Visit the IAGenWeb!Visit the USGenWeb! Carroll County, Iowa
IAGenWeb  Project
Carroll County Genealogy

If you have information to share, please contact the  County Coordinator.

 

GERMAN FAMILY OBITUARIES
From Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language Newspaper
Published between about 1874 and 1920
These bios are from a special 25th Anniversary Edition of  September 20, 1899

N thru Z

Translated & Contributed by David Reineke

I translated the following article from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on 15 March 1895. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

John Nestle

The funeral of our deceased fellow-citizen John Nestel, which took place Sunday afternoon at 2:00 from the home of the deceased, was the largest which had occurred in Carroll for some time. The Germania Verein [German Club] with 80 members, the entire fire department, the Freemason Lodge, the Knights of Pythias, and the Odd Fellows all assembled in their respective club houses, joined up on the corner of Main and Fifth Street, and marched to the home of the deceased, from which the body was transported to the Germania Hall, preceded by the Union Band and accompanied by an uncountable procession of coaches. The main entrance was closed until the arrival of the funeral procession, otherwise the hall would have been full before it got there. Two-thirds of the seats were filled by the various clubs, and the other seats and the gallery were quickly occupied by other mourners. Rev. D. Austin, Pastor of the M. E. Church of Jefferson, gave the funeral sermon, which was followed !
attentively by all those present. Following the funeral ceremony, the remains were accompanied to the municipal cemetery, where the deceased was buried according to the ritual of the Lodge.

NOTES: The obituary of John Nestel was published in the Demokrat the week before this article, and is already posted on line.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa between about 1874 and 1918. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 6 October 1911. I have added some explanatory notes of my own at the end. It read as follows:

Herman Hein. Olberding

On 25 September, Herman H. Olberding died at the home of his son Herman in Arcadia Township, with the Holy Last Sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church having been administered.

The deceased was born on 12 August 1824 Lehmden, District of Bechta, Oldenburg, and so had at the time of his death passed his 87th year of life.

On 18 January 1849 he married Miss Maria Olberding in the community of Steinfeld. This marriage was blessed with seven children, namely four sons and three daughters, as follows: Bernard, Clemens, Herman and Heinrich; Maria Anna Kaiser; Carolina, Mrs. Joseph Weber; and Josephine, Mrs. John Rehker, all of whom survive their father except Maria A. Kaiser who predeceased her father about two years earlier.

Mr. and Mrs. Olberding immigrated with their children to America in March 1876 and made their way directly to Carroll County. They settled on a farm three miles west of Mt. Carmel, where they lived for four years. Then they moved to their farm in Wheatland Township. Around 1890, the couple moved to Arcadia where they went into retirement. His wife died on 11 January 1898 and thereafter the deceased lived for a few years with his son Heinrich, and later moved in with his son Herman.

The deceased enjoyed good health his entire life until recently when he began to experience the infirmities of old age which led to his death.

With his death, a brave German and good father departs this life, and of whom his children will preserve a cherished memory.

The funeral service was held on 28 September at St. John’s Church in Arcadia, with Father John Schulte conducting the ceremony.

May the deceased rest in peace.

NOTES: The German towns mentioned are in the far northwest corner of Germany. Oldenburg is west of Bremen. Steinfeld (Oldenberg) and Lehmden are south of Oldenburg and northeast of Osnabruck. Bechta probably means Vechta, which is just north of Steinfeld and Lehmden.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 12 January 1894. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added some information in brackets and notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Arcadia
Joseph Olberding

On the morning of 23 December 1893, Jos. Olberding passed away after receiving the Last Rights of the Catholic Church. He was born in Steinfeld, Oldenburg, on 10 December 1809, and so had reached the advanced age of 84 years and 16 days. The funeral took place on 26 December with a large attendance at the local Catholic Church. May he rest in peace. Mr. Olberding is survived by his wife (who is over 82 years old and also confined to bed), and two sons and three daughters, namely: Heinrich, Frank, Mrs. Hermann Niehaus, and Mrs. Brd. Lampe, all of whom live near Arcadia, and also Mrs. Heinrich Scherbring in Petersburg, Delaware County.

