The following obituary for John Reineke was published in the Carroll Times Herald on October 11, 1916. He was born Johann Caspar Reineke in Steinheim, Westphalia, Germany. He came to the United States around 1865, and went by “John”. I have made some corrections to the spellings. For example, the paper misspelled the last name as “Reincke.” Other additions/corrections are in
0 brackets.


I translated the following obituary for Mrs. J. G. Hermsen from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 2 June 1899. I have not changed the name spellings. It reads as follows:

Mrs. J. G. Hermsen

The respected wife of Mr. J. G. Hermsen died on Tuesday evening at seven o’clock in Carroll Township, as a consequence of a long-term stomach illness, after having received Last Rights from Father Luehrsman of Mt. Carmel. The deceased was born in the province of Hannover in 1845. She was happily married to Mr. Hermsen for 24 years, and in addition to her grieving husband, she leaves behind four children, Johann Herm., Maria, Anna, and Albert. At the time we write this article, it is not yet certain when the burial will take place, but it may be this morning at nine o’clock at the churchyard in Mt. Carmel, when the Requiem Mass is celebrated in St. Mary’s Church. To the grieving survivors who have lost a dear wife and a loving mother, our deepest sympathies.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 31 January 1902. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added information in brackets and some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

[Michael Hermann]

On Monday morning, Michael Hermann died at the advanced age of 85, following a long illness, at the home of his son-in-law, Sam Williamson, in the Fourth Ward. The deceased was born on 21 December 1816, at Lustbrunn, District of Mergentheim, Wuerttemberg. He immigrated to America in 1848 and landed in Philadelphia. From there, he went to Illinois, and later in 1866, he came to Boone County, Iowa, where he remained until 1874. In the spring of that year, he came to Carroll County and stayed here two months. In the spring of 1875, he brought his family to Carroll County and lived on a farm one-and-a-half miles northeast of Carroll, until 11 years ago, when he made his home with his son-in-law, Sam Williamson. He leaves behind five children: M. R. Hermann; Abbie, wife of Adam Williams in Washington Township; J. C. Hermann; E. G. Hermann; and Kate, wife of Sam Williamson, with whom he lived until the end. He was one of the oldest readers of the “Carroll Demokrat. E2 !
If we are not mistaken, he had been a reader since the first year of publication. The funeral took place yesterday morning, Thursday, at Saints Peter and Paul Church. A large number of friends and acquaintances had gathered to pay their final respects. Peace to his soul.

NOTES: The article mentions the town of “Lustbrunn” in the district of “Mergentheim,” in the German state of Wuertemberg. Wuertemberg is in the southwest part of Germany. I think the towns are actually “Bad Mergentheim,” about 25 miles southwest of Wuerzburg, and “Lustbronn,” just a few miles southwest of Bad Mergentheim.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 10 April 1896. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Mrs. Matt. Hoffmann (Hoffman)

The funeral of Mrs. Matt. Hoffmann, who died last week as a consequence of an operation she underwent in Chicago, took place Saturday afternoon at two o’clock. The deceased had suffered for several years from headaches, which occasionally were so strong that she had to lie in bed. Last winter she visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Wingert, in Wayne, Nebraska, and according to the elderly gentleman, the old illness had improved significantly. In any case, she wanted to be completely free of the illness, and so she went to Chicago and consulted with a well-known surgeon who later gave her the assurance that an operation was the only hope of curing her suffering. Mrs. Hoffmann finally decided to undergo the operation because she hoped finally to be freed from the illness. And the doctor was correct, for a short time after the operation she was freed from suffering for eternity, and she now sleeps in the Catholic Cemetery in Carroll, at the side of her husband w!
ho predeceased her a few years ago, mourned by all her relatives, friends and acquaintances.

NOTES: The last name may be spelled “Hoffman.” Carroll Cemetery records list Matthias Hoffman, 14 June 1853 to 27 November 1892, and Marla A. Hoffman, 22 October 1857 to 2 April 1896.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 10 April 1896. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Bernhard Hüssmann

