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1875 A. T. Andreas Atlas
1880 Dubuque County History
Honorable William B. Allison
Frederick Christian Bauman
Cascade Biographies
Honorable Julius K. Graves
Henry Henkels
Rev. James Hill
Nancy R. Hill, M. D.
Susan Ann McCraney
James and Martha McGee
J. J. E. Norman
William J. Shoup
Johanna (Baker) Specht
Short Biographies

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1880 Dubuque County Biographies
The History of Dubuque County, Iowa
Published 1880 by Western Historical Company, Chicago

Courtesy of Doreen Weston and Tom Schlarman
Photos Courtesy of Tom Schlarman

Contact Doreen to express thanks for her transcription efforts. More of Doreen Weston's work can be found at http://members.tripod.com/~Doreen_3/index.html.

(Note: Sherrill's Mound is written as Sherrill's Mount)

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

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REV. F. W. ABERBROEKLING, Pastor of the Church of the Holy Trinity, Luxemburg; he was born Dec. 10, 1844, in Westphalia, Prussia; in 1856, he came to St. Louis, Mo.; there attended school till 1864, when he removed to Quincy, Ill. and there commenced studying for the ministry; in 1865, came to Milwaukee and continued his studies till Dec. 20, 1871, when he was ordained as Roman Catholic priest by Archbishop Henni; the following February, he came to Luxemburg and established and took charge of his present church; he was also Pastor of St. Mary's Church at Lattnerville during 1874-75.

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WILLIAM AITCHISON, Jr., farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Cascade; born in Scotland April 5, 1837; emigrated to America in 1855; for two years and six month in New York City, and eight years thereafter in Chicago, was engaged in merchandising, when ill heath caused a change of occupation and residence to his present farm, in 1865; has a farm of 137 acres, and has not striven to increase his landed possessions; from philanthropic views, he has been a life-long worker for the benefit of others rather than for himself; he penned the call for a meeting of those favorable to the organization of the Y.M.C.A. in Chicago, and was one of the three men who made the first organization of the Association there in 1856; was the first Secretary of Y.M.C.A. in that city; was also an earnest worker there in Sunday-school mission work; he supplied the pulpit of the Cascade Baptist Church for a year, when ill health compelled him to resign. On the 23d birthday, he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet A. Babcock, of Chicago; they have five children, all of whom yet live to bless their household - William C.,Albert W., Lydia Grace, John Y., and Harriet Ruth. Mr. A's father - William - was born in Scotland, Sept. 6, 1796; and his mother Agnes - was born in Scotland Feb. 4, 1799; they were married in 1824, and came to America in 1855; they, with six children - Rev. Dr. Aitchison, of Eau Claire, Wis., James Aitchison, Mrs. A. Fairburn, Mrs. Anson, Mrs. D. A. McKinla, of St. Paul, Minn.; and the subject of this sketch - are all pioneers in this county, and have ever been abundant in good works wherever they have lived.

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REV. J. B. ALBROOK, A.M., Principal of Epworth Seminary, Epworth; born in Clarion Co., Penn., July 18, 1844; came with his parents, to Delaware Co., Iowa in 1857; in 1863, he enlisted in the 2d I. V. C., where he served his country faithfully till the close of the war; he then entered Cornell College, graduating with full honors in the classical course in 1870, having made the best record in his class; the fall, he entered the Upper Iowa Conference, and was sent his first three years to Central City, which charge he left largely increased in spiritual and financial power, with a new church and parsonage; he was sent to Earlville one year, and then to Dyersville three years, the membership being doubled in that time; he was then stationed at Maquoketa, with grand benefits resulting to the church there; his finely disciplined mind and untiring working force have made him a brilliant record since he entered college; his editorship of the Collegian, at Cornell, evinced fine ability, further proven by later work as editor of various camp-meeting journals and the authorship of a book, "The Sunday School Assembly of the Northwest;" he has been secretary or President of various county and State Sunday School Associations, etc.; has been Chaplain of Grand Lodge of Good Templars and Chief Superintendent of Juvenile Templars, and has done noble work for temperance in Epworth, evidenced by a fine silverware testimonial from the citizens of the place, in memory of his services; the seminary, under his care, is making grand strides upward, and will so continue, for its Principal is a constant worker and knows no such word as fail.

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RICHARD ALDERSON, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Box, Rickardsville; born Oct. 1, 1823 in Yorkshire, England; in 1853, came to Dubuque Co.; first worked by the day, and as his circumstances would admit, he bought a small quantity of land and engaged in farming, and now owns 800 acres and is out of debt; this large property he has earned by hard work. He was married to Alice Guy July 15, 1843; she was born in England; they have eight children - George, Thomas, James, Richard, John, Elizabeth A., Anthony, and Hannah E. The wages he earned for the first two months after his marriage he gave to his father, then came to America when he had earned enough to pay passage for himself and family.

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THOMAS ALDERSON, general merchandise, Sec. 29; P.O. Rickardsville; born June 25, 1850, in Yorkshire, England; when he was about 4 years of age he came with his parents to Dubuque Co. He married Miss Margaret Conley in 1869, she was born in Iowa; they have three children - Margaret A., Thomas E., and John.

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JAMES H. ALLISON, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Peosta; born in Wayne Co., Ohio, July 27, 1835; came to Dubuque Co. in May 1865; he has been engaged in farming most of his life, though he taught school for some time in Ohio. In the Civil War, he was a member of Co. I, 163d Regt., O. N. G.; his farm here embraces 302 acres, including ten acres in Iowa Township. His wife, nee Cornelia Boots, was a native of Richland Co., Ohio. They were married Feb. 19, 1861; have two children living - John M. and William B., and three died in infancy. Mr. Allison's father, John Allison, born in Pennsylvania in 1798, was one of the pioneers of Wane Co., Ohio, coming there from Pennsylvania in 1820, and thence to Dubuque, Co. in 1865; the mother, Margaret Allison, died in 1861; but three of the family now remain - the father, an active, clear-headed, genial old gentleman of 82, William B., U.S. Senator and James K., the subject of this sketch.

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JOHN D. ALSOP, attorney at law, Dyersville; born May 4, 1822, in Derbyshire, England; in 1854, came to Dubuque Co., he commenced reading law in 1863, and was admitted to the bar in 1866; has been in constant practice since. Married Hentietta Potter in 1853; she was born in 1822, in Derbyshire, England; died in 1867; they have three children - Lizzie, Charles E., and Blanche; second marriage, to Miss M. Hatch, of Adrian, Mich.; she was born in Michigan.

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JACOB ALTHAUSER, cooper, 2316 Couler Avenue, Dubuque; was born in Baden, Germany, Dec. 29, 1833; he came to America in 1854, and came to Dubuque the same year; he learned his trade here; he engaged in business in 1860, and has carried on the business since then; he is a member of the order of the I.O.O.F. In 1860, he married Miss Margaret Jones, from Schleswig, Germany; they have six children - Mary, Charlie, Jacob, Emerine, Maggie, Helen.

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J. C. ALTHAUSER, dealer in confectionery, toys and fancy goods, 844 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque in 1855; he grew up and attended school here, and, after reaching manhood he engaged in his present business, and is building up a nice trade. Mr. Althauser is a member of the Knights of Pythias.

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THEODORE ALTMAN, proprietor of Harmony Hall Hotel, corner of Clay and Seventh streets, Dubuque; is a native of Luxemburg, Germany, and was born Aug. 13, 1832; he emigrated to America, in 1857, and came to Dubuque the same year; in 1866, he bought his present hotel, Harmony Hall, which for a long time was one of the prominent buildings in that part of the city. Mr. Altman was the first man to start the Luxembourg Gazette and the Iowa newspapers; he holds the office of city Alderman. In 1859, he was married to Miss Mary Stock, a native of Luxemburg, Germany; they have four children, two sons and two daughters - Frank, clerk in the office of P. Kiene & Son; Peter, Lucy, Mary.

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A. ANDERSON, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Dubuque; born in Erie Co., Penn., Oct. 24, 1820; came to Dubuque Co. in April 1842; for some twenty years, he was employed as Government Surveyor, his professional labors extending over wide regions in Iowa, Wisconsin and Dakota, and involving much hardship and frequent perilous adventures; his farm embraces 160 acres, located in Sec. 21, 22, 27, and 28. Politically he affiliates with the Republican party, and he takes a warm interest in whatever pertains to the welfare of his community. Mr. A. was married, June 8, 1847 to Miss Sarah Scott, daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth Scott, formerly of Baltimore, Md.; they have ten children - Flora (now Mrs. John Vigars, of Farley), Geneal (now in Colorado), Minnie, Eugene, Lillie, Mary, Cora, Willie, Eddie, and Tress.

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WILLIAM I. ANDERSON, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Peosta; born in Kentucky Nov. 13, 1814; he came to Southern Indiana in 1830; thence to Dubuque Co. in 1835; was engaged in mining during the winter of 1835-36, but has farmed most of the time since; he lived neat Sherrill's Mound till 1844, then in Iowa Township till 1867, since which time he has resided on his present farm of 173 acres in Vernon Township. He is identified with the Methodist Church, and with the Democratic party; has been County Surveyor, Justice of the Peace, etc. Mr. Anderson has been married three times; first to E. J. Denny; second to Hester Hillman; third to Mrs. Jane Averill; he has had four children by the first marriage, seven by second, and four by the third; eight of his children are yet living.

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NICHOLAS ANDRE, school teacher, Sec. 14; P. O. Luxemburg; born Jan. 25, 1855, in Liberty Township; he owns eighty acres of land; has been teaching school since 1876; he is also Township Assessor; was elected in 1879. Married Lizzi Ungs Feb. 5, 1880; she was born in Liberty Township. Catholic.

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H. M. ANDRES, manufacturer of fine cigars, and dealer in all kinds of tobacco pipes, etc., No. 724 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Schleswig-Holstein, March 23, 1833; he grew up and learned his business there and came to America in 1851; he came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque ____ 1857, and began working at his trade. During the war, he was in the service, and was a member of the St. Charles, (Mo)_ battalion. In May. 1860, he married Miss Sophia Beck, a native of Wurtemburg, Germany; they have seven children, two sons and five daughters. Mr. Andres is a member of Veterans Reserve Corps, and also a member of the Order of ___.

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WILLIAM ANDREW, of the firm of Andrew Treadway & Sons, a ____sale dealer in heavy and shelf hardware, Nos. 484 and 488 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Scotland, and was born Nov. 20, 1820; he grew up to manhood there, and came to America in 1842, came to Dubuque in 1846; in 1849 he went to California and returned in 1852, and bought the lot and built the store they now occupy ____ the following year, in the fall of 1853, he associated with him his present partner Mr. Treadway, and the house of Andrew & Treadway was then established, and has continued for over a quarter of a century; in addition to their large double store, which is crowded with goods, they have a large warehouse, fronting on Iowa street, which is packed full of iron and heavy hardware, and carriage timber, in packages for their jobbing trade; they probably carry the heaviest stock in the city, and are required to do so in order to meet the demands of their extensive trade. Mr. Andrew has been connected with the Commercial National Bank, as stockholder and Director since its organization. In 1852, he was united in marriage to Miss Cornelia W. Hamilton, a native of Ohio, and a daughter of Rev. Hiram Hamilton; they have four sons and four daughters.

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JAMES F. ANSON, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Cascade; born in the city of Dubuque Feb. 24, 1843; is a thorough farmer, and quite and extensive one, as is proven by the able management of the 248 - acre farm on which he resides.He is a member of the Baptist Church and of the Republican party; three years of his life were given to the service of the Union in the civil war, as a soldier in Co. H, 16th I.V.I.; his regiment was attached to the Seventeenth Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, and participated in the numerous battles in which that gallant command was engaged-siege of Vicksburg, Shiloh, Iuka, etc. and with Sherman in the grand march from Chattanooga to the sea, and at the final review at Washington. He was married, in 1873, to Mrs. Isabella Y. Hamilton, daughter of William Aitchison, Dr.; he has one daughter - Isabella H. Anson, and two step-sons - William W. Hamilton and Charles E. Hamilton.

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THEODOR ARENS, saloon, Luxemburg; he was born in Luxemburg, Germany, March 30, 1846; in 1850, he came to Jackson Co.; in 1872, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns twenty-eight acres of land, with his house, barn, etc. Married Mrs. Goebel in 1872; she was born in Luxemburg, Germany; have two children - Nick and Ernst. She has four children by a former marriage - Henry, Antony, Katie, and Peter. Catholic.

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THOMAS ARMSTRONG, manufacturer of carriages buggies and sleighs, corner of Jones and Locust Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland, and emigrated to America in 1853; he finished learning his trade in New York, and came to Dubuque November, 1854; he held the position of foreman for Mr. A. A. Cooper, the ex___ wagon manufacturer, for a number of years; in May of 1865, he engaged in business for himself on Third street, and carried on the business for ten years; then he built his present factory. When he began he had very little, but he has built up a good business; he manufactures spring wagons, carriages and buggy work, and owes his success to his own efforts.

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BEN ARQUITT, proprietor of stone quarries, Farley; is a native of New York State, and was born in Syracuse June 6, 1848; his parents came to Iowa in 1857, and located in Duubuque Co.; he grew up to manhood here; he is engaged in quarrying and shipping stone; he owns forty-five acres of quarry land; the stone is of a very superior quality, and has an excellent reputation wherever used. In 1871, Mr. Arquitt was united in marriage to Miss Bridget Murphy, from Auburn, N. Y.; they have three children - Clara, Agnes, and Gertrude.

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JOSEPH ATKINSON, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Rickardsville; born March 22, 1809. in the county of Durham, England; in 1821 he came to Pennsylvania; in 1832, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived, and is one of the first settlers of the county; he entered about one-half a section of land, and now own 119 acres. Married Jane Houps March 22, 1836; she was born in England; they have thirteen children - Joseph, Jonathan, Margaret, Hannah, John W., Aaron, Mary J., Esther A., Michael, Phillis, Frank E., and Thomas E. (twins) and Minnie F.

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S. A. ATHERTON, manager of the Key City Barrel Co., Iowa Street, between Second and Third Streets, Dubuque: is a native of Orleans Co., Vt. and was born Sept. 4, 1839; he grew up to manhood there; when the war broke out he enlisted in Co. A, 2d N.H. V.I.; he was in the first battle of Bull Run and Williamsburg. He served in the service about two years, then returned, and, in 1865, was united in marriage, in Vermont, to Miss Helen L. Everest; the following year, he came West to Dubuque, and reached here June 19, 1866; in 1868, he engaged in coopering business. The present company was organized in March 1878; they do a very large business, employing about fifty to one hundred men, with a capacity for manufacturing _____ barrels per week; they have two stave factories, one here and one in Wisconsin, where they make their own barrel staves. Mr. Atherton is connected with the Knights of Pythias, the I.O.O.F. and the Order of Workmen.

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S. B. AUSTIN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Peosta; born in Ireland Aug. 11, 1835; came to America in August 1847; stopped two years in New York, and came to Dubuque Co. in 1849; has farmed since coming here, except two years employed on Illinois Central Railroad; has a farm of eighty acres. Mr. Austin acts with the Republican party; is also a member of the Presbyterian Church; his wife, Mrs. Kirby, was born in Dubuque Co. Oct. 10, 1846. They were married April 7, 1864; have six children - George B., William, P. Lila M., Bertha, and James.

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THOMAS AUSTIN, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Peosta; born in Ireland July 22, 1837; came to America in 1847; to Dubuque Co. in 1849; engaged in farming; has a farm of 120 acres; has held township offices. Is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a Republican. Was married in 1862 to Mary Gauchet, a native of New York; has three children living; five died; those living are John, Alfred, and Ell.

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M. BAAL, cigar maker, 1355 Iowa Street, Dubuque; was born in Pittsburgh, Penn. in 1843; his parents came West in 1852, and settled in Dubuque Co.; he grew up in this county; during the war he enlisted in Co. E, 21st I.V.I.; he was in five battles, and was severely wounded at Vicksburg; he learned his trade in Dubuque, and began business for himself in 1876. He married Miss Mary Hoerner, daughter of Andrew Hoerner, of Dubuque, in October, 1873; they have two sons - Alvin Fred and John Andrew.

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JOHN BAEHLER, of the firm of Stahlman, Reed & Co., dealers in staple and fancy groceries, 640 Main Street, Dubuque: is a native of Switzerland, and was born Dec. 16, 1845; his parents came to America in 1854, they came to Dubuque the same year and located in Swiss Valley, Table Mound Township; he grew up here; when 15 years of age, he entered the store of John Klein, and was with him nine years; in 1874, he entered their present store as clerk and in 1879, he became on the of __ firm of Stahlman, Reed & Co.; they transact the largest retail grocery business in Dubuque. Mr. Baehler was united in marriage in Chicago, Oct. 14, 1874, to Miss _____ Long, a native of Indiana; they have two children - Nettie and Fannie. He belongs to the Masonic Order, and to the United Workmen.

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ALBERT BAEUMLE, firm of Ferring & Baeumle, proprietor of New Vienna Brewery; he was born Oct. 22, 1856, in Dubuque Co.; the brewery was built in 1874, by his father and Mr. Ferring, the present Sheriff of this county; he bought out his father's interest in May, 1879. Married Miss Mary Hess Feb. 2, 1880; she was born in Dubuque Co.; her parents now reside in Liberty Township.

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ANDREW BAHL, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Dubuque; born Nov. 30, 1833, in Alsace, France; in 1845, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; in 1850, he went to California, remaining there till 1853, when he returned to Dubuque Co.; he owns 320 acres of land; part of this land was entered by his father; he was elected a member of the Legislature in 1865, and served two years; he has been six years a member of the Board of Supervisors; has been eleven years Assessor; has been Township Clerk for past nine years; has been Township Treasurer, Justice of the Peace and Constable; he has been School Director for the past twenty-three years; is also Treasurer of the School Board. Married Mary Engler July 14, 1856; she was born in Prussia;had ten children, nine of whom are living - Emma, Maggie, Andrew, George, Joseph A., Anna, Frank, Ida, and Jacob P.; lost Mary, in 1878, aged 21 years. Is Catholic in religion and Democratic in politics.

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RICHARD BAKER, Jr. farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 25; P. O. Farley; born Oct. 18, 1828, in Somersetshire, England; in 1850 he came to Dubuque Co.; worked by the month for a short time; as soon as his circumstances would admit, he bought a small tract of land and engaged in farming; he now owns over 1,000 acres, and is one of the wealthiest and most extensive farmers in the county, and is entirely free from debt; he has also assisted others in securing farms. Married Elizabeth Wall in 1852; she was born in Somersetshire, England; they have five children - Elizabeth, William, Jane, R. W., and Mary L. They belong to the M. E. Church.

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C. S. BALDWIN, M.D., physician and surgeon, Farley; is a native of Delaware Co., N. Y. and was born April 3, 1835; he grew up and received his education in that State; and began reading medicine; he came West to Cincinnati and completed his medical studies, and graduated at the Physio-Medical College, under President A. Curtis; he came to Dubuque in 1860, and in the fall of 1861 came to Farley, and engaged in the practice of medicine; he was the first physician in Farley, and continued the practice of his profession until within the past few years, when he has given the most of his time to the interests of his drug business, which is the only drug store in Farley. He has held offices of Town Trustee and school offices; he is a member of Order of I.O.O.F. In 1859, Dr. Baldwin was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Miller, from Vestal, Broome Co., N. Y.; they have five children - Ella, now Mrs. A. W. Graham, of Storm Lake, Flora, Herbert, Elmer, and Edith.

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ISAAC W. BALDWIN, editor and proprietor of the Cascade Pioneer; is a son of William Baldwin and Mary Slichter, and was born Jan. 31, 1835, at Blair, Waterloo Co., Canada West; he removed, with his parents, in 1846, to Saginaw, Mich., and, in 1853, came with them to Cascade, Iowa. His father was a tanner and currier, therefore young Isaac was trained to the same trade until coming to Iowa, when his father went to farming, and the subject of this sketch went to Galena and served as Assistant Postmaster from 1854 to 1866; he was also, a portion of the time, proprietor of the DeSoto House; the latter was conducted on a very liberal plan, and did not prove a paying investment; an example of his liberality is seen in the grand farewell entertainment which he gave to Lieut. Gen. U. S. Grant in 1865, prior to the General's departure for Washington; this was the society event of the season; Gen. Dick Oglesby, Gen. John A. Logan, Gov. Cullom, Hon. E. B. Washburne, Jesse K. Dubois and other State notables were present. Mr. Baldwin was married in Galena, on the 17th of November, 1860, to Miss Hellen Mackay, a daughter of Col. Eneas Mackay, of the U. S. Army; his children by this union are Bruce Legate, born April 29, 1862; Waltenham Eugene, Oct. 29, 1863; Maud Mary, Nov. 21, 1865;
Charles Dunn, Oct. 2, 1867, and Hellen M., Sept. 5, 1869. Mrs. H. Baldwin died Jan. 17, 1872. After leaving the post office in Galena, Mr. Baldwin resided in St. Louis until the autumn of 1867, when he returned to Cascade, where he has since resided; he was, for several years, connected with Frank May in the liquor business; then, for a year, he managed the American House, and in June, 1877, became editor and proprietor of the Cascade Pioneer, which is the only paper now published in this city. On the 23d of September, 1874, he married his second wife, Miss Jean Hays McGregor, daughter of Joseph McGregor, of Dubuque, by whom he has three children - Mae Bernice, born Aug. 15, 1875; Frank Leckly, Dec. 16, 1876, and Maggie, Dec. 22, 1878; Hellen and Maggie both died in infancy. Mr. Baldwin has been Justice of the Peace for six years in Whitewater Township. He has been a Democrat from early boyhood, but was a loyal supporter
of the Government during the rebellion, his model statesman being Stephen A. Douglas and not Jeff Davis; he represented the Democracy of Jo Daviess Co., Ill., in State Convention continuously from 1856 to 1862; was Chairman of the Third Congressional District in 1866, and stumped the district with Hon. Thomas J. Turner, and against Hon. E. B. Washburne. He is a member of the Odd Fellows, and is the Master Workman in the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a ready writer and public-spirited citizen. In religion he is liberal. The Pioneer is Independent.

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J. BALE, gas and steam fitter, corner of Eighth and Main Streets, Dubuque: is a native of England and was born at Barnstable, Devonshire, August 26, 1813; he came to the United States in 1851; his eldest son was an architect and came to Dubuque to draw the plans for the St. Cloud Hotel, and, through his influence, his father came here in 1856; he has been engaged in bell hanging, gas and steam fitting. In 1837, Mr. Bale was united in marriage to Miss Mary Galliford, a native of Barnstable, Devonshire, England and was born Feb. 18, 1813;they have seven children - Albert G., now Pastor of Congregational Church at Melrose, near Boston, Mass; John J.;Edward E., during the war enlisted when only 16 years of age, and came home Captain of his company; Lionel, express messenger; Eliza A., Mary E.; Emily R., now Mrs. __D. Smalley, of Des Moines; she is a graduate of Iowa College, and was engaged in teaching, and was Principal of the High School at Waverly, Iowa.

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JOHN M. BALLOU, attorney at law.

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FRANK S. BANGHART, clothing merchant; son of G. G. Banghart, of Cascade; was born Feb. 12, 1852, in Washington Township, Jones Co., near Cascade, Dubuque Co., Iowa; his minority was passed at home on the farm and in his father's store, and at Cornell College and Bailey's Commercial College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa; on attaining his majority, he started a store for the sale of clothing and gents' furnishing goods, which he still carries on, and has much the largest stock in his line to be found in Cascade. He was married, Sept. 20, 1876, to Miss Maggie Moore; they have one child - Bernice, born Sept. 1878. He speaks German; is a Democrat; is social, popular and successful.

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GEORGE G. BANGHART, the oldest merchant in Cascade; is the son of William Banghart and Mary A. Sutton, and was born Feb. 11, 1817, in Belvidere, Warren Co., N. J.; his father died when George was only 7, and, at 15, he went to Michigan and learned the trade of a baker, and afterward clerked in a store; when only 20 years of age, he formed a partnership with A. B. Newcomb & Co., in Pontiac, Mich.; soon after his majority, he became sole proprietor in a large bakery and a provision and grocery store; the panic of 1837 brought back to first principles, but, having good credit, he started a grocery store in 1838, which was burned in the summer of 1839; immediately rented another store and went into general merchandising; ran the store two years, then, in 1841, came to Cascade, bringing several hundred dollars worth of dry goods, which he sold in Caleb Bucknam's Hotel. He was married Feb. 11, 1838 (his 21st birthday), to Miss Eliza A. Bucknam, daughter of Caleb Bucknam, Sheriff of Oakland Co., Mich.; they had ten children, seven of whom are now living - George C., born in April, 1839, and died in August 1879; Carrie A., married R. J. McVay, a merchant in Cascade; William J., grain-buyer, Cascade; Frank S., clothier; Henry J., merchant, Monmouth, Jones Co.; Oscar H., partner of his father in general merchandising; May L., in Rockford Seminary, Illinois; Fannie V., now at home; two other children died in infancy. He has passed through several panics, but has in every instance paid one hundred cents on a dollar; he has been the subject of several accidents, but escaped without serious physical injury; when his store was struck by lightning in 1852, and a keg of powder exploded, thereby blowing out on side of the store and doing $2,000 damage, he was writing at his desk and was temporarily stunned, and none in the building killed; he has been Supervisor several times and held other township offices; he has been identified with the entire development of Cascade; he is the largest stockholder in the Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western Narrow Gauge Railroad, and has been Director from its organization and was at one time Vice President and Treasurer. For several years, he has not been connected with any church, but his wife is a member of the M. E. Church, to which he also contributes, and he had aided in the erection of all the churches in the city. He has a farm of 800 acres in Jones Co., just south of and adjoining the city; there are three tenant houses on the farm, and his own residence is first-class in all its appointments. He is a conservative Democrat, but supported the Government through the war, believing with Douglas that then there could by only two parties - patriots and traitors. He is earnest, social, tireless; attends closely to his varied interests, and is regarded as the leading business man of Cascade.

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GEORGE BARNARD, proprietor of the Key City House, cor. Main and Third Street, Dubuque; is a native of Rochester, N. Y.; he grew up to manhood there and at Niagara, where he lived twenty years; he was connected with the New York Central Railroad for a number of years, and was connected with the Customs Department of the Government for five years, at Suspension Bridge; he came to Dubuque in 1874, and became associated with his brother in the hotel business, the Lorimer House, and continued there until October, 1879, when he opened the Key City House. In 1870, Mr. Barnard was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Sage, from Lockport, N. Y.; they have three children.

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WILLIAM BARNARD, proprietor of the Lorimer House, cor. Julien avenue and Bluff Street; is a native of Rochester, N.Y., and was born Oct. 28, 1818; he grew up to manhood in that State, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1856; he has been connected with the Lorimer House since 1861; it is one of the largest and best hotels in the State, and is deservedly popular with the traveling community. Mr. Barnard was united in marriage to Miss Lydia P. Houghton, from Avon Springs, N. Y., Sept. 30, 1848.

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RICHARD BARRY, farmer, Sec.24; P.O. Tivoli; born Jan. 27, 1827, in Ireland; in 1847, came to New Jersey, in 1849 to Connecticut, in 1857 he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 280 acres of land; is Township Treasurer, School Director, etc. Married Miss Catharine Waldron Jan. 10, 1851; she was born in Ireland in 1834; they have twelve children - six sons and six daughters.

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HENRY J. BAULE, dealer in groceries and provisions, 822 Main Street, Dubuque; was born in Prussia, Germany, May 25, 1840; his parents emigrated to America and came to Dubuque in 1842; they both died the same year. He grew up to manhood here. After the war broke out he enlisted in the 21st. I.V.I., Co. C, and was in the service three years; he was in the battles of Fort Gibson, Champion Hill, Black River and the charge on Vicksburg, and in other battles and skirmishes. After the war he returned, and, in 1868, he engaged in his present business, and has built up a good trade; Mr. Baule had nothing when he began and owes his success to his own efforts. He married Miss Mary Michael, a native of France, Jan. 1, 1867; they have six children - Annie, Henry, Florence, Frank, Andrew, and Edward.

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JOHN BAUMAN, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Sherrill's Mound; born April 18, 1822, in Bavaria; in 1835, came to New York with his parents; in 1837 to Medina Co., Ohio; in 1846 he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 190 acres of land; has been Assessor, Justice of the Peace, Constable, Township Treasurer, etc. Married Mary Witter in 1852; she was born in Baden; they have seven children - Bertha, Catharine, John, Mary, Charles, Elizabeth, and Emil T. Members of the M. E. Church; Republican.

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REV. JOHN BAUMANN, Pastor of St. Paul's Catholic Church, Worthington; he was born Feb. 15, 1846 in Columbus, Ohio; at age of 14, he attended the University of Notre Dame, and completed his studies at the St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee; he was ordained by Archbishop Henni in 1871; he was then sent to Waterloo, Iowa, as Assistant Pastor, thence to Newburn, Marion Co., where he was Pastor; in 1875 he came to Worthington, and was appointed Pastor of St. Paul's Church, which position he now holds; he is also Pastor of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Cascade; he established and is now managing the Roman Catholic school here, conducted by the Sisters.

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GABRIEL BAUMGARTNER, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Dubuque; born Feb. 18, 1824, in Switzerland; in 1846, he came to Wisconsin; in 1848, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 210 acres of land; also a store and dwelling in Dubuque. Married Elizabeth Jose in 1857; she was born in 1824 in Switzerland; have 9 children - Gabriel, Andrew, John, Edward, Elizabeth, Emma, Peter, Frank, and George. He has four children by a former marriage - August, Walter, Lena, and Mary. Presbyterian.

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C. BAYLIES, President of Baylies Commercial College, corner of Seventh and Main Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Binghamton, N. Y., and was born Aug. 18,1839. His father, Gen. John Baylies, was one of the most influential men in that section, and noted for his interest in educational matters. In 1854, Gen. Baylies, with others, came West with the intention of founding a settlement, and he became one of the founders of the beautiful and enterprising town of Highland, twenty-five miles northeast of St. Joseph, Mo., and his family moved there three years later. Highland University, now a flourishing institution, owes its existence to Gen. Baylies more than to any other man. The school days of C. Baylies were ended there. He served in the early months of the late war as an officer of the Kansas militia. After leaving the service he decided to engage in business, and, as a preparatory step, he came to Dubuque in 1862, and entered Baylies Commercial College, then conducted by his cousin, A. Baylies, the founder. A few months later he became an assistant in that school, and, in 1863, became partner. His cousin died in Boston a few months later, on the 2d of August, 1863, since which time Prof. Baylies has been the sole manager of the institution known as Baylies Commercial School, founded in 1858, and incorporated in 1859; it is the oldest school of the kind in Iowa; since 1863, under its present management the institution has gained rapidly in character, influence and patronage.

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JAMES BEACH, of the firm of Pleins & Beach soap and candle manufacturers, corner of Dodge and Bluff Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Dover, New Hampshire, and was born July 26, 1835; when 12 years of age he went to Lawrence, Mass., where he grew up to manhood; in 1856, he came to Chicago, and the following year came to Iowa, and located in Dubuque; he engaged in his present business with Mr. Pleins, and the firm of Pleins & Beach have carried on the business for twenty-three years, and built up a good trade; they are the oldest firm without change except one in the city. Mr. Beach has held the office of City Alderman. Mr. Beach was united in marriage to Miss Sadie Barr, from Springfield, Ohio, Jan. 14, 1873; they have three children - George, Edward, and Charles.

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M. H. BEACH, attorney at law, cor. Main and Fifth Streets; is a native of Seneca Co., N. Y., and was born May 22, 1828; he grew up and received his preparatory education there, and entered Hamilton College and graduated in 1853; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in the spring of 1856, and was admitted to the bar the same year; he engaged in the practice of law, and is one of the oldest attorneys in the profession here; during the war, he enlisted in the 44th I.V.I., and was commissioned Lieutenant of Co. A; he has served as a member of the Board of Education for several years. In December, 1857, he was united in marriage to Miss H. M. Hoskins, from Seneca Co., N. Y., they have three children - Lansing H., who is a cadet at West Point; Harry L., and Woolsey E.

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DICKSON BEATTY, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Cascade; born in Tyrone, Ireland, Dec. 17, 1832; at the age of 13, he came with his parents, Manes and Agnes Beatty, and three brothers, Alexander, John, and Benjamin, came to Dubuque Co.; they had been preceded in the migration hither by his two brothers, James and David, and three sisters, Margaret, Sarah A., and Esther; from residences in Pennsylvania, Mississippi and New York, the family finally all collected here, and settled on adjoining farms in Dubuque and Jones Cos. At the age of 26, with no capital except forty acres of wild land, the subject of this sketch started in business for himself, and since then, with clear head, industrious hands, and ceaseless energy, has worked his way into the possession of a handsome competence and the control of an exceedingly flourishing business; has 461 acres of land in Secs. 17, 25, 26, 34, 35, and 36; his business is most largely dairy-farming and stock-raising, is thoroughly well managed, brings him a fine income, and he owes no man a dollar. In religion, a Baptist; in politics, a Republican. He was married in 1854 to Miss Ann J. Barton, who came here at an early age from Ireland with her parents, James and Margaret Barton; they have ten children, as yet all members of the pleasant home circle - Henry, John, Margaret J.,James D., Lizzie, Sarah, Ulysses S. G., George W., Mabel A., and Frederick.

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W. J. BEATTY, dealer in confectionery and ice-cream, No. 155 Eight Street, Dubuque; is a native of Philadelphia, and was born Aug. 21, 1852; his parents came to Dubuque in 1856, and settled near Cascade; he grew up to manhood there; he came to Dubuque in 1873, and entered a store as clerk; in 1879, he engaged in his present business.

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NICK BECK, of the firm of Beck Bros., dealers in wines and liquors, corner of Tenth and Jackson Streets; is a native of Germany, and was born in Luxemburg Oct. 5, 1883; grew up to manhood there, and came to America in 1857, and arrived in Dubuque June 6 of the same year; he has been engaged in business here since 1864. In 1874, he went to Germany on a visit and returned in 1875. William Beck, of the firm of Beck Bros., was born in Luxemburg, Germany Dec. 8, 1835; he grew up to manhood there, and came to America in 1857, and arrived in Dubuque the same year; he has been engaged in business here since 1859.

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HENRY BECKER, dealer in groceries and provisions; No. 123 Locust street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born Aug. 12, 1842; he grew up to manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1870; he lived in Cincinnati and in the State of Ohio about seven years. While living there he married Miss Amelia Runck, a native of Cincinnati, in the spring of 1872. In 1877 they came to Dubuque, and he engaged in his present business, and is building up a good trade.

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JOHN BEHR, farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born May 10, 1810, in Bavaria; in 1846, he came to his present farm, consisting of 294 acres, with good buildings and well improved. Married Margaret Beaurnshmitt in November 1846, by Bishop Loris of Dubuque; she was born March 5, 1821 in Bavaria; have five children; Charles J., Anna S. (now Mrs. Federspiel ), Mary Kunis, Caroline S. (now Mrs. Runest ), and John J. Catholic

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C. W. BELDEN, physician and surgeon, Main Street; is a native of Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y. and was born April 2, 1802; he grew up and received his education in that State; he studied medicine in Onondago Co., and graduated at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., in 1835; after graduating he began the practice of medicine in Genesee Co.; in 1855, he came West to Iowa, and located at Dubuque, and engaged in the practice of his profession, and has continued since then, a period of over twenty-four years. He was one of the Board of Examining Surgeons for the army during the war; he has held the office of President of the School Board, and was connected with the Board for many years; he is one of the Board of Examiners for Pensions. In 1838, he was united in marriage to Miss Frances Cummings, from Warsaw, N. Y.; they have five children-two sons and three daughters.

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JOHN BELL, contractor and builder, Ninth and Locust Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Scotland, and was born Dec. 15, 1827, he came to Montreal, Canada, in 1844, and came to Iowa, and located in Dubuque in November, 1853, and began working at the carpenter and joiner's trade; when the war broke out in 1861, he enlisted in the 1st I.V.I., Co. I; he was severely wounded in the battle of Wilson's Creek; he came home, and, after six months, the ball was extracted by Dr. Horr; he again went in the field, and served in the Quartermaster's Department until the close of the war; after his return he engaged in building, and since then has contracted and built many of the best buildings in the city. In 1863, while in the army, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Sutherland, a native of Glasgow, Scotland; they have one son - John A.

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CHARLES P. BELZ, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner of Seventh and White Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in 1838; his parents came to America when he was 9 years of age, and lived in St. Louis, and came to Dubuque in 1852; he grew up to manhood here, and has lived here since, except that in 1857 he went to Missouri and spent several years; during the war he enlisted in Co. D, 5th I.V.I., under Captain Charles Mehl, of St. Louis; he was in the battles of Carthage and Wilson's Creek; he returned here and entered a store, and, in 1876, engaged in his present business. He is connected with the Masons, the Order of I.O.O.F. and the Order of Workmen. In 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Mehl, daughter of George Mehl, Esq., of the city.

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GEORGE BENEDICT, druggist, Cascade; born Oct. 7, 1850, in Cayuga Co., N. Y.; his father died when George was quite young, and ever since he was 12 years old he has "paddled his own canoe;" came West with his mother in 1866, and settled in Winnebago, Ill., and worked on a farm until 20, then attended school two years' and afterward taught two years; in 1874, he engaged in the drug business in Winnebago, which he continued three years. On the 4th of October, 1876, he married Miss Cora Moore, formerly of Massachusetts; they have one daughter, born Feb. 28, 1879, named Tolie Narcissa. In the spring of 1877, he located at Cascade, and purchased the drug establishment of Dr. Francis, and his is now conceded to be the leading drug store of the city. Himself and wife are Methodists, and he is a Trustee and Steward in the M. E. Church; is a member of the Ancient Order of the United Workmen; and is a reliable Republican; is deservedly popular both in social and business circles.

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F. I. BENSON, manager of the Western Union Telegraph Co., Dubuque; is a native of Erie Co., Penn., and was born Jan. 26, 1835; he grew up to manhood in that State; when only 12 years of age he learned telegraphing; in 1848 he took President Taylor's message, it being one of the first annual Presidential messages ever telegraphed over the country; in January, 1861, he came to Dubuque, and was connected with the telegraph office until 1866, when he became manager of the Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Co., and held that position for five years, until the consolidation of the two lines; he again became connected with the Western Union, and Jan. 1, 1879, was appointed manager of the office of the Company here. In 1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret L. Webster, a native of St. Louis, Mo.; they have two children - Annie W. and Margaret M.

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C. S. BENTLEY, of the firm of C. S. Bentley & Co., grain merchants; is a native of Schoharie Co., N. Y.; removed to Wisconsin in 1856. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he enlisted as a private in the 2d Wis. V.C., Co. D; was promoted Sergeant, then First Lieutenant, and afterward to the company of the company; he participated in several battles; when enroute from the battle of Prairie Grove to Wisconsin on recruiting service as ordered, his party arrived at Springfield, Mo., the morning previous to this battle; he served on Gen. E. B. Brown's staff, and, during this engagement, the General was severely wounded and removed from the field by Lieut. Bentley, aided by a soldier; the soldier proved to be Looby, late Adjutant General of Iowa; this pleasing incident was discovered in a conversation at a re-union near seventeen years afterward. Capt. Bentley served nearly four years; the last year, being disabled from doing field duty, served on Gen. Osborn's staff as Acting Assistant Inspector General of the Cavalry Brigade. Capt. Bentley was united in marriage to Miss Mary Duncan, a native of Galena, Ill., in October, 1864, at Planters' House, St. Louis; starting with the battalion for Vicksburg, and while enroute with his wife and command, on board the steamer John J. Roe, when near New Madrid, in the night, the steamer struck a wreck heap and sank in sixty feet of water, drowning nearly four hundred horses; the soldiers were saved by a gunboat lying near by. Mrs. Bentley and Maj. Dale's wife were the only ladies on board. Mrs. B. can rightfully lay claim to the vicissitudes of war; while at New Madrid, awaiting another transport, were awakened on night with a slight shock of an earthquake; one morning, while enjoying a horseback ride, Mrs. B. was violently thrown from her horse and seriously injured; she was driven back to camp in a veritable ambulance; later, while at Vicksburg with the Captain and a party of friends, driving outside the lines, through some misunderstanding, by order Gen. Dana, the ladies of the party were prohibited from returning, and Mrs. B. remained over night in the confederacy; after remaining a few months with her husband, braved the danger of navigation on the Mississippi in war times; leaving her husband and the army, returned home via St. Louis, on board of the steamer Mary Forsyth. The captain was mustered out of service at Memphis. Located in Vicksburg, planting cotton on the historic ground, taking in the Pemberton monument, marking the spot where Gens. Grant and Pemberton stood under the tree arranging for the surrender of Vicksburg; thence he removed to St. Louis, remaining eighteen months; came to Galena, Ill., in 1869; thence to Dubuque in 1874. Was elected and commissioned Colonel of the 4th I.N.G., also served as Captain General of Siloam Commandery No. 3. Mr. and Mrs. Bentley have three children - Marcia D., born in Vicksburg, Miss; Jessie M., Galena, Ill.; Virgia E., Galena, Ill.