NOTES: Steinfeld (Oldenburg) is located in northern Germany, northwest of Hannover and south of Oldenburg and Bremen.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 14 November 1902. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article, and have added some notes at the end. It reads as follows:

Gerhard Overmoehle

Following a short illness, Gerhard Overmoehle, age 72, died last Wednesday afternoon in Roselle after receiving Last Rights of the Catholic Church. The deceased was born in 1830 in the community of Ankum, County of Bersenbrueck, Hannover. In 1858, he married Maria Loxterkamp, who preceded him in death several years ago. This happy marriage produced five children, four of whom are still living, namely: Gerhard; Elizabeth, Mrs. Henry Buelt, living in Nebraska; Mary, a nun in the convent in Dubuque; and Minnie, Mrs. Anton Halbur, living in Roselle Township. One child died at a young age in Germany. The deceased had only been ill for five days. He spent his final years living with his son Gerhard, where he was cared for with genuine filial love and devotion. The family came to America in 1884, and settled in Roselle Township on a farm next to Roselle, where the deceased resided up to the time of his death. He was a quiet, hard-working German, imbued with real German loya!
lty and honesty. Peace to his soul. The burial took place last Saturday among a large attendance of relatives and neighbors.

NOTES: The town of Ankum is in the northwestern part of Germany, about 15 or 20 miles north of Osnabrueck. The article spelled the name Overmöhle, in the German fashion. In English, the two dots are changed to an e.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 25 September 1908. I have not changed the name or place spellings, and any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Wilhelm Pietig

On Thursday the 17th of September, Wilhelm Pietig died at the hospital in Clarinda following a long illness.

The deceased was born in Rolfzen, County of Höxter [Hoexter], Westphalia. He immigrated to America in 1870, and settled at first in Jasper County, Iowa. A few years later, he moved to Carroll County and settled on a farm in Pleasant Valley Township, where he had lived since then. In 1873, he married Miss Elisabeth Spieker. This marriage produced 10 children, namely four sons: Fritz, Joseph, John and Wilhelm; and five [should be six] daughters: Maria (Mrs. Henry Brincks), Elisabeth (Mrs. Henry Dultmeier), Theresia, Anna, Veronika, and Katharina. The last preceded her father in death.

He is also survived by his wife, and two brothers, John Pietig of Carroll Township and Anton Pietig in Germany, and a sister, Mrs. Maria Pollman of Wilmont, Minnestota.

Seven years ago, the deceased suffered a sunstroke, as a result of which his mental abilities became impaired. After careful medical treatment, however, he recovered and for several years was physically and mentally healthy. But a few years ago, the symptoms of his old illness returned, and his condition worsened to the extent that it was necessary to move him to the institute at Clarinda. Last week, his brother Johann and the family of the deceased had made all necessary preparations to bring him home again, since his medical condition seemed hopeless and his death close at hand. However, he died shortly before the trip could be undertaken. The body was brought here on Saturday, and, with a great number of people in attendance at the local Saints Peter and Paul Church, he was laid to his final rest on Monday.

May he rest in peace.


John Reineke

John Reineke passed away Saturday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Jos. Schmidt [should be spelled Schmitt], south of Carroll, after an illness of four months, the cause of death being Bright’s disease and diabetes.

Mr. Reineke was born at Steinheim, Westphalen, Germany, June 23, 1839 and died Saturday, October 7, 1916.

In 1869 he was married to Mary Spieker at Newton, Iowa. There they lived until 1876, when they moved to a farm south of Carroll. They remained there until five years ago, when they moved to Carroll to the home they purchased at 410 south Adam[s] Street. On December 18, 1914 his wife died and since then Mr. Reineke has made his home with his children.

Of the ten children born, eight survive to mourn their father. John and Anton pr[e]ceded him in death, July 1913.

The surviving children are: Mrs. Joseph Schmidt [or Schmitt], Carroll; Joseph and Fred [Reineke], Randolph, Nebraska; Mrs. Nic. Eltgroth, Osakis, Minnesota; William [Reineke], Dedham; Mrs. Joseph Brincks, Maple River; Mrs. John B. Brincks, Willey; and Matthew [Reineke] of Carroll. He also leaves three sisters: Mrs. Hermann Saak, Baxter, Iowa; Mrs. Anton Spieker, Carroll; and Mrs. Anton Riesenberg, Carroll; and thirty-one grandchildren.