The duties of a newspaper man are not always pleasant, but they are especially difficult when he must report the death of a dear and honest friend, and that is what the deceased Bernhard Hüssmann was to us. Our friend had been sick for a long time, and despite attentive care and the treatment of the best doctors, he gradually worsened until he passed away Sunday morning, when, surrounded by his dear wife, his two daughters, and friends, he gave his soul over to his Creator. The news of this worthy man’s death was received with sorrow in Roselle, Halbur, and everywhere he was known. Everywhere it was felt that with the death of such a universally respected man, that the entire community was suffering. The deceased was one of the earliest settlers of Roselle Township. He came to Dubuque County from Appelhülsen, in the Westphalian Münsterland, where his cradle stood. And after a short stay of a few years, he came to Carroll County, where he had live!
d uninterrupted for 21 years. The burial took place Tuesday morning at the Catholic cemetery in Roselle, after which the solemn requiem was conducted by Rev. Father Frey. The funeral was very large and demonstrated how beloved the deceased was everywhere. Our deepest sympathy to the bereaved.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 19 Jul 1895. I have not changed the name or place spellings, and have added some information in brackets and notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Chas. Kanne

The news that our esteemed friend and fellow-citizen Chas. Kanne had died spread like a prairie fire Sunday morning. He passed away about 3:00 a.m. in the company of his spiritual advisor, his beloved family, and several good friends.

Just over a year ago, the deceased became ill with Bellrose [a sickness that I cannot find in a German dictionary, but could be erysipelas], and from this sickness a type of cancer developed on one side of the throat. Although he was operated on several times by the best surgeons and the most renowned doctors from here, from Chicago and from other places were consulted, the terrible sickness constantly continued to grow in his throat until a few days ago his windpipe was affected, and swallowing solid food became almost impossible. The doctors had already noted that the sickness had made its way ever deeper, affecting a major blood vessel, and that death could occur at any time. Although this was understood, death nevertheless came too quickly; the separation from his dear wife and innocent children came too swiftly. Around midnight, he had called to his wife and informed her that he was bleeding badly. Mrs. Kanne no doubt realized that the dreaded hour had arrived. Th!
e bleeding was so heavy that the afflicted probably also felt death drawing near. Around 3:00 a.m., his heart stopped, which during his life had been so unselfish toward his wife and children and so full of love for his parents and so warm for his friends and acquaintances.

The extremely large funeral was Thursday morning. For several years he had been a member of the Roman Catholic Protective Society of Iowa, a member of the German Club [Germania Verein], and the founder of the Carroll Gymnastics Club [Turn Verein]. The clubs had chosen committees which met together in order to ensure that the funeral of their dear friend was as impressive and as beautiful as possible. Each club named two pallbearers: the Rifle Club [Schutzverein] named Mr. Chas. Ludwig and Mr. Seb. Walz; the German Club named Jos. Kempker [or Kemyker] and Fred. Franzwa; the Gymnastics Club named Vic. Janssen and Ph. Kaib. The respective clubs assembled in their club houses and stationed themselves on Main Street, and from there, preceded by the Union Band (which was arranged for by the Gymnastics Club), they marched to the home of the deceased. After the members of the various clubs had looked one last time upon the countenance of their dear friend, they formed the funer!
al procession, with the Gymnastics Club (which was founded by the deceased) and Band in the lead, followed by the German Club. The members of the Rifle Club marched as an honor guard along both sides of the hearse. And then the close relatives, friends, and associates of the deceased followed in buggies. The funeral procession was endless, and more and more buggies joined in on the way to Saints Peter and Paul Church. After the procession reached the church and the body had been blessed by the Rev. Father Nacke, and the relatives, various clubs, and mourners had taken their seats, a solemn mass was celebrated for the rest of the deceased’s soul. Then the priest read a very moving sermon wherein he expounded on the fate of humanity. As this dignified service ended, the funeral procession formed again and marched to the Catholic cemetery, where the dearly departed was entrusted to the sacred earth. In conclusion, the singing section of the Gymnastics Club sang !
a fitting funeral song, bringing the ceremony to a close. Our deepest
sympathies to the survivors.

NOTES: The 1895 census lists a Charles Kanne, age 28 and born in Germany, with wife Eva, age 21 and born in Germany, and children Joseph age 2, and John age 1, both born in Carroll. The cemetery records list him as Karl Kanne, 1866-1895.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 28 January 1898. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Theodor Kerper