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C. H. BERG, of the firm of Palmer, Winall & Co., blank-book manufactures, printers and book-binders, corner Sixth and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Pittsburgh, Penn., and was born March 15, 1841; his parents removed to Cincinnati when he was 9 years of age, and, four years later, they came to Galena, Ill., where he grew up and entered the office of the Galena Gazette and learned the printing business, and was foreman in that office when he enlisted, in 1862, in the 96th Ill. V.I., and was Orderly Sergeant of Co. A.; he was in every battle of the regiment- some fifteen in all; he was wounded at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, and also at battle of Resaca; he was in the service three years; after the war he was foreman of the Dubuque Times office for two years, and then became a member of the present firm of Palmer, Winall & Co., he is Receiver of Dubuque Lodge, No. 9, A.O.U.W., and is Treasurer of Harmony Lodge No. 2, I.O.O.F., and belongs to the Iowa Legion of Honor; is a member of the Veteran Reserve Corps. Mr. Berg, was united in marriage to Miss Ella C. Helm, a native of Polo, Ogle Co., Ill., Feb. 12, 1869; they have two children - Charles E., Harry H., and have lost one daughter - Estelle.

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LEONARD BERG, 731 Clay Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, in 1825; when he was 11 years of age, he came this country, and lived in Pittsburgh; he came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque, in the spring of 1842, and began working in a bakery; in 1850, he went to California and remained about eighteen months; after his return, he engaged in the bakery business for himself and continued for some years. In 1853, he married Miss Margaret Reinfred, a native of Pittsburgh, Penn.; they have had seven children - only four survive - Mary, Frank, George, and Herman; Mr. Berge built the building they now occupy over twenty-five years ago, and they have lived in it ever since then.

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MATTHIAS BEWER, dealer in dry goods and notions, corner Iowa and Twelfth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Prussia June 18, 1823; he emigrated to America in 1845, and came the same year to Dubuque; arrived here June 18; he began working at his trade of stone-mason, and continued until 1857; he entered the dry-goods house of John Bell & Co. in 1859, and was with that firm fourteen years; then engaged in his present business, which he has carried on since then; he had nothing when he came, and owes his success to his own efforts; he belongs to the Pius Society and was one of its founders; he also belongs to the Mutual Life Insurance Company, and has been Treasurer of it since it started for fourteen years. He married Margaretta Eeffes, from Luxemburg, Germany; they have five children - Mary, Paul, John, Katie, and Peter.

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J. E. BILBROUGH, artistic photographer, corner Main and Eighth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of England, and was born only a few miles from the city of London Feb. 18, 1839; he grew up and received his education there, giving much attention to the study of fine arts; in 1862, he came to America, an two years later, in 1864, he came to Dubuque, and established his present business, which he has successfully conducted since then; he has established an enviable reputation as an artist, as the superior character of his work testifies; he has recently purchased for his gallery, for taking cabinet and life size portraits, two instruments made by J. H. Dalmeyer, of London - the finest and best made in the world - which will give him superior facilities in maintaining the leading position he has taken in the profession.

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CHARLES W. BITTMAN, of the firm of Bittman & Schroeder, dealer in groceries and provisions; is a native of Germany, and was born in Rhine Folz, on the Rhine, Bavaria, Jan. 8, 1822; he came to the United States when 15 years of age, and lived in Cincinnati, St. Louis, New Orleans and California; he came to Dubuque in 1854 and established his present business, and has carried it on successfully for a quarter of a century, and is one of the oldest merchant in the city; he is Vice President of the Board of Directors of Linwood Cemetery Association, and is actively identified with the interests of the city.

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JOHN BLAKE, (deceased) was a native of County Cork, Ireland; he emigrated to America in 1834, and in 1836 came to Dubuque, and was one of the early settlers here; he engaged in manufacturing brick. He married Miss Ellen Murphy, a native of Ireland. Mr. Blake carried on business in Dubuque many years; he died in August 1870, leaving two daughters; their eldest brother died in 1868, and one brother died while attending college in St. Louis. Mrs. Blake and her daughters reside in the old home place on Mineral street; their residence when it was built was one of the finest houses in Dubuque.

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MICHAEL BLAKE, quarry-man; residence 361 Alta Vista Street, Dubuque; was born in Ireland; and came with his parents to Dubuque when he was only 5 years of age; he grew up to manhood here; he has been engaged in quarrying for the past ten years, and works the Fourteenth Street quarries and the Hill quarries, and carries on a good business. He married Miss Mary Smith, from Staten Island, N. Y., in 1862; they have five children - Edward, Louise, Hugh, Julia, and John.

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THOMAS F. BLAKE, Postmaster and dealer in general merchandise, Sec. 30; Rickardsville; born March 17, 1842, in Boston, Mass; in 1855, he came to Dubuque Co., remained here till 1864, where he went to Montana in 1876, he came to the locality and established his present business; he was appointed Postamaster in 1875; he also owns 80 acres of land. Married Margaret Kelly in 1870 she was born in Wisconsin; they have two children- Thomas and Anne; they lost three children in infancy.

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M. BLUMENAUER, brewers' headquarters, 531 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany,and was born Aug. 12, 1836, he came to America in 1842. and grew up in Frederick City, Md.; he came to Dubuque in 1856; he was connected with the brewery of Titus Schmid & Co. as Superintendent, and, after their death, he ran the brewery himself; he has held the office of City Alderman from the Fifth Ward, and served as Mayor, pro tem.; he belongs to the Masonic Order, and is a member of the Encampment and Lodge of I.O.O.F.; also a member of the Sharpshooters and Turner's Society. In 1862, he married Miss Josephine Schmid, a native of Germany; they have four children - Adolph H., Emma, Ella, Hilda.

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GEORGE BOCK, wagon-maker, Couler and Eagle Point Avenues, Dubuque;was born in Germany Aug. 7, 1851; he came to America in 1867, and came to Dubuque the same year; he earned his trade here, and in 1878 he engaged in wagon-making, and is building up a good trade; he belongs to Schiller Lodge,I.O.O.F. He married Miss Augusta Burt, of Dubuque in 1875, she is a native of Germany. They have two children - Christina and George.

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LOUIS BOISOT, cashier of the Second National Bank, corner Main and Sixth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland, and was born Aug. 5, 1823; he grew up to manhood and came to the United States in 1848, and came to Dubuque in 1853; he was connected with the bank of F.S.Jessup & Co. until 1857, after that he was connected with railroad and elevator interests; in 1867, be became connected with the German Bank, and continued with that institution as cashier until December, 1878. In February 1880, he was elected to his present positions cashier of the Second National Bank of Dubuque. In April, 1854, Mr. Boisot was united in marriage to Albertana Bush, a native of New York; they have four children - Louis, now attorney at law in Chicago; Emile, in the First National Bank, Chicago; Edward, insurance business at St. Paul; Alice, at home.

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JOHN C. BOLEYN, school teacher, Sec. 6; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born May 15, 1846, in Holland; in 1859, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; he owns 120 acres of land; in 1868, he attended the Lenox Collegiate Institute, at Hopkinton, Delaware Co., and continued his studies here till 1871; he then commenced teaching, he having taught, in all, about eight years. He is Secretary of the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Co. He married Louisa Proahl July 7, 1873; she was born in Dubuque Co.; they have four children - Augusta, Calvin, Clara A., and Bertha. He was one of the Trustees of the Presbyterian Church, having held this office for the past ten years.

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RICHARD BONSON, capitalist, Sec. 22; P. O. Dubuque; is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born Oct. 23, 1814; he grew up to manhood there and came with his father's family to the United States in 1834; they came to Dubuque the same year, and arrived here in July; his mother died of cholera while coming up the river; Mr. Bonson's father and Richard Waller, and John H. Roundtree, erected near Platteville the first blast furnace ever built in the United States; in 1836, they built three furnaces, one at Mineral Point,one on the East Fork of the Fever River, and one near Dubuque, at Rosedale; two of these furnaces are still operated; there was a company of twelve of them, which was found to be too large and unprofitable, so they dissolved and worked in smaller companies. In the early days of mining, there were many complications in locating claims. A committee of twenty-five was appointed as arbitrators to settle the disputes. From this committee was appointed an executive committee of three, consisting of T. Davis, J. Langworthy, and R. Bonson. They made the maps of the claims, and settled all disputes between the disputed claimants, and their decision was final. We are informed that Mr. Bonson is the only surviving member of this executive committee. Mr. Bonson has been interested in lead mining and smelting for over forty-six years, a longer period than any one else in Dubuque Co.; he was also engaged in the mercantile business for some years. When Mr. Bonson began life, he was a miner, and his father was without means, and his success is owing to his own efforts; he was twice elected as Representative to the State Legislature, and has served as member of the Board of County Supervisors. Mr. Bonson has been actively identified with the interests of the county, and with the mining interests of Iowa and Wisconsin. Mr. Bonson resides about one mile from the city, and has one of the most elegant and attractive houses in the State. In 1838, Mr. Bonson was united in marriage to Miss Jane Burton, from Derbyshire, England; she died in 1866, leaving two children - Mrs. Priscilla Morgan and Mrs. Mary Ellen Simplot. In 1868, Mr. Bonson was united in marriage to Mrs. Harriet Pierson, formerly Miss Harriet Watts, from Manchester, England; they have three children - two sons, Robert and William W., and one daughter, Annie Watts.

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C. H. BOOTH
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BALTZER BORN, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 14, 1825, in Germany; in 1835, he came to Somerset Co., Penn., with his parents; in the fall of 1844, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 129 acres of land. He has been Constable. Married Margaret Seigfreit in 1855; she was born in Pennsylvania in 1836, and died in 1872; has five children - Oscar W., Frank A., Edward E., George D., and Viola; lost Levi and Joseph in infancy. Second marriage was to Mrs. Nicholson, in 1874; she was born in Prussia; have two children - Henry and Effie; she has children by a former marriage - Parker W. and Mary. Presbyterian Church.

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A. M. BOTSFORD, proprietor Botsford Mills, Sec 35, P. O. Epworth; born in Newtown, Fairfield Co., Conn., Aug. 27, 1844; removed to Dubuque Co,. Iowa, with his parents, in 1856; in former years, he was at different times engaged in the various enterprises of farming, merchandising, flour-dealing, etc., but has given his continuous attention to his present vocation since 1870; he has a very considerable landed ancestors have, for seven generations past, resided on one homestead in Connecticut; the original ancestors belonging to the old Milford colony, who made the first English settlement in that portion of America. Mr. Botsford was married in June 1873 to Miss Julia A. Moriarty; they have five children - Thomas Abel, John Francis, Joseph Byron, Vincent Henry, and Alice Eveline.

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BEN BRADFORD, residence 204 Alpine Street, Dubuque; is a native of Southern Illinois; he grew up to manhood and was engaged in steamboating, and was, Captain on the Mississippi River for many years; he came to Dubuque in April, 1865, and since then he has been largely interested in mining. He married Miss M. Spease, a native of Kentucky.

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C. BRADLEY, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Rockdale; born in England Dec. 5, 1821; emigrated to America, and settled in Dubuque Co. Iowa, in June 1843; is one of the mist successful farmers in his locality, and by intelligent management and persevering industry has acquired quite extensive landed possessions; his farm comprises 630 acres in Sec. 26, 27, 34, and 35, Table Mound Township and in Washington Township. His politics are Republican. He was married, Jan. 7, 1851 to Miss Ann W. Sheldon, who, at the age of 6, came to America from England with her parents - Samuel and Sarah Sheldon; her mother is yet living; her father died in July 1879; Mr. and Mrs. Bradley have six children living - Cornelius, William, Sarah, Elizabeth, Christopher, and Christiana; three deceased - Mary A., Dorothy, and James.

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JAMES F. BRADY, Pastor of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Farley; is a native of Ireland, and was born in the city of Dublin, July 27, 1844; he grew up to manhood and received his literary education there, and also pursued his theological studies; he came to United States in 1870, and came the same year to Dubuque, and was appointed Assistant Pastor at the Cathedral; he was appointed Assistant Pastor at Des Moines, and was there two years; in 1873, he was appointed to his first pastorate at Ossian, Winneshiek Co., where he remained five years; after serving a short time as Pastor of the church in Dewitt, Clinton Co. he was, in December, 1878, appointed to his present pastorate of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Farley.

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NICK BRAND, dealer in fresh and salted meats, 1,575 Clay Street; was born in Berne, Switzerland, Nov. 29, 1863; he came to the United States in 1852, came to Dubuque in the spring of 1854 and began the butcher business; he has carried on the business for twenty-six years, and is one of the oldest in the city. In the fall of 1858, he married Miss Elizabeth Bishop, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany; they have seven children - Nick, John, Louise, Katie, Samuel, Alois, Ann Elizabeth. When Mr. Brand came to Dubuque he had nothing and had to borrow money to cross the ferry; he belongs to the Schiller Lodge, I.O.O.F., and has been a member of the German association for seventeen years.

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JACOB BREITBOCK, merchant, Lattnerville; born in Prussia May 6, 1824; emigrated to America; resided several years in Pennsylvania, coming to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in June, 1854; while in Pennslyvanina, his business was merchandising; the first nineteen years after coming to Dubuque Co., he engaged in farming; the last seven years he has added to this industry his former avocation as merchant, and also hotel keeping, etc.; has a fine new store and hotel building, and 107 acres of land adjoining Lattnerville. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democratic in general principles, but "best man" for local positions; he has held school offices. He was married in Pittsburgh, Penn., in the year 1851, to Miss Philomena Sigwart, a native of Baden; they have thirteen children, all living - Jacob J., L., Louisa, Lewis, Josephine, Francis, Philomena, Peter, Catharine, John, Mary Ann, Barbie, Caroline, and Joseph.

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CARL BREZINSKY, practical furrier; manufacturer and dealer in furs, 590 Main Street, Dubuque; was born in Eastern Prussia, Dec. 26, 1825; he grew up to manhood and served apprenticeship and learned the trade of furrier; he emigrated to the United States in 1855, and worked at his trade in New York and Boston; in 1860, he came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque, and began working at his trade; he engaged in business for himself in 1864, and since then has manufactured furs, and has built up a good trade; he is the only practical furrier in the city; Mrs. Brezinsky has charge of the store and attends to selling goods. After coming to Dubuque, Mr. Brezinsky married Miss Johanna Spiedler, in St. Paul, Oct. 17, 1860; she is a native of Prussia; they have two sons - Charles, born Nov. 26, 1861; Freddie, born Dec. 13, 1871; they have lost one daughter, Mary, born March 7, 1863; she died July 12, 1863.

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T. J. BRIGGS, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Epworth; born in Hampden, six miles south of Bangor, Me., Feb. 26, 1838; his father and family removed to the town of Adams, Hillsdale Co., Mich, in 1838 or 1840, and from there to Dubuque Co. in June 1844; so much of Mr. Briggs' life having been spent here, he has had no unimportant part to perform in changing this portion of the "Hawkeye State" from its natural condition to its present state of cultivated prosperity, and he can probably give quite as clear a statement as any man in his community of the "happenings" here since 1844; he has formerly farmed extensively, but of late years proceeds on the motto of " A little farm well tilled," and practices this maxim on his 40 acre farm near Epworth, being closely identified with the interest of the town, of which his father, Otis Briggs, deceased, was one of the founders. Is a Republican; has held township offices. He was married, Dec. 23, 1868, to Miss Mary P. Snyder, of Iowa City, to which place she had removed in 1841 from Cincinnati, Ohio, her native place; their only child, Mary Eliza, was called away by death.

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JOHN G. BROADHURST, contractor and builder, No. 478 Fifteenth Street, Dubuque; is a native of England, and was born Aug. 29, 1827;he grew up to manhood there and came to America in 1848; he came to Dubuque in 1852 and commenced working at his trade; he is one of the oldest contractors now in the business here; the firm of Biles & Broadhurst built the addition to the Julien House, the Lorimer House and the old Argyle House, and many other prominent buildings in Dubuque. Mr. Broadhurst was united in marriage to Miss Jarrilda Smart, from Illionis, Nov. 30, 1852; they have six children - Douglas,Isaac and John, and three daughters, Jarrilda, Arminda, and Maria, all born in Dubuque, in the house where they now live.

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GEORGE BROWN, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Rickardsville; he was born Oct. 9, 1800 in the county of Durham, England; in 1828, he came to Pennsylvania; in 1833 he came to Dubuque Co,. where he has since lived, and is one of the first settlers of the county, and raised the first apples in the State; he attended the first religious meeting held in Dubuque, which was in 1834, in a room over a saloon kept by a Frenchman named Nado; he owned about 186 acres of land, and has been engaged considerably in lead mining. He married Miss Mary Warmoth in 1827; she was born in 1806; died in February 1866; they had three children (two living): Joseph and Parker;Nicholas enlisted in 1862, 21st I.V.I., and served to the end of the war; he died in 1875, from a disease contracted in the army.

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JOHN BROWN, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Center Grove; born in Pennsylvania in 1834; in 1840, removed with his parents to Dubuque Co.; his father, William, died in 1868; his mother, Mary, lives with her son, the subject of the sketch; for the last twelve years, he has been farming; before that, was employed in the business of smelting, near Dubuque; has a farm of 100 acres in Secs. 5 and 7. Religion, Methodist. Politics, Republican. He was married in 1855, to Miss Louis Shwagler, who came here when 4 or 5 years old with her parents, John Shwagler and wife; six children living - John W., Henry W., Allen, Edgar, Frank, and Annie; three children have died - Emily, Annie J., and one who died in infancy.

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L. R. BROWN, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Epworth; born in Maine Oct. 24, 1830; came to Dubuque Co. in the spring of 1856; for some ten years, most of his time was devoted to the profession of teaching, being employed for five years in charge of the public schools of Epworth; farming and stock-raising has been his vocation in later years, preferring, however, to devote his attention to stock-raising, rather than to the cultivation of grain; his landed possessions aggregate 349 acres, in one of the finest localities in Dubuque Co., and his comfortable financial situation is the natural sequence of his own unaided, but well directed exertions. Worth less than $200 on coming to the county, he rank to-day among the foremost of her substantial citizens. Politically, he may be classed as an Independent Republican, with an earnest desire to see the best measure adopted, and the best men in office, without strict regard to party lines.

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AUGUST BRULOT, engaged in mining, West Dubuque; is a native of France and was born April 12, 1844; he came to America in 1852; lived in Ohio two years, and came to Dubuque in 1854; grew up to manhood here; he, in company with three other citizens, is associated in mining. He married Miss Mary Josephine Miller, a native of Dubuque Co., May 31, 1868; they have three children - Mary E., Addie V., and Josephine.

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HENRY BRUNS, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Oct. 15, 1813 in Hanover; in 1844, he came to St. Louis, thence to Illinois; in 1848, he came to his present farm, consisting of 160 acres of land; he first occupied a small log cabin, and now has one of the best houses in the township, as well as the largest barn and other out-houses; his farm is otherwise well improved, Married Sophia Stellmann in August 1845; she was born in Germany; had eight children (seven living) - Henry A., now in Clay Co., Minn., where he is carrying on a very extensive business, running a store, elevator and mill; Rosena, Sophia, Edward, Anna, Mary, and Attilla; they lost John in infancy. M. E. Church; Republican.

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L. BRUNSING, dealer in groceries streets, corner of Twelfth and Washington Streets, Dubuque; was born in Germany in December 1832; he grew up and was in mercantile business there; in 1873, he came to the United States and engaged in manufacturing mustard; he afterward sold out the business to John Glab; he engaged in his present business in 1879, and is building up a good trade. In 1866, he married Lizzie Kuelemann, a native of Germany; they have one son - Peter. He has two sons by a former wife - Henry and Anton.

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JAMES W. BRUNSKILL, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Dubuque; is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth Brunskill, who came to this locality at an early date in the settlement of the county; he was born in Dubuque Co. May 31, 1849; with the excetption of five years employed in smelting at Centre Grove, he has been engaged in the business farming, stock-raising and stock-dealing; his farm comprises about 198 acres in Secs. 4 and 9. Politics, Republican. On his 22d birthday, May 31, 1871, he was married to Miss Maria Frost, daughter of Joseph and Rebecca Frost, who became residents of Dubuque Co. in 1844; four children - Nettie E., Lula R., Wilbert W., and Edwin J.

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JOSEPH J. BRUNSKILL, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Dubuque; born in Medina Co., Ohio, Feb. 11, 1846; when quite young, his parents removed to Dubuque Co., where he has made his almost constant residence; his farm comprises 200 acres. Politics, Republican. He was married in June 1870 to Miss Alice Winders, of Dubuque Co.; they have three children - Joseph Elmer, David E., and Mary A. E.

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WILLIAM BRUNSKILL, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Dubuque; is a native of Wisconsin, and was born in Platteville Nov. 2, 1836; his parents came across the river to Dubuque the following year, and located near where they now live; he grew up to manhood here; he was engaged in smelting for five years; he moved on the farm where he now lives in 1865; owns a farm of 100 acres. In 1859, he married Christina Rowe, a native of England.

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GABRIEL BUBLETER, wines and liquors, Julien Avenue, Dubuque; born in Tyrone, Austria, July 13, 1827; he emigrated to the United States in May of 1853, and came to Dubuque in June of the same year; engaged in tailoring; afterward engaged in his present business. In January, 1854, he married Miss Elizabeth Zollicoffer, daughter of George Zollicoffer, one of the early settlers of Dubuque Co. they have six children - Kate, George, John, Amelia, Dena, Ada

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NICK BUER, wood dealer, No. 567 Eighth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Luxemburg, Germany, and was born in 1836; he came to America in 1855, and came direct to Dubuque; engaged in cutting wood with Nick Hanson up the river; he brought wood here on a flat-boat; since 1865, he has been engaged in the wood business, and is one of the oldest dealer here. He married Miss Eva Beck, a native of Luxemburg, Germany, Jan. 14, 1869; they have three children - Lizzie, John, and Peter.

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D. M. BUIE, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Epworth; born in Kentucky April 20, 1810; left Kentucky in 1828; lived in Illinois till 1832, when he came to Dubuque Co.; was in Black Hawk war in Gen. Henry's brigade, Col. Fry's regiment; has held township offices and been Captain of militia; has 378 acres of land in Vernon, Taylor, and Iowa Townships. Has been twice married, first in 1839, to Mrs. Sarah Camp, widow of Col. H. T. Cam p; she died in 1864. His second wife was Mrs. Margaret Miller, born in Belfast, Ireland, of Scotch parentage; Mr. Buie had two children by his first wife - a daughter, E. E. I., who died aged 26 years, and a son, Frederick C., who died aged 18 months; he has three step-children by his first wife - William K. Camp, now in Hot Springs, Ark., and Mrs. Mary D. Palmer, of Dubuque, and Mrs. Sarah D. Meyers, of California; and by his second wife - Mrs. J. Burge, of California; Mrs. E. W. Sculley and A. B. Miller, of Minnesota, and J. H. and Robert C. Miller of Dakota. Mr. Buie is a member of the M. E. Church, and of the Democratic party.

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F. X. BULLINGER, school teacher, Dyersville; born Dec. 3, 1834, in Bavaria; in 1854, came to Wisconsin; in 1858, to Dubuque Co; the following year he came to Dyersville, where he since has resided and taught school; he owns his house and lot in Dyersville. Married Miss Mary Boeckenstedtte in 1859; she was born in Oldenberg, Germany; they have four children - John, Joseph, Liddy, and Anna. Democrat; Catholic Church.

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FERDINAND BURGDORF, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born April 7, 1811; in 1845 he came to Dubuque Co.; he entered and owns 180 acres of land. He is Trustee in the M. E. Church, and has been School Director. There were but three brick houses in Dubuque when he first came here; he has hauled wood to Dubuque from his farm for 75 cents a load. Married Johanna Hiemstadt in 1842; she was born May, 1810, in Hanover, and died Feb. 23, 1878; they had one daughter, who married Wm. G. Albright in 1847; she died Dec. 26, 1876; they have seven children - two sons and five daughters. Attend the M. E. Church.

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L. R. BURNHAM, Superintendent of the Farley Creamery, Farley; is a native of New York State, and was born Jan. 30, 1847; he grew up to manhood in that State. While living there, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma G. Wing in the fall of 1870; in March 1874, he came to Iowa and learned his business at Sand Spring; in June 1878, when the Farley Creamery was established, he was appointed Superintendent, and since then has had the management of it.

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REV. L. H. BURNS, Pastor St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Key West, residence at St. Bernard's Mound; P. O. Key West; born in Ireland in 1847; came to America at the age of 12, and after a brief stay in New York, went to Philadelphia; remained there four years, and attended the parochial school at St. Augustine and was then taught by the Brothers of the Holy Cross. He then went to Villanova College, ten miles from Philadelphia, to commence his classical studies; in 1871, was sent to St. Charles College, Ellicott City, Md. (The college located on the former property of "Charles Carroll, of Carrollton".) After two years there, was sent to St. Bonaventure College and Seminary, Allegheny, N.Y., where he remained six years, and then applied to Bishop Hennessy for adoption. The Bishop's consent being given, he was ordained for the diocese of Dubuque June 24, 1879, and, called to his field of labor about the 1st of August. After some transient work at St. Joseph's College, Holy Cross, etc., was appointed Pastor of St. Joseph's Key West, Sept. 16, 1879. The great improvement of the church under his charge tells clearly of the earnest, faithful, and effective work he is doing for his people. The church building is renovated and re-arranged; and further improvements are planned for early completion. The church ceremonies are thoroughly performed and the numbers of the attending congregation fully doubled since his coming. The collections for charitable purposes have increased in much larger ratio, and the warmest affection exists among his people for the worthy Pastor, through whose labors such a desirable state of affairs has been brought about.

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GEORGE BURDEN, real estate and lands, residence 25 High Street, Dubuque; is a native of Devonshire, England, and was born Sept. 27, 1814; in he came to the United States in 1833, and located in Western New York, and lived in that State over twenty years, and was engaged in mercantile business; he came West to Iowa in 1855, and located at Dubuque, and engaged in the land business; in 1856, also established a bank in Winona; during the financial crisis of 1857, they were among the few who did not close their doors, but continued here until 1860; in 1862, they retired from banking in Winona, and since then have engaged in the land business. Mr. Burden was united in marriage to Miss Eliza A. Holmes (formerly Miss Eliza A. Richard s), a a native of Genesee Co., N. Y.; she is a graduate of Carey Collegiate Seminary, N. Y. In 1848, she came West to Rockford, Ill., and engaged in teaching a private school; she was requested by leading citizens to the town to secure a suitable person to establish a female seminary; she was successful in securing Miss Anna P. Sill, Principal of Carey Collegiate Seminary, a lady of rare literary attainments and qualifications for the position, and, in the spring of 1849, they established the seminary there, and it has become one of the most successful literary institutions in the West. Mr. and Mrs. Burden have one son - George Albert, born Feb. 3, 1866.

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E. H. BUSH, agent for Chicago,Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, Worthington; born March 8, 1834 in Bristol, England; in 1857, he came to Dubuque, and there engaged in railroading, which has been his business since a boy; he was one of the engineers of the Dubuque & South-Western Railroad when it was being constructed, and was appointed agent here on completion of the road in 1859; he is also dealing in live stock and grain, Married Lydia Culver in 1861; she was born in Michigan; died in June 1871; they have four children - Eddie, William, Francis, and Bertie; second marriage to Mary Almond in 1872; she was born in New York; have three children - Burnice, Kittie, and Kennith.

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OLIVER BUSSARD, miller and farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Washington Mill; was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., May 6, 1830; came to Iowa in 1850. Was married, in September 1856 to Sarah Saner; has seven children - George F., John, William, Michael, Samuel, Emma A., and Martha C. Washington Mils, built by Bussard & Kifer in 1858, has two run of stone, and contailns all modern improvements, with a capacity of 200 bushels per day. Mr. Bussard owns 200 acres of land in Dubuque Co., and is senior partner of the firm of Bussard & Kyne, owners of Washington Mills. Mr. Bussard is Independent in politics, and belongs to the Reformed Church.

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JOHN BUTT, of the firm of John Butt & Bros., manufacturers of wagons and sleighs, No. 645 Iowa Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Mecklenburg April 30, 1849; his parents came to America, and located in Dubuque in 1852; his father established the present business in 1853, and carried on the business until his death, which occurred in 1873. John, the oldest member of the present firm, grew up to manhood, and learned his trade here, and engaged in business with his father, and, at his death, he and his brothers - Ernst, William, and Helmuth - succeeded him in the business. He married Miss Therisia L. Hauser, a native of Dubuque, Oct. 18, 1877. Mr. Butt belongs to the Order of Workmen, and is a member of the Dubuque Shooting Club.

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P. M. BYERLY, wagon-maker, Farley; is a native of Ross Co., Ohio, and was born Aug. 2, 1838; his parents came to Iowa when he was 4 years of age, and located in Dubuque Co. in 1842; they located six miles north of Dubuque; he grew up in this county, and learned his trade in Dubuque. When the war broke out, he enlisted in Co. G, 1st I.V.C., and served in that regiment three years and three months; then served one year in Co. H, 4th Regt. Hancock's Veteran Corps; he was wounded, being shot in the head in crossing the Little Missouri River, Ark.; after the war, in 1867,he located in Farley and established his present business, and has continued since then, and is the only wagon-maker here; he belongs to the Order of United Workmen. In 1866, Mr. Byerly married Miss S. E. Stoffel, from Illinois; he has one son - Melville H., by former wife.

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CAESAR BROTHERS, wholesale dealers in fancy groceries, 233 Main Street, Dubuque; the firm was established in 1869, and was composed of August and Charles Caesar; they are both natives of Germany; August came to this country in 1858, and the same year came to Dubuque, and has been connected with the grocery trade in the city over twenty years, and has had a large experience in the business; Charles came to this country four years later, and in 1869 the present firm of Caesar Brothers was organized; by strict attention to the interests of their business, they have built up a good trade.

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C
MONROE M. CADY, attorney at law, of the firm of Graham & Cady, corner of Main and Seventh Streets, a native of Windsor, Berkshire Co., Mass., and was born Jan. 25, 1842, he grew up there until 17 years of age; attended school at Easthampton, Mass., and in 1862 entered Union College, New York, and graduated in 1866; he studied law in Troy, N. Y., and was admitted to the bar at the Supreme Court at Albany in 1868; he practiced law in Tioga Co., N. Y. a short time, and then went to New York City, and was engaged in teaching there in the French Academy; he was offered a good position there with Hon. Charles Nettleton, but he had a great desire to come West, and in 1869 he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in the practice of law; he has given much attention to patent law, and had made that branch of the profession a specialty; he has been associated with his present partner, Mr. Graham since October 1871.

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CHARLES J. CAFFALL, auctioneer, of the firm of Caffall & West, 737 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Rickmansworth, Herfordshire, England, and was born March 31, 1825; he grew up to manhood at Hammersmith, Middlesex, about twenty miles from London, and served apprenticeship with auctioneer and timber surveyor; he came to America in 1852, and the same year came to Iowa and located at Dubuque, and engaged in he auctioneer and real-estate business; the firm of Cox, Caffall & Co., was one of the most prominent in their business in this section of the State, and they sold the lands of the Dubuque & Sioux Railroad Company along the line of the road; Mr. Caffall makes a specialty of selling stock and farm property, and gives his personal attention to this department of the business; he is, without doubt, the oldest and most experienced auctioneer in the State. He has been twice married; his first wife was Miss Sarah Gomme, from Hammersmith, Middlesex, England, she died in 1853, leaving one son, Charles G.; his present wife was Miss Christina McKinley, a native of Dunfermline, Scotland; they have eight children - five sons, Richard, James, Frank, George, and David, and three daughters, Emma, Louise, and Effie E.

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ABSALOM CAIN, 354 Seventh Street, Dubuque; is a native of Virginia, and was born Aug. 28, 1813; he grew up to manhood in that State and learned the trade of shoemaker; he came to Ohio and lived there until coming to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque Dec. 13, 1840; he engaged some in mining and worked at his trade of shoemaker for one year, then engaged in mercantile business with Henry Simplot until the death of the latter in 1846, then Mr. Cain carried on the business with John Simplot until 1852; in 1852 he was appointed Deputy Clerk of the District Court, and then was clerk for the County Judge until 1866, since then, he has been engaged in attending to his own interests; when he came here, he only had $300, but, by industry and good management, he has acquired a competency, his success in life is owing to his own efforts. He was united in marriage to Caroline Faulhaber, a native of this city, Nov. 17, 1862; they have four children - Fannie, Harry, Lee, Frank R., and Addison.

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A. B. CARLIN, of the firm of Farley, Loetscher & Co., proprietors of the Key City Planing Mill, corner of Eighth and Jackson Streets; is a native of Guernsey Co., Ohio, and was born Aug. 20, 1838; he came West to Burlington, Iowa in 1848, when only 10 years of age, and came to Dubuque in 1850; in 1855, he went in planing-mill, and has been connected with that business in the manufacturing of sash, doors and blinds for twenty-five years; he was with J. L. Dickinson twelve years; in March 1877, the present firm was organized, and the have built up a large business. In November, 1875, Mr. Carlin was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Keeley, of this city; she is a native of Michigan.

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C. M. CARTER, Assistant Treasurer of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota R. R.; is a native of Cambridge, Mass.; he grew up and received his education in that State; after reaching manhood he came West in 1876, and held the position of Cashier of the B. & M. R. R. in Nebraska at, Omaha; he came to Dubuque on the 1st of March 1877, and was appointed Assistant Treasurer of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota R. R., and since then has occupied that position; he also performs the duties of Paymaster of the road. Mr. Carter was united in marriage to Miss Ada P. Hunter, of this city, daughter of John Hunter, May 15, 1879.

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WILLIAM CARTER
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D. D. W. CARVER, of the firm of Ham & Carver, publishers of the Dubuque Daily and weekly Herald; is a native of Delaware Co., N. Y., and was born May 12, 1834; he grew up and attended school in that State; after reaching manhood, he removed to Massachusetts, and there first entered the printing business; in the spring of 1856, he came West to Iowa and established the Charles City Intelligence, the first paper published in the Cedar Valley, north of Cedar Rapids; while publishing that paper, he was appointed Postmaster under President Buchanan; in 1862, he came to Dubuque, and, in 1864 bought a half-interest in the Dubuque Herald, and associated with M. M. Ham, and, since then, they have successfully conducted that paper. Mr. Carver acts with the Democratic party; he has no taste for political life, although mingling constantly with politicians; he has been repeatedly solicited to accept the nomination or become candidate for office, but has declined, preferring to devote his whole time to the interests of the business. In 1858, Mr. Carver was united in marriage to Miss Mary Kelly, a native of Wisconsin; they have one daughter - Josephine.

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EGBERT CHAMBERLAIN, of the firm of Chamberlain, Dewstoe & Co., wholesale dealers in cigars and tobacco, No. 419 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Albany, N. Y., and was born Oct. 30, 1846; when only 9 years of age, he began to earn is own living; he was office boy in the office of Rufus Choate, the eminent lawyer; in 1857, he came West, and when 17 years of age, he began railroading with the Illinois Central Railway, and remained with that Company over sixteen years; he held the position of trainmaster for sometime; he ran the first passenger train into Iowa Falls, and was one of the oldest conductors on this division of the road; he engaged in his present business January 1, 1880. Mr. Chamberlain was united in marriage to Miss Laura Clark, from the city of Dubuque, March 24, 1869; they have three children - John, Lena, Egbert.

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WILLIAM C. CHAMBERLAIN, President of the Norwegian Plow Co., Main St., Dubuque; is a native of Brookfield, Madison Co., N. Y.; and was born Feb. 18, 1834; when 15 years of age he entered a store in Utica and remained for five years and worked himself up to the position of chief clerk in one of the leading stores in the city; during the last two years of his stay there he was connected with a prominent scientific and literary club and became its secretary; when about 20 years of age, Mr. Chamberlain decided to come West, and arrived in Chicago in March 1854; he secured a situation immediately in one of the largest commercial business houses in the city; the following year he came to Dubuque and located in Dubuque in November 1855. In connection with F. A. Doolittle he started the first store for the sale of agricultural implements exclusively, west of the Mississippi and north of St. Louis; when this business was commenced, few, if any, of the improved implements and machines of this class now in general use, and which have revolutionized the methods of labor on the farmland come into use, excepting the reapers of McCormick and Manny; Mr. Chamberlain has by his energy and fair dealing built up a large business and has trade in almost every town in Northern Iowa, Southern Minnesota and portions of Wisconsin. He established the Norwegian Plow Co., in this city, and is President of the Company, which has erected extensive works and which is one of the largest and leading industries in Dubuque; he has quite a taste for inventing, and has taken out patents on several articles of practical value. Mr. Chamberlain was united in marriage to Miss Harriet A. Palmer, a native of Utica, N. Y., Aug. 27, 1857. Her father was one of the early citizens and leading business men of that city. Mr. Chamberlain is actively identified with the public interests of the city and is one of the most enterprising men in Dubuque.

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R. O. CHANEY, of the Dubuque Shot Manufacturing Co.; Sec. 22; P. O. Dubuque;a native of Pike Co., Mo.; he came to Iowa and arrived in April 5, 1845; he began mining in 1854 and has been engaged in that business over twenty-six years and has had a large practical experience in mining during that time; he built he shot factory and put in the machinery; and with Gen. Booth and Mr. Carter has carried on the business since then they constructed, for mining purposes, the tunnel that supplies the city of Dubuque with water; Mr. Chaney is a practical surveyor and has done a great deal of surveying since 1849; he has held the offices of Town Trustee and School Director. In 1849 Mr. Chaney was united in marriage to Miss Martha J. Crockwell, from Illinois. They have six children - Emma, Harriet, Helen, George, John, and Hyrell.

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JOSEPH CHAPMAN, general freight and ticket agent of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad, residence 796 Iowa Street, is a native of Pittsburgh, Penn., and was born June 14, 1831; he grew up to manhood and received his education there; he came West in 1856 and located in Dubuque, and until 186 was connected with the Julien House; he then began railroading with the Illinois Central Railway, and was connected with that road until Nov. 15, 1876, when he was appointed general freight and ticket agent Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad, and since then has held that position. Mr. Chapman is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and has been prominently connected with the Order in this State; he has served as Master of Lodge, High Priest, Eminent Commander and Past Grand Master of the State. In 1859, Mr. Chapman was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Cassidy; she is a native Baltimore, but raised in Pittsburgh; they have six children- four sons and two daughters - Charles W., Maria, Joseph, Edward, Oliver, and Edith.

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THOMAS J. CHEW, Cascade; is a son of Samuel Chew and Mary Sabins, and was born Dec. 6, 1806, at New Haven, Conn.; his father was Captain of a merchantman, and young Thomas, at the at the age of 18, shipped as a "boy", and, for eight years, followed a seafaring life, during which time he has visited the most noted islands and cities on the globe. He was first mate, for three years, before leaving the service, in 1832; he spent a few years in Allegheny Co., N. Y. and, in 1836, went to Franklin, Mo., and afterward located in Licking Co., Ohio; in each State he engaged in farming; in the spring of 1845, he came to Whitewater Township, Dubuque Co., Iowa, and settled on a quarter section of land now in limits of Cascade, where he has since resided; in 1847, he bought his present homestead of Arthur Thomas and J. W. Sherman. The same season, he purchased the Cascade Mills of J. W. Sherman and the Alvin Burt estate; in 1851, his mill was destroyed by a fresher, but he immediately rebuilt on n enlarged and improved plan; the mill is now rented to William Moore. He was married, in Dubuque, April 23, 1851, to Mrs. Margaret A. Carter, daughter of Nathan S. Bemis; they have no children of their own, but, in 1858, they adopted Miss Fannie O'Neill, who is still with them; he built a saw-mill neat his flouring mill in 1856; it is still in service, and is now rented to Thomas Crawford; his fine stone residence, on the hill east of Cascade, was completed in April 1861; since that days he has not engaged in severe manual labor, but has leisurely superintended his farming and other interest; he was influential and liberal in securing the building of the Cascade & Bellevue Narrow Gauge Railroad, which was completed in January, 1880; the depot and railroad grounds are located on his land, in the grove north of his residence. He has been a Republican ever since the formation of the party, and still takes a deep interest in political affairs. Mrs. Chew is an acceptable member of the Presbyterian Church; Mr. Chew was early trained as an Episcopalian, but is quite liberal in his religious views. He is a benevolent, public-spirited and valued citizen; he is temperate and moral friend to the needy and to every good cause.

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F. CHOLVIN, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Key West; born in France in 1814; came to Dubuque Co. in 1838; there was not a house in Dubuque at the time of his coming, though some rude dwellings were erected there very shortly afterward. After two months in Dubuque, he went to Galena, where he lived three years, and then, for the next eight years, transferred his residence to Potosi, Wis. He then went to Mifflin, ten miles west of Mineral Point, where he remained fourteen years; he was then three years in Dubuque, and from 1861 to 1867 in Wisconsin, and finally returning to Dubuque in 1867, has been a resident of the county ever since. The greater portion of the wealth was accumulated in the business of smelting, in which he was engaged until about six years ago, when he retired to his pleasant farm, near Key West. Mr. C is one of the financially solid men of the county, and his extensive possessions are entirely the result of his native force, energy and shrewdness. His home farm comprises 250 acres, and he has, beside this, some 1,000 acres of land in Wisconsin, etc. He was married in 1847 to Miss Martha Wilson, a most genial and estimable lady who came to Dubuque Co., from Ohio, in 1834; they have five children - Samuel, Alfred, John, Josephine, now Mrs. Bowen; Mary, now Mrs. Richie; both of the later are now living in Denver, Colo.

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AUGUSTUS CHRISTMAN, of the firm of J. and A. Christman & Co., dealers in dry goods and notions, Main Street; is a native of Pennsylvania, and was Sept. 8, 1836; born his parents came to Iowa the following year and located in Dubuque; he grew up and attended school here; when the war broke out, he enlisted in the 21st. I.V.I., but was not accepted; he afterward enlisted in the 44th I.V.I. Co. A and served until the close of the war; in 1865, he engaged in the dry-goods trade, and established the business now conducted by the present firm; in 1869, his brother became associated with him in the business. Mr. Christman was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Smith, a native of Ohio; they have three children - Carrie,Lillian and Alice. Mr. Christman is a member of the Masonic Order, and also of the I. O. O. F.