The funeral was held Tuesday morning from S[aints] Peter and Paul Church, of which he was a member.

Mr. Reineke was a good-hearted, generous minded man, a true neighbor and friend and when in good health, very faithful to his church duties.

He will be missed not only by his children, b[ut] by many dear friends.



I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on 15 May 1889. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Jos. Rettenmaier

One of the largest funeral processions, if not the largest, ever to take place in the county, moved last Sunday from the residence of the suddenly deceased Mr. Jos. Rettenmaier, one-and-a-half miles west of Mt. Carmel. As the last honors indicate, he was indeed considered one of the best, most upright, and bravest German men of Carroll County. It is said that 175 teams followed the mortal remains, and that the last teams had not yet left the farm of the deceased when the first had already arrived at the churchyard. The circumstances as well as the cause of the very sudden and unforeseen death are as follows: In the morning, Mr. Rettenmaier was quite well and asserted that he had not felt so well in a long time and that his appetite was better than ever. In the afternoon, he was gathering corncobs together on the farm and then went into the house complaining of feeling unwell and of pain in the chest. He sat in his chair and his wife came to him. He told her that it w!
as very cold, whereupon she wrapped him in a wool cover. Despite that, he complained about the cold although sweat was running from his face. He sank back in his chair and died without his wife having any idea. One cannot imagine the horror and pain of Mrs. Rettenmaier when a short time later she beheld the lifeless body of her faithful life’s companion. Attempts were made at resuscitation and Dr. Johnson in Breda was sent for. He arrived and conducted an inquiry, whereupon he diagnosed the death as due to heart attack. This is all the more striking because the deceased had never suffered from heart trouble. Even on the day after, many people did not want to believe that the respected man was really dead because he lay there so naturally in his appearance, and the color in his face was as ruddy as if he were only sleeping, and his skin was as soft as a living person’s.
Mr. Joseph Rettenmaier was born in Werdenberg, Rheinpfalz, Germany, in 1832. As a child he came with his parents to America, namely to Pennsylvania. From there his parents moved westward. They settled down near Waterloo, Blackhawk County, Iowa. In 1874 he moved with his parents to Kniest Township, where he worked one of the most beautiful farms. He was twice elected to the county board of supervisors, to which he belonged as a reputable, strictly upright member for 6 years. It can be said of him that he had hardly an enemy. He was loved and respected by all. He brought great credit to himself wherever peace needed to be made. Everywhere he could, he reached a helping hand to the poor and needy through word and deed. As a husband and father he was constantly loving, and there are probably few men who will be so mourned by his wife and children as Mr. Rettenmaier. He was a faithful, pious member of his (the Catholic) Church and his absence often will be felt. He !
leaves behind a wife and 8 children, of whom 4 are sons and 4 are daughters. Three of his children, two daughters and a son, are married. The oldest daughter married Mr. Jos. Reinhart in Sheridan Township, the second Mr. John Giesing from here, and the son took as a bride Miss Katie Maus. May he rest in Peace.


Arnold Heinrich and Maria Schrad

On Wednesday, the 18th of this month, Mr. Arnold Heinrich Schrad, who lived five miles southeast of here, passed away at the age of about 75 years. The deceased first saw the light of the world in Kirchspiel, Steinfeldt, Oldenburg, on the 25th of November 1825. Forty-five years ago he married Miss Maria Wilmhof. This happy marriage produced five children, namely three boys and two girls, although the latter two died in childhood in the old homeland. In 1871, he immigrated with his family to the United States, where he first settled near Petersburg, Delaware County, Iowa. In 1881, they came to Carroll County, and here he acquired a 160-acre farm which he operated until the end with his unmarried son Joseph. Last Saturday, the deceased found his final resting place in the St. John’s Cemetery. He was highly regarded by his neighbors and by all who knew him. He leaves behind a grieving widow and three grown sons who all live in the area, namely: Herman, Heinrich,!
and Joseph. May he rest in peace.