After suffering for several months from a heart ailment, which was also complicated by pneumonia, Theodor Kerper passed away in Willey Saturday morning at 10:00, surrounded by his children and grandchildren. The deceased, who had received Last Rights from his pastor, was born on 16 June 1828 in Sülem, County of Bitburg, Province of Rhine Prussia [also called Rhenish Prussia]. In 1869, he emigrated from the old fatherland to America and settled in Fayette County, Iowa, where he remained for 10 years. Thereafter, he moved to Pleasant Valley Township in this county and was one of the first founders of the town of Willey in that township. For many years he conducted a general merchandise business and was assigned the office of postmaster by the government. When the infirmities of old age became noticeable, he retired completely from business. On 6 March 1897, he suffered a severe loss by having his dear life’s companion taken from his side by death. On that d!
ay he felt as if a part of himself had been taken and that the other part also would soon be called away. And when, just two days before his death, his caring children tried to inspire him with courage for a good recovery, he announced his satisfaction to soon pass away and be united again with his dear spouse in a better hereafter. He died quietly, devoted to God. The death of the deceased is mourned by two sons, Johann and Jakob Kerper, who both live in and near Willey, and one daughter, Mrs. Gertrud Wurzer, as well as several grandchildren. The funeral took place Tuesday morning at 9:00. The Rev. Father Gehling celebrated a solemn funeral service and on the occasion gave a moving sermon. Thereafter, the earthly remains were laid to their final rest amid an innumerable crowd of mourners.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 15 November 1895. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Valentine Kries

Old “Vater Kries” in Sheridan Township, father of Nickolaus, John and Mrs. Underberg, died Sunday afternoon in the company of his family at the advanced age of 78 years. The deceased was an old settler of Carroll County and all who knew him loved and respected old “Vater Kries.” The burial took place Tuesday morning from the Catholic Church in Mt. Carmel, where the Rev. Father Lührsmann celebrated a solemn funeral service for the rest of the soul of the deceased. The active participation in the burial by friends and relatives, neighbors and acquaintances of the deceased was a testament to how highly regarded the deceased was. Our deepest sympathies to the bereaved.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 14 February 1902. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added explanations in brackets and some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Johann Klocke

Johann Klocke, whose sudden death we reported last week, was born on 9 March 1839 at Ralfzen [should be Rolfzen], County of Hoeckster [should be Hoexter], District of Minden, Westphalia. Thus, he would have reached 63 years old on 9 March. He entered military service in 1861, and was assigned to the battalion of riflemen [or sharpshooters] at Minden. In 1864, he took part in the war with Denmark, and in 1868 he participated in the war against Austria. In both wars, he received honors for loyalty and bravery, of which he was always very proud, as he had a right to be. In 1869, he left his Fatherland and immigrated to America, where in 1871 he married Theresia Spieker in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. He lived there until 1879, and then he moved with his family to Carroll County. He bought a farm in the southern part of Carroll Township, where he lived up to the time of his death. The marriage produced 11 children, eight girls and three boys, as follows: Elisabeth, marri!
ed to Bernard Potthoff; Theresia, married to Johann Bengfort; Joseph Klocke, married to Maria Stalla; and the unmarried children, Johann, Anna, Amalia, Sophia, Katharina, Anton, and Rosalia. [One of the girls is apparently not named in the article] His wife survives him. His family was devoted to him with great affection, and loses a dear family father. He was an old settler and a respected and beloved citizen. At every opportunity, he displayed his peaceful attitude toward his fellow-man, and his good humor never left him. On the Sunday before his death, he went piously to the Sacrament at Saints Peter and Paul Church. On Saturday morning, among a large attendance of relatives, friends and neighbors, he was buried at the cemetery in Roselle. Peace to his soul. [The article ends with a poem of eight lines.]

Notes: The village of Rolfzen is in the German state of Westphalia, today called North Rhine-Westphalia, in the western part of Germany. It is still a separate village, but is administered as part of the town of Steinheim, which is a few miles west of Rolfzen. Some of the family names that came from Rolfzen and Steinheim and settled in Carroll County are: Reineke, Klocke, Spieker, Pietig, Poeppe, Kanne, and Wiedemeier.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 11 March 1898. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Christoph Ludwig

It is with the deepest sadness today that we bring the report that businessman Christ. Ludwig is no longer among the living. He died at Saint Bernard Hospital, which is run by the nuns in Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he went a few days ago for care.

The deceased had suffered for several years from a disease of the kidneys, and two years ago, when he visited a spa in Indiana for his illness, it was thought that his malady had totally disappeared. Apparently, his condition had improved, and he and his family were optimistic about the future. But soon the illness returned again with renewed force and it was feared that he might die. Therefore, on Tuesday last week, he decided to seek help at the hospital in Council Bluffs. Initially he felt that he was recovering well and wrote home to his family that he was getting better and would soon return. On Sunday morning, his brother Charles traveled to visit him there, but realized that all hope was gone as soon as he saw his ill brother. On that day he received the Last Rights of the Catholic Church, and that night, at about 1:45 a.m., surrounded by several nuns and his brother Charles, he gave up his spirit into the hands of his Creator.