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JACOB CHRISTMAN, of the firm of J. and A. Christman & Co., 672 Main Street; is a native of France; his parents came to this country when he was very young, and they came to Dubuque in September, 1837, and he grew up to manhood here; he entered the store of J. P. Farley as clerk, and remained with him several years; in 1847, he entered into partnership with Mr. Farley in the hardware trade, and they continued together about fourteen years; he afterward associated in business with Richard Waller, the firm being Christman, Waller & Co., and continued about ten years; his brother established their present business in 1867, and, the following year, he became interested with his brother, and since then they have conducted the business, and have established a large and leading trade. There are few men in the city who have been actively engaged in business for so long a time as Mr. Christman. He was elected Vice President of the German Bank, and served as Acting President for two years; has held the office of City Alderman. In 1850, he married Miss Catharine Gouris, from Pennsylvania; they have six children, one daughter and five sons - Mary, Francis, Charles, Edwin, Fred, Ben B., and Willie. Mr. Christman is connected with the Order of I.O.O.F., and is the oldest initiatory member of Julien Lodge No. 12, of this city.

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P. CHRISTMAN, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Key West; born in France in 1822; came to America in 1832; stopped about a year in New Jersey, and then, for nearly five years in Pennsylvania, finally removing to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in 1837; in his earlier years, he was engaged in various business enterprises, manufacturing, merchandising, mining, etc.; of late years, his attention has been given chiefly to farming; his farm embraces 280 acres, is is well improved, and his residence shows construction with a view to comfort, durability, taste and convenience. His political affiliations are with the Republican party. While Mr. Christman is quite an old settler here, his wife, formerly Miss Christiana Weigel, was in the country at a still earlier date than he. Her family came into the county in 1833, when she was quite young. It is probable that they were the first who, as a family, came into Dubuque, and, being rather a numerous family, they were prominently associated with the early settlement of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Christman have seven children living - John J., Frederic U., Ida May, Peter A., Charles D. F., William P., and Emma S.; four deceased - Samuel, Mary, Augustus, and Fannie.

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HON. JOHN CHRISTOPH, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Dyersville; born May 2, 1832, in Bavaria; in 1844, came to America; in 1846, came to Dubuque Co., where he has since resided; he has always been engaged in farming, and was engaged about five years in the brewery business in New Vienna; he owns 415 acres of land; he has held all the township offices; was elected in the fall of 1860, County Superintendent; he has also been a member of the State Legislature, having served four terms, viz, 1864, 1870, 1872, and 1873. Married Anna Maria Schwerzler in 1855; she was born in Austria in 1835; they have five children - Anna, Rosa, Valentine, Tilla, and Aggie. Democrat; Catholic Church.

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SIMEON CLARK, Postmaster, Farley; is a native of Ohio, and was born in Hamilton Co., near Cincinnati, Aug. 9, 1801; he came to Illinois at an early day, and came to Iowa; he crossed the river June 24, 1834, and located in Dubuque Co. about ten miles west of Dubuque, and made a claim; he was one of the earliest settlers; he built a cabin, and the wolves were so thick they would chase his dog in the house of nights; he began making a farm; he brought the first hogs across the river in Northern Iowa, and afterward sold one of them to J. P. Farley for $30.50; he continued farming until 1866; when he came to Farley and engaged in the mercantile business; he has held the office of Postmaster for the past eleven years, and has held the office of Justice of the Peace; he delivered the first temperance lecture ever given in Dubuque in 1836; he attended the first Fourth of July celebration, and was Chaplin of the day; there are few of the old settlers now living who can be more entertaining in relating incidents of the early days of Dubuque Co. then Mr. Clark; he has had twenty-four wolf scalps in his house at one time, and all taken off by himself. In 1823, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Snodgrass, a native of Ohio; she died; two children living - Caroline and Fletcher W. He was united in marriage to Mrs. Eliza J. Brown, a native of Kentucky, May 22, 1866; they have one son - Simeon W. Mr. Clark came to Dubuque with his parents in 1835; they were very early settlers; her mother is 72 years of age, and is still living in Dubuque. George H. Brown, manufacturer of brooms, is a son of Mrs. Clark; he was born in Dubuque April 1, 1848; he grew up and learned his trade in Dubuque; he was in Chicago several years manufacturing broom, and came to Farley in September 1878, and since then has been engaged in business here.

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JOHN CLARKSON, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Dubuque; born in England in 1815; emigrated to America, and located in Dubuque Co. in 1850; was employed in teaming in Dubuque until 1865, since which time he has been engaged in farming; has 160 acres of land in Secs. 6 and 7; is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He was married in 1853 to Minerva Ducitt, a worthy lady of Dubuque Co.; the son, James, is their only child.

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REV. J. COMERFORD, Pastor of Pleasant Grove Catholic Church; residence with E. H. Horsefield; Sec. 33; P. O. Epworth; born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 2, 1854. At the age of 12, after some preliminary study, went to St. Kiernan's College, Kilkenny, and remained there nine years; thence to St. John's College, Waterford, Ireland, where he finished his course after two years' study, and was ordained for the diocese of Dubuque June 2, 1878; in October of the same year, he came to America and, after his arrival in Dubuque, was stationed a short time in Waverly, and afterward at St. Patrick's Church in Dubuque; on the 13th of April, 1879, he was appointed to his first mission at Epworth, where he has commenced and is energetically carrying forward the erection of a fine church edifice; in addition to this, his pastoral work at Pleasant Grove is zealously attended to. The people of his church have much reason to feel gratified in having at their head, so capable, faithful and efficient a Pastor.

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JOHN S. CONLEY, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born April 17, 1827, in Providence, R. I.; at the age of 21, he removed to Newburyport, Mass., and there engaged in general merchandising; in 1857, he came to Dubuque and there carried on the dry-goods business till 1863, when he removed to his present farm, consisting of 361 acres of land; he has 300 acres of this land under cultivation.

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JAMES L. CONLIN, merchant, Cascade; born 12th of August, 1846, in Lexington, Ky.; in 1858, he, with his mother and step-father, came to Whitewater Township; his father died when James was but 3 years of age; from 1864 to 1869, he was in the harness business; for the last eleven years, he has carried on a large general grocery establishment in connection with sale of liquors. He was married the 23d of January, 1871, to Miss Annie Finn, by whom he has had three children - Genevieve,John Thomas and Mary Senena. Does not aspire to office, but takes an active interest in local politics; is a reliable Democrat. Himself and wife are members of the St. Martin's Catholic Church; his is conceded to by the best patronized grocery establishment in Cascade.

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JOHN COOK, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Cottage Hill; born Feb. 10, 1826, in the county of Durham, England; in 1829, he came to Pennsylvania with his parents; in 1835, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 136 acres of land; his brothers, William and Joseph, are now living on the farm consisting of 200 acres, which was entered by their father, it being their old homestead. He married Elizabeth Glew Jan. 25, 1852; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have six children - Susan A., Elliott R., Thomas S., James F., J ohn H., and Eddy W., lost Sarah B., in 1872, aged 16 years.

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DANIEL CORT, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Zwingle; was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., Nov. 1, 1813; went to Monongahela in 1835, and remained four years; engaged in the mercantile business in Adamsburg, in 1839; came to Iowa May 16, 1846. Was married May 28, 1835 to Sarah Bughman; the children of this union are Elizabeth J.,Emiline,Albert M.,Sarah A. and Mary M.; children all married; Elizabeth, to Rev. F. M. C. Bauman;Emiline, to William C. Simpson;Albert M., to Catharine M. Foster;Sarah A., to Abram Irwin, and Mary M. to John Bauman; Mr. C. has been Justice, Trustee, Director, and a member of the Board of Supervisors for seven years; his services as a committee to settle with the County Treasurer, sauced the county at one rime about $3,000; was elected to Legislature in 1856, and again in 1864; while Mr. C. was a member, a great railroad swindle was attempted; the programme was to grant a very large amount of land to four railroad companies, and exempt certain property of the company from taxation; Mr. C. put the "proviso" upon the bill which defeated its evil purpose, and saved the State millions of dollars. Mr. C. is a Democrat, and belongs to the Reformed Church.

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THOMAS COTTERILL, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Dubuque; born Jan. 25, 1819, in Derbyshire, England; in 1848, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since resided; he owns 300 acres of land. Married Wilhelmina Frank in 1865; she was born in Germany.

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JAMES P. COUSIN, general merchandise and Postmaster, Worthington; was born April 29,1847 in Dubuque Co.; he commenced his present business in 1869; was appointed Postmaster in 1870; he has held the office of Town Clerk several years. Married Miss E. Morse in 1871; who was born in Illinois; they have two children - Edward M. and Albert B. He is a Republican.

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AMAB COUSLEY, proprietor of the Seven-Mile House, Julien Station; P. O. Dubuque; born in Center Township, Dubuque Co., Oct. 16, 1848; his parents, Benjamin and Mary Cousley, of French descent, had some years previously become residents of this township, having removed there from Montreal, Canada, their native place; they were quite early pioneers here, and highly respected by all who knew them; the father died July 10, 1876, aged 62 years; the mother, a sprightly, cheerful lady, resided with her son. Mr. C.'s with, nee Caroline LaBrune, is also a native of Dubuque Co. and of French parentage, being a daughter of George and Matildah La Brune, who came to Dubuque Co. at an early date in its history. Mr. and Mrs. Cousley's children are Mary, Benjamin, Caroline, Edmere, Willie, and Louise Josephine.

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FRANK COURT, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Dyersville; he was born Oct. 12, 1841 in Somersetshire, England; in 1857, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since resided; he owns 140 acres of land, also makes a specialty of breeding and raising Poland-China pigs. He has been Township Assessor the past two years. He married Miss Sarah Baker in 1861; she was born in Somersetshire, England; they have two children - Charles W. and Mary B. They belong to the M. E. Church.

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CRAWFORD BROS., general merchants, Cascade; the senior member of the firm, Benjamin F. Crawford, who was born Oct. 15, 1840, in County Monaghan, Ireland, came with his parents in 1850 to Niagra Co., N. Y.; in 1852, came to Jones co., Iowa, and his parents both 280 acres; he worked on them until 1875, when he and his brother bought the general merchandise store of M. Snyder, in Cascade; Benjamin and his brother John still carry on the business under the firm name of Crawford Bros.; they are the sons of William Crawford and Betsey McGlone, who are dead. The family, on their arrival in Iowa, invested all their means in land, but have prospered in farming and mercantile business, always meeting their obligations on time at par. The parents were both Protestants, as also are the sons, but the latter are not identified with any denomination. John was married in 1877 to Miss Susan Reed and has a son William; Ben is still in the delectable land of singlehood; while in Jones Co., Benjamin was Assessor two years, and Town Clerk six years, being elected by the votes of both parties; he is now Senior Warden of the Cascade Lodge, No. 127, A., F. & A. M. Is a conservative Democrat; the firm own the store which they occupy and also have eighty acres of timber land in the adjoining county, also three acres and two dwellings in Cascade; the business of this popular firm is not excelled by more than one establishment in the place, and the Crawford Bros. have an excellent reputation.

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THOMAS CRAWFORD, Postmaster, Cascade, is the son of Thomas Crawford and Ellen Stewart, and was born on the 16th of December, 1826, in Belfast, Ireland, both of his parents were of Scotch, and he never heard a word of Irish spoken, and never ate at a table with an Irishman until after coming to America; his father was a manufacturer of fine lawns, and he returned to Glasgow and resumed business there when Thomas was 8 years of age; before he was 18 years old he had learned the trade of boiler maker, and in 1844 he came to this country and located in Thompsonville, Conn.; he stayed there a few years, during which time he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner; afterward, he lived in Hartford, and other towns in Connecticut until 1854, when he came to Cascade, and for several years was a masterbuilder; any of the finest residences and business blocks in this city and vicinity attest his skill as an architect; he is still in demand whenever plans for a nice buildings are to be drafted. He was matted in Thompsonville, Conn., in June 1854 to Miss Elizabeth Hamilton, daughter of Alexander Hamilton, formerly of Scotland; they have no issue. His commission as Postmaster was from Gen. Grant in 1870, and has continued without renewal to the present date; he carries on the manufacture and sale of furniture; his patronage extends many miles, even to cities in an adjoining county; he was in the army, enlisting in the early history of the rebellion and served until disabled by disease. His earliest instincts were in sympathy with the principles of the Republican party, and for years he has been a radical stalwart' his wife is a member of the Baptist Church, but he, at present is not connected with any church; he is strictly moral, and is an esteemed and popular citizen.

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ADAM CRESS, farmer and gardener, Sec. 36; P. O. Dubuque; born Sept. 5, 1836, in Bedford Co., Penn.; when 1 year old, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; he owns ninety-five acres of land. Married Bertha Wendenbruck in June 1858; she was born in Germany; have seven children - Eliza M., Emma L., Samuel F., Frank E., Lydia Lena, Anna L., and Hilda Mena. His father was born in 1806, and now lives at Eagle Point. Congregationalist in religion; Republican in politics.

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JOSEPH CREVIER, farmer, Sec 21; P. O. Rickardsville; born Jan. 8, 1818, in Canada; in 1836, he came to Dubuque Co., in 1849, he went to California and engaged in mining; returned here in 1851, where he has since lived; owns 277 acres of land. Married Rachel Valley in 1847, she was born in 1822 in Canada, and died in 1868; they had eleven children, eight living - Emily, Rachel, Josephine, Eliza, Adaline, Mary, Joseph, and William; Matilda died in 1867, aged 22 years; they lost two children in infancy. His second marriage was to Mrs. Sayer in 1869; she was born in Canada. Catholic.

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JAMES F. CRIDER, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Centralia; born in Dubuque Co. Aug. 25, 1849; his parents, James and Rachel Crider, came to Dubuque Co. in the spring of 1836, from Missouri, and much to do with the settlement, development and progress of the county. His father, with Marshal Emerson, kept one of the first stores in Dubuque, but, after five years of mercantile life, became a farmer; he died Jan. 31, 1879, aged 63; his mother, aged 65, soon followed, being called away by death Feb. 23, 1879. The subject of this sketch has been a constant resident of the county; he has a pleasant farm of forty-five acres in Sec. 31, Dubuque Township, and nineteen acres of timber land in Center Township. He was married, March 6, 1873, to Miss Mary Alsop, daughter of Thos. and Isabella Alsop, who came to their present home near Center Grove, from England, when the daughter was quite young; Mr. and Mrs. Crider's only daughter, Mary Elizabeth, aged nine months, died Sept. 9, 1875.

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JOHN CRIPPES, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Pin Oak; he was born Dec. 23,1833 in Luxemburg, Germany; in 1852, he came to Concord Township; he owns 200 acres land; he has held public offices ever since coming to the county, viz., has been a member of the Board of Supervisors, has been Justice of the Peace since 1865,was Notary Public, has held this office since 1872; has been for the past fifteen years Secretary of the School Board, and has held all the township offices. Married Elizabeth Leisen Jan. 17, 1860; she was born in Luxemburg; had ten children, seven living - Mary, John, Susan, Katie G., Henry, Peter, and Veroneka. Catholic.

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D
DR. G. A. DANDO, physician and surgeon, Worthington; born Aug. 12, 1829, on Long Island, N. Y.; he commenced studying medicine in 1858, with Drs. Howard and Chamberlain, in Medina Co., Ohio; afterward attended lectures in constant practice the past nineteen years; he has been located here since 1863. He married Miss Julia A. Rosa November 1853; she was born in New York; they have two children - Ella (now Mrs. Kammis ) and Geo. E.

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GEORGE DANENMILLER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Centralia; born April 3, 1807; in Alsace, France; in 1837, he came to Ohio; in 1839, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 170 acres of land, on which he has built a brick house and other improvements. Married Mary Winter in 1850; she was born in Baden, Germany, Dec. 11, 1827; they have five children - Andrew, Frank, George, Luis, and Valentine. Catholic in religion.

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WILLIAM DATISMAN, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born ___________8, in Jefferson Township; his parents came here from Germany in May of ______ owns 160 acres of land, entered by his father. Married Mary Miller------- 75; she was born in Jefferson Township; they have one child, William. (Incomplete)

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METCALF DAYKIN, proprietor Three Mile House; P. O. Center Grove; born in Dubuque Co., March 20, 1848, and, except a nine years residence in Wisconsin, from 1851 to 1860, has been a constant residence of Dubuque Co. Is Postmaster of Center Grove and in partnership with his brother John T., is proprietor of the hotel, and the same firm is also engaged in mining enterprises, owning some fifteen acres of mining lots in the vicinity. Mr. D was married Nov. 25, 1879, to Miss_____Oliver, a native of the Isle of Man. Wm. Daykin, father of the above, was born in Yorkshire, England, July 27, 1816, married July 8, 1843, Miss Mary Metcalf; came to Dubuque Co., in 1845, and settled at Canter Grove; they had seven children, four of whom are deceased, viz, Jonathan,James William, and two named Ellis; the three surviving children are Metcalf (the subject of the above sketch) John T. (his partner in business) and George W. ( blacksmith in Center Grove). John T. Daykin was born in Benton, Lafayette Co., Wis., Aug. 31, 1854; he was married in September, 1874, to Miss Jennie Weston, of West Dubuque; they have three children - Wm. Oliver, Raymond Elvin, and Eleanor.

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GILBERT DEAN, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Cascade; born Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, Aug. 1, 1823; came to Dubuque Co. in July, 1842; has 120 acres of land in a beautiful location, and is bringing fine results form it; he assisted in the preservation of the Union by faithful service for three years, as a soldier in Co. I, 21st I. V. I.; was engaged in battles of Magnolia Hill, Baton Rouge, Black River, Mobile,the siege of Vicksburg, etc., being wounded by a shell during the siege of Vicksburg, and did honorable service unti mustered out with his command at the close of the war. Religion, Adventist; politics, Republican. He was married, in February, 1867, to Miss Emeline Gillott, a native of Lorain Co., Ohio; they have five children living - Arthur Curtis, Sarah Myrta, Bertie Joseph, Mabel Elizabeth, Olive May; one son, Ernest Claire, has died.

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SAMUEL DEAN, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Cascade; born in Ohio Nov. 25, 1821; came to Dubuque Co. in 1842; his parents, Joseph and Sophia Dean, removed hither at the same time; the father died about 1857, the mother about 1872; Mr. D. was emphatically a pioneer here, most of the settlement of Cascade Town and Township having been made since the time of his settlement here; has a good farm of 160 acres. Politics, Republican, varied to vote for "best men", regardless of party. Resident with Mr. D is A. P. Hamil, born in Jones Co., Sept. 13, 1851; has lived most of his life in Dubuque Co.; is engaged in farming with Mr. Dean. Is a member of Baptist Church, and of the Republican party. His parents, A. P. and Mary J. Hamil, were early settlers in Cascade, where the mother yet resides; the father, A. P., died in 1862. In September, 1874, Mr. Hamil was married to Miss Elizabeth Morrison, a native of San Francisco, Cal., her father having died there in her infancy, her mother removed here immediately after; Mr. and Mrs. Hamil are blessed with two pleasant children - Melvin P. and Earle J.

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SYLVESTER DEAN, farmer, Cascade; son of Joseph Dean and Sophia Fay; was born on the 4th of May 1842 in Cuyahoga Co., Ohio; he,with his parents and family came to Cascade in July, 1842, and settled on land which is still owned by the family; before he was of age, he learned the trade of plasterer, but his main occupation has been that of a farmer; after opening a farm and getting it under good cultivation, he built a house, and then it "not good for man to be alone," therefore, on the 9th of December, 1851, he married Miss Catherine Lathrop, daughter of Deacon Anson E. Lathrop, formerly of Cascade; they have had six children - Minnie S., who married Robert M. Ewart, County Superintendent of Schools for Delaware Co., Iowa; Albert E., graduated from Hopkinton College and is now Principal of the public schools at Strawberry Point, Iowa; Charles S. is teaching in the home district; Emma A. is attending school in Manchester, Iowa; Willard E. and Mattie M. are living at home. He has over two hundred acres of land well improved, and is now living on the same farm, and in the same house where he took his wife at the date of their marriage. His wife is a member of the M. E. Church, but he is not connected with any church, although he contributes to support moral and religious institutions; he is a straight Republican, and works for the success of the party. He has never been engaged in litigation, either as plaintiff of defendant; is a kind neighbor and a good citizen.

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HENRY DEHNER, Cascade; is son of John Dehner and Mary Kounnatz, and was born July 15, 1813, in Hoancoler, Germany; his father was a farmer; Henry was 21 years of age the day in 1834 when he landed in Baltimore from Bremen, with his parents and all their family of seven children; they traveled westward by emigrant wagon, without sleeping in a house until settled on a rented farm in Green Co., Ohio; he remained with his family until past 32 years of age; they removed in 1836 to Carroll Co., Ind., and bought 900 acres, mostly timber land; for the money paid for this wild land, they could have bought 200 acres where now stands the city of Dayton, Ohio; they stayed in Indiana nineteen years, clearing the woodland and making farms; the father died in 1838, but the sons continued many years to carry on the farm. He was married on the 7th of January, 1847, to Miss Eve Mary Kenner, daughter of Joseph Kenner, of Berlin, Shelby Co., Ohio; they have had six children, three of whom are now living - John B., Sophia H., Joseph, Mary Ann, Henry L., and Stephen D.; of these Stephen, John and Joseph are dead; Stephen was born July 4, 1857, and died of diphtheria on his fourth birthday, and the two older brothers died of the same disease within three weeks of same date. After his marriage, in 1847, Mr. Dehner took charge of the entire farm until 1854, when he bought in Cascade where he now resides; he owns 379 acres; the three remaining children live at home; his only surviving son, Henry, is serving his second term as Justice of the Peace for Cascade Township and is a very worth young man. Mr. D. has served twenty years as Township Trustee, but says he dislikes office, as he is fully occupied in attending to his own business. When on his farm in Indiana, he drew a load of wheat 120 miles to Chicago, and sold it for 50 cents per bushel. He has been the victim of numberless accidents, such as falls, runaways, etc.; has been bruised, crushed, lacerated, and with dislocated limb, but is still cheerful and active. He never sued a man, neither was he ever sued. He is a faithful member of the St. Mary's German Catholic Church; is a conservative Democrat; is a kind, genial gentleman, and a highly respected citizen.

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P. L. DEVANEY, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Cascade; was born in Dubuque Co. in 1840; his parents, Lawrence and Bridget, emigrated from Ireland to the Valley of the Red River of the North, and from there, with a Scotch colony, to this locality in an early day; his father died in 1846; his mother makes her home with her son, the subject of this sketch. Mr. Devaney had an honorable record as a soldier, having served three years during the civil war as a non-commissioned office in Co. I, 21st I.V.I.; was engaged in the battles of Hartsville, Mo., Magnolia Hills, Black River Bridge, Champion Hills, Spanish Fort, and Blakely, Ala.; siege of Jackson, siege of Vicksburg, etc.; was honorable mustered out with his command at the close of the was. He has a form of 160 acres in Sec. 14 and 17. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democratic. He was married in 1871 to Miss Ellen Kennedy, a native of Charleston, S.C.; she died April 1, 1877; there are three children - James H., Mary A., and Loretta.

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MARTIN DENLINGER, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Zwingle; was born in Huntingdon Co., Penn., in 1827; came to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1854. Was married March 5, 1848, to Elizabeth Wortz; his children are John B., Main, David C., and the twins, Anna Maria and Jane Elizabeth, Isaac L., Mary D., Samuel L., Albert, Aden H., and Sarah M.; Mr. D.owns 240 acres of land in Dubuque Co. Is a Republican in politics and belongs to the Reformed Church.

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J. D. DICKINSON, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Epworth; born in Chester Co., Penn., April 4, 1821, remaining there until 21 years of age, when he changed his residence to Huntingdon (now Blair) Co., in the same State; in 1845, he came to Dubuque Co.; his occupation for most of his life has been farming; his farm consists of 130 acres of good land in Sec. 15. He is a member of the Lutheran Church; and a Republican in politics. Has held township offices. Mr. Dickinson was married in 1843, to Elizabeth Broombaugh, of Pennsylvania; they have eight children living - Adaline A. (now Mrs. King, of Farley), William E. (of Dakota), Loretta (now Mrs. Rolla, of Emporia, Kan.), Almira (now Mrs. Wells, of Shelby Co.), Annetta (now Mrs. Wilmott, of Farley), Martha Jane (now in Normal School, Emporia, Kan.), Charles J. (Wyoming Territory), George F.; one child, Mary C. is dead.

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AUGUST DIETRICH, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Rickardsville; born July 11, 1811, in Hanover; in 1845 he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns eighty acres of land. He married Dora Schrader in 1850; she was born in Brunswick in 1803; they have one daughter - Johanna (now Mrs. Benne ). Lutheran in religion.

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ANTON DIGMANN, retired, Dyersville; born Dec. 10, 1833, in Prussia; in 1850, came to Wisconsin; in 1865, came to Dubuque Co., he owns about twenty-six lots in town, also the house he occupies; previous to his coming to Dyersville, he had always been engaged in farming. Married Margaret Digman May 27, 1855; she was born in Prussia; they have an adopted son, William Crowder. Catholic.

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CHRIST DINKLER, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Rickardsville; born June 4, 1852, in Dubuque Co.; his father came to this country in 1845; they own 120 acres os land. Married Mary Schmitt in 1872; she was born in Germany in 1854; they have three children - Charles, Anna, and John. Lutheran in religion.

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THE DUBUQUE FURNITURE AND BURIAL CASE COMPANY, 584 Main Street, Dubuque; was established Feb. 1, 1877; they manufacture all kinds of furniture and burial cases; their large manufactory on the corner of Washington and Eighteenth streets employs fifty-five hands; they do both wholesale and retail business. Mr. William Kley, the manager of the store and salesroom, is a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and was born Feb. 21, 1830; he grew up and learned the business there, and emigrated to America in 1849, and came to Iowa in August, 1856, and settled in Dubuque and began working at his trade; he has a large experience in the business, and has built up a large trade in Iowa, and extends into Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois. Mr. Kley married Miss Elizabeth Wagner, a native of German, in 1852; they have three children. - Mary, Emma, and George.

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L. DUGGAN, Postmaster and general merchandise, Tivoli; he was born in the parish of Upper Glanmire, Count of Cork, Ireland, Sept. 29, 1828; he came with his parents, to New Orleans in 1841; in 1843, they moved to Dubuque, and was apprenticed to learn the blacksmith and wagon business with John Hartsock; after learning his trade, he engaged with Newman & Cooper and carried on this establishment three years; in 1853, he formed a partnership with Morgan, Duggan & Morgan, same business and continued this two years; he then removed to Iowa Township and has been, most of the time, a resident of this locality since; he first kept tavern here, and the post office, known as Evergreen Post Office; he has been fifteen years a member of the Board of Supervisors; has been Justice of the Peace; President of the School Board; is now Notary Public; he own 220 acres of land, which he cultivates. Married Ellen O'Connell in July, 1850; she was born in Ireland; they have eight children - Honoro M., William H., Mary A., Bridget, William, Catharine, and Ann. Catholic.

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JOSEPH DUNKEL, proprietor of the Union House, Worthington; he was born Dec. 23, 1836 in Germany; in 1860 he came to Wisconsin; in 1864 he came to Dubuque Co., engaged in farming till 1874, when he removed to Worthington and commenced his present business, which he owns as well as 400 acres in Delaware Co.; he is also engaged in live stock and grain. He married Miss Elizabeth Kunkel in 1863; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have five children-one son and four daughters.

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DANIEL DURHAM, famer, Epworth; born in New York Feb. 8, 1828; came to Iowa, Clinton Co., in 1844, and to Jackson Co. in 1845, remaining there until 1854; he then removed to Minnesota, in which State he resided until 1865, taking an active part throughout the war in support of all measures tending to preserve the Union; in 1865, he came to Dubuque Co., and has been a worthy citizen here since that date, except one year in merchandising in Minnesota; his attention has always been given to farming; for the past few years, he has been gradually working to make his business what it now is, largely that of dairy farming, to which his nice rolling farm of 110 acres, in Secs. 2 and 11 is peculiarly well adapted. He is connected with the Republican party; has held school-offices, and was one of the leading members of the organization of the Baptist Church in Epworth. His first wife Emeline Graham, a native of Pennsylvania, married in 1851; she died in Minnesota July 28, 1860. His second wife was Lamira Ensign, a native of New York; they were married in 1861; four children are living - Mary (now Mrs. Wright), Alice E., Almon L., and Freddie A.; four have died - Franklin A., Clarence, and twins (unnamed) who died in infancy.

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ANTHONY DUSTER, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Pin Oak; he was born in 1845 in Luxemburg, Germany; when he was but 1 year old, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he own 148 acres of land; is Justice of the Peace; has held this office the past ten years; he has also taught school about two years, and has held all the township offices. Married Theressa Kozen in February 1869; she was born in 1852 in Prussia; died in 1879; have four children - Peter, Susie, Catharine, and Rosa C. Second marriage to Mary A. Ruden Jan. 15, 1880; she was born in Dubuque Co. Catholic; Democrat.

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S. A. DUTCHER, retired, Farley; is a native of Connecticut and was born in Canaan, Litchfield Co., Jan 7, 1823; he grew up to manhood there, and came West to Iowa in 1855, and located in Dubuque; he engaged in contracting; the firm of Dutcher, Brigham & Co. built the Illinois Central R.R. from Freeport to Dunleith; they also built thirty miles west of the river of the Dubuque & Sioux City R. R.; after the war, Mr. Dutcher settled upon his farm, and lived there until he removed to Farley; he still owns his farm of 270 acres, finely improved. He has held town and school offices. He was united in marriage, March 11, 1870, to Miss Caroline E. Russell, from Salisbury, Conn., a daughter of Wm. P. Russell, of that place; she died Oct. 31, 1879; they had two children, neither of whom are living.

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DAVID EDWARDS, carpenter and contractor, Epworth; born in Pennsylvania Feb. 24, 1823; came to Dubuque Co. in 1854; since the age of 18 he has been a carpenter, and for much of the time has carried on house-building on quite an extensive scale; he was the contractor for the Epworth Seminary building, and also for the M. E. Church building in Epworth. For the last fifteen years he has been adding bee-keeping to his other industries, and is now quite extensively engaged in this business. He is a member of the M. E. Church and of the Republican party. Mr. E. was married, in 1845, to Miss Sarah Moore, of Pennsylvania; they have two children - James A. and Mary J.

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HON. MICHAEL EHL, Sec. 12; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born Sept. 14, 1832 in Prussia; in 1852 he came to Buffalo, N. Y.; in 1854 to Michigan, and in the fall returned to New York; in 1855, he went to Indiana and traveled, on account of poor health, through Michigan and Canada, and in the fall returned to Buffalo; In 1857, he went to Detroit, and was there employed as a clerk in a store; Jan. 6, 1858 he came to Dubuque Co,. where he has since lived; he owns sixty acres of land. He has been Township Clerk, County Superintendent, Justice of the Peace, Treasurer and Secretary of the School Board, and is now a member of the Legislature, having been elected in 1879; he is also President of the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company. He married Miss Anna Blasiar, in Detroit, in 1857 she was born in France; had seven children, six living - Caroline, Mary L., John G., Katie, Anna P., and Gustav I.; lost one in infancy. Catholic; Democrat.

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J. M. EMERSON
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JOSEPH ENDRES, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Lattnerville; born in Bavaria, Germany, April 17, 1818; emigrated to America in 1853; stopped two years in New York, coming to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1855, and has since then been a resident in Center Township; worked at the carpenter trade for four years after coming, but has since that been engaged in farming; his farm comprises eighty acres. In religion, he is Catholic; in politics, a Democrat. He was married June 28, 1853 to Josephine Sigel, also of Bavaria; they have two children - Mary Josephine (now Mr. Lattner), of Cascade, and Oscar.

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PETER ERSCHENS, farmer, stock-raiser and stock-dealer, hotel-keeper,etc., Centralia; born in Rhine, Prussia, March 26, 1833; came to America in 1852, living for the next three years in Wisconsin and Illinois, coming to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in the spring of 1855; his first two years in Dubuque were employed in brick manufacturing; since then he has gradaully worked into the various occupations that now engross his time; he is entitled to much credit for untiring exertion, which has placed him in his present comfortable situation; he came to the country a poor man; has been very industrious and economical, and has comfortable possessions as a reward of his efforts; has 550 acres of land in Center and Vernon Townships, besides his large and comfortable home and hotel, known as the Ten Mile House, in Centralia, etc. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democratic; has held township offices, and has done very much to aid the church and social affairs of his community. On the 17th of February, 1857, he married Miss Susan Hoven, also a native of Prussia; they have five children living - Phillip, Katie, Lena, Peter, and Teresia; three deceased - Matthew and two who died in infancy.

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FRED ERTEL, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Waupeton; born Nov. 12, 1840, in Bavaria; in 1850, he came to St. Charles, Mo., in 1852, he came to Dubuque Co,; he owns eighty acres of land. He has been Constable, Assessor, School Director, etc.; he is now Township Treasurer. Married Ernstina Spead in 1866; she was born in Dubuque Co.; They have seven children - Kate, Lena, Dora, George, Fred, Paulina, and Louisa. Lutheran Democrat.

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PETER EULBERG, of the firm of Wm. Meuser & Co., brewers and maltsters, Couler Avenue, Dubuque; was born in Nassau, Germany, Oct. 15, 1845;he came with his parents to America in 1854; they came West and settled in Wisconsin and he grew up to manhood there; he came to Dubuque in 1871, and in January, 1877, he became a partner with Mr. Wm. Meuser in the brewing business. He married Miss Mary Schwind, daughter of Jacob Schwind, of this city, May 27, 1872; they have three children - Mary A., Laura, Bertha.

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BENJAMIN B. EVANS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Sageville Mount; born Jan. 18, 1812 in Oneida Co., N. Y.; in 1834, he came to Galena and thence to Quincy, Ill,; in 1836, he came to Jackson Co., Iowa; in 1839, he removed to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 110 acres of land. Married Mary Norton in 1841; she was born in Ireland in 1824, died Dec. 1, 1860; have five children - Anna, Mary, Patrick H., John, and Michael; lost Daniel and Benjamin, aged respectively 13 years and 4 years.

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JOHN T. EVERETT, County Surveyor, Dubuque; is a native of Hartford, Conn., and was born Feb. 2, 1826; he came West to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque Dec. 9, 1837; when 17 years of age he engaged in surveying. During the Mexican war, he volunteered in 3d I.V.I., Co. E, and was in the battle of Buena Vista, "Cerro Gordo", and "Molino Del Rey;" was wounded during the war; was in the service two years, then returned to Dubuque and engaged in surveying Congress lands; he was Surveyor of Grant Co., Wis., six years, and has held the office of County Surveyor of Dubuque Co. for twelve years; he is one of the oldest surveyors in the State, and is one of the early settlers of this county. He married Miss Martha J. Stipp, a native of Ohio, Feb. 22, 1850; they have one daughter - Martha M., now Mrs. A. R. Brewster; they have lost one daughter.

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A. FAIRBURN, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Cascade; born in Scotland Jan. 26, 1824; came to Dubuque Co. in 1860; has a farm of 185 acres, grandly adapted to stock-raising, to which branch of industry, more particularly sheep-raising. Mr. Fairburn is giving much attention; inclination makes this a favorite branch with him, his ancestry in Scotland having, for a long time, been shepherds; his prudence and intelligently directed energy have given him success in all his undertakings. Religion, Baptist; politics, Republican. He was married, June 30, 1848, to Miss Jennet Aitchison, also a native of Scotland; they have five children living - George, married, lives in Fonda, Pocahontas Co.; Agnes, now Mrs. Bell, of Monticello; Isabella, now Mrs. Parker, of Alta, Buena Vista Co.; William A., and Jennie; two children died in infancy.

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MRS. MARGARET FANNING, whose maiden name was Margaret McEvoy; is a native of Ireland, and was born at Inniskillen, County Fermanagh, in 1813; she came to St. Louis, Mo., in 1834, when that place contained only 11,000 people; while living there in 1841, she married Patrick Fanning; he was born in Queens Co., Ireland, in 1814; they came to Dubuque March 29, 1852; he was a stone cutter by trade, and had a large stone-yard, and was engaged in contracting and building and carried on a large business until his death, which occurred in 1865; they have five children - J ames H., living in Denver: George lives in Topeka, Kan.; William lives in Dubuque; Mary, engaged in teaching school; Margaret, now Mrs. DeLisle, living in Grand Rapids, Mich. They have lost four children - William,Michael,John and Mary Jane; Mrs. Fanning lives on the home place on Grand View Avenue.

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F. A. FARLEY, Farley; is a native of Dubuque Co., Iowa, and is a son of J. P. Farley, one of the oldest and most honored citizen of Dubuque Co.; he was born in Dubuque March 25, 1842; he grew up and attended school there, and completed his education at Cornell College; when 18 years of age, he began railroading under his father's supervision, and he has been engaged in railroading for the past eighteen years. In June 1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Kimber, from the city of Philadelphia; they have three children - Jessie May, Frank A., Edwin.

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J. P. FARLEY, is a native of Tennessee, and was born April 2, 1813, and in 1817 his parents removed to St. Louis, which was then a small French town, and did not contain a single brick house; the first steamboat landed at St. Louis during that year; when only 14 years of age, Mr. Farley came to Galena and landed there in April 1827, and began working in the mines; after two years, he went in partnership with his brother-in-law, and engaged in smelting; in the fall of 1832, he came, with others over to Dubuque, but did not remain; in the spring of 1833, he opened a stock of goods in Galena, and in the month of May, that same year, he came to Dubuque and made a contract for building a house, and also a store, and in the following September he opened a stock of goods here; in 1837 he moved his family here; he continued in mercantile business from 1833 to 1858, a period of a quarter of a century; since then, he has been connected with railroading, and has been extensively engaged in building railroads. Mr. Farley has always been an enterprising business man, and actively identified with the interests and growth of the city; he is largely interested and principal owner of the Key City Planing Mills, and also of the Key City Steam Bakery; Mr. Farley has been three times elected Mayor of the city of Dubuque, and held that office for three years; he has also served in the City Council. In 1833, Mr. Farley was united in marriage to Miss Mary P. Johnson, from the city of Baltimore; she died in 1844, leaving four sons - Charles W., J ohn P., George W., and Francis A. In 1845, Mr. Farley married Miss Mary L. Johnson, from Danville, Ky.; they have five sons - Harry G., Edwin B., Jessse K., Fred H., and Warren C.

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JOHN P. FARLEY, agent of the Keokuk Northern Line Packet Company, No. 2 Levee, Dubuque; is a son of Jesse P. Farley, one of the earliest settlers and most honored citizens of Dubuque; he was born in Galena, Ill., Nov. 2, 1836; his parents came here when he was only a few months old, he grew up to manhood here and attended school here and at Mt. Morris, Ill., and Mt. Vernon, Iowa; he has been engaged in steamboating since 1862; he has held the position of agent of the Keokuk Northern Line Packet Company since 1869, and is one of the oldest steamboat agents on the river. He was united in marriage, July 18, 1861, to Miss Bertha Markle, a native of Dubuque, and daughter of J. W. Markle, one of the early settlers; they have two children - Glenn M. and Carl T.

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MRS. H. R. FARR, manufacturer and dealer in all kinds of human hair goods, ladies' furs made and repaired, Ninth Street, opposite post office; established her present business in Dubuque, December, 1878; she has a large stock of hair and manufactures wigs, waves, curls, masquerade wigs, and does all kinds of hair work; she does the leading and largest business of the kind in the city, and is building up a large trade; she buys her goods in New York, and has a large stock of all kinds of hair, and is enabled to suit the most fastidious at reasonable prices.

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NOAH H. FAUST, dealer in pumps and lightning rods, corner White and Tenth streets, Dubuque; is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born Sept. 1, 1846; his parents came to Iowa during the same year, and in the following spring of 1847, they came to Dubuque; he grew up to manhood here, and learned the trade of wood turner. He engaged in his present business in 1866, and has built up a good trade. He married Miss Minnie Miller, a native of New York City, Oct. 25, 1869; they have four children - Charles, William, Minnie, and an infant daughter not named.

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WILLIAM M. FAUST, of the firm of Faust & O'Connell, dealers in groceries and provisions, cor. Clay and Ninth Streets; is a native of Centre Co., Penn., and was born May 29, 1843; his parents came to Iowa in October, 1852; they lived in Delaware Co. two years, then came to Dubuque Co., in 1854, and he grew up to manhood here; after the war broke out, he enlisted in the 6th I.V.C., Co. G., under Col. Pollock; he remained in the service over three years; after he returned, was engaged in the lightning rod business for nine years, and engaged in his present business in July, 1875; he was elected to the office of County Supervisor in October, 1879. In 1868, he married Miss Mary A. Keating, from this city; they have one daughter - Ida May, and have lost one son - William N.

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PETER FAY, insurance agent and Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, No. 1477 White Street; is a native of Germany, and was born in the Rhine province of Coblentz in 1835; his parents came to the United States in 1837; they came to Wisconsin in 1840; he grew up there, and attended school in Milwaukee; in 1850, he came to Dubuque; he learned his trade of Rouse & Dean, and worked for them until 1858; he had charge of the machinery of the Dubuque Elevator eleven years, and was the inspector for three years on the C. D. & M. R. R.; he is Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, and has held the office of City Alderman. He is a member of Pius Society. In 1859, he married Miss Mary Pfiffner, a native of Switzerland; they have six children - Anthony, Albert, Frances, Charles, Alois, Mary.