“Papa Schrad” did not have to remain lying alone in the cemetery for long. After the funeral, his dear life’s companion, who had kept vigil at her husband’s side day and night after he became ill, took to her bed never to leave it again living. She passed away, having received the Last Rights of the Catholic Church, at one o’clock Monday afternoon, and today she was laid to her final rest at the side of her husband. Peace to her ashes. We join the entire community in extending our deepest sympathy to the deeply mourning surviving sons.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 15 December 1893. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

[Arcadia]
Bernhard Schröder

Following a five-day illness suffering from influenza, Bernhard Schröder died on Wednesday the 6th of this month at the age of 87 years, 11 months, and 16 days. With many people in attendance, his earthly remains were interred last Saturday by Rev. Father Nacke from Carroll outside the local Catholic Church. May he rest in peace. Mr. Schröder, or “Papa Schröder,” as we always called him, saw the light of the world in Damme, Oldenburg, on 20 January 1806. He immigrated to America in 1868, and settled in New Vienna [Iowa]. From there he moved here with his sons Bernhard and Ferdinand and was a citizen of this county since the spring of 1878. He leaves behind three sons and their families, who deeply mourn the loss of their dear father, namely: Bernhard and Ferdinand from here, and Frank, living near Templeton. Our deepest sympathies to the survivors.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 15 May 1908. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Heinrich Schulte

On Saturday evening, 9 May 1908, Heinrich Schulte died following a short stay at the local Saint Anthony’s Hospital. He had been ill a long time, and on Tuesday, he underwent an operation for appendicitis and hernia. Although there was hope at first, his condition worsened very quickly, such that he had passed away by Saturday.

The deceased was among the earliest settlers of Kniest Township, having settled there in 1870. He took an active role in the development of St. Mary’s Parish. He was one of the most energetic members of the parish, and always gave it his utmost support.

Heinrich Schulte was born in Meppen County, Province of Hanover, Germany, on 1 January 1850. He spent his youth in the old fatherland, and was employed in farming with his parents. In 1869, he immigrated to America with his father and siblings, and settled first in Boone, Iowa. After staying there one year, they moved to Kniest Township, where his father purchased 240 acres of land. He remained another seven years with his father, at which time his father sold him 100 acres of land. He later increased his holdings, and achieved prosperity through hard work and thrifty and careful management. He enjoyed the respect of his acquaintances and of the Mt. Carmel Parish, for which he had acted in the office of church official for 16 years.

In 1877, he married Miss Lena Ahrling. This marriage produced two children, but both died at a tender age. His wife has been in a psychiatric institution since 1880.

In 1903, he moved to Carroll, in order to retire.

He is survived by his wife, one brother, Bernard Schulte in Willowvale, Kansas, and a sister, Mrs. Jos. Schaefer of Wheatland Township, and Mrs. John Gottlob living in California.

The funeral took place on 13 May at Mt. Carmel, and he was laid to his final rest at the cemetery of St. Mary’s Parish.

May he rest in peace.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 11 April 1902. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Jakab Steininger

On Tuesday evening an accident occurred near town in which Jakab [probably Jakob] Steininger lost his life. He had come to town in the afternoon, and around sundown he was driving home to his farm west of town, which is known as the Pratt farm. Just west of town, on the west side of the river and near Barney Brown’s place, where the steep slope is, the wagon turned over. Steininger fell under the wagon and thereby broke his neck. By all appearances, the horses were frightened and sprang down the side of the slope. He was found by his son Frank, who was coming the same way. The deceased was brought to Carroll. The officials were informed and they then held a coroner’s inquest in Arts Brothers Furniture Store. Charlie Ludwig, Herman Baumhover, and Fred Guthrie acted as the jury and rendered a verdict in accord with the known facts. The funeral will take place today, Friday, at Saints Peter and Paul Church. The deceased was born in Vilzhofen, Niederbay!
ern [Lower Bavaria], on the 11th of June 1841. He leaves behind a widow and seven children.

NOTES: The last name may be spelled “Stininger.” Carroll cemetery records list Jakob Stininger, 11 June 1841 to 8 April 1902.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It was originally published on Friday, 10 August 1894. It reads as follows:

John Stevens

Saturday morning at nine o’clock, the mortal remains of John Stevens from Hillsdale [Roselle] were buried at the Catholic cemetery at Hillsdale. Friends and acquaintances had gathered early in order to pay their last respects to the deceased. We saw people from Mt. Carmel, Breda, Manning, Halbur, Templeton, Dedham, Willey, Carroll, and so forth. At he stroke of nine, the pallbearers arrived and, amidst prayers, the deceased was then carried from the house of mourning to the church, where the Rev. Father Frey consecrated the body and led it to the grave.