The deceased was born in 1854 in Bickenriede, County of Mühlhausen, District of Erfurt, Germany. When he was eight years old, he came to America with his parents, who settled in Joe Davis [Jo Daviess] County, Illinois. They have lived in and around Carroll now for the last 30 years, and for the last 18 years, the deceased and his brother Charles have conducted a very successful mercantile business in Carroll. The deceased had been a stockholder of the “Carroll Demokrat” for many years and for about the last seven years he was treasurer of the Demokrat Publishing Company. This writer, as well as his co-workers at the “Demokrat,” have lost in the deceased a true and upright friend. He was always ready to do a good deed for anyone and so was highly respected and esteemed by all who knew him.

On Monday, the deceased’s remains were transported to Carroll where they were received and escorted to the deceased’s residence by the local branch of the Roman Catholic Mutual Protection Society. The funeral was Wednesday morning at nine o’clock. An endless row of wagons accompanied the remains from the home to the church, where Rev. Father Nacke performed a solemn funeral service, and afterwards gave a heart-rending sermon. Then the funeral procession formed and upon reaching the churchyard, the deceased was laid to his final rest amid the prayers of the priest and the devout.

At his grave mourn his deeply saddened widow, six children, his elderly mother, four brothers, and two sisters.

May he rest in peace.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 28 June 1912. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Katharina Meiners

On Saturday the 22nd of June, Mrs. Katharina Meiners died at her home near Dedham. Her health had not been good for a long time.

The deceased, whose maiden name was Schroeder, was born on the 30th of August 1856 at Ankum, County of Bersenbrücke, Province of Hanover, Germany. She later immigrated to America. On the 28th of July 1885, she married Mr. Gerhard Meiners at Roselle, Iowa. This marriage produced eight children, of which those named here are still living: Herman, living in Oconto, Nebraska; Anna, Mrs. Heinrich Kohorst, living in Roselle Township; and Theodor, Elisabeth, Bernard and Heinrich, all of whom still live at home. She is also survived by her spouse.

The funeral took place on Tuesday morning at Saint Mary’s Church in Willey.

May the departed rest in peace.


Louis Meyers

To friends and acquaintances comes the disturbing report that Louis Meyers was suddenly called away from this life.

Last Monday, he traveled to Chicago with Mr. Adam Thein in order to bring livestock there.

On Wednesday, Mr. Henry Meyers received the following telegram from his son Frank, who is studying medicine in Chicago:

“Chicago, 15 Jan. 1895.
Uncle Louis fell and received a skull fracture. He died around 10:00 this morning. –Frank.”

That was the first report of this terrible accident. Yesterday, Thursday morning, Mr. Henry Meyers received a letter informing him that his unfortunate brother had jumped down and fallen on a rail at the stockyards in Chicago. He got up again and continued on, but he was taken to a hotel and put in bed. Here he fell into a coma and did not awaken, so that his nephew Frank was not able to speak with him again. The letter continued that as soon as the coroner finished the inquest, Frank would arrive in Templeton with his uncle’s body as soon as circumstances permitted.

According to other reports, Mr. Louis Meyers had lain for about 10 minutes after his fall, then came to, and went with Adam Thein to the hotel where he asked for a doctor to examine him. The doctor gave him medicine, whereupon he fell asleep and did not awaken again. The accident occurred on the very morning that they had reached Chicago. Since the deceased was afflicted with stomach trouble, and during the arduous trip he had neither slept nor eaten, it is assumed that the medicine was too strong. At any rate, this is only conjecture, and if the inquest dispels this, then the skull fracture and perhaps even injuries to other vital parts will prove to be the cause of his sudden death.

A Chicago newspaper published the following account of the sad incident:

“Louis Meyers of Carroll County, Iowa was seriously injured Wednesday morning at the stockyards, which led to his death at noon. Meyers came to Chicago Tuesday night with a carload of cattle. Around 5:55 Wednesday morning, he fell to the ground from a high platform and seriously injured himself.

He was brought to Stover House, 4151 South Halsted Street, where doctors examined him. He had internal injuries and several broken [illegible word]. He was unconscious until he died. The body was brought to the morgue.”

Louis Meyers is one of four Meyers Brothers in Roselle Township, where the family has resided for many years and is certainly counted as one of the most respected families in the county. The deceased was just 41 years old and leaves behind a deeply grieving widow and four children, of which the oldest is 18 and the youngest is 6 years old.

The burial takes place Saturday at 10:00 in Hillsdale [Roselle], where the solemn requiem will be held in the Catholic Church. Our deepest sympathies to the bereaved.


 

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