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MICHAEL FERRING, Sec 9, general merchandise; P. O. Tivoli; he was born Nov. 30, 1844, in Prussia; in 1856 he came to Dubuque Co., where he engaged in farming until 1867, when he removed to his present locality and opened a general store, which he still carried on; he also owns about sixty acres of land, with his store and other buildings; he is Treasurer of the School Board of the independent district, Married Miss Eva Bracht Oct. 27, 1867; she was born in Prussia; they have six children - Maggie, Nicholas, Christopher, William, Frank, and John P. Catholic.

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JOHN P. FISCHBACH, proprietor Commercial Hotel, Dyersville; born Aug. 7, 1849, in Luxemburg; in 1868, he came to America; two years later came to Dyersville and kept the Pennsylvania Hotel; remained in this house till 1875; he then removed to the Commercial Hotel, which house he built and owns. He has been Alderman two term. Married Maggie Feier Sept. 11, 1871, in Dubuque; she was born in Luxemburg; have four children - John A., H. T., Maggie, and Lillie.

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JOHN FISCHER, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Rickardsville; born Dec. 18,1802. in Bavaria, Germany; in 1834, he came to Missouri; in 1836, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he is one of the oldest settlers of the county; he owns 120 acres of land. He married Miss Susan Loubster in 1830; she was born in 1806 in Bavaria, Germany; they had six children, three living - Elizabeth, John, and Lewis.

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JOHN W. FINLEY
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CORNELIUS FITZPATRICK, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Farley; born in Auglaize Co., Ohio, March 29, 1848; came to Dubuque with his parents, Edward and Clarissa Fitzpatrick, in 1860. His father died in 1876, aged 79; his mother lives in Farley. Mr. Fitzpatrick has constantly pursued the vocation of farming, except three years employed in Farley as dealer in farm machinery, grain, stock, etc. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democrat. He was married Oct. 25, 1876, to Miss Mary A. Turner, the daughter of James and Susan G. Turner, of Iowa Township; they have one child living, George Alfred; a daughter, Louisa, died in infancy.

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JOHN H. FLOYD, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Pin Oak; the subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work, was born March 4, 1800, in Nelson Co., Ky.; at the age of 14, he came to Gallatin Co., Ill.; he remained there till 1828, when he removed to Wisconsin; in 1833, he came to Dubuque Co., and has since resided here; he is one of the wealthiest and earliest settlers in the county; he owns in his immediate neighborhood about 600 acres of land, all of which he entered; soon after coming here, he received the appointment of Postmaster, and has held this office about forty years; he named the post office Pin Oak, from the character of the trees grown here; as his house is situated about twenty miles from Dubuque, it seemed the most convenient place for travelers to stop, and he was forced to keep a public house; this house has been known as the Western Hotel; there is a sign fastened to a tree which reads Western Hotel, and was presented to Mr. Floyd in 1848 by his friend, Mr. McCraney, it laid about his house a year or two, when Samuel Peck, now of Clayton Co., proposed fastening it to a tree, which he did, and where it has remained since; the oldest cabin in the county was located on his land, and is even now in a good state of preservation; this cabin he first occupied when coming here; he lived in it one winter without doors, there being none in the house, and no timber to make any with; he afterward bought some plank to make doors, but used it in making a coffin for a noted horsethief and robber, named Kentuck Anderson, who was shot by Mr. Sherrill, and whom he assisted in burying; Mr. Floyd assisted in getting out the logs to build the Old Bell Tavern at Dubuque; it was located near where the Julien House now stands; it was built in 1833; there was a tree used as a post office and known as the White Oak Post Office, situated in Jefferson Township, and near where T. Alderson's store now stands; a large, square hole was morticed in this tree, where all mail matter was received and delivered; J.W. Griffith performed the duty of mail carrier, and made weekly trips; this office was started in about 1837 or 1837. Mr. Floyd was married to Miss Sarah Wathen Dec. 30, 1835; she was born in Nelson Co., Ky., Jan. 28, 1811; they had five children, two living - Sarah J., now Mrs. A. C. Tucker and Fannie E., now Mrs. L. E. Tucker. Since the above was put in type, Mrs. A. C. Tucker has met her death by the accidental discharge of a gun in the hands of a servant while house-cleaning. The hammer of the lock came in contact with the door, causing premature discharge, the contents entering the heart of Mrs. Tucker. This sad affair happened on Friday afternoon, April 16, 1880.

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SAMUEL FLOYD, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Sageville; born Dec. 7, 1803, in York Co., Penn.; in 1826, he came to Rochester, N. Y.; in 1838, to Cincinnati; in 1840 to Key; in 1844, he came to Dubuque Co., he manages his daughter's farm - Mrs. Thompson; he also owns eight acres, with his residence; he married Mrs. Challes in 1838; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn.; her parents removed to Baltimore when she was a girl; they have one son; she has two children by a former marriage - Henrietta, now Mrs. Thompson, and John F.

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JOSEPH FOGG, carpenter, Epworth; born in Waldo Co., Me., Jan. 16, 1824; farmed with his father at home until 21 years of age; since that time his occupation has been that of a carpenter; he came to Dubuque Co. in 1866, and has resided in Epworth since that time; besides his nicely located residence, carpenter shop, etc., here, he has a good mill, run by steam power, in which, while it is specially fitted up as a feed-mill, other industries may be carried on; cheese boxes were for a time extensively manufactured there. Mr. F. is connected with the M. E. Church and with the Republican party; has been School Treasurer and Township Trustee, and is universally respected as a man of sterling worth and honesty by all who know him. He has been married twice; first in 1847, to Miss Amelia Randall - died in 1858 - a native of Freedom, Me.; second, in 1861, to Miss Mary M. French, also of Maine, his present wife; her sister, a teacher of superior abilities, now employed in Epworth Seminary, and mother also resides with them; there are three children - Edward P., married, and, with his wife, teaching in Albia, Iowa, and two daughters - Laura H. and Amelia Randall - both educated at one of the best institutions in the West - Mount Union College, Ohio.

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JOHN W. FOSTER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Epworth; born in Maine Feb. 6, 1830; removed to Massachusetts in 1850, and from there to Dubuque Co. in 1854; has a beautiful farm in good cultivation, consisting of 120 acres of timber land in Iowa Township. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of the Republican party; has held school and township offices, and gains an enviable name for integrity and business capacity. Having located here when their finances were a minus quantity, Mr. Foster and his good wife deserve infinite credit for achieving success in the face of difficulties. The first five years here were spent upon a rented farm, but wisely directed industry has made for them a comfortable home, within easy reach of superior social, educational and religious privileges. His wife, nee Miss Eunice Houghton, of Massachusetts, to whom he was married in 1852, has been a worthy helpmeet in all the years since; their only child - Charles Henry - is a bright, active youth, with every promise of a noble manhood.

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WILLIAM H. FRANCES, M. D., Cascade; was born in County Armagh, Ireland, on the 19th of November, 1824; at 16, he began the study of medicine at Tanderagee; at 18, he took one course of lectured in the medical department of Trinity College, Dublin, and, in his 21st year, spent a term in Kings college, London. In 1847, he located in New York, and in April 1848, was married to Miss Ann J. Manhaa, who died in 1852; by this union he had three children, all of whom are dead. After spending a short time in Detroit and Chicago, he in 1856 settled in Des Moines, and opened the first drug store on the east side of the river; this did not prove a paying investment during the revulsion of 1857. He was, for some time, connected with the Missouri Medical College; his American diploma is from this college. In 1861, he came to Dubuque Co.; spent one year in Dyersville, then settled in Cascade, started a drug and general merchandise store, and continued his practice; in 1876, he sold his business and gave up his practice in order to devote his energies in the interest of the Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western Railroad; the initial organization of the old company was in August, 1877, at which Dr. Frances was present; he has been a Director from the first, and was Secretary until the transfer, in May, 1879, to the company now construction the road; the Doctor has had an unconquerable faith in the success of this enterprise which has truly "come through great tribulation;" he resumed his practice after the above transfer. His second wife is Miss Sarah W. Walters, of Baltimore, to whom he was married at St. Louis in 1861. He has a homestead, a business block and twenty lots in Cascade. He was raised an (SORRY THIS IS ALL I HAVE)

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CALVIN O. FREEMAN, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Cascade; son of Jeduthan Freeman and Lucy W. Roberts, was born in Broadalbin, Montgomery Co., N.Y., Aug. 5, 1803. His grandfather was a Captain in the Revolutionary war, and was also a surveyor and a pioneer in Monroe Co., N. Y. and acquired his land, in payment for surveying, from the Holland Purchase Co., under a charter from King George III; the old Captain, with his five sons, on of whom was father of C. O., went as emigrants into that then unexplored region, and suffered all the privations and hardships known to pioneer life; all those five sons settled near their father in Monroe Co.; Mr. Freeman's father subsequently removed to Buffalo, and afterward settled in Ohio. At 17, young Calvin was apprenticed to the trade of gunsmith, and then he went to general blacksmithing, which he has followed more less for twenty-five years. He was married in Ohio March 26,1828, to Miss Hannah D. Jenne, daughter of David Jenne, of Fairhaven, Mass.; they have had ten children, six of whom are living - Silas E., Edwin A., George W., died in 1873; Calvin R., died in 1872; Lemuel P., Hannah M., Angenette L., Salina A., the other two died in infancy. He, with a family of seven children, came to Whitewater Township in 1844, and bought 300 acres, which his sons carried on, while he worked at general blacksmithing till 1854, since which time has has confined his attention to the farm; hi wife died in February 1870. The Cascade Railroad Depot is neat his farm. In politics, he desires to be recorded as a nation man; he is quite firm in his views of party principles, and in his opinions of men and things generally, and is not averse to controversy. He is not a church member, but is a believer in the fundamental truth of Christianity.

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G. J. FREEMAN, farmer, stock-raiser and stock-dealer, Sec. 21; P. O. Farley; born in Lorain Co., Ohio, Oct. 22, 1842; removed with his parents to Dubuque Co., in 1853; his father, Samuel A. Freeman, born in Vermont, died in 1866; was a soldier in the war of 1812, and, with his intelligent New England energy, had all the qualities essential to successful pioneer life; his mother, Harriet Freeman, born in New Hampshire, died in 1874, was a worthy helpmate for such a man, and the sterling qualities of the parents are inherited by the son; Mr. Freeman has 530 acres of land in Secs. 20 and 21, seventy acres of timber land in Iowa Township - a farm grandly adapted to stock-raising, and effectively used for that purpose by its able proprietor. Mr. F. acts with the Republican party, but takes little time to work in the field of politics; his best energies are devoted to the development of his business, and to the furtherance of good enterprises in his community, of which he is one of the earliest settlers, and his success is, beyond question, mainly the result of his own exertions. He was married in 1866, to Miss Catharine Carroll, daughter of Peter and Ann Carroll, who removed from Ohio to Dubuque Co., when she was only 10 years of age, so she too, was one of the pioneers of this locality; they have six children - Cora G., Joseph A., Charles L., Anna, Harriet, and the youngest, very aptly named Winnie.

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EDSON GRANVILLE FRENCH, was born July 2, 1820, in New Hampshire, and married Relief Walker, of Vermont, April 26, 1843; their children are Freddie Walker, born July 19, 1847, and Jennie Elizabeth, born Feb. 4, 1865. On attaining his majority, Mr. French lift the hotel business because it was then considered necessary to sell liquor with it, and has always been a strict temperance man; he engaged in teaching school till the spring of 1844, when he went to Massachusetts and pursued a course of study in the State Normal School; he was appointed teacher in the public schools of Newbury Port, Mass., in September, 1845, and continued in charge till the fall of 1856, when he was compelled by ill health to leave the profession; Mr. French came West during a vacation in 1854, and erected the second house in the prospective town of Epworth, and removed hither with his family in the fall of 1856, and purchased Hiram Young 's new brick residence and land near by, and has now twenty acres; he engaged in market-gardening and farming, and in April 1858, succeeded R. Wilmott in the brick store where he carried on the business till May, 1863; he then commenced fruit-raising, and also grew many shade trees which now adorn all parts of the town and the country around; in November, 1872, Mr. French re-opened a general store, and, with his wife and son, still continues the business; he was Secretary of the School Board of Epworth for six years, from 1871 to 1877, and is a stanch friend of our public schools. Mr. and Mrs. French are members of the Unitarian Church.

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TIMOTHY FRENCH, farmer, Epworth; born in Waldo Co. Me., Jan. 27, 1831; removed to Dubuque Co in 1867; has a fine farm of 100 acres just outside of Epworth, and evidently manages it in such a manner as to secure first-class results; quite a number of the seminary students find boarding at Mr. French's; his large, nicely arranged and well-appointed house being admirably adapted for this purpose. Mr. F.'s denominational preferences are for the Free-Will Baptist Church; politically, he is identified with the Republican party. He was married in June, 1867, to Miss A. D. Mitchell, a worthy lady, of Kennebec Co., Me., of the firm Peter Fries & Son, general merchandise, Sherrill's Mound; born Aug. 11, 1844, in New Jersey; when a child, he came with his parents to Baltimore, Md.; in 1848, they removed to Dubuque Co. where he has since lived; in 1865, he took charge of his father's store and still manages it; he also owns a store at Sageville; he is largely engaged in breeding Poland-China and Essex pigs, Brahma chickens, waterfowl, ducks and turkeys, Cotswold sheep and shepherd and Newfoundland dogs. He married Miss Kate Greenley April 1, 1879; she was born in Jefferson Township; they have one child - Marsetus.

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PETER FRIES, proprietor of Fries' Hotel and general merchandise, Sherrill's Mount; he was born Dec. 6, 1814, in Prussia; in 1841, he came to Philadelphia, thence to Baltimore; in 1848, he came to his present locality; he own 200 acres of land; his grounds are handsomely laid out as a resort for pleasure-seekers, and are frequented by the fashionable residents of Dubuque, it being but ten miles distant and the only fashionable drive out of Dubuque; his hotel was built in 1856, costing from $5,00 to $6,000; it is built of stone; he built his store in 1860, and has carried on merchandising since then, He was the first Postmaster at Sherrill's Mount and held that office for twenty-four years, Married Catharine Kunkel in 1842; she was born in 1823 in Prussia; have five children - Edward, who now has charge of the store; Louisa (now Mrs. Kier - her husband was a member of the Legislature), died in 1874; Mary (now Mrs. W. H..Creager ); Caroline (now Mrs, Hurst ), and Peter. Catholics

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JOHN GEARHART, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Worthington; born in Pennsylvania Oct. 23, 1827; came to Dubuque Co. in 1849; has a farm of 225 acres in Secs. 3, 4 and 6; in addition to farming, he carried on, until the last four or five years, his occupation as a stonemason, being greatly assisted by his family during this time, in the management of his farm. Religion, Reformed Church; politics, Democratic. Mr. G. was married, March 10, 1853, to Miss Lavina Fogleman, of Pennsylvania; they have eight children - William H., John C., Lydia S., Charles R., Edwin W., Jacob F., Bertha J., and Rosa Lovina.

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ANDREW GEHRIG, tailor, corner of Main and Fifth streets, residence 1036 White street, Dubuque; was born in Switzerland Feb. 7, 1826; he grew up and and learned the tailor's trade, and came to United States in 1855; came to Dubuque May 19 of the same year; and began working at his trade; in 1867, he began business for himself, and has carried it on since then; he is one of the oldest tailors in the city. In 1851, he married Dorothea Boul, a native of Switzerland; they have had seven children, five of whom are living - Doc A. (now City Treasurer). Emile, Lena, Amelia, and Emma. Mr. Gehrig belongs to Schiller Lodge, No. 11, I.O.O.F., and to the Humbold Encampment; also belongs to the Germany Benevolent Society and to the Knights of Honor. pg. 792

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JOSEPH GEHRIG, proprietor of the Jefferson House, corner White and Seventh streets; was born in Switzerland Dec. 26, 1820; he grew up and learned the trade of shoemaker; he emigrated to America in November, 1844, and came to Dubuque June 1, 1845; he began work in Lorimer's stone quarry; in 1849, he went to California overland, and arrived in Sacramento in December; there were no houses and only fourteen tents where the city of Sacramento is now located; he dug the first cellar in Sacramento; he remained in California until 1851, then returned to Dubuque and bought the lots where his hotel stands; Mr. O'Connell was hung and was buried on this same corner. Mr. Gehrig began building the hotel in 1854, and completed in 1856, and it is one of the largest houses in the city; he rented it for a whole, and then has conducted it himself for many years; he gives it his personal attention; there are very few hotels that have so large a basement floor, so well filled with meats and vegetables, and stores of all kinds, and everything so neat and clean as that of the Jefferson House; when he began life, he had nothing, and, by industry and good management, he has acquired a nice property. He married Miss Oursala Kiene Sept. 26, 1851; she was born in Switzerland, and is a sister of Peter Kiene; she died in 1872, leaving six children - Mary, Lena, Paul, Henry, John, and Joseph. pg. 792-793

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JOHN GEORGE, merchant, proprietor of a hotel, etc., Centralia; born in Germany in 1829; he came to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1854; for twenty years, he worked at his occupation of machinist in the city of Dubuque; the past six years he has been in Centralia, engaged in the combined vocation of merchant, hotel-keeper, etc.; besides his hotel and store in Centralia, he has seventy-four acres of land in Sec. 5, Vernon Township, and a house and lot on the corner of Tenth and Jackson streets, in Dubuque. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democratic. In 1856, he was married in Dubuque to Miss Mary Kudnacker, also a native of Germany; they have seven children - John, Lena, Annie, Katie, Mary, Caroline, and Lizzie.

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ALEXANDER GLEW, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. Cottage Hill; born Jan. 29, 1823 in Center Co., Penn.; in 1838, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he now owns 375 acres land; part of this land he entered. Has been Constable, Township Treasurer, President of the School Board, etc. Married Amanda M. Waltham in 1845; she was born in Illinois; have seven children - Elizabeth A., J. M., William, Sarah J., John, Emanuel W., and Ida.

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THEODOR GOERDT, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Dyersville; born Oct. 15, 1824, in Germany; in 1850, came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 200 acres of land, part of which he entered. He has been President of the School Board and Director. Married Barbara Huter Sept. 3, 1850; she was born in Germany; they had thirteen children; six now living - Theodor, Elizabeth, Anna, Mary, Katie, and Joseph. Catholic.

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JOHN GOLDTHORPE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Dubuque; he was born in July 27, 1808, in Yorkshire, England; in 1829, he came to Philadelphia, coming on the ship John Wells; in February, 1832, he came to Galena, and there engaged in mining; the following years, he removed to Blue Mound, Wis., still following mining; in 1836, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns about 405 acres of land; a large part is under cultivation, which he has cleared and improved, with substantial buildings, etc. He married Alice Cocker Jan. 1, 1833; who was born in Lancaster, England, in August, 1808; they have four children - George W., Edward, Sarah J., and John R.; Hames was born March 10, 1836; was killed while mining on Mr. Rooney's farm, Jan. 18, 1865; George W. enlisted in 1861 in a Dubuque battery as gunner; he was afterward promoted to Sergeant, and served to the end of the war.

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S. GOODALE, proprietor of the American House, Farley; is a native of Lewis Co., N. Y., and was born Dec. 9, 1825; he grew up to manhood and lived in that State until 1866, when he came to Delaware Co., and located in Farley; he engaged in the hotel business and opened the American House in 1868; he built one part, and, in 1872, he enlarged it by building an addition; it is an attractive, well-kept hotel; Mr. Goodale is also engaged in the livery business, and he has had the contract for carrying the mail from Farley to Cascade for the past six years; he has held the offices of Assessor, Town Trustee and school offices. In 1854, he was united in marriage to Miss M. E. Hubbard, a native of Jefferson Co., N. Y. They have four children - Leon H., Everitt V., and Edna V. (twins), and Clark F.

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CHARLES GOODMANN, farmer, Sec., 28; P. O. Rickardsville; was born Jan, 6, 1823, in Germany; in 1847, he came to Pittsburgh, Penn,; the following year, he removed to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 160 acres of land. Married Mary Miller in May 1847; she was born in Germany; they have nine children - Henry, Charles, Julius, Berthie, Louis, Mary, Matilda, Ernest, and William. Protestant.

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SMITH GORDON, farmer, Sec. 30, Worthington. His father, Ransom S. Gordon, was born July 22, 1800, in New York; he died Aug. 14, 1879; he came to this locality in 1855, where the family have lived ever since; they own 100 acres of land He was married to Miss Rachael Little in 1839;she was born Jan. 1, 1815, in Ireland; they had seven children, five living - Ransom S., Smith, Ira, Henry, and Lois. Ransom and Smith served in the late war. Scott enlisted in 1862 in C. H, 9th N. H. V. I., and died of army disease in 1865. Stimson enlisted in 1862 in Co. C, Second Battalion, 12th U.S. Infantry, and was killed at the battle of the Wilderness May 5, 1864.

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JACOB GOSDEN, farmer and veterinary surgeon, Sec. 7; P. O. Cascade; born near London, England, June 22, 1817; came to America and settled in Dubuque Co., Iowa, in May 1852; his farm consists of 220 acres in Secs. 7, 8 and 18, Whitewater Township, and Secs. 12 and 13, Cascade Township; his farming business includes the raising of stock of all kinds, and he has an unequaled reputation as a veterinary surgeon; his practice in this profession extends twenty, thirty, and even forty miles from his home; the fine horses on his farm testify to his love of this noble animal, of whose disposition and ailments he has such accurate knowledge. Mr. G. is a member of the Episcopal Church; in politics, his leading principle is to vote for the best men for official positions. He was married, in 1852, to Miss Ann Rice, a native of England; they have five children - Rosa, Henry, Fannie, May, and Emily.

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NICHOLAS GOTTO, general merchandise, Sec. 20; P. O. Pin Oak; born June 6, 1841, in Prussia; in 1868, he came to Michigan, thence to Chicago, Ill.; in 1870, he removed to Dubuque Co., and commenced his present business; he owns eighty acres of land, also five lots in Georgetown, with the wagon and blacksmith shop, and carries on quite an extensive business. He married Mary E. McGuire May 2, 1871; she was born in Concord Township; they have one child - Anna F.; they lost Mary E. in infancy. Roman Catholic.

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JOHN GREENLEY, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Rickardsville; was born May 23, 1806 in Yorkshire, England; in 1838, he came to Dubuque Co.; he has owned from two hundred to three hundred acres of land, which has been divided amongst his children; he now owns thirty-five acres. Married Alley J. Dobson Jan. 28, 1828; she was born Jan. 9, 1807 and died Sept. 15, 1855; they have five children - Ann,Jane,George,William and Elizabeth; William enlisted in 1861, in the 9th I.V.I,: was wounded in the battle of Pea Ridge. Second marriage to Mrs. Cook in September 1856; she was born July 25, 1802 in Northumberland, England; she has nine children by a former marriage - John, William, Joseph, Walter, Mary, Elizabeth, and Jane (twins), Robert and Thomas. Richard C. Cook enlisted in 1862, in Co. C, 21st I. V. I.; was killed in the battle of Black River Bridge. Thomas Cook enlisted in 1861, in the 9th I. V. I.; was wounded at the battle of Vicksburg, for which he draws a pension. M. E. Church.

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CHARLES H. GREMMELS, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Dubuque; born July 14, 1837, in Hanover, Germany; in 1854, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co. where he has since lived; he owns 157 acres of land in this county, also 160 acres in Fayette Co. Has been Township Treasurer for three years, and just been re-elected to the same office for three years more; he is Treasurer of the Farmers' Fire Ins. Co. He married Anna Bartles in 1865; she was born Nov. 4, 1837, in Hanover; she died Dec. 4, 1875; have three children - Henrietta,Anna and Charles H. He married his second wife, Mary Kempe, April 15, 1876; she was born in Dubuque Co.; they have two children - William and Frieda. His father was born Jan. 4, 1809 in Hanover; he married Catherine Ahrens in 1835; she was born April 6, 1810, in Hanover; they had seven children, two living - Charles H. and Hannah. They are Lutheran in religion.

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JUSTIES GRIMME, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 21, 1818 in Hanover, Germany; in 1848, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; they own and occupy the farm formerly settled on by Mrs., Grimme's parents, consisting of 160 acres; he has been School Director and is President of the School Board. He married Miss Catharine Ihlers Dec. 14, 1850; she was born Oct. 14, 1833, in Hanover; she came to America with her parents in 1844; they have six children - Justies (now holding the office of Constable, having been elected in 1879, he has received quite a liberal education) Edward, Henry, Ferdinand, George, and Vernon. Attends M. E. Church.

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WILLIAM GROGAN, son if Bernard and Margaret Grogan, was born March 26, 1850, in Onondaga Co., N. Y.; he is a brickmason and plasterer by trade, he moved, with his parents, to Jones Co., Iowa in 1855; he commenced business for himself about 1868, after serving an apprenticeship with his father, and, in January, 1879, located in the town of Cascade, Dubuque Co., where he has continued to follow his trade. He was married the 10th of January, 1879, to Miss Katie Conwell, the only child of John and Alice Conwell; they also reside in Cascade.

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W. W. HALLER, contractor and builder, Farley; is a native of Harrison Co., Va., and was born Sept. 15, 1826; he grew up to manhood in Illinois and Missouri; he came to Iowa in 1846, and located in Lee Co., where he lived three years, and came to Dubuque Co. in 1849, and engaged in farming; he continued farming fifteen years; then engaged in building, and has continued in that business since then, and is now the oldest builder here; he has held school offices for many years. In 1849, Mr. Haller was united in marriage to Miss Jane Wilson, a native of Kentucky. They have six children - Arthusa, John, Campbell, William W., Paulina A., and Ellen.

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JOSEPH HALTY, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Centralia; born in Dubuque Co. March 2, 1848; he is a son of Martin and Lena Halty, mother's maiden name was Lena Sebastian, his parents coming here from Alsace, France in 1847. The father died in 1878, aged 70 years; the mother is still living, aged about 60 years; the father's family numbered seven children, three of whom are living - Joseph, Mary (now Mrs. Keller ), and John; four deceased - Kate, Lena, Tony, and Martin. The home farm of forty acres in carried on by Joseph, the subject of this sketch. In religion, a Catholic; in politics, a Democrat.

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M. HAM
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DEACON JAMES S. HAMILTON, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Cascade; his parents were Patrick Hamilton and Elizabeth Smith; he was born Oct. 7, 1805, in Allegheny, Huntingdon Co., Penn.; he stayed at home until 24 years of age, himself and brothers carrying on the farm after the death of his father, which occurred when he was but 16 years old. He was married in his native town, Oct. 8, 1829, to Miss Mary Walker; they have had nine children, six of whom still live - Sarah E., Jane E. (now dead), William G. (now dead), Mary C., Martha A., Frances E., Abby A., Ida M., and Charles W. (now dead); five children are married, and all but Mary C. live in Iowa; Abby A. is yet at home. In the spring after his marriage, he commenced farming in his native county, which he continued for ten years, and then farmed for five years in Bedford Co., Penn.; in the spring of 1845, came West with his family, and stopped that season twelve miles west of Dubuque; during May and June of that year, they lived in a covered sheep-pes, having neither door nor window, and one daughter was born there; when it rained, the little ones were sheltered under an umbrella, the clapboard roof affording poor protection; they lived mainly on potatoes and johnny-cake; the nearest grist-mill was at Canton, eighteen miles distant, and the nearest physician was at Dubuque. In the fall of 1845, he settled in Whitewater Township upon the farm which he now owns; his first house here was a log cabin 12 X 12, with a sod roof, and had only a small four-light window; he now has a comfortable house, a large barn and 200 acres of land all in good condition. He was a liberal contributor to the new railroad enterprise. In early life, he was a Congregationalist, but now he and his wife are acceptable members of the Methodist Church. He is not a member of any secret organization; politically, he is a reliable Republican. He is benevolent and public spirited, and lives peaceably with all mankind. On the 8th of October, 1879, occurred the golden wedding of this venerable couple; fully fifty of their pioneer friends gathered at the homestead with children and grandchildren on that memorable occasion; the many presents were of both intrinsic and associated value. The infirmities of age are seen upon the Deacon, but he and his energetic wife are enjoying the rewards of industry and pure living, namely, many friends, a fair competency and clear consciences.

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G. F. HAMMERAND, wagon manufacturer, Sec. 24; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Jan. 3, 1847 in Bavaria; in 1854 he came to Dubuque; remained here till 1864, when he removed to Galena, Ill., and was apprenticed to the wagon business; after working at this trade three years, he returned to Dubuque Co., and settled at his present locality and at once commenced business for himself, which he has since followed; he owns four and a half acres of land with his house and sheds. Married Margaret Sternwas Dec, 1, 1868; she was born in Ohio in 1846; they have four children - Edward, George, Lizzie, and Anna. Lutheran; Republican.

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FREDERICK HANTELMANN, farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 7, 1834, in Hanover,Germany; in 1844, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; he owns 160 acres of land, also 110 acres in Nebraska; he is Township Trustee, and has been School Director. He married Susanna Hillanbrand April 4,1857; she was born in Wurtemberg in 1834; they have seven children - John, Daniel, Henry, William, Amelia, Augustus, and Susan. In religion, Mr. H. is a Lutheran.

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THOMAS HARDIE was born in the city of Montreal, Lower Canada, Jan. 25, A. D. 1820: his parents emigrated to Canada from the " old country" about the year 1810, and settled in Montreal; his father, Alexander H., was a native of Edinburgh, Scotland; his mother was a native of Deptford, England, and her maiden name was Elizabeth Enfield. Alexander Hardie, on locating in Montreal, established himself in business as a merchant clothier, and for a number of years drove thriving and profitable business, but was finally ruined by indorsing heavily the notes of a supposed friend; he had to pay those notes, which left him nearly penniless. He removed to the small town of Laprairie (near Montreal), in the year 1829, where he died in the summer of 1830, leaving an orphaned family of five children, the mother having died in Montreal some six years previous; Thomas, the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of these children; his entire school education was embraced within a period of two years or thereabouts, when he was less than 8 years of age. The school he attended was known as the " Union School" and was kept by the Workman brothers, Benjamin, William,Joseph and Samuel; they were classical scholars, and each one of them has since reached high social and political distinction in the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario; in this school, all grades, from A B C to the classics were taught; but the few months' schooling that Thomas received here was, of course, confined to the merest rudiments of education. They served, however, for the foundation upon which a lad of quick perception could and did build a life of intelligence, usefulness and honor. From the death of the father, the children of the family were separated, and thenceforward Thomas had to "hoe his own row" in the field of life. Whatever success in life he has since achieved, is due entirely to his own efforts to surmount trials and adversities such as seldom beset the path of youth. On the death of his father, in 1830, Thomas removed to Montreal, where he worked at brushmaking with a Mr. Walton, an old friend of his father's, until the cholera broke out in the memorable year of 1832. The Walton family became victims to the dread scourge which decimated the city, and Thomas was again cast adrift. He was then taken to Kingston, Upper Canada, by a cousin who had been brought up in Mr. Hardie's family. Here he remained until the summer of 1844, when his cousin removed to Buffalo, N. Y. He resided there until the fall of" 1839, and in the mean time
had learned the painter's trade with the Miller brothers, the leading artists of the day in their line.

In September, 1839, he removed to St. Louis, Mo.; from there, in the spring of 1840, he went to Springfield, Ill., where he carried on the painting business for three years, having for a partner George Bennett, now of this city. In Springfield, he married Miss Lydia Woodworth, in 1842. The issue of this marriage was three children, the eldest of whom-- Laura Esther, alone survives. After a residence of three years in Springfield, be was induced by his brothers John and William, then established in a flourishing business in Montreal, to remove to that city, which he did in the fall of 1843. He remained in Montreal, the city of his nativity, until the autumn of 1846, when it was found that that rigorous climate did not agree with his wife's health; the seeds of consumption were implanted in her constitution, and a removal to a more genial clime was found necessary. He then determined to remove to one of the Southern States, and, in September,

1846, went to Chicago, where his wife had preceded him a few months on a visit to her friends.

When in Chicago, he learned that his old friend and partner, George Bennett, was located in Dubuque, so he determined to pay him a visit and take a boat from there to New Orleans. He landed in Dubuque, Oct. 6, 1846, and was so charmed with the beauty and healthfulness of the location and the free hospitality of its people, that he concluded to remain. Here the wanderer at last found a permanent abiding place. He immediately formed a partnership with his old friend Bennett, under the title of Bennett & Hardie, in the painting business, which continued until about 1850 or 1851, when Bennett retired, having sold out to John R. Harvey. Mr. Hardie's specialties in his occupation were sign-painting and graining, in which he excelled. But, owing to failing health, he was obliged to abandon the business, and, through the favor of his friend, Gen. Warner Lewis, Surveyor General of Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, he was assigned a position in the Surveyor General's office in the summer of 1853. Mrs. Hardie died of consumption in the spring of 1850. In August, 1851, he married Miss Mary Ann Parker, daughter of John Parker, one of the earliest settlers of Dubuque. His second wife died of typhoid pneumonia, April 30 1868, leaving three children-- Alice,John, and Frank, who, with Laura, his daughter by his first wife, now comprise his family; Laura as housekeeper; Alice is a teacher in the grammar department of the city schools; John graduated with honor from the city high school in 1871, and learned the molding business at the Novelty Iron Works, where he is still employed, and Frank, a bright boy of 14 years, is a member of the fifteenth 'Class of the Third Ward School.' The family still reside in the house where the three last-named children were born; this house, when purchased by Mr. Hardie in 1847 was located in the fields north of the city, which fields were overgrown with wild penny-royal, and hazel brush. This location is today the most desirable residence property in the city and compactly built for blocks beyond it; the old homestead is now surrounded' by the most elegant mansions in the city. A generation of men have passed away since Mr. Hardie located there and all is changed, himself least of all. Mr. Hardie continued to occupy a desk in the Surveyor General's office during the administration of Presidents Pierce and Buchanan, but, on the inauguration of President Lincoln, a new Surveyor General was appointed, and Mr. Hardie, with others, was gently notified that:'', his services were no longer required.

In March, 1863, Mr. Hardie was elected Secretary of the Board of Education, a position which he still holds, having been unanimously re-elected each consecutive year since that time, a fact which of itself speaks volumes for his efficiency in performing the duties of his office. He has filled other public positions from time to time. In 1849, he was elected Alderman to represent the Fourth Ward; at the end of the year he retired, and has since persistently refused aldermanic honors. He represented Dubuque Co. in the Sixth General Assembly of the State of Iowa, the last session held at the old capital, Iowa City, and was also a member of the Ninth General Assembly regular and extra sessions. In the House of Representatives, be was emphatically a working member, being honored with prominent positions on several important commits tees, and his ability as a correct parliamentarian was undisputed. Hon.Rush Clark, the Speaker. of the House in the Ninth General Assembly, himself one of the best presiding officers that the House ever had, complimented Mr. Hardie's ability in this line by frequently calling on him to preside over the deliberations of the House, and said that he would rather trust the order and business of the House in Mr. Hardie's hands than in that of any other member. This was a compliment Mr. Hardie felt justly proud of, as coming from a political opponent, at a time, too, when to be a political.' opponent was almost to be a personal enemy.

In his early years, Mr. Hardie was instructed in the religious views of Calvinism, as then taught and held in the Scotch Presbyterian Church, but being cast upon the world and left with thought untrammeled, he gradually imbibed more liberal views, without, however, settling down to any decided conviction of doctrine, until April, 1849, when he united with the Christian Church in Dubuque, with which church he still holds fellowship. In politics, he has always been a Democrat of the most decided type, and expects to die in the faith. He has given a large portion of his life work to the benevolent Orders of Freemasons and Odd Fellows. Soon after locating in Dubuque; he joined Dubuque Lodge No. 3, Freemasons, was admitted in 1858, to become a charter member of Metropolitan Lodge, No. 49; he was its first Secretary and is its last, having held the office most of the time since the organization of the Lodge. He joined the Odd Fellows by uniting with Sangamon Lodge, No. 6, at its first organization in Springfield, Ill., in 1841, rapidly passed the chairs and was a member of the Grand Lodge of Illinois in 1843. He joined, also, Washington Encampment No. 3, of Springfield, on its first organization-in 1842, and was a Past Chief Patriarch when he removed to Montreal in 1843. Reaching Montreal, he found that a lodge of the American Order just been established there; this he joined, and at once became an active worker in good cause. The Order in Canada rapidly increased, and in Montreal took in the very best portion of the male population. Mr. Hardie was a charter member of the first Encampment instituted there, and also a charter member of the Grand Lodge of Canada, being Deputy Grand Master of that honorable body when he left Montreal, in 1846. His work in Odd Fellowship in Canada was so well appreciated by his brethren, that, then he left for the West; a splendid banquet was given in his honor, and he was presented by his Lodge with a beautiful gold watch and chain, and by the Grand Lodge with a silver snuff-box lined with gold, in which was inclosed a highly complimentary address. Soon after reaching Dubuque he became a charter member of Julian Lodge, No. 12, where he still holds active membership, frequently representing it in the Grand Lodge of the State. He is also a charter member of Halcyon Encampment, No. 1, of this city, and in 1851-52 represented the Grand Lodge of Iowa in the Grand Lodge of the United States.

It would seem that one holding so many official positions as Mr. Hardie has done, in his quiet but not uneventful life, would be constantly pushing himself forward, but this is not the case with him; he is modest, perhaps too much so for his own good, and he `takes some pride in saying he has never yet intimated, directly or indirectly, that he wanted a nomination or election to any office he has ever held. In his case, it is true that the office has always sought the man, and not the man the office. Would this were more often the case. Mr. Hardie is not deficient in literary ability; he is a good correspondent and a fluent and ready writer; his reports of the public schools of Dubuque attest his efficiency in this line, and many personal sketches from his pen have been given the public through the press, enjoyed and appreciated for the rich humor and fun they contained, without a suspicion of their origin.

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REV. FATHER A. HATTENBERGER, Pastor of St. Joseph's Convent, Sec. 33; P. O. Dubuque; born in Alsace, France in 1823; educated in the Seminary at Strasbourg, France; came to America in 1847; in 1849, was ordained in Chicago for the diocese of Dubuque; his first work was the pastorate of Fort Des Moines Valley, with residence of Ottumwa; then, for twelve years, in connection with the above work, he had charge of the church ar Fort Madison, and, after that, at West Point, in Lee Co.; from there, in 1870, he came to his present pastoral work in connection with St. Joseph's Convent, the Mother House of the Sisters of Charity, as its spiritual director and the priest and guide of the church for the surrounding neighborhood. Father H. is universally beloved by his people for his urbanity of manner, devotion to his work and affection for his church.

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JACOB HEDRICK, farmer and gardener, Sec. 35; P. O. Dubuque; born May 1, 1832, in Germany; when a year old, he came with his parents to Pennsylvania in 1836, and thence migrated to Dubuque Co.; owns 120 acres of land. He married Barbara Esslinger in 1854; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have eight children - Jacob, William, Mary, Louisa, Mena, Emma, George, and Emil; Frank was accidentally shot in 1878 (aged 14 years), by his brother George, while playing with fire-arms.

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A. HEEB, proprietor of the Dubuque Brewery, Couler avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born April 11, 1811; he immigrated to America and landed in Baltimore in September, 1835; in 1836 he went to St. Louis; he came to Dubuque in 1846, and the following year, 1847, he came here and located permanently and engaged in his present business; he has carried on the business over thirty-three years, a greater length of time than any brewer in the State, and he has built up the largest business in the State. In 1846, Mr. Heeb was united in marriage to Miss Kathrina Guerig, a native of Germany; they have ten children, five sons and five daughters; Mr. Heeb has held the office of County Supervisor, and was twice elected to the City Council. P. 803

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REV. FATHER GEORGE W. HEER, Pastor of St. John's Catholic Church, Centralia; born in Boke, Province of Westphalia, Prussia, April 25, 1849; emigrated to America in 1855 and settled in Fort Madison, Iowa; after some preliminary study, he went to the College of the Franciscan Fathers at Quincy, Ill.; one year was spent in study there, when he was transferred to the Salesianum Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis.; finished his course there after seven years' study and was ordained for the diocese of Dubuque by Bishop Henni, of Michigan, on the 16th of March, 1872; his first work was as Pastor of St. Peters Church, Keokuk, but, after some months of service there, was appointed to Richmond, Washington Co., Iowa, where he remained eighteen months; he was then appointed to his present charge of the church in Centralia and Lattnerville; he is universally beloved by his people, and is, beyond all questions, "the right man in the right place."

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WILLIAM HEFFNER, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born Nov. 14, 1813 in Wurtemberg, Germany; in 1837 he came to New York, thence to Toledo, Ohio, afterward to Portsmouth, Cincinnati, Kentucky, St. Louis, etc. etc.; in 1843 he came to Wisconsin; in 1846 to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; owns 334 acres of land. Married Mary Coopmann in 1844; she was born in Germany; they have two children - William and Louis.

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HENRY HELLMANN, farmer, Sec.5; P. O. New Vienna; he was born in August, 1817, in Germany; in 1834, he came to Ohio; in 1844, he came to Dubuque Co., he being one of the first settlers of this locality, there being but three buildings in the township at this time; he owns 200 acres of land, part of which he entered. Married Agnes Fangman in 1847; she was born in Germany, and came to Dubuque Co., with her parents in 1844; they have six children - Angeline, Andrew, Mary, Henry, Anna, and Elizabeth. He has been Township Treasurer, School Director, etc. Catholic.