The deceased was born in Lone, Hannover, Germany. He came to America in 1844 and settled at first in Cincinnati. From there, he moved to Gutenberg, Clayton County, Iowa, and 18 years ago he moved to Carroll County, Iowa. He had reached the advanced age of 74 years and 11 months. The old gentleman enjoyed good health until shortly before his death. He was only sick for eight days, and “Vater Stevens” used this time to put his affairs in order and spiritually prepare himself for the better life hereafter. The deceased was a very respected man, and “Vater Stevens” was loved and respected by all who knew him.

Some erroneous information crept into last week’s short report of Mr. Stevens’s death. The deceased leaves behind a deeply grieving widow and three children: Hermann and Henry Stevens of Templeton, and Mrs. Henry Korves of Hillsdale. One daughter, Mrs. Pelz, predeceased him but she left a son who was raised by his grandparents.

Our deepest sympathies to the survivors.

NOTES: The town where he was born could be Lohne (Oldenburg), which is south of Oldenburg and about 60 miles northwest of Hannover.


I translated the following obituary and short article from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was published on Friday, 10 February 1882, and the short article was published the following on 17 February 1882. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article. It reads as follows:

Frank Venteicher

Unexpected Death!
-------------------------
Fall from Wagon is the Cause
---------------------------------------
Yesterday evening, Frank Venteicher of Pleasant Valley Township was found lying dead in the road near the Catholic cemetery a mile south of town. It was about seven o’clock. The unexpected death of the young man, just 25 years old, was due to a fall from a wagon caused by runaway horses which raced off at great speed. The injuries that he suffered must have caused death instantly. The deceased was brought to town where he was laid out in the courthouse until the coroner, who was called by telegraph from nearby Arcadia, had conducted the inquest. The verdict reached by the jury was in agreement with the circumstances. The deceased is survived by a grieving widow and one child. May he rest in peace.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[17 February 1882]

The funeral of Frank Venteicher produced a large crowd of people, and it is said that 72 wagons accompanied him to pay their last respects.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTES: Cemetery records show his name as Franz Venteicher, and list his date of birth as 22 September 1851, and his death as 9 February 1882, which would make the obituary incorrect as to his age. There is a Frank “Fenteicher” in the 1880 census, married to wife Anna. He is listed there as 27 and born in Prussia. She is listed as 23 and born in Prussia.



I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 21 February 1896. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Gertrud Vonnahme
(Sent from Mt. Carmel)

Last Monday evening at 8:00, Mrs. Gertrud Vonnahme, whose maiden name was Ehrich, died at the age of 51 years, after receiving Last Rights.

The burial took place Thursday at about 10:00 a.m. in our cemetery. Reverend Father Lührsmann conducted a solemn requiem for the soul of the deceased. People were present from near and far in order to pay their last respects to the dearly departed. It was one of the largest funerals that there ever was here.

The deceased came to America from the old fatherland in 1868, and in the same year married Mr. Bernard Vonnahme. In 1871, they moved to Carroll County and onto the place where they lived until now. The marriage was blessed with 10 children, four of whom, however, predeceased their dear mother. In 1887, their only daughter made the decision to renounce worldly things, and she was accepted into the Franciscan Order in the convent at La Crosse, Wisconsin. In 1888, Mr. and Mrs. Vonnahme adopted an orphan girl, who now also mourns the difficult loss of her foster-mother. One brother, Mr. Anton Ehrich, who now lives near Danbury, Woodbury County, Iowa, three sisters, and the family, were around the death bed when the dear wife, mother and sister gave over her soul into the hands of her Creator.

The good woman had been sick for about three months, and everything possible was done in order to restore the health of the dear wife and mother. Various capable doctors were called in for advice, but the dear Lord had decided otherwise. About a week ago, the family realized what a sad end awaited, and when they realized that death could come at any hour, they surrendered patiently to the will of God. Our deepest sympathies to the bereaved. May she rest in peace.


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. It was originally published on Friday, 30 September 1910. Any information in brackets or notes at the end are my own explanations. It reads as follows:

Veronica Wiedemeier

On Thursday evening, the 22nd of September, Mrs. Veronica Wiedemeier died at the local Saint Anthony Hospital after having received the last rights of the Roman Catholic Church. She was suffering from a gallstone illness for which she had been operated on a short time earlier. However, the illness had progressed to such an extent that even surgical intervention was no help.

The deceased, whose maiden name was Thieleke, was born on the 25th of September 1848 in Eversen, Westphalia, Germany. She married Mr. Joseph Wiedemeier there in June 1869. In June of the following year, Mr. and Mrs. Wiedemeier immigrated to America and settled in Carroll, Iowa. After staying about a year in Carroll, they moved to their farm in Grant Township where they lived for the next 16 years. Then they moved again to Carroll, where they lived until death. Her husband died on the 26th of June this year.

The very happy marriage of the respected Mr. and Mrs. Wiedemeier produced the following children who survive their mother: Joseph, in Carroll; Maria, Mrs. Wilhelm Bredemann, in Chicago; Anton, in Grant Township; Matilda, Mrs. P. Donlan, also in Grant Township; Jospehine, Mrs. Hein. Janssen, in Carroll; Veronica, Mrs. Hein. Gronemeyer, in Vail; and Miss Rose, who lived with her mother. Three children died at a young age. The deceased is also survived by a sister, Mrs. Fritz Neumeyer, in Kniest Township; and a brother, Wilhelm Thieleke, in Germany.

The deceased was known as a devout Catholic, a good spouse and [the rest of the article is missing].


I translated the following obituary from Der Carroll Demokrat, a German-language newspaper published in Carroll, Iowa, between about 1874 and 1920. The obituary was originally published on Friday, 1 May 1896. I have kept the name and place spellings as they were in the article. I have added some explanatory notes of my own at the end. It reads as follows:


Christ Wille

Christ Wille of the Third Ward in Carroll died on Sunday morning between 4 and 5 o’clock at the advanced age of 74 years, 11 months, and 16 days, as the result of a heart ailment after he had received last rights from the Reverend Pastor Lothringen from Denison. Old age and illness had afflicted the elderly gentleman for some time, such that it had been feared since the previous autumn that the time of his passing was not far off. And since 8 days before his death his dear wife suffered a stroke leaving her paralyzed on one side, all hope of maintaining the old gentleman’s health was lost. He sleeps softly now in the Hereafter. The deceased was born in Luedersfeld, Principality of Schaumberg-Lippe, Germany, came to America in August 1860, and settled in Illinois. In 1865 he moved to Winneshiek County, Iowa, and in 1874 he moved to Carroll County. At his grave mourn his dear life’s companion and 5 children, namely: Christoph and Henry in Cook Cou!
nty, Illinois; Mrs. Sophia Huckshold in Omaha; Wilhelm in Carroll Township; and Mrs. Anna Maria Truhe in Roselle. Old Mother Wille now makes her home with the last-named daughter. The burial took place Monday afternoon at 4 o’clock outside St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. The flower arrangements were magnificent. A granddaughter from Omaha placed a wonderful wreath of real flowers on the casket. The formal service by the Reverend Pastor Lothringen was impressive and hardly a dry eye remained during the moving funeral sermon. The crowd of mourners paying their last respects to good old Papa Wille was extremely large. May he rest in peace.

NOTES: The deceased’s full first name could be Christoph. The obituary lists Luedersfeld as the place of birth. There is a German town of that nane (also spelled “Ludersfeld” with two dots above the u) about 15 miles west of Hannover.


 

These pages were designed and are maintained by IAGenWeb, solely for the use and benefit of the IAGenWeb Project, a part of the USGenWeb Project.
Copyright © 1997 by IAGenWeb & the Contributor of the specific information.   Rootsweb Please read the IAGenWeb Terms, Conditions, & Disclaimer  — all of which apply to Carroll Co.

Back to top of page                             Return to Carroll Co. IAGenWeb Home                             Back to top of page

Photo background collage is made from colorized penny postcards donated to the USGenWeb Archives