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S. HEMPTSTEAD
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REV. FATHER JOHN P. HENNESSY, Cascade, son of James Hennessy and Winnifred Gleesan; was born June 28, 1847, in the County of Tipperary, and in the archdiocese of Cashel and Emly, Ireland; until 15 years of age, he was with his parents, who were farmers, and at that age he began a preparatory course for college at the Jesuits' Seminary in Limerick; at the age of 19, he entered his diocesan college at Thurles; he spent eight years in this college, taking the full classical and theological course; he came to Dubuque Oct. 8, 1874, and his first appointment was in Allamakee Co., Iowa, where he remained but a year, and his second charge was that of St. Martin's Church at Cascade, where he has since remained; his pastorate includes fully 150 families; the St. Martin's congregation have a parochial school with an enrollment of nearly one hundred children, taught by six Sisters of the B.V.M.; it was established in 1869, and is provided with a spacious, three-story brick building; the church was erected in 1867, and is of stones, neat, commodious and within is richly ornamented, and will seat 600; they have a comfortable brick parsonage adjoining the church. Father Henry, during his pastorate, has secured a sweet toned bell, weighing nearly a ton, and has made other substantial improvements. He is not identified with any political party, and does not interfere with, or in any way dictate to, his congregation in regard to their political action. The pleasantest relations exists between him and his people, and the general public.

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LOUIS HENNEY, farmer and gardener, Sec. 35; P. O. Dubuque; born Oct. 27, 1855, in Eagle Point, Iowa, and has always lived in Dubuque Co.; he owns forty acres of land, which he devotes to gardening purposes; his father was born in Germany in 1818, and died on this farm in 1868; his mother was born in 1825, in Germany, and died here in 1879; his two sisters - Emma and Minnie - live here with him.

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FREDERICK HENNIGES, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Dubuque; born Feb. 17, 1839, in Hanover; in 1853, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 295 acres of land; he is Township Trustee, and has been School Director. He married Mena Kemp in 1866; she was born in Dubuque Co.; they have three children - Emma, Frederick, and Henry. In religion, he is a Lutheran.

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PETER HENTGES, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Pin Oak; born Oct. 10, 1819, in Prussia; in 1847, he came to Chicago, thence to Du Page Co., Ill.; in 1855, he came to his present farm, consisting of 253 acres of land; his residence and other buildings are equal to any in the township, all of which he has built since coming here, He has been three years Township Treasurer. Married Mary Schmidt in 1851; she was born in Prussia; they have six children, four sons and two daughters. Catholic.

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PETER HERBER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born July 25, 1835, in Prussia; in 1854, he came to Chicago, and, in 1856, he migrated to Dubuque Co.; he owns eighty acres of land; he is Township Assessor, Township Trustee, and Treasurer of the School Board. He married Mary Reinert in 1865; she was born in Prussia; they have five children - Katie, John, Mary, Michael, and Frank; the latter enlisted, in 1862, in Co. E, 21st I.V.I., and served to the end of the war. Mr. H. is a Catholic in religion, and a Democrat in politics.

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JOHN HIGGS, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Farley; born in England June 1, 1825; came to America in 1851; remained one year in Pennsylvania, removing to Dubuque Co. in 1852; has a farm of 80 acres; is a member of the Republican party; has held township offices, and is held in universal esteem by all who know him; his wife was Miss Elizabeth Sobey, a native of England. They were married in 1851; eight children are living - Lucy (now Mrs. Ogan ), Nannie, Bettie, Kittie, Joseph, John, Amanda, and Edith; three are dead - Joseph, Richard, and Sophia.

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JAMES HILL, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Farley; born in Ireland in 1835; came to Dubuque Co. in 1837; has been engaged in farming, as a vocation, for all the years since old enough to transact business; has a good farm of 80 acres, in a fine community; is connected with the Catholic Church, and identified with the Democratic party. He has been married twice; his first wife was Bridget O'Connor, a native of Ireland; they were married in 1876; she died, 1877; his second wife was Annie Dowd, also born in Ireland; married, 1877; two children - Rosana and Jennie.

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REV. JAMES HILL, retired Baptist minister, of Cascade; is the son of Wm. Hill and Sophia Hawkins, and was born on the 6th of December, 1822, in Cheddar, Somersetshire, England; he was apprentice until 21 years of age, to the draper and general store business. After attaining his majority, he was an assistant in a mercantile establishment in Bristol, England, until 1849, when he came to America and settled in Dubuque, where he remained until 1854, when he located in Cascade, which has since been his home. He was married in Cheddar, England, in July, 1848, to Miss Sylvia Brown, daughter of James Brown, of Nicholston, Devonshire, England. On his arrival in Cascade, he purchased and began improving a quarter-section of land where his homestead now is, and at the same time preached to people in the region round about his settlement; most of his minisrty have been without money or price. Through his
efforts, the Baptist Churches at Epworth and Worthington were gathered, organized and supplied with places of worship; he was also a liberal contributor to Cascade churches. In 1862, he raised seventy-two men for a company of volunteers, and Capt. David Graves completed the company, and it was enlisted in the 21st, I. V. I.; he was elected First Lieutenant, and served in that position until just after the fall of Vicksburg, when he was called to the chaplaincy of the regiment by the unanimous choice of privates and officers; before the close of the war, he was well known in that division as the "Fighting Chaplain;" he preached several times every week, and religious revival were not unfrequented in his regiment. On his return at the close of the war, he resumed his missionary labors in this vicinity. In 1857, he built a fine brick residence in the suburbs of Cascade; it is situated upon a commanding eminence, and his attractive grounds give evidence of cultivated taste. His wife was his efficient co-laborer until her death in March 1874; from 1872 to 1877, he was Pastor of
the Baptist Church at Cascade; has now a regular appointment at Worthington, but still resides on and superintends his farm, The plain east of his dwelling was an ancient Indian burying ground; relics have been frequently found, and a full length skeleton of an adult Indian was exhumed not long ago. This vicinity was a favorite camping place of the roving tribes, and until within a score of years, some made annual pilgrimages to these hunting-grounds and resting place of their departed heroes. In 1878, Mr. Hill was made a Director of the Chicago, Bellevue, Cascade & Western Narrow-Gauge Railroad, and was then elected Vice President, and early in 1879 was the President, but afterward resigned in favor of O. F. Wyatt, who, in connection with J. F. Joy and George Runkel, are now constructing the road; he was for one year connected with the Cascade flouring-mills. In September, 1874, he married Mrs. Angie Potter, daughter of John V. McCune, of Belle Plain, Benton Co., Iowa; he has no children. He has been a conscientious and active Republican from the earliest existence of the party, and during his entire life has been an enemy of oppression and slavery of either black or white, and early prophesied that the rebellion would be the death of American slavery. His friend nominated him for the Legislature from this stronghold of Democracy, and he ran 700 ahead of his ticket, but, of course, failed of an election. He is candid and benevolent, and well known for his unostentatious deed of charity. His wife ably seconds his labors, He is emphatically a self-made man; his culture, literary and theological, is the result of devoted study at home in connection with his daily labors. He is not bigoted in his views on religious, social or general questions which divide mankind, but acts in the spirit of Chalmer's beautiful sentiment: "In essentials, unity; in non-essential, liberty; in all things, charity."

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JOHN HINDE, farmer, Secs. 28 and 29; P. O. Epworth; born in the village of Ince, near Chester, Cheshire Co., England, in 1843; his ancestry of the Hinde family have lived in the above village for many past generations; he came to America and to Dubuque Co. in 1853; lived in Jefferson Township nineteen years, removing to his present location in 1872; has a farm of 120 acres under good cultivation. He is a member of the M. E. Church and of the Republican party; has held school offices, and invariably acts well his part in aiding all worthy enterprises in his community. He was married Nov. 16, 1871, a worthy lady - Miss Louise V. Crosley, daughter of William Crosley, of Center Township, who moved to Dubuque Co. from Virginia, in September, 1856; they have five children living - Mary L., John William, Hannah Elizabeth, Thomas Joseph, Richard Henry; and one daughter died in infancy. Mr. Hind's father, Thomas, his two brothers, Richard and Thomas, his cousin, Robert, and a more distant relative, Richard, are all residents of Jefferson Township, so that the long-time family associations of England are in great measure transferred to this portion of the New World.

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JOSEPH HINKLEY, livery and sale stable, Dyersville; born Dec.18, 1843, Northamptonshire, England; came to Dyersville in 1855; in 1855 he went to Colorado, California and other Western States, and, in 1870, returned to Dyersville. Has held the office of Marshal and Constable the past five years. Married Susanna Northey, July 4, 1871; she was born in England; have two children - Herbert G. and Hanney H.

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JOHN HODGDON
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ADAM J. HOEFER, firm of Hoefer & Ramm, proprietors Washington House, New Vienna; born Aug. 7, 1856, in New Wine Township;at the age of 17, he went to Milwaukee and attended the Pio Nono College two years; then returned and was engaged in teaching school till 1880, when he commenced his present business. He married Josephine Kikenege, Nov. 25, 1879; she was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. His parents came to Dubuque Co., in 1860. His partner, Christian Ramm, was born in Nassau, Germany, May 8, 1852; in 1837, he came to Dubuque Co., and engaged in farming till he commenced his present business. His parents reside in Iowa Township.

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HENRY HOLSCHER, of the firm Holscher Bros, general merchandise, grain, pork, etc., Dyersville; was born Feb. 23, 1832, in Westphalia, Prussia; in 1856 he came to Baltimore, Md., thence to Wisconsin, and there engaged in railroading for about six months; Jan 3, 1857, he came to Dyersville, having to borrow $10 to pay his expenses here; he then opened a small store and gradually increased his stock as his means would admit, and now carries on an immense business, and is now probably the wealthiest man in this locality; he has just been elected Mayor, and has held several other local offices. Married Catharine Schultz, Nov. 20, 1860; she was born Prussia; they have nine children - three sons and six daughters. Democrat; Roman Catholic.

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FREDERICK HOHLSTEIN, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born on July 31, 1819 in Germany; in 1835; he went to Texas; in 1836, he came to Jefferson Township, where he has since lived: he first made a claim of 320 acres, now owns eighty-six acres; has been eight years School Director. Married Catherine Tishauser in 1862 she was born in Germany; have four children - Fred, Emma, Caroline, and Mary; he has five children by former marriage - Mary, William, Rosena, Louisa, and John.

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CARL F. HUMTKE, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Dubuque; born Dec. 31, 1810, in Hessian, Germany; in 1839, he came to Baltimore, Md. and thence to Wheeling, Va.; in 1842, came to Dubuque Co. and the following year moved to his present farm; he owns 351 acres of land, part entered and improved. He married Wilhelmina Halsman in 1839; she was born July 28, 1810, in Hessian, Germany; they have six children - Wilhelmina, Charles F., John H., Mary, Frederick, William, and August; they lost one child in infancy. Mr. Humtke is a Presbyterian in religious belief, and a Republican in politics.

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CHARLES H. HUNTINGTON, manufacturer, Cascade; was born Oct. 7, 1835, in Geauga Co., Ohio; left home when but 14, and at age of 15 began blacksmithing, and, with slight interruptions, has continued that business to the present date; in spring of 1855, came West, and in that fall settled in Monticello, and went into general blacksmithing; afterward came to Cascade, and since 1856 has been identified with the business interest of the place; has sometimes employed twenty men in his shop, manufacturing wagons and plows, and repairing reapers and also horseshoeing; he was for eighteen years associated with D. A. Dickinson in same business, whom he bought out, and now has no partner in carrying on his large manufactory, which is excelled in magnitude by but one, namely, the brewery; he owns the large shop which he occupies, also has a comfortable residence in East Cascade. He was married, May 9, 1858, to Miss Mary Delay, formerly of Lawrence Co., N. Y.; they have five children, all born in Iowa, and all living at home - William H., Charles H., Mary M., Clara J., and Rachel A. Belle. Himself and wife are Baptists; he is a Republican; is active member of Ancient Order of United Workers.

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J
EPHRAIM JACKSON, M. D., homoeopathic physician, Epworth; born in Middlesex Co., Mass., July 25, 1816; he traces his ancestry back for eight generations to Edward Jackson, born in 1616, who came to Massachusetts from London, England, in 1642, and took the Freeman's Oath in 1645; after him came Sebas, who was born on the passage to this country; Edward; Edward, born in 1698; Jonathan, first Collector of the port of Boston, 1757; Samuel;Ephraim; and in the eighth generation, Ephraim, the subject of this sketch. Dr. J. came to Dubuque Co. April 17, 1854; he settled at that time neat his present place, being the pioneer physician here, there being only one other physician at that time between Manchester and Dubuque; his success as a physician has brought him a large practice, which he still retains; ten other physicians have, at different times, located in the place, but Dr. J. has remained a fixture here, and in the medical profession; he has long been an active official member of the M. E. Church, and himself and wife were among the first Sundayschool workers in the town. He has been married twice; first, in 1838, to Miss Harriet N. Kidder, and native of Pittston, Me., and sister of Z. Kidder; she died May 17, 1864; his second wife was Mrs. Adaline McClellan, to whom he was married July 2, 1865; two children have died - Elma L., Jan 30, 1842, and Joseph E., Oct. 27, 1849; eight children are living - Harriet E. (now Mrs. Tuttle ), Sewell M., Mary T. (now Mrs. Brown ), Abby Ann F., Etta E., Addie Valentine, Frank Winslow, and Sarah J.

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WILLIAM J. JOHNSON, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Farley; born in Ireland, July 11, 1852, and came to Dubuque Co. in June, 1869; is thoroughly well known as a farmer of good abilities, industrious habits and deserving qualities. He is a member of the Republican party, and much esteemed as a neighbor and citizen. He was married, April 4, 1875, to Miss Catherine Lawler; they have three children - Johnnie, Jennie, and Willie.

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T. W. JOHNSTON, Superintendent of Poorhouse and Dubuque County __arm Julien Station; P. O. Dubuque. The subject of this sketch was born in Ireland in 1840; his mother died in his early boyhood, and his father, with his broken family, emigrated to America in 1848; for three years they lived in New Jersey, removing to Ohio in 1851; after six years residence in the Buckeye State, the removal which changed to home to Dubuque Co., Iowa, was made in 1857; for two years, they lived in Iowa Township, then removed to Table Mound Township. The father, Thomas Johnston, a well-known and much-esteemed citizen of Table Mound, died Jan.1, 1871, aged 62 years. Mr. J's education was mainly received in the excellent schools of Massillon, Ohio, and his creditable career in Dubuque Co. proves that this culture was bestowed upon a mind of good ability; his honorable record for ten successive years as Township Clerk, Township Assessor and Clerk of the School Board in Table Mound Township, as member of the State Legislature for the Fifteenth and Sixteenth General Assemblies, and in his present official position since March, 1877, shows that he is entitled to confidence as one of the most trustworthy, capable and efficient citizens of the county.

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GRO W. JONES
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JOHN JONES, grocer, Postmaster, Durango; was born Nov. 8, 1828, in County Merioneth, Wales; in 1850, he came to Racine, Wis., thence to Galena, Ill.; in 1853, he returned to Wales; remained abroad till 1855, when he returned to Galena, Ill.; in November 1856, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he was appointed Postmaster here, July 1879. Married Elizabeth Home, April 17, 1850; she was born in the county of Carnarvon, Wales; they have five children, three living - Ellen (now Mrs. Jones, living now in Wales), Jane Ann and Ellis. Attend M. E. Church.

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K
CHARLES F. KANTHLENAR, farmer, Secs. 28 and 29; P. O. Farley; born in Wurtemburg, Germany, Dec. 14, 1842; came to America and to Dubuque Co. in 1848; lived in Sherirll's Mound until 1869, when he removed to his present location; has a farm of 160 acres,with fine improvements, and in what is in some respects probably the finest location in his neighborhood. In religion, Mr. K. is a Methodist; in politics, a Republican, and is highly regarded as a most estimable citizen and worthy neighbor. He was married, in 1869, to Eliza Boyle, a native of Dubuque Co.; their only child is a bright, intelligent boy, named Henry.

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JOHN KANTLEHNER, Sec. 11; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born in September 1844 in Wurtemberg, Germany; in 1848, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; owns 177 acres land. Married Lizzie Renkert March 16, 1880; she was born in Jefferson Township. Members of the M. E. Church.

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P. KEAGY, merchant, Epworth; born in Bedford Co., Penn., April 4, 1822; came to Dubuque Co. in October, 1855; his occupation for many years was cabinet making, and, for part of the time, carpentry and house-building; for the past sixteen or seventeen years, he has been a merchant, keeping a general store in Epworth. He is a member of the M. E. Church and a Republican; has held local offices of honor and trust, but has no inclination for office-seeking. He was married, in 1843, to Miss Jane Moore, of Pennsylvania; has six children - Charles W. (who lives in Manchester), Sarah (now Mrs. Husted, living in Manchester), William (now in Parkersburg), Anna (now Mrs. Crist, living in Clay Co.), Henry Reed, and Edson F.

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J. KEARNEY, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Cascade; born in Jefferson Co., Va., Oct. 18, 1831; removed to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in August, 1855; was engaged in teaching for a number of years in Virginia and in Iowa; finally, however, left the profession, and has since devoted his attention to farming; has a beautifully located and well managed farm of 160 acres in Sec. 15, with 20 acres of timber land in Sec. 8. He is one of the leading members of the Reformed Church in his vicinity. His political preferences are with the Democratic party; he takes a warm interest in educational matters, and has held various responsible school and township offices. Mr. Kearney was married May 13, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth A. Long, and estimable lady, of Frederick Co., Va.; seven children - Sarah E., Annie M., William S., Edward M., Adrian F., Charles A., and Eleanor B., complete the family circle of this interesting and pleasant household.

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LORENZ KEMMLING, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Rockdale; born in Gibaldihausen, Hanover, Germany in 1817; emigrated to America and settled in Dubuque County, Iowa in 1852; has a farm of 80 acres in Secs. 16 and 17, which shows careful and intelligent tillage. Has held school offices; is a member of the Republican party, using his efforts, however, to place in official positions the best men, irrespective of party. He was married in 1844, to Miss Teresa Becker, also a native of Hanover; they have seven children - Teresa (now Mrs. Le Clere of Linn Co.), Christopher (married; and lives in Montgomery Co.), Clara ( now Mrs. Lux of Delaware Co.), Frank, Annie, Lawrence, and Louisa.

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CHARLES KEMPE, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Dubuque; he was born September 1812 in Brunswick, Germany; in 1846, he came to Dubuque Co. where the family have since lived; he owns 140 acres of land. He married Sophia Miller in 1842; she was born in Hanover in 1817; they hace four children - Augusta,Mena,Charles and Mary. Their son Charles lives here and manages this farm; he was born Nov. 18, 1850; he married Miss Emma Bartels May 6, 1875; she was born May 24, 1858, in Dubuque Co.; they have two children - Dora and Lena.

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KARAN KENNY, farmer, Sec.18; P. O. Pin Oak; born March 17, 1830 in Ireland; in 1850 he came to New Orleans, thence to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he own 320 acres of land. Married Margaret Kogan in 1853; she was born in Ireland; they have three children - Thomas, Mary, and Rose. Roman Catholic; Democrat

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JACOB KERN, firm of Kern & Co., millers, Sec. 34; P. O. Cottage Hill; he was born Dec. 7, 1822, in the parish of Krombach, district of Landgricht, Alzenau, Germany; in 1849 he came to New York, thence to Grant Co. Wis.; engaged there in milling till 1876, when he came to his present locality and bought the premise known as the New Spring Mills; this mill has a capacity of grinding about one hundred bushels per day. Married Eliza Pluemel in January 1854; she was born in Germany; they have eight children -Caroline, Theressa, Joseph, Josephine, Eliza, Henry, Anna, and Sarah. Catholic.

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JACOB KERPER, Postmaster and general merchandise, New Vienna;born Aug. 26, 1848, in Prussia; in 1852, he came to Dubuque with his parents; in 1874, commenced his present business; was appointed Postmaster in 1879; is School Treasurer. Married Anna M. Meyers in 1873, she was born in New York; have three children - George, Bernard, and an infant not named. Catholic.

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JOHN KERPER, farmer, Sec.1; P. O. New Vienna; born March 20, 1820, in Prussia; in 1852, he came to Dubuque Co., he owns 180 acres of land; is President of the School Board. Married Anna Mary Wirtz in 1846; she was born in Nieden Rhein, Prussia, in 1819; they have five children - Bernard, Jacob, Mathias, Michael, and Anthony. Catholic

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JACOB KESSLER, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Nov. 13, 1830 in Bavaria; in 1850 he came to Galena, Ill.; in 1859, he came to Dubuque Co.; owns 120 acres land; he has been President of the School Board and Director and Assessor; he is now County Superintendent, having been elected in 1875. He married Ellen McDonald in October 1860; she was born in Dutchess Co., N. Y.; they had eight children, six living - Mary A., John, Ellen A., William C., Elizabeth M. and Jacob J., Jane and Edward died in infancy. Catholic.

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P. KIENE
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WESLEY KILE (deceased), was born in Pennsylvania in 1816; at an early age, he removed to New York, and from there to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in 1836, where he thenceforward resided until his death, which occurred March 19, 1865; Mr. Kile was well known to nearly every citizen of the county; he, at different times, held several office in the county; was an intelligent, public-spirited and useful citizen, and, probably, the leading man in the community, and, to the fullest extent, enjoyed the confidence of his fellow citizens. He was first married, Feb. 27, 1838, to Mrs. Matilda Rittenhouse; she died Oct. 22, 1852; he was married again on the 30th of March 185_, to Miss Catherine Sims, who survives him; their children are James, Alexander, Charles, Wesley, Kittie, and Belle.Mrs. Catharine Kile, widow of Wesley Kile, is a daughter of Alexander and Catharine Sims, old and well-known citizens of Center Township; they came with the family to Dubuque Co. in 1836, from Pennsylvania; they were formerly from New York, and originally from Scotland; her father, Alexander Sims, died Feb. 19, 1873, and her mother, Catharine Sims, died Nov. 28, 1878; Mrs. Kile has a beautiful home in Sec. 25, Mr. K being, at the time of his death, the owner of a fine farm here, comprising over a section of land, and other valuable property; the cultivated and refined family who inhabit this charming homestead, cared for by the kind and intelligent mother, are altogether one of the most pleasant and estimable family groups within the limits of the county.

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HON. JOHN KING - deceased; was born in Shepardstown, Va., in 1803, d was a son of Samuel King, who died in Dubuque over nineteen years ago. The subject of this sketch was much more than an ordinary man, having been the first editor and newspaper proprietor in the State of Iowa, and had filled a number of public offices of honor and trust with fidelity, and to the satisfaction of his fellow-citizens. As an early journalist and an enterprising citizen, he was identified with the movements which detached a part of the Territory of Michigan and formed Wisconsin Territory, then including Iowa, in 1836. While in youth, he became a resident of Chillicothe, Ohio, where he reached manhood, and, like thousands of young men, after 1830 and since, he looked to a farther West
as the place of fortune, enterprise and greater usefulness. He was already about 30 years old when the first permanent settlement was made in Iowa. After examining various localities in new parts of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and a part of Missouri, he resolved to make his home in the then unsettled region west of the Mississippi. In 1833 (no legal right permitting even the pioneers who preceded him to occupy any part of what is now Iowa, until June of that year), while exploring the region of the Upper Mississippi, he determined to make "Dubuque Mines," as this locality was then known, the scene of all his future operations. Like many others, he engaged in lead mining for a year or more with varied success. At that time, even up to 1835, there was no legal administration of justice. Though several Justices of the Peace for Dubuque Co., then comprising half of Iowa and most of Minnesota, were appointed by the Governor of Michigan in 1835, there was no authority for the trial even of alleged murderers, until after
1836, but the administration of public justice was mainly by voluntary assemblages of the people. In all this, Judge King acted a conspicuous part. One instance of such proceedings appears in an Illinois paper, of August, 1835, before Iowa had its first newspaper. The town of Dubuque was infested with infamous gamblers and lewd women. A public meeting was held, and Judge King drew up the stringent resolutions that drove that class of nuisances across the river. Judge King was then, as he remained to the close of his life, an admirer of honesty and integrity. To the rich he was always just; to the poor he was generous, and he would have left a much larger estate had he not always leaned to the side of kindness and charity. After two years of work and observation as to the means by which he could advance his own interest and at the same time promote the welfare of the new community, he concluded not only to make Dubuque his permanent home, but to establish here the first newspaper. In the fall of 1835, he accordingly determined to return to Ohio and procure the material for a newspaper. Passing the winter at Chillicothe, he went in the spring to Cincinnati, and, by the opening of navigation, had purchased a Washington press and sufficient printing material for a weekly newspaper. He accompanied his purchase by steamboat by the then long, slow route of the river, and arrived at Dubuque about the 1st of May, 1836. On the 11th of that month, he issued the first number of the "Du Buque Visitor," the only paper then north of St. Louis and west of the river. In 1836, it was his custom to walk eighteen miles to Galena to get the "exchanges" of a newspaper then published at that place. But there are many other matters of more immediate local interest as relating to Judge King, in reference to his work and influence in advancing the moral, social and other interests of his adopted village and city. Whether base men and bad women were to be expelled, or an effort made to secure and preserve for Dubuque proper sites for public squares or graveyards, or. for any other matter of public welfare, he was always ready with his voice and pen to work in the right direction. Such was the esteem in which he was held by his fellow-citizens, that, in the early days of 1835, he was recommended for the highest office in the county. He was appointed, as appears by his commission, "Chief Justice of the County Court of Dubuque County," by Stevens T. Mason, then Acting Governor of the Territory of Michigan. From that fact he received the title of Judge, a cognomen by which he was familiarly known ever since. He was then the only person, with the exception of two Justices of the Peace and Peter A. Lorimer, as Supreme Court Commissioner, who had the authority to issue warrants for the arrest of alleged criminal offenders. But even that authority, as intimated, did not then protect society. Judge King's court could commit prisoners, but the courts, in what is now Wisconsin, discharged them for want of jurisdiction. Several years afterward, about 1839, Judge King was appointed Postmaster of Dubuque, which office he held for several years, and, after an interval of a few years, he was again appointed as Postmaster, before 1850. During the boundary controversy between Iowa Territory and the State of Missouri, mainly instigated by the peculiar nature and management of Gov. Lucas, Judge King was appointed Aid-de-Camp to the Governor with the rank of Colonel. Gov. Lucas then presided over the destinies of the young Territory. The difficulty was finally settled by Congress and the Supreme Court. He was an early admirer and earnest supporter of the railroad policy of the lamented John Plumbe, the earliest Western advocate of a Pacific railroad. Between 1854 and 1866, he was for several terms a member of the City Council. In his position as Alderman, he was equally faithful to every public trust reposed in him. In that capacity he endeavored, as he always did as a private citizen, to have the city adorned and embellished to as great a degree as possible, consistent with the use of private means and the proper use of the public finances. As a writer, he never lost interest in the daily press and scarcely a week passed in the last twenty years before his death, that the public did not have the benefit of articles or communications from Judge King, extending through the range of local, city, county and State interests, from forest culture and railroads in the country, to gardening, fruit-growing and street improvements at home. He was especially useful in some of these respects, having been one of the first members of the Dubuque County Farmers' Club, in 1860. He had then one of the best-adorned homes in Dubuque. On the matters of agriculture and horticulture he was a free contributor to the local press and papers abroad, and did more than any other man in Dubuque to create a taste for shade trees, shrubbery and fruit trees around the city. One of the efforts of the last days of his life was the attempt to write a few more lines in his diary, and though scarcely half legible he was unable to use his voice to explain them : this fact is an evidence that one of his ruling motives still remained, strong even in death, to let all who lived after him know just what he thought and felt so long as he might live. Among the striking traits of the character of Judge King was his independence. He expressed his opinion freely on any subject, and in reference to any man, without reserve. Anyone could know, at any time, what he thought of anything or any subject. This independence sometimes made some men rather fear him or try to avoid his displeasure, but almost invariably because there was something wrong in their conduct or motives. There were two or three other elements of his character equally commendable. Had he been a poor man, his occasional generosity would have been a fault, but his increasing wealth only made him still more generous. He was a contributor to almost every ennobling or charitable enterprise, from the building of a church to the raising of a fund for the benefit of the poor. But it was not in the subscription lists to charitable purposes alone that some knew best of his liberality. As an earnest, energetic man, he was singularly modest. The world knew little of his private and unostentatious beneficence. Sometimes a needy friend or neighbor would receive money favor in a way that he scarcely knew where it came from or to whom to express his gratitude. On some occasions, he sought avoidance of all thanks by sending his money gratuitously, in an envelope, through the post office, to those whom he considered deserving, and, by this delicate manner, did good acts unknown to the world. When he commenced his Visitor with the motto that he always followed, "Truth our guide, the public good our aim," there was no ocean steam navigation, no sewing machine or electric telegraph, or even the Lucifer match in common use. Thousands of other useful inventions were devised after he had passed middle life. But he was one of those few men who kept up with the times and favored every new thing that had utility. It is in the memory of those who knew him at home that all the kindly elements of his nature are best known. To the last days of the lives of his sisters, his wife, his daughter, son and intimate friends, they will all tell, in their recollections of him, of his gentle nature at home, the place where all men are the best, truly and correctly known.In the home life of this man, he was loved as much as he was respected by all good men, in his other relations to society. The cool self-possession that marked most of Judge King's life as a journalist, a business man, a philanthropist and a citizen, was one of his characteristics to the day of his death. He even went beyond most men in his preparations for death especially after the serious injury he received from the street-railway accident in 1869. As soon as he recovered sufficiently from the prostration and delirium incident to such an accident, involving a concussion of the brain and serious resultant injuries to the lungs, he appeared to realize more than before the necessity of so arranging his earthly affairs as to be ready to depart from what we call this life. Hence his arrangement of his business affairs, and, with a precaution seldom adopted by anybody, his purchase and careful preservation of a costly suit of clothes, evidently intended for other but his burial purpose. To the very last he was the uncomplaining invalid and polite gentleman, as long as he could move his hand to signify welcome to a friend, or wave the words of recognition or the good-by. In religion, Judge King was a moralist of the strictest kind. The older he grew, the more careful and conscientious were all the acts of his life, and, during the last year of his life, he occasionally remarked to his relatives and to a few other friends, and, especially during his last illness, that he was prepared to die, that he had tried to live right, and that he wished to die as he had lived. Judge King had in his long, eventful life, suffered much affliction. His first wife died about 1851; his second was Miss Smith of Cleveland, Ohio; he lost two interesting boys at one time from scarlet fever about 1865. Judge King died in the city of Dubuque on the 13th day of February, 1871, leaving a wife, a daughter ( wife of E. B. Farley, of the firm of J. P. Farley & Sons, wholesale concern, Dubuque), and a son who survive He died respected and honored by all who knew him, and, in the history of Dubuque and in the recollection of its citizens, his example and character is preserved grateful remembrance.

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JOSEPH M. KING, attorney and counselor at law, Cascade, Iowa; born 1828, in Indiana; studied law in Brookville, Ind., and was admitted to practice in 1850; continued practice of his profession in Shelbyville, Ind., till 1855, when he came to Cascade and went to farming on account of poor health; after recovering his health, he resumed his profession, which he has continued to the present date; he is the only lawyer in Cascade, and is also member of firm of King & Deitz, Anamosa. In 1850, he married Charlotte J. Bolton, by whom he had three children, all now living - Josephene A.,William M. and Rollin E.; his wife died in 1877; he has real estate in Jones Co., and also a large tract of unimproved land in Pottawattamie Co.; was elected member of General Assembly of Indiana for session of 1854-55; elected as a Douglas Democrat and was the youngest member of the House; was supporter of the Government during the civil war; is still a Democrat; is member of Ancient Order of United Workmen; is a Mason and also a Methodist; his present wife was Mrs. Emma Thackara, daughter of Rev. Bishop Isbell, of Anamosa; Esquire King takes an active interest in politics, but appears to be outside of all rings; he is esteemed as an honorable lawyer and a useful citizen.

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NELSON B. KING, blacksmith, Farley; is a native of Canada, and was born Nov. 8, 1848; his parents came to Iowa in 1855; and the following year they came to Dubuque Co. and located at Farley; there were only two houses here at that time; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade here; he engaged in business in 1870, and has carried it on since then, and has built up a good trade. He is the only young man now engaged in business who was raised here. He married Miss Adaline Dickinson, a native of Pennsylvania, Feb. 13, 1872; they they have three children - Nelson, born Feb. 24, 1873; Anna J., April 7, 1877; Elizabeth A., Sept. 6, 1878.

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J. M. KIRKPATRICK, farmer and real-estate dealer, etc., Sec. 10; P. O. Epworth; born in Pennsylvania Sept. 15, 1833; came to Dubuque Co. in September, 1856; has been dealing in real estate and other property in the city of Dubuque ever since; he has quite an amount of property in Dubuque, but, though he still does business there, he has for the last six years made his home on his pleasant farm of sixty acres near Epworth. He went from Pennsylvania to California in 1852, remaining there until 1856; a second trip to California was made in 1862, from which he returned to Iowa in 1865; part of every year from 1869 to 1873 was spent in Missouri, but he finally disposed of his Missouri property and is probably a permanent citizen of Iowa. He is a man widely known for sound judgment, energy and integrity He has served fifteen years as a school officer, with decided benefit to his community. Mr. K. was married, in 1859, to Mrs. Artemisa Loire, formerly of Tennessee - a lady who has much personal knowledge of the early settlement of Dubuque, having seen that city in 1833, when one log house (used as a store) was the only building, except bark houses and tents, then in the place.

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ISAAC KISSINGER, teacher, Sec. 4; P. O. Worthington; born in Northumberland Co., Penn., Jan. 8, 1832; came to Dubuque Co. in 1852; after a short time returned to Pennsylvania, and completed his education in the University of Lewisburg during the years 1853-54-55, since which time he has been a resident of Iowa; has been principally engaged in teaching music and teaching in public schools; has a good home, with five acres of ground attached; has given some time to other vocations than teaching. Has been Assessor of his township eight years, and is well identified with the best interests of his community. He was married, in 1866, to Miss Adelia Nicholson, a native of New York, whose parents had removed here during her 5th year of age; her father, John Nicholson, now lives in Earlville, Delaware Co., Iowa; her mother Maria Nicholson, died in 1876; Mr. & Mrs., Kissinger have three children living - Mary Caroline, William Franklin and John Nicholson; their daughter Jennie Maria died when less than 2 years old.

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FREDERICK KNOCKLE, farmer, Sec. 19, P. O. Dubuque; born May 11, 1825, in Switzerland; in 1852, he came to Pittsburgh; in 1854, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 240 acres of land. Married Cecelia Mona in 1851; she was born in 1826 in Switzerland; have five children - Albert, Julius, Elizabeth, Louis, and Emma.

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HON. F. M. KNOLL, Sec. 28; P. O. Sageville; he was born March 8, 1833, in Alsace, France; in 1847, he came to Buffalo, N.Y., with his parents; he remained there till 1853, when he came to Dubuque Co. where he has since resided; he has served longer in the Legislature that any other man in the State, with the exception of Mr. Larabee, of Fayette Co., having served in all twelve years; in 1861, he was elected a member of the House of Representatives and served two years; in 1863, he was elected to the Senate and again re-elected in 1867, serving eight years; in 1877, he was again elected to the Legislature, and held this position till 1879; he has held various minor offices; Mr. Knoll is highly intellectual and well qualified to fill the various offices which have been intrusted to him; he is the possessor of a large and well-selected library. He married Miss Catharine Deckert in November, 1854; she was born in July 1833, in Alsace, France; died in August, 1873; have eight children - Eugenia,Josephine (now Mrs. Schnepf ), Mrs. Hagen (now living in Colorado), Fred, Albert, Augusta, William, Mena, and Henry; second marriage to Agnes Stader, in June, 1874; she was born December 1, 1850 in Baden Germany; they have three sons - Edward, Thea, and Oscar. Luthern in religion; Democratic in politics.

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NICHOLAS KONS, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born Nov. 9, 1849, in Germany; in 1867, he came with his family to Dubuque Co.; they own 160 acres of land. He married Miss Anna Mary Smitz in 1879; she was born in Germany; his father was born in 1811, and died Jan. 1, 1877, aged 66 years; his mother was born in 1817, and lives here with sons.

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REV. A. KORTENKAMP, Pastor St. Frances Xavier's Church; residence, Victoria street, Dyersville; he was March 13, 1834, in Westphalia, Prussia; at about the age of 14 years, he commenced studying for the priesthood; first, at the Gymnasium at Munster, Westphalia, where he remained nine years at this school, he then attended the university three years; in 1861, he came to Dubuque, Iowa, and was ordained a Roman Catholic Priest by Bishop Smith, and then was appointed Assistant Catholic Priest of the German Church in Dubuque; Feb. 2, 1862, he removed to Dyersville, and was appointed to the position which he now holds; he has had charge of various churches since coming to Dyersville, viz. fifteen years Pastor of the church at Worthington, also at Delhi, and was the first priest who took charge of the church at Luxemberg, Liberty Township

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PETER KREMER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Cascade; born in Luxemburg, Germany in March 1838; emigrated to America in 1855, when 17 years old; spent his first winter in the city of Chicago, the following summer in Dubuque; he then removed to Jones Co., where he remained about ten years, and then returned and settled in Dubuque Co, where he has since resided; has 180 acres in Secs. 15 and 21. Religion, Catholic; politics, Democrat. He was married May 27, 1868 to Elizabeth Soison, also a native of Luxemburg; four children are living - John, Nicholas, Henry, and Katie; five have died - Henry, Willie, Susan, Harry, and John P.

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JOHN KURT, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Cascade; born in Luxemburg, Germany May 8, 1842 came to Dubuque Co. with his parents, Michael and Mary Kurt, when he was about 6 years of age; has a farm of 280 acres in Sec. 23, well located and well managed, and, with his new, large, well-planned and substantially built house, is prepared to enjoy life, while doing a handsome business, Religion, Catholic; politics, Democrat, He was married 1870 to Miss Mary Till, who at the age of 4 or 5 migrated here with her parents, Peter and Elizabeth Till, from Luxemburg, Germany; they have five children - Peter, John, Frank, Annie, and William.

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PETER KURT, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Cascade; born in Luxemburg, Germany April 27, 1817; emigrated to America in 1847, and settled in Dubuque Co. the same year; has been constantly engaged in farming, and, with industry, thrift, and care, has acquired possession of a fine farm, embracing 250 acres of land, located in Secs. 14, 20, 22 and 28. His politics are Democratic. He was married in 1848 to Miss Ann Leytem, also a native of Luxemburg; they have seven children living - Nicholas, Mary, Annie, Michael, Margaret, Catharine, and Elizabeth; six children have died - Mary, Susan, John, Peter, and two who died in infancy.

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JOHN KYNE, son of Michael Kyne, deceased, is a merchant, dealing in general merchandise at Washington Mills; his post-office address is Washington Mills.

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MICHAEL KYNE, deceased; was born in Howard Co., Md., in 1815; moved to Dubuque in 1854, where he became the owner of a bookstore, which he soon sold and engaged in mining; was engaged in mining about five years; held the office of Superintendent of Poor Relief about two years; moved to Prairie Creek Township in April 1865. Was married about 1843 to Bridget Flaherty : had eight children - Matthias, James, John, George, William, Julia A., and Mary E. James Kyne, son of Michael Kyne, is the junior partner of the firm of Bussard & Kyne, owners of Washington Mills. Was married to Bridget Potts, and is miller of the Washington Mills; 148 acres belong to the mill company in Sec. 36. Mr. Kyne is Independent in politics and is a member of the Catholic Church; his post-office address is Washington Mills.

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JAMES LAHEY, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Bankston; he was born in 1833, in Lancaster Co., Penn.; at the age of 12 years he came with his parents to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he lives on the old homestead, formerly occupied by his father, which he has very much improved; he now owns 340 acres, and is the largest farmer in his locality; he has been Township Trustee, School Director and County Supervisor. His father died in 1866, aged 60 years; his mother died in 1860, aged 50 years. He married Miss Hannah Welsh June 7, 1863; she was born in Virginia; have five children - James, Alice, Monica, Lucy, and Richard.

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J. T. LAMBERT, physician and surgeon, Farley; is a native of Ithaca, N. Y., and was born Nov. 22, 1848; he grew up and received his education there; after completing his literary course, he studied medicine and graduated at Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1870; he came West to Iowa in 1870, and located in Dubuque Co. at Farley, and engaged in the practice of his profession, and has established a good practice; he is local surgeon of the Illinois Central R. R., and belongs to the Masonic Fraternity and to the Order of United Workmen. Dr. Lambert was united in marriage, Jan. 17, 1878, to Miss Sadie Carpenter, daughter of L. W. Carpenter, of this place.

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JOHN LANGE, dealer in horses and stock, Jackson street, between Twenty-seventh and Peru Road; was born in Germany Jan. 8, 1818; he emigrated to the United States in 1844; lived in Ohio and Indiana, and came to Dubuque in 1854, engaged in farming for a time; afterward moved in the city, and has been engaged in dealing with horses and cattle. In 1848, he married Mary Meyer, a native on Germany; they have three children - John,Louise and William.

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ROBERT W. LANGE, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner Lake Street and Johnson Avenue; was born in Prussia, Germany, July 16, 1830; he emigrated to America in 1854, and came to Dubuque in 1856; he began bricklaying, and continued in that business over twenty-two years; he engaged in the grocery business in 1871, and has carried it on since then; he holds the office of Town Trustee, when he came here, he only had $2.50, and all he has is owing to his own efforts. When the war broke out, he enlisted in 1861 in Co. K, 17th MO. V.I., and was in the service three years and three months, and was in seventeen engagements. In 1856, he married Louise Meyer, from Germany; she died in 1864, leaving three children - Robert,Willie and Louise. In 1866, he married Othelia Lange, a native of Prussia; they have four children - Hugo, Otto, Selma, and Huldah.

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JAMES A. LANGTON, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Key Weston; born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, in 1822; his father died not many years after, and his mother and family, in company with James Fanning, an old and well-known settler of Dubuque Co., now deceased, removed to this county in June 1833. There was at that rime no settlement farther out than Rockdale. Until 1861, Mr. L was a resident of Dubuque, removing to his present farm of 160 acres in Table Mound in that year; in 1849, he went to California, returning in 1851. Is a member of the Catholic Church and of the Democratic party; was City Collector and Treasurer of Dubuque, member of the Legislature, besides holding township offices, etc. He was married in 1855 to Miss Margaretta Murphy, a worthy lady of Pittsburgh, Penn.; they have seven children living - Florence D., James A., Mary M., Grattan, Sidney F., George, and Thomas; two deceased - James R. and Annie M.

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E. LANGWORTHY
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LUCIUS H. LANGWORTHY of the firm of Dolan & Langworthy, wholesale and retail dealers in hardware, 472 Main street, Dubuque; is a native of the city of Dubuque, and was born Oct. 9, 1854; his father, Lucius Langworthy, was one of the earliest settlers of Dubuque Co.; Lucius grew up and received his education here; after reaching manhood, he engaged in his present business in 1873, and is the senior member of the firm of Dolan & Langworthy; they are building up a large and constantly increasing business. Mr. Langworthy was united in marriage to Miss Carrie L. Glover, daughter of H. B. Glover, Esq., of this city, June 6, 1877; they have one daughter-- Valeria E.

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LUCIUS HART LANGWORTHY (deceased). At Hopkinton, St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., in 1807, was born Lucius Hart, third son of Dr. Stephen Langworthy, his life has been so full of adventure, peril and daring, that it seems like a page from romances of bygone times. One may picture him as a veritable modern Jason whose golden fleece was shrined in fields as yet untrodden by the white man's foot. Following the changing fortunes of his father's family, we see him emigrating from Western New York to Western Pennsylvania, and from there setting out on his long and wearisome journey to the Far West. It is difficult for us, familiar with the luxury of modern travel and of rapid progress, to comprehend entirely the admirable endurance, indomitable courage and dauntless enterprise of such a man, A mere stripling we watch him passing sturdily through new lands - beyond the comforts of home and of civilization. We find him
grappling with the dangers of Indian warfare, and wresting from the stern heart of the wilderness itself name, fortune and security. In the flush of vigorous youth, patiently, unselfishly, working with his brothers, to assist in the support of a large family; a little later, not yet 18 years of age, adding to his slender resources by teaching school; always and everywhere a keen and ambitious, a shrewd, yet tender, man. But life on a farm or in scattered Western villages had too little opportunity to offer such stirring souls. Rumors of great fortunes in the distant lead mines came to his ears. His elder brother had already gone to Galena, then a mere mining village; and for that point Lucius, with his brother Edward, set out. Hard work and privation were familiar companions, but still Lucius felt that his fortunes were soon to be assured. But at this moment the Winnebago war broke out, and the young miner hastened to join a company under Gen. Dodge. His mining operations had
been carried on at different points successfully, but, the war having ended, vague whispers were afloat, that still richer lands lay just beyond the Mississippi. Iowa was at this time unborn-not a foot of its soil belonged to the whites. Its Indian owners jealously guarded it from intrusion. At the spot where Dubuque now stands was the village of Little Fox. A bitter inter-tribal war sprung up, and the Indians fled from their homes. In June, 1830, nearly three years before any settlement in any other part of Iowa, James and Lucius, swimming their horses by their canoe, crossed the broad river, and stood for the first time on its western shore. Other adventurers followed, and the two brothers soon struck a rich lead. Only a few facts can in these limits be gleaned from the eventful life of Lucius Langworthy. He built the first frame house in the State of Iowa; a stately edifice, indeed, among the humble cabins; and, in an article entitled, " A Vision," published in the earliest newspaper, he first used the word, "Iowa," a name afterward given to the State. Not a few smiled at the fancy of a writer in an obscure mining town, who could venture to predict a great population for "the future State of Iowa." He also served in the Black Hawk war until its close. Was the first Sheriff of Dubuque County, when Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota were a part of the Territory of Michigan. In the fall of 1833, he helped to build the first schoolhouse in Iowa, and was ever the generous friend of schools and churches. He was elected a member of the Territorial Legislature of Wisconsin, meeting at Burlington. In 1835, he married Mary Frances Reeder, of Cincinnati, who died at the early age of 22, leaving two sons, one of whom still lives. In April, 1842, he married Valeria A. Bemis, of Maryland. She still survives, having borne him six children, all of whom are living save one. Lucius Langworthy was a man of much foresight. He was keenly alive to everything which could build up a city. He was one of the special delegates sent to Washington to procure a grant for the Pacific Railroad, of which he was one of the original incorporators. Largely interested in railroad facilities in his own State, he was President of the "South-Western," and liberally advanced its interests. As a citizen, his hand was ever open to aid the material prosperity of Dubuque. With a mind intense and practical, he possessed also rare literary ability and poetic taste. Much of the early history of his State has been preserved by his pen, while his lectures, published many years ago, will always be the thrilling recital of one who himself passed through and gave authentic record of the stirring scenes of border life. A tender, indulgent husband and father, a friend of the needy, a genial companion; his blemishes were few, his virtues many. On the 9th of June, 1865, at the early age of 58, he died. It does not often fall to one man to find crowded in so brief a life so many changes. It has been said of him: "He followed the trail of the Indian, and saw springing from the selfsame spot the streets of a populous city." Before the days of steam travel he penetrated unpeopled wilds, snatched fortune from the flinty bosom of an unknown and hostile country, and watched the mighty tide of savage life roll sullenly westward. He lived to see a fertile and opulent State, teeming with industry and netted with railways. And he will be numbered among those sturdy pioneers fast dying out in our land, of whom it may be said; States are their monuments - cities their epitaphs.

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J. L. LANGWORTHY
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STEPHEN LANGWORTHY, M.D. At the close of the war of 1812, he resided in Western New York. He was a physician and surgeon in the army of the United States, and, partly induced by disturbances along the New York and Canadian line, partly by the difficulty of supporting so large a family, he decided to emigrate to Brie, Penn., and, in 1815, we find him located at French Creek. Here he erected a saw-mill, which gave employment to the two oldest sons, the father, meantime, following his profession. A few years were thus passed, when Dr. L. determined upon going still farther westward. For this purpose, a flat-boat was built, and he, together with his family, descended the French Creek, the Alleghany, into the Ohio River. While passing over Letarts Falls,
most of the valuable goods stowed in the boat for future use were destroyed, the family barely escaping, with but little left from the wreck: Pursuing their journey to Marietta, on the Ohio, they saw directly opposite Blennerhasset's Island, near its center, the deserted mansion of Blennerhasset, who had joined with Aaron Burr in a scheme to establish a Southern Federacy. The plan, however, was frustrated by Lewis Cass, then Governor of the Northwestern Territory. The baffled conspirators, flying down the Ohio and Mississippi, eluded pursuit, and returned no more to the lovely island and its ruined castle. In the spring of 1819, this family again resumed their journey. Embarking on a rude flat-boat, they passed down the beautiful Ohio, whose waters had not, as yet, been disturbed by any manner of craft propelled by steam. The solitude was unbroken, save at intervals when the ax of some wood-cutter felling trees for his cabin, broke the silence, or the sharp crack of the hunter's rifle startled the birds, and sent the wild deer bounding down the valleys. Arriving at Shawneetown,
the flat-boat was sold and wagons and horses procured. In the wagons were placed the household goods, provisions, and, also, such members of the family as were too young or too frail to walk. After a period of twenty-five days, through the mud and mire of Southern Illinois, early in May, 1819, the historic town of Edwardsville was reached, and at last they are in their Western home. At this time, St. Louis was the only considerable point for business, and contained a mixed population, French, Spanish and negro, numbering about three thousand souls.

There Dr. Langworthy went, as it offered him an opportunity to follow his profession. But the location of the family proved to be an unfavorable one, and the father was called home by the illness of his wife. The malarial fever, peculiar to that section in that day, soon ended her life, and a son, Stephen, followed his mother, a victim to the same malady. These sad events determined Dr. Langworthy to seek a more healthful region. Accordingly, the eldest son, James, with Dr. Isaiah Massey, his mother's brother, traveled northwest, and after a long and hazardous journey, they found Diamond Grove. Here the father, aided by his sons, began to open up a farm. A cabin was built, ten or twelve acres of land on the edge of the grove, covered with weeds, which had grown there since the Kickapoo Indians had cultivated it as a corn-field, and, according to a previous treaty, had now abandoned it. An abundant crop rewarded their first year's labor. Dr. Massey, having selected for himself the eastern end of the grove, had returned to Edwardsville, where, soon after, he was seized with the malarial fever, which terminated his life. Diamond Grove, proving a healthful location, soon became quite well settled with a population partly Eastern, but principally Southern. There settlers had taken up claims, made improvements, either skirting the water-courses or in the vicinity of groves. Their cabins, made of round logs, served both for dwelling-places and schoolhouses. The expenses of the latter were divided among the different families, according to the number of pupils furnished by each. By this arrangement, the greater portion of the expense fell upon the "Yankees," as many of the Southern settlers, believing that education would produce dishonesty and wickedness, refused to permit their children to be instructed. Corn and wheat were the principal products, affording subsistence both to men and animals. The want of mills to grind the grain was one of the severest hard ships encountered, the horse-mill being the only resource. This was constructed with a sweep, to which every person having a grist to grind attached his own team, mounted the sweep and drove the horses round a circuitous track. If, luckily, his team was strong and fast, he could obtain about two bushels of meal or flour per hour.

Dr. Langworthy now revisited St. Louis, remaining a year, during which time he married Miss Jane Moureing, installing her in his home at Diamond Grove, where she watched over his large family with true devotion. The county seat of Morgan County was now fixed at Jacksonville, two miles east of his residence, and, rapidly increasing in population, rendered his profession a lucrative one. The farm, too, had prospered, leaving the elder members of the family free to seek their fortunes elsewhere. In 1824, James L. Langworthy set out for the Upper Mississippi Lead Mines, where mineral had recently been discovered in large quantities. The journey was made on horseback, a compass being used to direct his course. In about ten days, be arrived at Fever River, where Galena now stands. He immediately associated himself with Orrin Smith, a native of Cincinnati, and commenced mining one mile east of Hazel Green, Wis., at a place commonly called Hardscrabble. After nearly two years' hard labor, they struck a big lead, selling the same in 1826 to Alexander Phelps for a large sum of money. This gave them the means to visit their respective homes. Together, on horseback, they made the trip to Diamond Grove. Here the happy household joyfully greeted the brother safely returned, and hospitably entertained his companion. The family consisted of the following members: Dr. Langworthy and wife, with his children-- Eliza,Laura,Lucius H.,Edward,Mary Ann,Maria,Lucretia,Solon,Lucien and Harriet. Happy these heroes, who, conquering adversity, had returned to thrill the hearts of their fascinated relatives with wild tales of adventure and daring. Orrin Smith at length departed for Cincinnati; but the friendship inspired by one member of the family had fast ripened into true affection. Excited by the success of their elder brother, Lucius and Edward now determined also to seek the mines. In the spring of 1827, accompanied by their two sisters, Mary Ann and Maria, made their way in a wagon to a point on the Mississippi named " Wood's Woodyard," now the city of Quincy, containing more than 40,000 inhabitants. This yard was the property of John Wood, afterward Lieutenant Governor of Illinois. They arrived there about the 10th of April, having traveled a distance of eighty-six miles. A family of Dunkards had settled midway between the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers, and, following their trail, the young travelers gained their residence. There they were hospitably entertained for the night, and, by directions from these kindly friends, they went onward on their wanderings. The following day, and just at nightfall, they reached the summit of the lofty bluff overlooking the Mississippi and the woodyard for which they were destined. The steamboat Red Rover had been advertised to arrive at this place and soon rounded the point below. After taking on board the adventurers and a supply of wood, the vessel turned her prow up stream, and rapidly vanished from sight. Solon, the younger brother, left alone on the river bank in charge of the team, without delay ascended the bluff. This team was the first that ever descended the precipitous bluff, and the Red Rover was the first steamboat any one of the young travelers had ever seen. About 4 P. M., Solon again entered the hospitable cabin of the Dunkards. The following morning, when about to turn homeward with his team, he found a most unlucky accident had befallen it. A vicious bull had gored one of the horses. Nothing remained for him but to mount the other and in that manner reach Diamond Grove. Letters from the absent brothers were received about the 1st of July, assuring the anxious family of the safe arrival of the party at Buncombe, at which place they were joined by James Langworthy and Orrin Smith, who were still partners in mining and merchandising.

Not many months passed before Mary Ann fulfilled the promise she had made and became the wife of Orrin Smith,Maria sharing their home. Lucius and Edward repaired to Coon Branch, near Hazel Green, where they built their cabin and engaged in mining. Solon, it will be remembered, was still on the farm at Diamond Grove. Being the oldest son now left there, the care of the farm devolved upon him. With the assistance of one man and a younger brother, Lucien, more than a hundred acres, cultivated in field crops, yielded an ample return. They were, however, far from being remunerative, corn being only 10 and wheat 37 cents per bushel, other products being proportionately low. Remoteness from markets compelled the exchange of farm products for dry goods, groceries and other necessary articles, which were excessively high. As an instance of this kind of trade, it may be mentioned that 1,000 bushels of corn were delivered at Jacksonville, two and one-half miles distant, the consideration being a horse, valued at $100. Now came a fresh break in the home circle, Eliza marrying, in 1827, William Maclay, and Laura choosing for her husband Jacob D. Williams. In April, 1828, Solon, accompanied by Horace McCartney, started for Galena, Ill. Between the Grove and Galena the inhabitants were few and scattering. Although they had sold these lands, the Indians still persisted in remaining upon them, thus retarding the settlement of the country. The two travelers bad gone a short distance west of the Illinois River, when they overtook a party of drovers en route for the mines. They were strongly advised not to undertake the journey alone, but for safety to join the drovers, which offer they accepted, remaining in their company six or seven days, until within twenty miles of Rock River, when, finding that their provisions were nearly exhausted, it became imperative for the two companions to leave the slow-traveling drovers and push rapidly forward. No sooner were the trees skirting the river fairly in view than a large body of mounted Indians were seen, and, ere the danger was entirely comprehended, the travelers were surrounded by the dusky warriors. Two of the chiefs, by the aid of certain gestures and broken mutterings, seemed to inquire upon what business and to what place the whites were bound. Satisfied upon these points, they unceremoniously examined the equipments and then signified that the voyagers must follow them, and, in a few minutes, the entire party were on the banks of the Rock River. An application to the chiefs for the use of their canoes was refused, the Indian boys sportively wrestling with the young whites. No other resource remained but to cross the stream as best they could, seeing which, Solon mounted his horse, which, swimming safely over, was soon followed by his companion. Untroubled by further incidents, Council Hill was reached, where the path of the comrades separated, Solon going to Buncomb. About 4 o'clock in the afternoon, he arrived safely, and there met his brother James. The day following, they both repaired to the mining cabin on Coon Branch, where, for the first time in several years, the four brothers were re-united, Orrin Smith, too, soon added his kindly welcome and conducted the young adventurer to his residence on the Platte, a spot now known as British Hollow, where the joy of the two sisters may well be imagined. But, after a short visit, Solon returned to Coon Branch, residing that summer with Lucius and Edward. As a miner, this season proved fortunate, the young man realizing a snug little sum, which enabled him, in company with James Meredith, in November, 1828, to revisit Diamond Grove. The next three years were devoted to labor upon the home farm. This was sold in 1831, the entire family removing to St. Charles, Mo. Solon now found employment with a neighboring farmer. Becoming dissatisfied with that business, in July, 1832, he enlisted in Co. A, United States Ranging Service, Capt. Nathaniel Boone commanding, a grandson of the famous Daniel Boone. This officer was ordered to report to Gen. Winfield Scott, at Rock Island, which he did about the 20th of August. The company encamped immediately below the garrison. In a couple of weeks, the cholera made its appearance in the garrison, creating great alarm, in consequence of which the company obtained permission to make a fresh camp south of the Rock River, six miles distant. Twelve of its members died of the malady, a slight mortality, compared with that of the garrison. About the 1st of September, Gen. Dodge dispatched two of his Aids-de-camp, H. L. Massey and James L. Langworthy, announcing to Gen. Scott the capture of Black Hawk at the battle of Bad Axe. Solon was present at Rock Island when the treaty was made which terminated that war. The company, being enlisted for a year's service, was then ordered to Fort Gibson, on the Arkansas River, reaching that place early in January, 1833. In the following spring, it was sent westward, for the protection of the Santa Fe trade, a service for which it had been originally designed. Late in that summer, the company marched to Fort Gibson, and were disbanded. Solon, in company with Ezra Overall,William H. and Jesse Moureing, set out for their Missouri homes. On reaching St. Charles, Solon found his brother-in-law, Mr. Williams, had died of cholera, and he remained with his sister during the winter, for the purpose of settling up the estate. In the spring of 1834, he embarked at St. Louis, on the steamer Olive Branch, for Galena. Here he met his sister Maria, then the wife of Capt. Smith Harris. Upon his boat, the Jo Daviess, he visited Dubuque the following day, and was soon the guest of his three brothers in their mining cabin in Langworthy Hollow. They at once employed him in hauling, rails for fencing a farm, which is now in the heart of the city. In June, he broke up sixty acres thereon, which is thought to be the first land plowed in the State of Iowa, that is, in any quantity. Farm work being completed, he began an examination of the country with a view to its mining resources. In the fall of 1834, he purchased a large mineral lot on the Maquoketa. Lucius, also, was interested in the undertaking, and, together, after two weeks' labor, they struck a fine prospect. Thereupon, they built a cabin, and Lucius returning to Dubuque, Solon took up his residence, hired two men, and, for a year and a half, carried on the mining. In the autumn of 1835, he bought a prospect on the Ewing Range. Here, after blasting for nearly a month, an immense cave was discovered, filled with shining ore. The success of these ventures stimulated Solon to further achievements. In the spring of 1836, he joined with Orrin Smith, in operations on Fever River and Coon Branch. On the latter, they purchased a claim for $800, obtained 2,000 pounds of mineral and exhausted it in one day. Deserting the spot, Solon, in a few days, encountered four Missouri brothers named Jemison, whose lot, cabin, tools, and lead already on the surface, amounting to sixty or seventy thousand pounds of mineral, he bought for the sum of $2,500, taking possession of the cabin, hitching his pony at the end of the windlass rope. Solon hired four men, and the next morning saw them delving industriously in the mines, his partner, Orrin Smith, now in Cincinnati, being quite unaware of his operations. In less than two months, he sold from this lead over three hundred and fifty thousand pounds of mineral, clearing, above all expenses, about $4,000, half of which was paid over to Mr. Smith, on his return. At the end of the year, the profits had increased to about $22,000, a great portion of which was invested in the steamer Brazil, built in the winter of 1837, by Orrin Smith, at Cincinnati. This vessel was the first one which had ever been upon the Upper Mississippi, up to that date. After making a few very successful trips between Cincinnati and Dubuque, she struck a rock on the upper rapids of the Mississippi and sunk, being a total wreck and entirely uninsured. During the autumn, Solon made a journey on horseback to St. Louis, navigation being closed. There he purchased four horses and a wagon, and a stock of clothing valued at $4,000. Henry L. Massey then became his partner, taking charge of the team, and at once passing through the State of Missouri and the Territory of Iowa, commenced business at Snake Diggings, now Potosi, Wis. Large mineral discoveries had' attracted here a large body of miners, to whom the goods were rapidly sold, and the proceeds remitted to Mr. Langworthy, then in Cincinnati, to be again invested in new stock. Mr. Massey carried on the business at Potosi until the fall of 1838, when Mr. L. personally assumed charge of it. On the 20th of April,1840, he married Julia L. Patterson, daughter of Myron and Frances Patterson, of Long Island. In this village they resided until 1848, at which period they removed to Dubuque, Iowa, erecting the house in which they now reside. Their family consists of three daughters and two sons. In 1862, Solon Langworthy was appointed Lieutenant and Quartermaster of the 27th I. V. L, and went into the struggle for the life of the Union. In the hardships common to such a period, he shared, until the year 1864, when, resigning, he returned to his home. His life since then has been an active one, and he has embarked in many enterprises, having at different times engaged in the banking, lumbering and similar occupations. A busy, stirring manhood, let us hope, will bring the peace and serenity of an old age, happy in an unbroken and a loving household circle.

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MARTIN J. G. LA NICCA, druggist and apothecary, Np. 1245 Iowa Street, Dubuque; was born in Holland May 24, 1828; he grew up to manhood in Switzerland, and learned his business there; he emigrated to America in 1849, and came to Dubuque and engaged in business here Jan. 1, 1857, and has engaged in the business here most of the time since then there are only three drug houses in the business here now that were here when he came here. In 1856, he was united in marriage to Miss Maria U. Marks, a native of Switzerland; they have two daughters - Annie and Maria; they have lost one son - Lucius.

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A. LASHER, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Worthington; born April 19, 1826, in Greene Co., N.Y.; in 1848 he came to Milwaukee and engaged in the mercantile business till the fall of 1850, when he removed to Dubuque Co., where he has since resided,; he owns about 350 acres of land. Is Justice of the Peace; has held this office since 1853; he was two years a member of the Board of Supervisors, and has held about all the township offices. Married Matilda Kebby in 1853; she was born in 1827 in Michigan; died in 1865; have three children; then was married to Eva A. McCune in 1867; she was born in Pennsylvania; have five children - Fred, Burt, James H., Fannie M., and Jessie C. Republican

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HON. W. LATTNER, general merchandise, Worthington; he was born Nov. 20, 1835, in Baden, Germany; in 1847, he came with his parents to New York and engaged in the railroad business till 1856, when he with others of his family removed to Dubuque Co., and settled in Lattnerville, which place was laid out by himself and brothers. He represented this county in the Legislature during the Fifteenth General Assembly; in 1874, he came to Worthington and commenced his present business; he is also proprietor of the Worthington Creamery. Married Miss Magdalena Smidt in 1864; she was born in Alsace, France; at about the age of 4 years, she came to America with her parents; they have seven children - Mary, Emma, Lucy, Josephine, Anna, Clara, and Frank. Democrat.

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F. J. LAUDE, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Rockdale; born in France Jan. 2, 1823; came to America in 1834; settled in Oswego Co., N. Y., and remained there twelve years, removing to Dubuque Co., Iowa in June 1846; has a nicely located farm of 530 acres, with commodious and substantial barns, etc. and a residence, in the construction of which thorough good taste, convenience and comfort have all been consulted. Mr. Laude has held school offices continuously since 1848. He is an active member of the Presbyterian Church; politics, Republican; consulting the best interests of his township and county by voting for the best men irrespective of party lines. He was married Nov. 26, 1842, to Miss Louise LeClere, who, at the age of 6, came with her parents from France to Oswego Co., N. Y.; nine children living - Elise C. (now Mrs. Blank), James F., Rosine S. (now Mrs. Tisserand), Susanne J.,Emelie C. (now Mrs. Martin), Eugene P., Henry W., Louise, and Ida May; four children deceased - Louise (Mrs. Houser), Alexander and two who died in infancy.

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CHAUNCEY G. LAWRENCE (deceased) was a native of New York State, and grew up mostly in Ohio; he came West to Iowa when it was a Territory, and located in Dubuque; when he came, there were only three brick houses in Dubuque; he engaged in building. In 1858, her married Miss Frances B. Partridge, a native of Massachusetts. Mr. Lawrence was successfully engaged in contracting the building until his death, which occurred in 1868. They had three children - Chauncey G., Frances B., and Olive H. Mrs. Lawrence with her family reside at 908 Main Street.

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WILLIAM LAWTHER (deceased) was a native of County Down, Ireland; he emigrated to America in 1825; he lived in Baltimore and Virginia; he went to St. Louis at a very early day, and lived in Fulton and Springfield, Mo; he was clerk on a steamboat in 1835; he came to Dubuque in 1836 and was on the the early settlers; he was clerk in a store, and afterward engaged in the general mercantile business; was one of the largest merchants here, and had branch stores at several other places in 1854, he retired from active business; in 1863, he again engaged in mercantile business with his nephews, who compose the present firm of Lawther & Sturgeon; he continued in business until his death, which occurred in 1866; he was a old and honored citizen, and one of the enterprising men of Dubuque. He married Lucy Foulk, from Missouri; she died in 1857. Mr. Lawther built the first three-story brick building in Dubuque.

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WILLIAM LAWTHER, of the firm of Lawther & Sturgeon, dealers in dry goods, clothing and gents' furnishing goods, 145 Main street, Dubuque; is a native of County Down, Ireland, and was born June 29, 1847; he came to America in 1862 and came to Dubuque the same year; the following year, he entered the store of his uncle, Wm. Lawther, as clerk, and, upon the death of his uncle, he and Mr. Sturgeon succeeded him in business; they have built up a large trade. He was united in marriage to Miss Libbie Bell, daughter of John Bell, Esq., of this city, in 1869; they have four children - Mary, Anna Bell, William, and Evaline; they have lost on son, John.

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C. LECKIE, attorney at law, corner Main and Fifth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Scotland, and was born on Christmas morning, 1828; he grew up to manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1849, and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1856; he engaged in the mercantile business. He was in the Government service during the war, and served in the Quartermaster's Department; after the war, he returned and was elected Justice of the Peace, and held that office for six years; he now holds the office of Alderman of the Fourth Ward of this city. He is one of the charter members of the St. Andrew's Society, and was chosen its President for many years, and is now Secretary of the Society. He was united in marriage to Miss Jane Monroe, a native of Scotland, Sept. 9, 1852; they have two children - Charles F. and Maggie Jane, both born in Dubuque.

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NICHOLAS LEFFERT, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Zwingle; was born in Prussia, and emigrated with his parent to Pennsylvania when about 3 years of age; lived there about thirteen years; came to Iowa April 18, 1848. Was married Jan. 20, 1876, to Sarah Kemerer; has two children - Minerva M., was born Nov. 16, 1877, and Daniel W., born Dec. 6, 1878. Has been Trustee, Road Supervisor and School Director; Mr. L. owns 215 acres of land. Is a Democrat, and belongs to the Reformed Church.

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PETER LEHNHOFF, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Worthington; born in Germany Dec. 12, 1832; came to Dubuque Co. in November, 1853; for a time followed the occupation of brickmason, and later that of shoemaking in Dubuque and in Cascade; has been farming at his present place for the past ten years; has 160 acres of land in Sec. 4, Cascade Township, and Secs. 33 and 4, Dodge Township, and 54 acres.

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JOHN LEIBRAND, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Sageville; born May 10, 1820, in Wurtemberg, Germany; in 1852, he came to New Orleans, the following year removed to Dubuque Co.; he owns 100 acres of land which he has transformed from a rugged wilderness to a well-improved farm. Married Henrietta Leibrand in 1843; she was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1821; they had eight children, seven living - John, Hannah, George, Mary, Lizzie, August, and Augustine are twins; lost Paulina in 1878, aged 17 years. Attend the Presbyterian Church; Republican in politics.

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CONRAD LEIK, firm of Leik & Banwarth, millers, Durango; he was born July 30, 1845, in Germany; when about nine years old, he came with his parents to Pennsylvania; in 1865, he came to Dubuque Co.; he is now running th Durango Mills, owned by Mr. Gandelfo. He married Emeline Shafer, in March 1871; they had five children, three living - Charles H., Anna E., and Emma P. They attend the Lutheran Church.

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HENRY LEMBECK, City Assessor's Office, City Hall, Dubuque; is a native of Prussia, and was born Nov. 7, 1827; he emigrated to America in June 1847, and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque June 28, 1853; he engaged in manufacturing sash, doors and blinds, and had a planing-mill; he carried on the business for twenty-five years (until 1878), a longer time than any one in the same business in Dubuque. He was elected Alderman of the Third Ward in 1864 and 1865. In 1857, he married Kathrine Arenbeck, from Prussia; they have five children - Barney, Mena, Annie, Fanny, and Clara; they have lost nine children.

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CHARLES LEMIER, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner of White and Fourteenth Streets, Dubuque; was born in Prussia, Germany, Feb. 9, 1842; grew up to manhood there, He served, in 1866, in the was with Austria, and, 1870 and 1871, in the Franco-Prussian war. He came to the United States in 1872, and came to Dubuque the same year he engaged in his present business in 1874. He married Miss Anna Klauer, a native of Prussia, Sept. 15, 1875; she came to Dubuque in 1861. Mr. Lemier belongs to the St. Alphonsus Society.

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D. J. LENEHAN, attorney at law, corner Main and Sixth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of the city of New York, and, when very young, his parents came West to Dubuque, in 1850; he grew up and attended school here, and completed his literary education at St. John's College, in the State of Wisconsin; he studied law in Dubuque. and was admitted to the bar in 1872, and since then he has practiced his profession here, He was elected County Attorney in 1876, and since then has held that office.

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JOHN M. LENIHAN, proprietor of the Key City Lime Works, is a native of England, and was born in the city of London June 18, 1834; he came to the United States in 1846, and he came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque Co. in 1850, and began making farm; he carried on farming in Prairie Creek Township for twenty-five years, then came in the city and engaged in his present business of manufacturing lime, he still owns his farm of 200 acres. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace, Town Trustee and School offices. Mr. Lenihan was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Cox, a native of Virginia, Feb. 8, 1860; they have seven children - Catharine, Frances M., Maria, Elizabeth, Theresa, Daniel J., and Dennis W.

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C. M. LEONARD, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O Sherrill's Mount; he was born Feb. 5, 1815 in Onondaga Co., N. Y.; in 1838, he came to La Salle Co., Ill., thence to Du Page Co.; in 1843, he removed to Galena, Ill., and was engaged there in mining for five years, meeting with good success; in 1848, he came to his present farm, and has always been engaged in mining as well as farming, he now owns 480 acres land, but devotes a greater portion of his time to mining, and has always been very successful; he has been Justice, Treasurer of the School Board, etc. Married Miss Susan M. Davis, March 17, 1847, in Galena, Ill., she was born in New York. Congregational Church.

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S. LESSER, physician and surgeon, No. 1283 Iowa Street, Dubuque is a native of Prussia, Germany; he grew up and received his education there, and then studied medicine and graduated in 1866, at Greifswalde; he came to America in 1869, and came to Iowa, and located at Fort Madison, Lee Co., and remained there until 1876, when he came to Dubuque, and since then has practiced his profession here. He married Miss Henrietta Zimmerman, from Davenport, Iowa, they have three children - Flora, Monroe, and Pincus.

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JOHN LETICH, blacksmith, Dec. 25; P. O. Cottage Hilll born April 22, 1820, in Pennsylvania; in 1855, came to Dubuque Co.; he owns about twenty-nine acres of land and carries on the blacksmith business, Married Elizabeth McIntosh April 1, 1877; she was born in England; he has three children by a former marriage - Henry,Nettie and Daniel W. He enlisted in 1864 in Co. A, 6th I.V.C.; served to the end of the war.

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ALEXANDER LEVI, retired, residence corner of Main and Twelfth Streets, is a native of France, and was born March 13, 1809; he emigrated to America in 1833, and came
direct to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque Aug. 1, 1833; he engaged in the grocery and provision business, and continued until 1837; he was also engaged in mining, and in 1847, he engaged in the mercantile business- dry goods and clothing with mercantile business and mining for a period of forty-five years. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1846, and held that office two years. Mr. Levi was the first foreigner naturalized in the State of Iowa. He is a member of the Masonic Order and was the first initiatory member of that Order in Dubuque; his is Teasurer of Dubuque Lodge No. 3, and is also Treasurer of Dubuque Chapter No. 3. Mr. Levi, when he began life, had nothing, and his success is owing to his own efforts; by industry, integrity and good management he has amassed a fortune, and has one of the finest and most commodious homes in the city. In 1847, he returned to France, and was united in marriage to Miss Minette Levi, a native of France; they have five children - Eliza, Emile, Gustave, Celina, and Eugene.

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HON. E. W. LEWIS, attorney and counselor at law, Farley; a native of New York State, and was born in Cooperstown, Otsego Co., Sept. 5, 1821; he grew up to manhood and received his education in that State, he studied law in Watertown, N. Y., and was admitted to the bar in 1845; he practiced law there for twenty-five year. He held the position of Superintendent of Schools, Magistrate, and held the office of County Judge; in 1857, he was appointed Adjutant General by Gov. Seymour on his staff, and was inspector of military matters for Northern New York; he held the same position during the war, and his knowledge and familiarity with the duties of his position made his services valuable at that time. Mr. Lewis is a strong Democrat, and for many years was prominently identified with the interests of his party. On account of his health, he came West in 1869; he located in Farley, and has since practiced his profession here. In October, 1853, he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Downs, a native of Massachusetts, and a lady of fine literary attainments; they have two children - one son, Dixon H., living in this county, and one daughter, Ina E. living in New York.

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GEN. WARNER LEWIS, County Recorder, was born in Goochland Co., near Richmond, in the year 1805, being a scion if one of the old "F.F.V.'s" whose pages of family history are full of romance and interesting incident, but with the member named it is only interesting to deal in this connection: Warner Lewis emigrated to Missouri
with his father in 1818, and settled in St. Louis when that new magnificent city was but an almost unknown French village; in 1827, he came to the upper lead mines of what was then known as Wisconsin; he participated in all the eventful and often bloody scenes of the Black Hawk war in 1832, serving as aid to Gen. Henry Dodge, a distinguished officer, gallant soldier, and often, politically and officially honored citizen; at the close of the war, Gen. Lewis settled in Iowa in the spring of 1833; he took a prominent and active part in the municipal and political affairs of the city and State; after the admission of Iowa to the Union, he was three or four times elected to the State Legislature, serving several terms as Speaker of the House of Representatives; he was appointed Register of the United States Land Office under the administration of James K. Polk, and later as surveyor General of Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, by Franklin Pierce, and continued in the same office by James B. Buchanan; Gen. Lewis has held many public and responsible positions of trust at the hands of the of Dubuque or Iowa has
been more thoroughly trusted and honored by all classes of the people, and no citizen community and the people at large than he fifteen years ago, he was elected to the office of Recorder of Dubuque County_______which he has filled with perfect satisfaction to the people of the city and county and the duties of which are well adapted to the more quiet pursuits and comparatively easy labor which the weight of accumulating years make necessary.

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G. M. LIEBOLD, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Cottage Hill; born July 1, 1824 in Bavaria, Germany; in 1845, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 199 acres of land; part of which he entered. Married Catharine Besaneus in 1853; she was born in Prussia; had six children, four living - Theressa, John, Mathias, and Michael;Joseph died May 26, 1878, aged 22 years; they also lost one child in infancy.

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JOHN M. LILLIG, foreman of Ingraham, Kennedy & Day's lumber yard;was born in Bavaria, Germany, October 15, 1838; he came to the United States in 1851, and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in 1852; he grew up and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, and worked at that business; he has held his present position of foreman for the past twelve years; he was elected City Alderman and has held that position for the past four years; he belongs to Harmony Lodge, I.O.O.F. and to the Encampnet and also to the A.O.U.W. He married Miss Amelia L. Sieggrist, a native of Switzerland; they have six children - Martha, John, Fred, George, Ada, Alexander.

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MICHAEL LINCK, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Luxemburg; born April 15, 1851, in Liberty Township, and has always lived in Dubuque Co.; he owns 219 acres of land, bought of his father; part of the land was entered by his father; is Township Clerk. Married Anna Meyer Nov. 14, 1871; she was born in October 1850, in Germany; they have two children - Catharine and John. His father lives with him. Catholic; Democrat.

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BART E. LINEHAN, Dubuque's most enterprising young merchant and old settler, was born in this city, June 11, 1853; his education was received at the Third Ward School, in which he never missed a room, and also took a course of book-keeping at the Commercial College in this city. At a very early age, he developed quite a business tact, which was noticed by W. E. Wellington, who persuaded him to leave school and accept a clerkship on the wharf-boat of the Packet Company of which Mr. Wellington was Superintendent. This position, which, for one so young, was quite responsible, he held, with the exception of a few months, for five years, when, with his present partner, M. N. Hansen, purchased the business from their former employer, and have built up one of the largest businesses in the city, and have the most complete steamboat supply store in the West, they also do a large grain, coal and bay business, and operate a large farm in Delaware Co. Mr. Linehan's natural shrewdness and foresight, together with the indomitable energy of his nature, have kept him with more business on hand than on of his years ought to care for. He took hold of institutions which previously were considered unsafe investments, but which, today, are as good stock as we have in the city. We have reference to the Dunleith & Dubuque Ferry Company, and the Dubuque Street Railroad Company. Of both corporations he is Secretary and Treasurer, also a Director in the Dubuque Co. Bank and is the Northwestern Agricultural & Mechanical Association; and to him is the credit sue for the fine base-ball park in which the club have won such fame; with his brother, he purchased the ground and fitted it up in first class style, and there is no better park outside of Chicago. He has always taken an active part in anything to further the interests of the city, and is quite well posted on river transportation and river improvement being Secretary of the St. Paul Railroad Convention in 1877, a delegate to the New Orleans Commercial Convention in 1878, and also to Quincy in 1879; and to him in the credit due for the first efforts being made in having the large sand-bar in front of the harbor dredged up, which at one time threatened to close up the landing. Socially, Mr. L. is an affable and courteous gentleman, having as large a circle of acquaintances, as any young nam in the Mississippi Valley; has traveled considerably; is possessed of a good mind, and devotes what little leisure time he has to books and music. He is one of the men whom misfortunes could not dishearten, and quickly - new castles on the ashes of old hopes; endowed with that energy and ability he never fails to achieve the greatest success.

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EDMOND LINEHAN, deceased; was one among the early settlers, who came West to open our Iowa prairies; he was born in County Cork, Ireland, and spent his youth laboring on a farm; he came to Dubuque in 1842, and traveled to ?Brownsville, Minn., where he entered one-half section of land; he returned and bought ?? acres of land in Whitewater Township, and also entered a farm close by where the present monastery now stands; he was possessed of good education, of temperate habits, and left a named untarnished; he died May 20, 1860, leaving a wife, one daughter and five sons, two of whom - the Recs. Thomas M., of Fort Dodge, and Mathia C., of Lyons - are clergymen in the Catholic Church; D. W., of the firm of Lineham & Pierce dealers; Alderman John J., who has so well represented his ward in the Council for the past six years, and Bart E., of the firm of Hansen & Linehan, who is well known throughout the Mississippi Valley.

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JOHN J. LINEHAN, Superintendent of the Dubuque Street Railway Company, is a native of Ireland, and was born June 24, 1842; his parents came to America in 185?, and came to Dubuque the same year; he grew up and received his education ___, after reaching manhood, he engaged in contracting; in January, 1876, he was elected Superintendent of the Dubuque Street Railway Company, and has since then held that position; he holds the office of City Alderman. In May, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret O'Hare, a native of Dubuque, and daughter of Edward O'Hare, one of the early settlers of Dubuque Co., they have five children - Edward, John, Mary M., Charles, and James; they have lost one son.

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C. LOETSCHER, of the firm of Farley, Loetscher & Co.; proprietors of the Key City Planing Mills, corner of Eighth and Jackson Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland, and was born Aug. 2, 1850; he emigrated to this country in 1869; he with Mr. J.P. Farley, one of Dubuque's oldest and most enterprising citizens, and they established the Key City Planing Mills; during the year 1879, they built their present large commodious brick building, which is the largest mill in the city, and they carry on an extensive business, and they have a capacity of employing 125 hands. When Mr. Loetscher came to this country, he only had $40, and by industry he has worked himself up to his present position. He married Miss Mary Loetscher, a native of Switzerland; they have four children - John A., Fred W., Emile C., and Lydia C.

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JOHN B. LONGUEVILLE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Rockdale. The subject of this sketch was born in Lorraine, France, Nov. 25, 1833; at the age of 13, with his parents, Paul and Mary E. Longueville, he came to Dubuque Co., and settled neat his present home; the original farm on which the settlement was made was then "wild" land, and bought by his parents directly from the Government; his father, Paul Longueville, died Sept.. 16, 1846, a few weeks after arriving here; his mother, Mary E. Longueville, died Aug. 1, 1875; Mr. Longueville's farm comprises 85 acres and is under careful cultivation. He has for a long period been prominently connected with public affairs in his township and county; has been Justice of the Peace for the last twenty years; was four years County Supervisor and in the Thirteenth General Assembly a member of the State Legislature. Religion, Roman Catholic; politics, Democratic. He was married, Nov. 8, 1855, to Miss Teressa Losh, an estimable lady, native of Luxemburg.

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JOHN P. LONGUEVILLE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Rockdale. The gentleman above named a well-known and highly respected citizen, son of Paul and Mary E. Longueville, was born in Luxenburg, Germany, Oct. 9, 1842, and came with his parents to Dubuque Co. in 1846; has a farm of 108 acres. Is a member of the Republican party; has held school offices, and is ever ready to help forward whatever will benefit the community in which he lives. He was married, Jan. 31, 1870, to Miss Margaret Welter, also a native of Luxemburg; they have two children living - Eli and Louis - two deceased - Louis and Victoria.

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N. J. LOOMIS, farmer, Sec 19; P. O. Farley; born in New York June 23, 1831; removed to Northern Wisconsin in 1842; lived in that State eight years, and then, after three months' residence in Galena, Ill., came into Dubuque Co. on the 4th of July, 1850; for the last twenty years, he has been engaged in farming and kindred enterprises; previously to that time was devoted to merchandising and general trading; his landed possessions are quite extensive, embracing 730 acres, located in Sec. 18 and 19, Taylor Township, and Secs.13 and 24, Dodge Township; his intelligence, business ability and unwearied, energetic industry have brought him an unwonted measure of success, and, he is, in the best sense of the word, one of the solid men of his community. In religion, Presbyterian politics, Republican; has held school and township offices; Mr. Loomis was married, June 17, 1854, to Miss Ellen Hooper, of Dubuque Co.; they have eight children living - Amasa N.,May Frances,John N., Bennett E., Elizabeth E., Wellington W., Frank, and George; two of their children died in infancy.

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JOHN S. LOONEY, residence 1370 Iowa Street; is a native of Smith Co., Tenn., and was born Aug. 11, 1806; when 12 years of age, he went to Kaskaskia, Ill., and lived there when Illinois became a State; he grew up to manhood there; he helped to survey the land where Springfield and Jacksonville are now located; in October, 1828, he came to the lead mining region, and passed by where Dubuque now stands, on the steamer Red Rover; he returned to Kaskaskia in 1835; he again came to Galena, and afterward came to Dubuque; engaged in mining; in 1859, he went out to the mountains and returned in 1861; he went to Minnesota and liver there until 1867, then returned to Dubuque. Mr. Looney is perhaps the only person now here who passed by this place as early as 1827. In 1828, he married Miss Margaret White, a native of Randolph Co. Ill.; she died in October 1874; they had ten children, seven are living - Corrydon, Abraham, Matilda, Elizabeth V., Margaret, Eliza, and Ella.

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R. LORENZ, merchant tailor, No 255 Fourth Street, Dubuque; was born in Baden, Germany, Aug. 8, 1835; he grew up and learned the tailor's trade there; he emigrated to America in 1853, and came to Dubuque the same year, and began working at his trade; in 1860, he engaged in business for himself, and has continued in the business since then; when he came here, he had nothing, and has earned what he has by his own efforts, He married Miss Anna Gaylord, from Belgium, June 4, 1866; they have eight children - Mary, Tillie, Rosa, Amelia, Louise, August, Otto, and Adam. The father and mother of Mr. Lorenz are both living in this city, and are 72 and 71 years of age.

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D. A. LOVELACE, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Worthington; born Nov. 26, 1812, in Butler Co. Ky.; in 1827, he came to Cass Co., Ill.; remained there till 1844, when he came to Dodge Township, Dubuque Co., where he has since resided; he owns about 150 acres of land, which he entered; he formerly owns the land where Worthington is now situated, and donated a portion for railroad purposes; he has been Justice of the Peace, and has held most of the township offices. He enlisted in 1862 in Co. K, 21st I.V.I.; served about two years. He married Miss Mary A. Kibby Sept. 8, 1835 in Clark Co., Ill.; she was born Aug. 23, 1817, in Nashville, Tenn.; they have nine children - James T.,Eliza J. (now Mrs. Dr. Danda ), Lucius W., John K., Henry C., Winfield C., David C., Washington D., and Fannie A. Republican.

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MRS. CATHARINE LUCK, whose maiden name was Bright, was born in Kentucky Feb. 20. 1808; she was raised there, and in 1825, married Larkin Luck; he was born in Virginia July 17, 1801. They came to Dubuque in 1834, and were among the early settlers here. He was a wagon-maker by trade and made the first wagon ever made in Dubuque; he afterward engaged in mercantile business; he died July 27, 1855; they had eleven children, five of whom are living - Eliza, Kittie, Greenbury, George, and John. Mrs. Luck lives with her son on Alta Vista Street.

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GEORGE LUCK, plasterer; residence, Alta Vista Street, is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque May 2, 1836; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade in this city. After the war broke out, he enlisted in Co. F, 21st I.V.I.; he was in the siege of Vicksburg, and was taken prisoner at Jackson, and was in Libby Prison six weeks; was at the taking of Mobile, and in other battles; he served three years. After his return from the war, Mr. Luck was united in marriage, June 13, 1863, to Miss Sarah Harris, a native of the city of Glasgow, Scotland; they have one son - Charles B., who was born April 15, 1867. Mr. Luck was a member of Julien Lodge, No. 12, I.O.O.F., and also belongs to the A.O.U.W., and to the Order of Foresters. Mr. Luck is one of the oldest native-born citizens of Dubuque Co. now living here.

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ANTHONY LUGER, dealer in wines, liquors and cigars, 456 and 438 Seventh Street, was born in Tyrol, Austria, Aug. 16, 1848; he came to America in 1854, and came to Dubuque the same year, and grew up here. He has been engaged in his present business for the past twelve years; he belongs to Schiller Lodge, No. 11, I.O.O.F. He married Miss Mary F. Flynn, from this city, Oct. 31, 1871; they have three children - Evelin,Mary and Helen M.

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EDWARD A. LULL, cashier of the Dubuque County Bank, No. 625 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Windsor Co., Vt. and was born Aug. 24, 1816, he grew up and attended school there, and spent several years in Boston; after reaching manhood, he came West to Dubuque in 1838; he remained here only a short time and went to Potosi, Wis., in the mining region, and remained until 1843, when he returned to this county and engaged in business at Cascade several years, and at Canton, Jackson Co, until 1851, when he located permanently in Dubuque and engaged in mercantile business and mining; in 1862, he was appointed Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue, and held that office until 1873, when that office was abolished; he was elected cashier of the Dubuque County Bank upon its organization in 1875, and since then has occupied that position. In 1839, Mr. Lull was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Ward, a native of New York.

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E. R. LUMBERT, dealer in lumber, corner of Seventh and White Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Bangor, Me.; he grew up to manhood and engaged in lumbering; in 1850 he went to California and remained there thirteen years, and, in April, 1864, he came to Dubuque, and since then has been engaged in the lumber business; he was elected County Supervisor in 1877 and held that office two years. In 1870, he was united in marriage to Marcia Holmes, a native of Maine. Col. Lumber has two children by a former wife.

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C. W. LUTHER, proprietor of European Hotel and dealer in wines and liquors, Seventh Street, Dubuque; was born in Prussia, Germany, March 28,1823; he emigrated to America in 1845; came to Chicago; he came to Dubuque in 1848, but returned to Chicago and lived there until coming to Dubuque in 1856; he engaged in his present business and continued it since then; he is also interested in mining, He belongs to the I.O.O.F. and to the Turner's Society, In 1852, he married Miss Dora Hagerhurst, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have seven children - Minnie, Emma, Clara, Augusta, William, Tillie, and Frank.

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E. P. LYMAN, Superintendent of the telegraph lines of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad; is a native of Illinois, and was born in Geneseo, Henry Co., Dec. 14, 1848; he grew up to manhood in that State; he has been connected with railroading, in the telegraph department, since he was 15 years of age; he came to Dubuque in June, 1868; in 1872, he was appointed train dispatcher, and, Jan, 1, 1873, was appointed Superintendent of Telegraph Lines of the road, and since then has held that position. In October, 1878, Mr. Lyman was united in marriage to Miss Margaret E. Johnson, niece and adopted daughter of Judge Grant, of Davenport.

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D. E. LYON, attorney at law, firm of Foulke & Lyon, corner Main and Fifth Streets; is a native of Cattaraugus Co., N. Y.; he grew up and received his education there; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in Buffalo in 1857; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1858, and since then has practiced law here in the office he now occupied, He has held the office of City Attorney; he holds the office of United States Collector of the Port of Dubuque.

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JOHN MACDONALD, manager of the house of H. C. Tillinghast & Co., dealer in hides, tallow, wool, and furs, No. 280 Main Street and 281 Iowa Street, Dubuque; is a native of Scotland; he came to the United States in 1865; learned the tanning business in Pennsylvania; came West to Iowa in 1870, and since then has been connected with the house of H. C. Tillinghast & Co., of Chicago, and since 1875; when the branch house was established here, Mr. Macdonald has had the management of the business. It is the only exclusive house of the kind in Dubuque, and they have a very large trade, their shipments in 1879 amounting to over 2,5000,000 pounds. Mr. Macdonald, was united in marriage to Miss Eliza G. Powell, from Galena, Ill.; they have one have daughter - Evelyn C.

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MACKENZIE & HARPER, photograph artists, No. 751 Main Street, Dubuque. A. H. Mackenzie is a native of the city of New York; he came to Dubuque in 1875 and established their present business; in 1878, D. W. Harper, who grew up to manhood in this city, became associated with him, and since then the firm of Mackenzie & Harper have built up a good business, making good pictures at the most reasonable prices.

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J. MACLAY, senior member of the firm of J. Maclay & Co., wholesale dealers in hardware and house-furnishing goods, 768 Main Street; is a native of New York City, and was born in 1826; when 7 years of age, he came to Galena with his father inn 1833; in August, 1845, he came to Dubuque, and, after learning the business in 1853, he engaged in business for himself on the same lot that the firm now occupies; the firm was Maclay & Green until 1858, when Mr. Green retired, and Mr. Maclay continued the business until 1875, when the firm became J. Maclay & Co.; with one exception it is the oldest hardware and house-furnishing goods house in the city, and they are doing a large trade; the sales the present year will amount to $150,000. Mr. Maclay has been actively identified with the interest and growth of the city, and has aided in building railroads, street cars, churches, schools, library and other associations; he has held the office of City Alderman; has served as President of the Bible Society, and President of the St. Andrew's Society, and Vice President of the Board of Trade. He is active and consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and has served as one of the Ruling Elders for a great many years. In 1847, he was united in marriage to Miss Ann Alexander, a native of Scotland; she grew up to womanhood in this country; they have seven children, four daughters and three sons.

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GILBERT MACOMBER, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Cascade; born in Susquehanna Co., Penn., June 16, 1832; came to Dubuque Co. about 1840; a year later, he went to Illinois, but after a two years' residence there, returned to Dubuque Co., where he has since remained; is farm comprises 150 acre in Secs. 23 and 26. In politics, he is a Democrat; has been Township Clerk for several years. His first wife was Margaret Boyer; she was also a native of Pennsylvania; they were married in 1861, and she died in 1870; he was married again in 1872 to Mary McBride, whose native place in Ireland; they have seven children - Charles Henry, Mary Caroline, George B., Elsie, Jessie, Mabel and Arthur. His father, Egbert Macomber, was born in Dutchess Co., N. Y., Nov. 15, 1805; lived for many years in Pennsylvania, and, later, in Illinois before coming here; he still resides in Iowa with his children, and is a clear-headed, hale old man; his wife, Charlotte Macomber, died here about 1859, nearly 45 years of age: these parents have seven children living; four reside in Dubuque Co.

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D. J. MAHONY
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MICHAEL MALONEY, decesased; was born in the county of Cork, Ireland, in 1803; he came to America in 1826. Was married in 1828 to Joanna Murphy; had five children - John, Richard, Margaret, Lawrence, and Mary; deceased lived in Syracuse, N. Y., fron 1826 to 1839. Was a Democrat, and belonged to the Catholc Church. John M. Maloney, son of Michael Maloney, was born Oct. 3, 1829; has filled the offices of Trustee and School Director; is owner of the old homestead of 240 acres in Sec. 26. In politics is a Greenbacker, and is a member of the Catholic Church; his post-office address in Melleray.

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JOHN MANGOLD, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Dec. 4, 1850 in Jefferson Township; he owns 100 acres land, which his father entered. Married Mary Datismann in 1872; she was also born in Jefferson Township; they have three children - Frank W., George B., and Selina.

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JOHN N. MANNING, Superintendent of the Dubuque Steam Heating Company; is a native of Illinois, and was born in the city of Chicago Sept. 5, 1844; he grew up to manhood and received his education there; he served an apprenticeship and learned his present business there; he held the position of Superintendent of the steam heating department of the Crane Brothers Manufacturing Company for five years, and had charge of the outside construction; he has had a large practical experience in heating buildings by steam; he came to Dubuque in August, 1879, and since then assumed the duties of his present responsible position. Mr. Manning was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Carrico, from Springfield, Ill., in 1861; they have three children - George G., Maud, Guy.

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WALTER MANSON, deceased; the subject of this sketch, an old and well known citizen of Rockdale, was born in Scotland in 1808; about the year 1830, he emigrated to Canada, and shortly after to Vermont, whence after a year or two he removed to Ohio; agree three or four years' residence there, he came to Dubuque Co., Iowa, and was thenceforward closely identified with its best interests; for about a year, he was engaged in mining enterprises; then in partnership with James Pratt and Thomas Watters, Sr., he bought the Rockdale Mills; he was connected with the management of the mills until 1868, when he sold his interest in the business; making some investments in real estate in Dubuque, he erected several business houses in the vicinity of the Julien House, and, retiring from active business, devoted his attention to managing and supervising his property in the city and elsewhere; he died on the 28th of March, 1879, and was buried in the cemetery at Rockdale; having long been connected as an earnest, active and continuous worker in all the educational, church and benevolent enterprises of his community, Walter Manson will ever be remembered there as a true philanthropist, and his loss universally regretted. Mr. M. was first married May 27, 1836, to Mrs. Jane Alderson, of Ohio; she died Jan. 31, 1861; his second wife, who survives him was Miss Elizabeth Nicholson, who, in 1851, at the age of 12, came to America with her father, Thomas Nicholson, from her native place in England, she was married to Mr. Manson, on the 13th day of August, 1861; her son and daughter, John W. and Nettie, are now students in the excellent schools of Dubuque.

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J. M. MARSH, (deceased); was a native of Seneca Co., N. Y.; he grew up to manhood, and came West and engaged in surveying; he surveyed a large part of the States of Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa; he came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in 1840; he was U.S. Deputy Surveyor; he ran the State line between Iowa and Minnesota, under the authority of the Government; he possessed rare ability as a mathematician, and was usually employed in the more intricate and responsible branches of the service. In 1845, he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet L. Langworthy, a sister of the Langworthy brothers; she died in 1854, leaving one son - Frank M., now living in Sioux City, and is Civil Engineer and Roadmaster on the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad. In January, Mr. Marsh was united in marriage to Ann J. Stevens, from Seneca Co., N.Y. Mr. Marsh died Jan. 16, 1858, leaving one son - James E., in the employ of the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad. Mr. Marsh was a man of strict integrity, of great energy, and was actively identified with the interests of Dubuque; he built the large, attractive home occupied by Mrs. Marsh, in 1856; at that time, it was the most elegant house in Dubuque.

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WILLIAM MARSHALL, proprietor of the Eagle Steam Boiler Works, Washington Street, between Ninth and Tenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of England, and was born in the city of London June 24, 1831; he grew up to manhood here, and served as apprenticeship in the boiler works; he came to America in 1854, and came to Chicago in July 1855, and began work for C. Reisig & Co., boiler makers; in 1856, he came to Dubuque and engaged in business for one year, then returned to Chicago; in January, 1861, he came to Dubuque and located permanently, and engaged in his present business; he had a partner until 1865, and since then he has carried on the business alone. In 1852, he was married to Miss Sarah Adams, a native of London; they have nine children, five sons and four daughters.

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GEORGE MARTIN, engaged in teaming and transferring freight; residence, 68 Burch Street; was born in County Down, Ireland; he grew up to manhood there and came to the United States in November, 1853, and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in December, 1853; he bought a horse and dray, and began delivering goods; the next summer he bought a team and since has continued in his present business; he brought the load of freight after the railroad reached Dunleith; he has been engaged in the business longer than any person in the city; when he came to Dubuque, he only had $20, and his success is owing to his own efforts. In 1844, he had married Miss Mary Ann Murdock, a native of County Down, Ireland; they have had ten children, seven of whom are living - Hugh, James, William, Moses, George F., Annie and Mary.

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HUGH MARTIN, of the firm of Martin & Strane, dealers in coal and wood, corner of Third and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland and was born Aug. 15, 1844; he came to the United States in 1855, and came to Dubuque the same year; after reaching manhood he engaged in the wood and coal business and has carried it on for the past thirteen years, and has built up a good trade. Mr. Martin has been twice married; his first wife was Miss Rachel Strane, from Pittsburgh, Penn.; she died in 1876, leaving one daughter - Laura. His present wife was Miss Emily Laud, a native of Dubuque Co.; they have two daughters - Lulu B. and an infant not named.

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MRS. JANE MARTIN, proprietress Union House, Cascade, Iowa; born in Ireland; is widow of Andrew J. Martin, formerly of Ireland, who died in Cascade in June, 1877; Mrs. Martin and her sons, John and Thomas, have continued the management of the hotel since Mr. Martins death. He was a Republican, and was Captain of the Home Guards during the rebellion; he had one brother in the regular army, and both had military drill while in Ireland; the Union House was and is strictly a temperance house; the managers are kind, the beds are clean, and the table substantial; it is conceded to be the best hotel in Cascade; new railroad facilities demand enlarged hotel accommodation, but, doubtless, the Union House will continue to receive its share of patronage.

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SAMUEL MARTIN, firm of Walker & Martin, dairy, Sec. 12; P. O. Dubuque; born June 22, 1823, in Warren, R. I.; at about the age of 9 years, he came to Vermont and engaged in farming; afterward, clerked in a store in Brattleboro, where he remained till 1874, when he removed to Dubuque; their dairy is the largest in the county. Married Miss Lucretia Walker in December, 1853; she was born Sept. 26, 1822 in Dummerston, Vt.; they have two children - Harry R. and Julia E.; her father, Reuben Walker, now a resident of Dubuque, was born March 26, 1798, in Dummerston, Vt.; he removed to Dubuque in 1869; Mrs. Martin's mother was thrown from a wagon and killed April 21, 1860, aged 64 years.

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CHRISTOPHER MASON, dealer in stoves and tinware, 251 Main Street; is a native of Norfolk, Va., and was born Sept. 19, 1812; he grew up to manhood in that State, and learned his trade in Norfolk; after reaching manhood, he went to St. Louis and remained several years; then came to Iowa and located at Dubuque, arriving here Nov. 15, 1842; the ground was covered with snow, and continued covering until the following May. Mr. Mason brought his tools with him and engaged in business, and has carried on the business since then, except a short interruption; there is not a merchant doing business here now that was here when he came, thirty-seven years ago, and he has carried on the business longer than any merchant in Dubuque. In Sept. 1840, he married Miss Susan P. Smith, from Missouri; they have three children - Christophene, Edward, Louise; Edward is engaged in business with his father; they have lost five children - Christopher, Charlie, Fannie, Emma and Lillie.

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LUTHER MASON, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. Epworth; born in Grafton Co., N. H., March 7, 1822; at the age to 21, he removed to Waltham, Mass., where he remained about seventeen years; in the latter part of August, 1859, he came to Dubuque Co., and is one of the most highly respected and substantial citizens of Taylor Township. He was one of the leading members of the Baptist Church in its organization in Epworth, and has ever given efficient aid to all worthy enterprises in his community. Has a fine farm of 190 acres, which shows evidence of careful handling and intelligent management. Mr. Mason was married in 1850 to Miss Angeline S. Kidder, of Maine, a genial lady, who has illuminated his household with the constant sunshine of a cheerful disposition; they have six children living - Lewis K, Charles F., Z. K., William L, Fred and Sarah E., and one daughter, Eva, deceased.

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F. I. MASSEY, contractor for the Holly System Steam Supply office, corner Main and First Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Lockport, N. Y. and was born May 31, 1842; he grew up to manhood and received his education there. Upon the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted in Co. B, 105th N. Y. V.I.; he served in the Army of the Potomac, and was wounded in the battle of Gettysburg; in November, 1863, he was transferred to the regular service with rank of First Lieutenant, was on detached duty and served in the War Department until 1868, when he resigned his position and came to Iowa, locating in Dubuque. He held the position of Auditor of the C., D. & M. Railroad until 1876; he built the Steam Motor Railroad on the Bluff, and also had chargeof building the works of the Steam Supply Company, having a large stock interest in both; in January, 1880, he resigned the management of the Dubuque Steam Supply Company and since then has been engaged in contracting for the Holly system of steam heating. Mr. Massey was united in marriage Oct. 3, 1866, to Miss Aleen M. Langworthy, daughter of the late James Langworthy, one of the earliest and most honored settlers of Dubuque.

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EDWIN MATTOX, school teacher, Sec. 22; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born Aug. 13, 1839, in Dubuque County.; he went to Wisconsin, and attended Prof. Parson's Academy at Tafton, thence to Plattville, and there attended the normal institute, and, preparing himself as a teacher, in 1862, he went to Jamestown, Wis., and taught school during that winter; he then went to Fairplay, Wis., and taught five years; in 1867, he came to Zwingle, Jackson Co., Iowa and taught three years; in 1870, he removed to Mill Rock; taught here six months; he has taught at Sageville and Washington Mills two years; pervious to his preparing himself as a teacher, he had been employed as book-keeper for Randolph and Chaplin, of Dubuque. He enlisted in 1864, in the 3d Kansas Heavy Artillery; was discharged in February, 1865, on account of a wound received falling from a horse, Married Miss Leah Long April 15, 1865; she was born in Westmoreland Co., Penn., in 1845; they have four children, three sons and one daughter. Attends German Reformed Church; Republican in politics.

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MARTIN MATZ, grocer, Sec. 4; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 4, 1838 in Baden, Germany; in 1855 he came to Pittsburgh, Penn., in 1856 to Galena, Ill., in 1857 to Dayton Co., Iowa; in 1859, went to Missouri; in 1860, he crossed the Plains to Oregon, engaged in mining rill 1866, when he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns thirty-two acres land with his store and other buildings. Married Magdalena Ertel in February 1875; she was born in Germany; have four children - Charles F., Rosena, Margaret and Matilda.

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HERMAN MAUER, President of the Key City Furniture Company, Elm Street, from Eleventh to Twelfth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Hanover July 24, 1834; he came to the United States in 1851; lived in Chicago two years, and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque and worked at cabinet-making; then was engaged in building for fifteen years; upon the recent organization of the Key City Furniture Company, he was chosen President of that corporation, In 1860, he married Miss A. Kruse, a native of Prussia, Germany; they have nine children - Emma, Augusta, Rosa, Herman, Lulu, Henry, Willie, Waldy and Lilly. Mr. Mauer belongs to the I.O.O.F. and to the Encampment and to the German Benevolent Society.

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DANIEL McCLEAN, pilot on the Mississippi River; residence, No. 309 Julien Avenue; was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1834; his parents came to America in 1840, and they settled in Dubuque in 1845; in the fall of 1848, he went on the river, and began piloting in 1855, and has continued since then - over a quarter of a century; he has been engaged in steamboating over thirty-two years, and is one of the oldest now on the river. In 1860, in married Miss Mary Ann McManus, a native of New York; they have nine children - Emeline, George, Charles, Mamie, Daniel, Alice Lucy, Willie, Fannie and Frank.

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BENJAMIN McCLUER, physician and surgeon, southwest corner of Main and Tenth Streets; is a native of Franklinville, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., and was born May 8, 1824; he grew up and attended school there, and entered the Genesee Weslenian Seminary at Lima, Livingston Co., N. Y., where he completed his literary course; he commenced reading medicine with W. C. Dwight, M. D.; attended lectures in Boston during the winter of 1849-50, and, during the winter 1850-51, attended lectures in Cleveland; in 1851, went to Cambridge, Mass., and the Lawrence Scientific School; then took a course in the Medical Department, and graduated in the spring of 1852; he practiced medicine in
Middlesex Co., Mass, four years, and came West of Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in the practice of his profession here in October, 1856. Upon the breaking-out of the rebellion, he was commissioned by Gov. Kirkwood as Surgeon of the 9th I.V.I.; the 3d Iowa Battery, under Co., Wm. Van Dever, was a part of the command; he was called into the service again, and ordered to duty as Surgeon of Volunteers, and was commissioned by President Lincoln and served as executive officer of the Madison U.S. General Hospital at Madison, Ind., was promoted Surgeon, and afterward had charge of the hospital boat Jacob Strader, at Louisville; Feb. 20, 1865, he was ordered to report to Gen. J. H. Wilson, at headquarters of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Cumberland, March 4, 1865; he was ordered to Gen. Croxton, as Surgeon-in-Chief of the division; he remained on duty and served as Post Surgeon and Health Officer at Macon, Ga.; June 30, 1865, he was made Medical Director of the cavalry corps, and was Medical Director of the District of Columbus,
headquarters at Macon, and had charge of matters pertaining to the Freedmen's Bureau in that locality until December, 1865; in November 1865, by recommendation of Gen. John H. Wilson, he was made Lieutenant Colonel by brevet, and in February, 1866, he was mustered out of the service. He returned to Dubuque and resumed the practice of medicine, and since then has practiced his profession.

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JOHN McCOY, contracor and builder, is a native of the city of Cork, Ireland; he came to the United States in 1850, and learned the trade of carpenter and joiner in Rochester, N. Y.; he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, in 1856, and began working at his trade; he has been engaged in contracting and building for many years, and is one of the oldest in the business here; he has erected some of the best buildings in Dubuque. Mr. McCoy married Miss Margaret Redfern, a native of Bedford, Penn.; they have five children - James, Mary M., Sarah E., John and Edward.

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ORLANDO McCRANEY, Deputy Collector Internal Revenue; is the son of Thomas and Susan McCraney, and was born in Adams Co., Ill., Sept. 22, 1826; his parents were among the very earliest settlers of Dubuque; they arrived here Oct. 12, 1832; they were the first family to come here and locate on the main shore; it was before the settlers were allowed by the treaty to come here; when the soldiers came to order the settlers off, Mr. McCraney did not go; they threatened to tear down his shanty, and finally did so; Mr. McCraney engaged in mining and smelting, and he erected the first furnace that was built here; he sold the property now embraced between Eighth and Twelfth Streets, and from Main Street back on the bluff, to P. Lorimier for 30,000 pounds of lead; Mr. McCraney was one of the earliest pioneer miners and was connected with it for a long time; he died in 1866. Orlando grew up and attended school here; he was a scholar in the first school ever taught in Iowa, and was present the first day the school was taught; he afterward entered the office of the Miner' Express, and learned the printing business; he was connected with the Iowa Transcript, and afterward published the Dubuque Telegraph; he started the Fairfield Ledger, in Jefferson Co., in 1852 now one of the oldest papers in the State; he was editor of the Rocky Mountain Herald in Denver City, and was connected with other journals; he lived in McGregor a number of years, and was engaged in real-estate business, . and was also extensively engaged in building there; he also laid out and started several towns elsewhere in this State; he has been connected with the revenue service since 1862, and has served as Assistant Assessor and Deputy Collector. Mr. McCraney is a member of the I.O.O.F. and has been prominently connected with the Order officially; he has served as Grand Master and Grand Representative of the State. In April 1849 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Hill, a native of Illinois, and daughter of Dr. Allan Hill; Mr. and Mrs. McCraney have three children, one daughter and two sons - Ella V. (now Mrs. Wm. H. Lorimier ), Henry A. and Read.

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A. Y. McDONALD, manufacturer of pumps and plumbing goods, Iowa Street, between Fifth and Sixth Streets; is a native of Scotland, and was born in the city of glasgow Feb. 14, 1834; after reaching manhood, he came to the United States in 1854, and came to Dubuque in 1860. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he enlisted in April, 1861, in the 1st I.V.I., Co. I; was wounded in the battle of Wilson's Creek; he re-enlisted in the 21st I.V.I., and was commissioned Lieutenant of Co. E, and had command of the company much of the time; he was wounded at Black River Bridge; he served until the close of the war. After his return, he established his present business, and has built up a large trade. In 1865, Mr. McDonald was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Masoner, of this city; they have five children - Mattie E., Andrew Y., John M., Hannah M., Nellie Y.

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TERNES McDONELD, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Farley; born in County Longford, Ireland, in 1815; came to New York in 1851; resided in Orange Co., in that State for five years, removing to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1856; has a good farm of 160 acres, and, with driving industry is making it profitable. Is a member of the Catholic Church, and of the Democratic party. He was married in 1845, to Mary Slaven, also a native of Ireland; they have nine children living - Bridget, James Mary, Ellen, Esther, Thomas, Fannie, Terence and Peter; four are dead - Thomas, and three who died in infancy.

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WILLIAM McDOWELL, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Worthington; born April 22, 1816, in Buncombe Co., N. C.; when about 5 years of age, he came with his parents to Georgia; in 1826 he came to East Tennessee, thence to Missouri; in 1834, he came to Dubuque Co., and is one of the first settlers in this county; he owns 200 acres of land; has been Township Trustee. Married Margaret Flinn Jan. 21, 1841; she was born April 26, 1823, in Illinois. Democrat

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T. COKE McGEE, M. D., Cascade; was born in Baltimore Co., Md., on the 15th of October, 1830; his father was for forty years a member of the Baltimore Conferencce of the M. E. Church, and the Doctor affiliates with that denomination, although not a member; he was at home till 18 years of age, them studied medicine and taught school four years. On the 4th of November, 1852, he was married to Miss Mary E. Long of Frederick Co., Va., by whom he has had four children - Frances T., Edwin M., Mary E. and Augusta V. He took a course of private lectures in medical science, by Prof. Dunbar in 1853 at Baltimore, and in 1855 continued his study of medicine in Maryland University; his second course of lectures were taken at Rush Medical College, in Chicago, where he graduated in 1856; then practiced medicine three years in Dubuque Co., and, in January, 1859, returned to Maryland; in the spring of 1861, he located in Savannah for practice of his profession. During a visit to Richmond, he was appointed Surgeon of the 1st Md. V.I., which was organized at that city; he was soon permanently crippled by an accident, and retired from the service within a year from date of enrollment. He lived in Baltimore from 1862 to 1873; then spent two years in Dallas, Tex., and in 1875 came to Dubuque Co., and to Cascade, where he now has a large practice; he has a pleasant and hospitable home in East Cascade, not far from the railroad depot of the Narrow Gauge Railroad; he is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and is a Democrat; his portly form and genial countenance enable a stranger to easily identify the Doctor; he is a courteous gentleman and a successful physician.

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CHARLES L. McGOVERN, general merchandise and Postmaster; Pin Oak; born March 1, 1852 in Concord Township; Feb. 1, 1875, he commenced his present business and was then appointed Postmaster; he is Assessor; has been Township Clerk. Married Miss Mary Lynch in 1875; she was born in Dubuque; they have two children - Barnard and Mark.

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REV. J. B. McGOWAN, Pastor of St. Clement's Roman Catholic Church; P. O. Tivoli.

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NEIL McGOWAN, blacksmith, corner Delhi and Center Streets, West Dubuque; was born in Ireland, and emigrated to America in boyhood, and lived in New York twelve years; he came to Dubuque in the fall of 1848, and began working at his trade; he has been engaged in blacksmithing and mining for thirty years. In 1838, he married Miss Margaret Flanagin, a native of Ireland; they have three children - James, Ellen and Jeremiah. His eldest son was educated for the ministry, and is Rev. Father McGowan, Pastor of the church at Bankston, in this county.

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REV. P. J. McGRATH, President of St. Joseph's College, Fourteenth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland, and was born in County Clare July 7, 1847; he came to America in November, 1868; he received his classical education at Milwaukee Seminary and pursued his philosophic and theological studies at Cape Girardeau, Mo., he came to Dubuque and was ordained by Bishop Hennessy, at the Cathedral, July 26, 1874, and since then has been connected with the St. Joseph's College, serving as Vice President until July, 1877, when he was appointed President of the college, and since then has occupied that position.

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JAMES M. McKENZIE, wagon-maker and blacksmith, 879 Clay Street, Dubuque; is a native of Canada, and was born in 1846; he grew up and learned his trade there; he came to Iowa in 1867 and located at Dubuque; in 1874, he engaged in business for himself; he has carried it on since then. In September, 1868, he married Miss Rosa Ortschied, from Cassville, Wis.; they have three children - Edward, Alexander, and Annette.

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WILLIAM McKINLAY, carpenter, builder and lumber-dealer, Epworth; born in Scotland May 28, 1828; came to America in 1849; stopping in New York till November of that year, he came to Chicago, where he remained until May, 1851, when he came to Dubuque, and was a resident of that city for ten years, removing to Epworth in 1861, with which pleasant town he has been identified ever since. His first wife was Miss Jane Miller, of Scotland, their marriage taking place Jan. 1, 1849; her death occurred in 1859; his second wife was Miss Mary Rose Wilkinson, a native of Williamsport, Penn.; they were married Jan. 22, 1863; six children are living - Margaret C., Adam D., Effie J., Henry W., Charles C. and Samuel C.; three are dead - William J., Robert A. and one who died in infancy. Three of Mr. McK's brothers came to America and Dubuque at about the same time - James M. (a book-keeper and lawyer came to Dubuque in 184; removed to New York City in 1868; married Catharine de Lorimier, born in 1829, died in 1864), David A., (came to Dubuque in 1851, now in St. Paul, Minn; he is a book-keeper; wife nee Margaret Y. Atchison ), and Robert M. (resides in Dubuque since 1849; carpenter and builder; his first wife was Margaret Miller, second Katie A. Yoar ).

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JOHN McKNIGHT, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Dubuque; he was born Feb. 27, 1840, in Dubuque; he now owns and occupies the farm formerly owned by his father, consisting of over four hundred acres of land, and probably the oldest settled farm in the county. Married Miss Eliza Looney in 1872; she was born in Minnesota; they have three children - Jessie, Belle and Grace.

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THOMAS McKNIGHT, (deceased); was born in Augusta Co., Va., March 10, 1787; his parents removed to that country in 1774; at 16 years of age, his father said to him that he must carve his own fortune; in 1783, he invested his few hard-earned dollars in a stock of goods, which he carried from door to door; a few years later, he extended his trade and travels to Nashville, Tenn., and, in 1809, to St. Louis, Mo.; he formed a partnership with his brothers James and Robert, and Thomas Brady, with branches at St. Genevieve and St. Charles; St. Louis then had but 700 inhabitants. In 1822, he was elected to the City Council, and subsequently was Director of the first "Bank of Missouri." He had married, in 1844, Miss Fannie Scott; they had five children, three of whom and their mother died in 1824-25. Business changes caused him to accept a responsible position under the Government, collecting the rental of land claims in the Galena District, and felled the position to the entire satisfaction of miners and the Administration. After being ten years a widower, he married, in 1835, Miss Cornelia Hempstead, of St. Louis, Mo.; by this marriage he has five children. In 1846, he was candidate for Governor of Iowa; in 1838, he was appointed by President Van Buren, Receiver of the Land Office at Dubuque, and continued through the next Administration, and was removed by President Polk in 1845. Upon his administration coming into power, President Taylor appointed him Register of the same office, which he held until 1853. The life of Thomas McKnight was a remarkable one; He was a merchant in St. Louis in 1809, two years before a steamboat was built on the Western river, eight years before steamboat trade reached St. Louis, and over twenty years before a railroad was built on the continent, and thirty years before the telegraph was invented; he was an extensive merchant; was Assistant Superintendent of the Government of the great lead mining district of Galena, and, with his partners, he constructed and operated the first hot-air smelting furnace in the Dubuque mines. He died Dec. 1, 1865. The Old Settlers' Society held a meeting which was largely attended, and, although the weather was very inclement, the association and a large number of citizens accompanied the remains to their burial place in Linwood Cemetery.

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FRANCIS McLAUGHLIN, Auditor of Dubuque County; is a native of Ireland, and was born in 1836; his parents came to America in 1848; they lived in Pittsburgh, Penn., two years, and came to Dubuque Co. in the spring of 1850; he grew up and lived on a farm for fifteen years; he was engaged in the grain business for ten years; he was elected Auditor of Dubuque County in 1873 and was re-elected in 1875 and again in 1877; he has also held town and school offices. In 1864, he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen McDaniels, in this county; they have four children - Edward, Peter, Francis and Johanna.

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GEORGE W. McMELLEN, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Centralia; born in Dubuque Co., in 1851, and has been a continuous resident of the county; has a farm of 143 acres, with a handsome and convenient brick house, and all the needed farm conveniences in good shape. His father, William McMullen, who came here from Illinois at an early date, is now living in Dakota Territory, not far from Sioux City, and is aged about 62 years. In 1872, Mr. McMellen married Miss Emma V. Crider, daughter of James and Rachel Crider, who are elsewhere mentioned as among the earliest settlers in Dubuque Co. Politics, Republican.

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THOMAS McQUILLAN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Pin Oak; he was born in 1835 in Ireland; in about 1841 he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; in 1852 he went to California; there he engaged in mining will 1855, when he returned to Dubuque Co., he owns 200 acres of land, which was entered by his gather; has been Township Treasurer and School Director. Married Emma F. Quigley in 1855; she was born in Pennsylvania; have eight children - William F., Daniel, Joseph, Maria, Cyrus, Anna, Katie and John. Catholic

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ROBERT J. McVAY, merchant, Cascade; born Sept. 24, 1836, in Lawrence Co. Penn.; came to Maquoketa in 1854, and taught winter school in Shade Burleson's district, and the next winter taught in the Presbyterian Church in Scotch Grove, After some mercantile experience, he came to Cascade in 1859, and clerked for G. G. Baughart, whose daughter, Carrie A., he married March 5, 1861; they have two children - Ada L. and Burd W.; from 1861 to 1864, was a dealer in live stock and did general brokerage business; he was neatly two years in the oil regions of Pennsylvania, and was interested in several wells, one of which was the most expensive sunk at that date; it proved a "dry well; " agree his oil experience, he was in the employ of W. B. Lovejoy & Co., wholesale clothiers, Chicago; then, until 1872, was in partnership with W. J. Baughart in a general store, and then, until 1876, engaged in general speculation in real estate and commercial paper; from 1876 to the spring of 1879, he was in the grain trade at Grundy Center, Iowa; in September, 1879, he resumed the dry-goods and notions business, at Cascade; he sells for cash exclusively. His daughter Ada L., is a graduate of Prof. Jones' Musical Conservatory at Dubuque. Mr. McVay is a Republican and a Mason, but not a church member; was Deputy Sheriff awhile under C. J. Cummings, but soon resigned in disgust with official duties; he is energetic, wiry, and speculative.

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H. H. MEAD, dealer in groceries and provisions, 522 Julien Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Delaware Co., Ohio, and was born in 1839; he came West to Dubuque in 1856; during the war he enlisted in Co. L, 1st I.V.C., and was in many fights and skirmishes; he was in the service three years; since the war, he has been engaged in business here. He belongs to the I.O.O.F. He married Miss Virginia Mace Sept. 12, 1864; they have three children - Walter C., Hilan H. and LeRoy R.

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GEORGE MEHL, retired, Seventh and White Streets, Dubuque; was born in Alsace, France, Jan 17, 1819; he emigrated to America in 1832, and came to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived nineteen years, and came to Dubuque June 13, 1851, and engaged in the furniture business with Mr. Herancourt for three years; then engaged in the grocery business on the corner of Seventh and White Streets; he erected the building in 1856. He belongs to the Schiller Lodge, I.O.O.F. In 1842, Mr. Mehl married Miss Elizabeth Herancourt, and native of Bavaria; they have two children - Elizabeth, now Mrs. Charles P. Belz and Charles, engaged in business with Mr. Belz; Charles was in the army; he enlisted in Co. G, 16th I.V.I., under Capt. Ruehl; he was in twenty battles and engagements - Shiloh, Corinth, Iuka, siege of Vicksburg, Atlanta and with Sherman to the sea.

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N. MELMER, proprietor of billiard parlor, No. 530 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Luxemburg Dec. 16, 1856; he came to America in 1872, and came the same year to Dubuque; he went away in 1875, and returned in 1878 and engaged in his present business.

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F. M. MENGIS, wholesale and retail dealer in millinery goods of all kinds and fancy dress costumes, No. 738 Main Street; is a native of Switzerland, and was born March 7, 1837; he came to the United States in 1852; he learned the drug trade and was engaged in the drug business in Indiana. While living there, in 1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Weber, a native of the city of Luzerne, Switzerland; her parents came to Dubuque in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Mengis came to Dubuque in 1865, and soon after engaged in the millinery business, and since then have successfully carried on the business, and have built up a large and leading trade in this city; when they came here, Mr. Mengis says, they had only one child, a canary bird and 35 cents; through their own efforts they have the largest business in their line in the city, and carry stock of $25, 000; they have five children - Paula, Irma, Herbert, Walter and Lessing.

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GILBERT MERRITT, farmer, Sec. 8, P. O. Dubuque; born Jan. 2, 1815, in Pike Co., Penn.; when a child he came with his parents to Wayne Co.; in 1837, they came to Marion, Ohio; soon after coming here, his father, died, aged 54 years; in 1846 he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 140 acres of land. Married Finetta Shippy in 1848; she was born in Ohio; they have thirteen children - Martha, Mary ( now in Idaho), Clara, William, Amanda, Lawrence, Elizabeth, George and Bertie are twins, C harles E., Maude, Glen and Grace. Member of the M. E. Church; Republican.

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NICHOLAS METTEL, owner of the Tivoli Flower Garden, West Eagle Point Avenue; was born in Rhine Prussia, Germany, Feb. 27, 1828; he came to the United States in 1854, and came to Dubuque in 1856, and has lived here twenty-four years; he has had a large experience in gardening and cultivating flowers; engaged in business for himself three years ago; he has the finest roses in the city, and is building up a nice trade. He married Mary Greiner, a native of Germany, in 1854; she died in 1856. He married Margaret Greiner, a native of Germay in 1856; they have four children - John, Mary, Susie and Josephine; have lost three children.

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JOHN D. METZ, blank-book manufacturer, book-binding and printer, corner Fifth and Main Streets, Dubuque; was born in Holland March 5, 1822; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade there; he emigrated to America in 1846; he lived in Rochester, N. Y. and worked at his trade there, and afterward engaged in business for himself; in 1860, he came to Galena and was there two years; then came to Dubuque; he established his business here and has continued in the business since then; has built up a good trade and employs seven men; the character of work turned out by Mr. Metz bears testimony to his experience and superior ability in his business; in 1875, he received the only premium for blank books awarded by the American Institute of New York, and he also received the grand medal of honor and diploma of highest merit awarded by the Centennial Exhibition, Philadelphia, 1876. In 1858, Mr. Metz married Miss Maria Faas, a native of Holland; they have six children.

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WILLIAM MEUSER, of the firm of William Meuser & Co., brewers and malsters, Couler Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Nassau, Germany, and was born Aug. 22, 1834; he emigrated to America in 1856; he came West to Wisconsin. When the war broke out, he enlisted in the 2d Wis. V.I., Co. I, and was in the first battle of Bull Run, Gettysburg, and in all the battles of the Wilderness and many others; he was wounded at Gainesville; in the battle of Gettysburg, of 550 men of his regiment who were in that engagement, only forty answered roll-call the following morning; he was in the service over three years. After the war, he engaged in brewing business at Mineral Point, Wis.; he came to Dubuque in 1875 and engaged in his present business and is building up a large trade. In 1864, he married Miss Margaret Eulberg, a native of Nassau, Germany; they have four children - Joseph, Margaret, Lizzie and Willie.

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AUGUST MEYER, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. Waupaton; born Nov. 19, 1817, in Holstein, Germany; in 1850, he came to Dubuque Co., he owns 380 acres of land, and is largely engaged in the manufacture of grape wine; has been President of the School Board. Married Sophia Krokow in January 1852; she was born in Germany Feb. 5, 1823; have six children - Anna, Bertha, Clara, Dora, Emma and Francisca. Lutheran

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F. G. MEYER, proprietor Spring Valley Mills, Sec. 26; P. O. Cascade; born in Prussia, Germany, Aug. 17, 1833; came to America in 1854, settling in Jo Daviess Co., ILL., where he remained the thirteen years; while there, he carried on at different times and with unqualified success, the occupations of miller, merchant and lumber dealer; in 1867, he removed to Dubuque Co., and has carried on milling since, at his present location with like success; the fact that he is, financially, one of the the most solid men of his locality, is due solely to his persistent and unconquerable business energy; he came to America with his fortune all yet to be made, and has acquired a handsome competence by the good use of his fine business abilities. In politics, he is a Democrat, varying this, however, to vote for "the best men", regardless of party. He was married, in 1858, to Miss Babbett Musselman, a native of Bavaria; they have five children - Augustus, Frank G., Christian, Edward and Joseph.

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HENRY MEYER, dealer in groceries and provisions, choice teas and crockery, 241 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born April 17, 1820; he emigrated to America in 1848; he came to Iowa and located at Dubuque in April 1852; engaged in tobacco and cigar business for two years, and then engaged in the grocery trade and has carried on the business since then, a period of over twenty-five years, a longer time than any retail grocer in the city. In 1852, he married Miss Charlotte Quade; she is a native of Hanover, Germany.

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JOHN P. MEYERS, stonecutter and contractor, corner Seventh and Jackson Streets, Dubuque; was born in Rhine Province, Prussia, in 1834; he grew up and learned his trade there; emigrated to America in 1853, and came to Dubuque in May 1857, and began working at his trade, and since then has continued in the business and is one of the oldest stonecutters in Dubuque. In 1857, married Margaret Mares for Prussia; they have had three children; none of them are living.

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PETER MIHM, stonemason; residence 500 West Eagle Point Avenue; was born in Bavaria, Germany, Aug. 16, 1827; he grew up and learned his trade there; came to this country in August 1852; lived in Pennsylvania and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in 1855, and began working at his trade; he has worked at his trade here twenty-five years and is one of the oldest stonemasons in Dubuque. In 1853, he married Mary B. Albenger, a native of Germany; they have had ten children, eight of them are now living - Annie M., Katie M., John J., Peter E., Amelia, Frank, Bertha and Lizzie. They have lived on this place twenty-five years Mr. Mihm belongs to the Pius Society.

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J. R. MILLER, farmer, Sec.4; P. O. Dubuque; born in Switzerland Jan. 10, 1842; his parents emigrated to America in 1851, stopping in Mineral Point, Wis., for about a year, they then removed to Dubuque County in 1853; his father, John Miller, died in 1857; his mother, Anna Miller, resides with her son, J. R. In the Civil War, Mr. M. was a member of Co. A, 46th I.V.I., and did effective work during his term of service; his brother, John W., was killed in the charge on Vicksburg, May 22, 1863, and had been previously wounded in the battle of Hartsville, Mo. Mr. Miller has been engaged in both the enterprises of mining and farming; has a farm of 187 acres in Sections 3, 4 and 8; is a member of the Republican party. He was married in 1866, to Miss Frances Ruth Lockey; they have six children - Eleanora, William, Henry, Annie, Catharine, George Franklin, Maude Lily and John Rudolph.

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LOUIS MILLER, proprietor of the Sherman House, Farley; is a native of Germany; and was born in Prussia June 29, 1836; he came with his parents to the United States in 1850, and came to Iowa the same year; they located in Dubuque Co., on a farm in Jefferson Township; he continued on the farm until 1863, when he came to Farley and bought the hotel, and has conducted it since then; the building burned down in 1871, but was rebuilt. Mr. Miller has been several times elected a member of the Board of Supervisors of Dubuque Co.; has held the office of Justice of the Peace, and school offices. He has been connected with school interests since he was 21 years old. In 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Lizzetti Barry, from Wheeling, W. Va., they have nine children - two sons and seven daughters.

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C. M. MILLS, attorney at law and Justice of the Peace, corner Sixth and Main Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Washington Co., Penn., and was born Oct. 20, 1847; his parents came to Dubuque in 1855, when he was only 8 years of age; his father, Wm. Mills, was one of the leading attorneys of this section of the State for many years; he died May 18, 1879. C. M. grew up to manhood and received his education in this State; studied law with Mills & Graham, and was admitted to the bar in 1869, and engaged in the practice of law. He holds the office of Justice of the Peace - was appointed in 1876, elected in 1877, and reelected in 1879. In November, 1878, he was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Lee, and native of New York.

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GEORGE MINGES, M.D., physician and surgeon, 989 Clay Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque July 8, 1855; he grew up and attended school here and graduated from the high school; he went to Europe and completed his education there, mostly in Vienna; he studied medicine and graduated at the Buffalo Hospital College; he completed his medical education in Europe; after completing his studies, he engaged in the practice of his profession in this city in September, 1879; he is a member of the Dubuque Medical Society. His father, Dr. Minges, a physician and surgeon, was a native of Bavaria, and was born on the Rhine in 1825; he received his literary and medical education there, taking his diploma in Wurzburg, Bavaria; he came to Dubuque in 1854, and engaged in the practice of medicine. He married Miss Laura Hillgaertner, a native of Bavaria. Dr. Minges continued in the practice of medicine until his death, which occurred in March 1870; he left two sons and three daughters; Mrs. Minges is still living in this city.

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W. MINGES
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C. W. MITCHELL, Vice President of the Norwegian Plow Company, Dubuque; is a native of Racine Co., Wis., and was born Dec. 2, 1842; he grew up and received his education in Green Co., that State; after reaching manhood, he engaged in the mercantile business; in 1874, he associated with H. H. Sater and engaged in manufacturing the "Norwegian Plow ", at Brodhead, Wis.; they continued until 1879, when the Norwegian Plow Company was organized and the business removed to Dubuque, where they have erected large works and engaged in manufacturing on an extensive scale, Mr. Mitchell being elected Vice President of the Company. Mr. Mitchell, while living in Wisconsin, served on the County Board of Supervisors and held town and school offices. In 1864, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Jelliff, a native of Newark, N. J.; they have two children - Ora and Eddie.

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MAJ. RICHARD MOBLEY, Main Street; is a native of Wellsburg, Brooke Co., West Va., and was born Aug. 29, 1800; when 18 years of age, he went to Shelbyville, Ky., and in 1819, came to Illinois and settled in Jonesboro; in 1821, he went to Vandalia, then the new seat of government, and the first session of the Legislature was held there in that winter; in July 1823, he went to Springfield, and, a land office being opened there, he cried the first sale of public lands there; in the winter of 1826-27, he represented Sangamon Co. in the State Legislature; when Tazewell Co. was first organized, he was Clerk of the County Commissioners Court, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Recorder and Judge of Probate and Postmaster; in the spring of 1844, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque; he engaged in banking, and continued until the panic of 1857; in 1849, he was appointed Receiver of Public Lands, by President Taylor; in 1861, he went to Washington and was appointed by President Lincoln Chief of Public Lands, and held that position until November, 1866, when he was appointed Pension Agent, and held that office two years; was again appointed Chief Clerk in the Land Department by the President and confirmed by the Senate, and remained in that position until June 1, 1878, when he resigned the office and returned to Dubuque to reside with his only daughter, Mrs. Littleton. In 1824, he was united in marriage to Miss Martha C. Stephenson, a native of Kentucky; she died July 3, 1873; there are three children living. Maj. Mobley had five sons in the Union army during the war; he was a personal friend of President Lincoln, and enjoyed his confidence in a high degree, and has letters now in his possession written him by Mr. Lincoln after he was elected President. There are very few men who have been more prominently identified with the affairs where he has resided for the past fifty years than Maj. Mobley, and now, nearly 80 years of age, he looks twenty years younger, and is still an active Christian gentleman.

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JAMES F. MONTAGUE, proprietor of the Key City Sign Works, and dealer in ornamental glass, No. 38 Eighth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Massachusetts, and was born in the city of Boston Feb. 22, 1853; he came to Dubuque in 1870 and learned his trade here; he established his present business in 1878, and is building up a large trade; he makes a specialty of painting fine carriages and deals in ornamental glass of all kinds.

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JAMES MONTGOMERY, farmer, Sec. 23, P. O. Cottage Hill; born Sept. 8, 1819, in Crawford Co., Penn.; in 1836, he came to Dubuque Co., being one of the earliest settlers of the country; he owns 143 acres of land, which he entered; has been a Constable, and has held other minor offices. Married Sarah Glew Nov. 1, 1840; she was born in 1825 in Pennsylvania; they had eleven children, seven living - Amanda, Wright A., W. S., Sarah F., Martha E., Ella May, James R.; his son J oseph G. enlisted in 1861, in Co. K, 9th I.V.I.; died, October 1864 at Memphis, Tenn., of disease contracted in the army; they lost three children in infancy. Congregational Church.

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JOHN M. MOORE, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. Centralia; born in Missouri Feb. 16, 1809; came to Dubuque Co., in 1823 to his present location, where he has made a fine farm of 200 acres, 120 of which is under cultivation. Mr. Moore is a member of the Democratic party; was in the State Legislature 1854-57, and has held other public offices, as member Board of Supervisors, Justice of the Peace, etc. His first wife was Nancy Brady, the marriage taking place March 26, 1837; his second wife was Catharine Anderson, to whom he was married Dec. 31, 1866; Mr. Moore has ten children living - Daniel B., John F., C. P., Mary (now Mrs. Brant ), Lucy A., Benjamin F., Ada, Cora, Jane and Thomas W.; seven have died - two of these in Co. H, 21st I.V.I., the death of one being caused by wounds, of the other, disease.

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M. H. MOORE, President of the Dubuque Lumber Co., Dubuque; is a native of the town of Dummerston, Windham Co., Vt.; he grew up and attended school there; after taking a preparatory course, he entered Williams College and graduated in the class of 1854; after graduating, he came West to Iowa and located at Waterloo in 1856, and engaged in lumbering and banking; in 1865, he came to Dubuque, and, in 1866, organized the Dubuque Lumber Co., and was chosen Vice President, and since then has been actively identified with the management of the company which is the largest, in the manufacture of lumber in Dubuque; it has suffered largely from fires three different times since its organization, involving a loss of from $40,000 to $80,000 each time; but, by the energetic management was immediately rebuilt, with all the latest improvements, and is now one of most complete mills on the river. In October, 1856, Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Matilda P. Wheeler, a cousin of Vice President Wheeler; she died Aug. 10, 1871, leaving four children. In May 1876 Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Ella H. Ratcliff, a native of Wheeling, Va.; they have one son. Mr. Moore is a native of the same town of President Hayes, and was intimately acquainted with the family.

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ISAAC A. MORELAND, farmer, Sec.30; P. O. Dyersville; born July 6, 1822, in Fayette County, Penn.; in 1838, came to Dubuque, thence to Delaware Co. where he remained till 1844, when he returned to Pennsylvania; here he remained several years, then came again, West and located in Dyersville, and carried on a general merchandise business until 1861, when he sold out to Limback Bros.; he then removed to his present farm, consisting on about one hundred and sixty acres of land. He has been Justice of the Peace and held other town offices; he also filled the unexpired term of T. Crawford as County Superintendent. He married Miss Isabella P. Jack in 1855; she was born in Fayette County, Penn.; they have five children - Lizzie, David I., Ida, Samuel and Joseph.

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WILLIAM H. MORHISER, photographic artist, Diamond House, corner Julian Avenue and Hill Street, Dubuque; was born in the city of Dubuque March 28, 1844; grew up and attended school here. After the war broke out, he enlisted in Co. H, 16th I.V.I.; after serving eighteen months in that regiment, he served as headquarters scout for the First Brigade, McCook's Division, in the Army of the Cumberland; he was taken prisoner July 30, 1864, and was confined in Andersonville a long time. After the war, he studied photography in St. Louis, and since then has lived in Springfield, Mo., and in Dubuque. He belongs to the I.O.O.F. and the Encampment and the the Veteran Corps. In September 1868 he was married to Miss Mary Checkham, a native of England; they have had four children; only one daughter, Amy, survives. Mr. Morhiser's father, Philip C. Morhiser, is a native of Baltimore, and came West to Dubuque in 1835; after the war broke out, he enlisted in the 8th I.V.C., and was commissioned Captain of Co. G; he served as Inspector General of the brigade; he was taken prisoner and was in prison several months; after being released he was acting Provost Marshal and Chief of Military Police at Nashville until close of the war. Mr. Morhiser married Miss Amelia Bush, sister of Hon. John D. Bush, Mayor of Dubuque; they have seven children; Mr. and Mrs. Morhiser are living at Springfield, Mo.

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F. E. MOSER, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner of 11th and Main Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland, and was born March 20, 1836; he came to America in 1850, and came to Dubuqe in 1851; he grew up to manhood here, and entered the grocery store of Bissell Bros., on the same corner he now occupies and in 1856, he engaged in his present business, and has continued in the same location for twenty-four years - a longer time than any retail grocer in the city except one. In October, 1861, he was untied in marriage to Miss Carrie Lawton, from New York State; they have three children - Fred W., Alice and Charlie; they have lost one daughter, Carrie.

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GEORGE G. MOSER, dealer in groceries and provisions, flour and feel, Clay Street, between Seventh and Eighth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland and was born Sept. 2, 1837; his parents emigrated to America in 1848, and they came to Dubuque in 1850, and grew up to manhood here. After the war broke out, he enlisted in 1862 in Co. I, 21st I.V.I.; he was wounded in the charge on Vicksburg May 22, 1863; he was promoted and commissioned Second Lieutenant of Co. I; he was in twelve different engagements, and served three years; after his return from the war, he engaged in business and has continued in trade since; he holds the position of Junior Vice Commander of the Veteran Reserve Corps, and is a member of the Order' of Workmen and the Legion of Honor. Mr. Moser was united in marriage, Oct. 25, 1865, to Miss Sophia M. Weigel, a sister of Fred Weigel, one of the early settlers of Dubuque; they have one daughter - Lizzie Ann.

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AUGUST MUEHE, hardware and stoves, Dyersville; born Dec, 29, 1834 in Bavaria; in 1853, came to New Jersey; in 1857, to Dubuque Co.; the following year to Dyersville; in 1859, he started a tinshop, and, as his trade improved, he continued to enlarge his business, and now conducts a first-class hardware, stove, and tinware store. He has been a member of the School Board, served as Alderman two terms, now serving his third term; has also held other town offices. He married Miss Rosa Auerbach Oct. 29, 1853; she was born in Bohemia; they have had seven children six living - Lena (now Mrs.Toomer ), John C., Henry D., Katie, Emma and Carrie; lost Edward, aged 21/2 years.

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C. H. MUELLER, farmer; Sec. 17; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Feb. 17, 1822. in Germany; in 1843, he came to Ohio, and followed the cooper; s trade, having learned it in Germany; in 1853; he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 210 acres of land; soon after coming here he carried on the brewery business for several years; it was located near Sherrill's Mount. He has been President of the School Board and Director. Married Mary Schmidt in August 1847; she was born in Germany Nov. 16, 1876; they have four children - Rosena, Mary, Anna and John. Lutheran in religion.

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ERNST MUELLER, dealer in confectionery and fancy goods; was born in Saxony, Germany in 1846; he came to America in 1862, and came to Dubuque in the spring of 1863; he established his present business in 1873, and has built up a good trade; he is a member of the Order of I.O.O.F. and the United Workmen. In 1872, he married Miss Emma Werft, a native of Saxony, Germany; they have three children - Emile, Bertha, Carl. During the war, when only 17 years old, Mr. Mueller enlisted and served in the 46th I.V.I., Co. A.

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CORNELIUS MULLEN, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Dubuque; is a native of Ireland, and was born in County Londonderry; he emigrated to America in 1844, and came to Dubuque the same year, and engaged in farming and mining and has carried on that business until within the past few years; he entered the farm from the Government, where he now lives; also has 160 acres in Center Township. Mr. Mullen is one of the early settlers; he is unmarried.

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DANIEL H. MURPHY, Pastor of the Cathedral, Dubuque; is a native of Appleton, Wis.; he grew up and attended school there, then entered the seminary in Milwaukee, where he remained three years, and completed his studies at the seminary in Montreal, where he remained three years; he was ordained in 1875; he was Pastor of the church in Ossian, west of McGregor, over three years; Aug. 5, 1879, he was appointed Pastor of the church at McGregor, where he remained only a short time, and, Oct. 5, 1879, he was appointed to his present charge as Pastor of the Cathedral.

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DENNIS MURPHY, farmer, Sec 33; P. O. Farley; born in Burnford, Ireland; came to America in 1866; resided two years in Cleveland, Ohio, and then removed to Dubuque Co., in 1868; has ninety acres of good land, forty acres of which is located in Taylor Township, and fifty acres in Whitewater Township. Mr. Murphy is a member of the Catholic Church, and an industrious, hard-working citizen. He was married, in 1863, to Miss Margaret Rairdan; they have seven children living - Daniel, Allen, Patrick, Mary, John, Margaret and Dennis' four children are dead - Mary, Dennis and two who died in infancy.

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LAWRENCE MURPHY, superintendent of A. A. Cooper's wagon factory, Dubuque; is a native of Seneca Co. N. Y. and was born March 25, 1837; he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1850; he grew up and learned his trade here. After the war broke out, he enlisted in the 21st I.V.I., Co. F, and remained in the service until the end of the war; he was in seven battles. After the war, he returned here, and since then has been with Mr. Cooper; in 1870, he was appointed general superintendent of the manufacturing department, and since then has held that position. In 1867, Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to Miss Maria Crowley, a native of Dubuque; they have three children - William, Mary, Albert.

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TIMOTHY MURPHY, Auditor of Dubuque Co., Dubuque; is a native of Seneca Co. and was born June 7, 1845; his parents came to Iowa and located in Dubuque Co. in 1850; he grew up and received his education here; after reaching manhood, he engaged in farming. In the fall of 1879, he was elected County Auditor, and took charge of the office Jan. 6, 1880; he has also held town and school offices, and was chosen President of the School Board. In June 1875, Mr. Murphy was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Morgan; she was a native of Galena, but grew up in the county; they have three children - Maggie, Patience and Timothy C.

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PATRICK J. MURRAY, farmer, Sec. 19; P. O, Epworth; born in Ireland Jan. 6, 1845; came to America in 1853; after stopping in New York two years, he migrated westward and located in Dubuque Co.; he is engaged in farming, with a fine success; has a farm of 160 acres in Secs. 19 and 24. Is a member of the Catholic Church, and identified with the Democratic party. He was married in June, 1878, to Miss Ellen Hall, of Dubuque Co.; Mr. Murray's father and mother have been associated with him in his various removals, and are yet members of his pleasant household.

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MICHAEL MUSCHITSCH, grocery store, 379 High Street, Ham's Addition, Dubuque' is a native of Austria, and was born in August, 1829; he emigrated to America in 1851, and came to Dubuque in the spring of 1852; he kept store in Liberty Township, and has been engaged in his present business for the past fifteen years. In 1853, he married Maggie Beuchel, a native of Prussia; they have two children - George Y. (clerk in store) and Mary M.

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DIEDRICH MUYGENBURG, brick manufacturer, north end of Broadway, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in 1823; he emigrated to America in 1854, and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in 1855, and began working in a brickyard; in 1876, engaged in making brick; he manufactures 700,000 yearly; he owns thirteen acres of land. In 1863, he married Miss Frederika Muker, a native of Germany; they have four children - Otto, Charlie, Gustav, Bertha.

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D. D. MYERS, of the firm of Myers, Tice & Co., manufacturers of tobacco and wholesale dealers in tobacco, domestic and imported cigars, 322 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born Nov. 3, 1841; he grew up to manhood and has lived in this county over thirty-eight years; he was Clerk in the County Treasurer and Recorders office, under W. G. Stewart, and held the position of Deputy Recorder; he was in the office of the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad; in 1867, he engaged in business for himself. The firm of Myers, Tice & Co. have a large wholesale trade; they have a large factory fronting on Iowa Street, where they manufacture largely chewing, fine cut smoking tobaccos; it is the only one in the city. Mr. Myers was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Gregoire, of this city, May 17, 1865; they have five children.

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WILLIAM MYERS, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Dubuque; born in New Madrid, Mo., Aug. 22, 1807; his father had settled there about 1795, when the territory yet belonged to Spain, and received a patent for his land from the Spanish Government, and that portion of the Louisiana purchase was not really occupied by the United States Government until after the date on which the subject of this sketch was born. A fondness for pioneer life, fostered by his early associations, led him into vocations only congenial to a daring spirit, Accordingly, the age of 20 finds him a salaried employee of the American Fur Company, at the head of which was John Jacob Astor, of New York. In the employ of this company, for the six years from 1827 to 1833, he was constantly in traffic with the leading tribes of Indians on the Western frontier, and the numerous incidents of that Indian life are vivid pictures of an experience such as few men could undergo. Having closed his engagement with the above firm, he came to Dubuque Co. in June, 1834, when less than a dozen families were in Dubuque. He received an appointment as Major from Gov. Lucas, the first Territorial Governor of Iowa. Opening a store on the corner of Third and Main Streets, he continued in business there until 1842, since which time he has lived on his present farm of 160 acres, having located this farm in 1836. He was married, at St. Genevieve, Mo., in 1832, to Miss Susan L. Shannon, daughter of Wm. Shannon, and old and honored citizen of Missouri. Maj. and Mrs. Myers are both Catholic in religion, and as is natural from old association, Southern in sentiment. They have six children living - S. S. Myers (of Myers, Tice & Co., Dubuque), Mary J. (now Mrs. Place, of Waterloo), George S. (farming near Alden, Iowa), Annie (now Mrs. Cox, of Alden, Iowa), Harriet J. (now Mrs. Cox of Dubuque) and Wm. A.; three deceased - Eliza A., Wm. B. and Susan S.

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REV. G. T. NAGLE, private secretary of Bishop Hennessy; is a native ot the city of New York, and was born in 1857; his parents came to Dubuque in 1859; he grew up and attended school here, and afterward entered college at Prairie du Chien; after completing his literary course, he pursued his philosophical and theological studies in Montreal, Canada, and was ordained there Dec. 20, 1879; upon his return to Dubuque in January, he was honored with the appointment of private secretary to Bishop Hennessy, a position of honor and responsibility.

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THOMAS S. NAIRN, dealer in leather, imported and domestic calfskins, saddlery hardware, etc., 372 Main Street; is a native of Washington Co., Md., and was born Feb. 16, 1822; he grew up there, and after reaching manhood, he went South to Mobile and remained there three years; he came West to Iowa in 1845 and located in Dubuque; he soon afterward entered the office of the Surveyor General; a great deal of the land in Iowa, Wisconsin and Southern Minnesota was surveyed under his supervision; he remained in the office of the Surveyor General for seventeen years; in 1861, he engaged in the drug business in Washington, D. C. and continued there until 1866; in 1867, he engaged in the leather trade, and since then he has continued in that business; he is Secretary of Linwood Cemetery Association. A few years after coming to Dubuque, on the 13th of June, 1848, Mr. Nairn was united in marriage to Miss Henrietti Karrick, a native of Madison Co., Mo., and daughter of George O. and Amanda Karrick; they came to Dubuque in 1836, and were among the earliest settlers here. Mr. and Mrs. Nairn have four children; three sons - John, Joseph and George, and one daughter - Mary.

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WILLIAM NEUMEISTER, dealer in fresh and salted meats, at 205 Johnson Avenue and at the Central Market, Dubuque, is a native of Germany, and was born Feb. 14, 1827; he grew up to manhood there and emigrated to America in August 1848; he came West to Wisconsin and lived there until the spring of 1850, when he came to Dubuque; he worked as a butcher, and, in 1854, engaged in business for himself, and, he has carried on the meat business here over twenty-five years and is one of the oldest in the city; he belongs to Schiller Lodge, I.O.O.F., and to the German Benevolent Society. He married Miss Mary Beyer, a native of Germany, Jan. 29, 1854; they have ten children; three daughters - Mary (engaged in teaching school), Julia and Henrietti, and seven sons - Henry, Willie, Fred, August, Frank, Charlie and Otto.

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J. W. NEWBURG, decorative painting and frescoing, No. 86 Eighth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Tuscarawas Co., Ohio, and was born Jan 13, 1840; he grew up and attended school there until 16 years of age; then went to Detroit; he learned his trade in Detroit and Cleveland; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1862 and established his present business; he carries on both house and sign painting, and gives special attention to decorative painting and frescoing, employing fifteen men and doing the leading business in his line in Dubuque; he sends his work through this section of the State, and has sent his work to Chicago and even New York; his is a member of the Masonic Order - the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery - the Knights of Pythias, I.O.O.F., and the A.O.U.W. In September, 1860, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Brendle, from Galena, Ill; they have three children - Carrie, Charles and Alfred.

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JOHN NEWMAN, carriage and wagon maker, 141 Third Street, Dubuque; is a native of Geneva, Seneca Co., N. Y., and was born Oct. 20, 1831; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade in that State; came to Dubuque in 1854 and began working at his trade and continued until 1875, when he engaged in business for himself. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Quinn, from this city, in 1859; they have four children.

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A. L. NICHOLS, forman car department C., C., D. & M. R. R.; residence, 1829 Jackson Street; is a native of Western N. Y., and was born near Buffalo June 26, 1831; he came West to Chicago in 1856; lived in Belvidere, Ill., four years; he came to Cedar Falls, Iowa in 1861, and lived there ten years, and came to Dubuque in 1871, and since then has been connected with the shops of the C., C., D. & M. R. R.; in 1875, he was appointed foreman of the car department and since then has occupied that position. Mr. Nichols was united in marriage to Mrs. M. M. Stiles, from Grand Rapids, Mich., Dec. 25, 1861; she is an accomplished musician, and has taken a leading part in church choirs for many years.

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DAVID NICHOLS, farmer, Sec.36; P. O. Farley; born Oct. 5, 1811, in Duchess Co., N. Y.; he came to Dubuque Co. in 1852, and has since resided here; he owns 200 acres of land. He married Sophia Jenkins in 1837; she was born in Columbia Co., N.Y.; they have four children, two living - Mary J. (now Mrs. Watts ) and Arthur H. (who served in the late war). Democrat.

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THOMAS NICHOLSON, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Cottage Hill; born Dec. 24, 1809, in Cumberland, England; in 1851, came to Ohio, thence to Dubuque Co.; he owns 100 acres of land. Married Elizabeth Wearthemuth; she was born in England; they have three children - Elizabeth, Sarah and Phebe. M. E. Church.

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A. NIEBUHR, merchant tailor, No 1314 Clay Street, Dubuque; is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born Feb. 22, 1839; he grew up and received his education and learned his trade there; he traveled for a number of years in different kingdoms and speaks fluently five different languages; he came to America in September 1872; he was engaged in his business in Washington, D.C., for five years, and came to Dubuque in March 1877, and since then has carried on his business here. In 1875, he married Miss Mary Gorius, a native of Dubuque Co.; they have one daughter- Matilda, a nice little girl.

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HERMAN NIENSTAEDT, druggist and apothecary, proprietor of the Fifth Ward Drug Store, No. 1924 Couler Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born March 27, 1847; he grew up to manhood and received his education there and studied his profession; he came to America in 1873, and came to Iowa the same year and located in Dubuque, and since then he has been connected with the drug business; he is building up a good trade. He was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Pleins, from this city, Aug. 27, 1878; they have on son - Franz L.

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F. R. NITZSCHE, physician and surgeon, 1077 Clay Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Saxony July 2, 1829; he grew up and received his education there, and studied medicine and graduated in 1861 at the Surgeon Medical Academy, Dresden; he came to America in 1866, and came to Iowa and went to Chicago and attended a course of lectures at Rush Medical College, and graduated from that institution and received a diploma. In April, 1872, he was united in marriage to Miss Wilhelmina Jodam, a native of Dubuque Co.

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RUDOLPH NOLTE, residence corner Jackson and Tenth Streets; is a native of Prussia, and was born in Westphalia March 13, 1813; he emigrated to America and landed in Baltimore Sept. 19. 1836, after a voyage of ten weeks, and a part of the time they were out of provisions. He came to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque June 19, 1837, and began working at the carpenter trade; he helped finish the first brick house built in Dubuque; he bought the lots where he now lives in 1837; it was then a corn-field; he and D. Harms, now of Plattville, Wis., used to chop wood in the winter and sold it for $1 a cord, and they had to pay 75 cents to get it hauled here, and teams were so scarce they could only get it hauled on Sunday, and only got 25 cents a cord for chopping; in the winter of 1838, he made some furniture; he could get no varnish here, and walked to Galena and back again in one day, and paid $2, all the money he had for varnish; Mr. Nolte has been engaged in mining for a great many years; when he began life he had nothing, but he has been successful, and has accumulated a competency; he owns the property where he lives, and the brick store adjoining and other city property. He has been married three times; he married his present wife, Pauline Zwiener, Dec. 8, 1868; they have two children - Emil and Alwin.

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NORTON BROS. 245 West Locust Street, Dubuque, consisting of Joseph, John, and Edward Norton, are all natives of Dubuque, and sons of the late Patrick Norton, one of the earliest settlers of Dubuque Co.; they grew up the manhood here and are engaged in tree planting; the business was established by their father, and they have engaged in it longer than any one here. Joseph, the oldest of the firm, was born Dec. 7, 1847; he grew up and succeeded his father in his present business. He married Miss Margaret Glynn, from this city, in 1869; they have had three children; only one daughter, Stella, survives.

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PATRICK NORTON, (deceased) was a native of Ireland; he came to Dubuque in 1833, and was one of the earliest settlers. He married Amanda Kea, a native of South Carolina. He was engaged in teaming, tree-planting and dealing in real estate. He died in 1867, leaving a widow, now living, and six sons and one daughter. The old Norton homestead was located where the Episcopal Church now stands, on the corner of Fourteenth and Main Streets.

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MICHAEL NUGENT, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Ballyclough; born in Ireland, 1829; came to New York in 1845; after nine years residence there, removed to Dubuque County in 1854; has a farm of 240 acres in Sections 16 and 17. Is a member of the Catholic Church, and is identified with the Democratic party; has held township offices. He was married in 1859, to Miss Mary A. Duggan, daughter of Daniel and Hannah Duggan, who came to Dubuque County in 1834, and have been constantly connected with the early settlement and progress of affairs in the county; five children living - John, Katie, Daniel, Delia and Ella; two children - George and Annie - have died.

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O
M. O'CONNOR, dealer in groceries and provisions, No. 85 Bluff Street, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland, and was born in County Cork in 1803; he grew up to manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1840, and came to Dubuque in the fall of 1834; he is one of the early settlers, and has lived here thirty-six years; there were only several brick buildings in Dubuque when he came; he was engaged in draying and teaming for many years, and for some time past has been engaged in his present business; when Mr. O'Connor came here, he had nothing, and by his industry he has acquired considerable property. He is a consistent member of the church, and gives liberally to its support. Married Miss Ellen Linehan, a native of Ireland; she died June 29, 1851; they had six children, three of whom are living - John, William and Richard.

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PATRICK O'CONNOR, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Tivoli; he is a native of Ireland; at about the age of 21, he emigrated to America; first landed at Quebec, thence to Ohio, and in 1841, he came to Dubuque; a fee years later, he removed to his present farm, where he has since resided, and is one of the first settlers in the township; he owns about four hundred acres of land. He married Ann O'Connell Nov. 24, 1847; she was born in Ireland; they have eight children - Mary, Johanna, Bridget, Anna, Maggie, Katie, Ellen and Morris. Catholic.

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LAWRENCE OERTEL, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born June 30, 1815, in Bavaria; in 1853 he came to New York, thence to Washington, D. C.; worked in the United States navy yard five years; in 1861, he enlisted in Co. B, Washington National Guards; served three months; he then continued to work for the Government till 1866, when he came to Chicago; in 1867, he came to his present farm, consisting of 100 acres. Married Margaret Hahn in 1842; she was born in January 1810, in Bavaria; they have two children - Christ, now living in Jackson Co., and John M., who manages the farm; he was born Nov. 26, 1843, and was married to Henrietta Wetter July 18, 1878; she was born in Dubuque Co., in August 1858; they have one child, George L.

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MRS. E. M. OGILBY, 1044 Iowa Street, Dubuque; is a native of Chester Co., Penn.; her maiden name was Miss E. M. Reed; she came West to Iowa with the Philadelphia Company in 1836, and settled in Dubuque; they were among the early settlers here. Miss Reed was united in marriage, June 10, 1840, to Joseph Ogilby, from Philadelphia; he came West to Iowa with the Philadelphia Company in 1836, and settled in Dubuque; he was extensively engaged in building and contracting; was interested in manufacturing and other enterprises; his death occurred in 1865, leaving three children - Elizabeth R. (now Mrs. Maj. J. L. Horr ), Josephine, b.

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JOSEPH OGILBY
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MRS. ANN O'HARE, Grand View Avenue, between South Dodge and West Dodge Streets, Dubuque; was born in County Monahan, Ireland; she came to this country and arrived in Galena in October 1823. On the 6th of June, 1841, she married Edward O'Hare, a native of County Clare, Ireland; he came to America about 1825 and known to Galena and Dubuque among the earliest settlers; he was one of the pioneers of this county; he was engaged in mercantile business and farming during his life, and was successful; he died July 31, 1854, leaving a nice property; they had seven children, only three of whom are living - Timothy A., James Edward and Margaret, she married Alderman J. J. Linehan of this city. Mrs. O'Hare lives on Grand View Avenue; she owns nineteen acres of land finely located inside of the city limits.

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PETER OLINGER, livery, sale and boarding stable, corner Eleventh and Clay Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Luxemburg June 11, 1854; he came to the United States in 1871, and came to Dubuque the same year; in 1877, he engaged in the grocery trade, and, in 1878, he engaged in his present business; his stock of horses and carriages are as good and well selected as there is in the city, and he is building up a good business. In 1877, he married Miss Maggie A. Whiel, a native of Germany; they have two sons - John and Frank.

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BERNARD J. O'NEILL, manufacturer of brick and buying and shipping grain, Brad Street, south of Third Street, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland, and was born Aug. 15, 1846; his parents came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque Co. in 1852; he grew up and attended school here; after reaching manhood, he engaged in the grain trade, and has carried on that business since then; for the past ten years, he has also been engaged in manufacturing brick; during the summer season, he makes 1, 000,000 annually; he buys and stores grain during the winter, and ships it during the spring. Mr. O'Neill was united in marriage to Miss Mary J. Gandolfo, from this county, Oct. 29, 1872; they have three children - Dominick John, Henry E., Bernard J.

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JOHN O'REGAN, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Ballyclough; born in Dubuque County May 9, 1841; his father, John O'Regan, Sr., now living in Dubuque, was one of the earliest settlers here, building what was possibly the first dwelling-house erected in the county. The subject of this sketch has been all of his life a resident of Dubuque County, except about five years absent in Kentucky, attending school, etc.; he has a fine farm of 320 acres located in Sections 9, 15 and 16; religion, Roman Catholic; politics, Democratic. He was married in 1875, to Miss Margaret Conners; they have three children - Daniel, Mary, Ellen and Rachel.

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FRANK E. ORMSBY, manufacturer of shirts; collars and cuffs, and proprietor of the Steam Laundry, No. 890 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Lewis Co., N. Y., and was born Feb. 10. 1857; he grew up to manhood in that state; he came to Chicago in 1876, and came to Dubuque in 1877 and established his present business, and is building up a good trade; he has the only steam laundry in Dubuque. Mr. Ormsby was united in marriage, Dec. 4, 1879, to Miss Stella Pyne, from this city.

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P
J. C. PAINE, dealer in stoves, tin, copper and sheet-iron ware, and house furnishing goods, 846 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Canada, and was born near Montreal Jan. 9, 1832; he grew up to manhood there; after living in Vermont a short time, he went to Albany, N. Y., where he learned his trade; he came to Dubuque in 1857, and began working at his trade with J. Maclay, and was with him about eighteen years; he engeaged in business for himself in 1874, and has established a good trade; he belongs to the Masonic Order, and also is a member of the I.O.O.F. He was united in marriage, May 12, 1863, to Miss Julia Gilliam, daughter of Charles Gilliam, of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Paine have three children - Eva, Charles, Gertrude.

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RICHARD PAISLEY, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Rickardsville; born in 1813 in Ireland; in 1840, he came to Galena, Ill., and engaged in mining; remained there till 1845, when he removed to Dubuque Co.; he owns 620 acres of land; part he entered. Married Mary Paisley in 1859; she was born in Ireland; they had eight children, five living - James, Jane, John, Richard, and Willliam; Henry died aged 12 years; David and Margaret died in infancy.

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THOMAS PAISLEY, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Rickardsville; he was born in 1815 in Ireland; in 1835 he came to New York City; the following year removed to New Jersey; in 1838, he came to Ohio; in 1840, he removed to Galena, Ill., and engaged in mining; in 1841, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he entered 420 acres, which he still owns. Married Miss Margaret Foster in 1843; she was born in Ireland; they have five children - Samuel (enlisted in 1862 from Milwaukee, in the 28th Wis. V.I.; served to the close of the was), Jonathan, William H., Thomas J. ( who commenced reading law in 1877, with H. T. McNulty; is now practicing with Pollock & McNulty, at Dubuque), and Robert D. M. E. Church.

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WILLIAM H. PAISLEY, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Rickardsville; born Jan. 29, 1852, in Concord Township; his parents came to Dubuque Co. in 1841, where they have since lived; he own 80 acres of land and is engaged in buying and shipping live stock; has been Constable, Secretary of the School Board and Director; he is frequently consulted on matters of law and has practiced in Justice Courts; his name has been used as a candidate to represent this county in the Legislature, but was defeated on account of political differences.

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JOHN PALMER, retired; is a native of Christian Co., Ky. and was born Aug. 3, 1813; he lived there until 15 years of age, except one year spent in Morgan Co., Ill.; in May 1828, he came to Galena with his father, who died in the fall of the same year; John returned to Morgan Co. and attended school and left there to come to Galena to take part in the Black Hawk war; after the war closed, he with others were back and forth from Dubuque to Galena, until the Government allowed then to come, in June 1833, then he came and settled here permanently; he engaged in mining for some years; he entered land from the Government at the land sales, and made a farm which he still owns, adjoining the city corporation; he has also been connected mote ot less with mining interests; he has held town and school offices; he served officially on the School Board in the Sixth School District for over thirty years. In 1837, Mr. Palmer married Mary Gwyther, an English lady; she died in 1871, leaving four children, two of whom are still living - Edward D. lives at Yankton, and is in the employ of the Government; Elizabeth, (now Mrs. Graham ), living in Hardin Co., Margaret J. and Mary A. are not living. In 1878, Mr. Palmer married Mrs. Mary Graffort, a native of Illinois. Mr. Palmer's son Edward was in the army, and held the Commission of Lieutenant in Co. C, 21st. I.V.I., and participated in several battles.

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W. A. PALMER, of the firm of Palmer, Winall & Co., blank-book manufacturers, printer and book binders, corner Sixth and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Genesee Co., N. Y., and was born Dec. 18, 1836; he grew up to manhood there until 1860, then came to Dubuque and engaged in his present business, and, in 1864, the firm of Palmer, Winall & Co. was organized, and they have continued the business since then, and have built up a large trade; in 1879, they erected the large brick building on the corner of Sixth and Iowa Streets, to meet the demands of their trade. In 1861, Mr. Palmer was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Strong, from Galena, Ill.

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LEWIS H. PARKER, freight agent of the Illinois Central Railroad; is a native of New Hampshire, and was born in Hillsboro Co., April 13, 1836; he grew up and attended school there; after reaching manhood, he came West, in 1858, to Springfield, Ill.; he began railroading with the Great Western now the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railroad, and remained with that road as agent and trainmaster until 1866, when he became connected with the Illinois Central Railroad; he was cashier and head book-keeper in the office of the Superintendent at Centralia, Ill.; he remained there until September, 1872, when he came to Dubuque and was appointed trainmaster here and served until January 1877, when he was appointed freight agent at Dubuque, and since then has held that position; while living in Centralia, Mr. Parker was elected Mayor of the town. In June 1858, Mr. Parker was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. McDoel, a native of Hillsboro Co., N. H.; they have two sons - Harry D. and Lewis W.

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W. W. PARKER, manufacturer and dealer in trunks, No. 614 Main Street, is a native of Gallia Co., Ohio, and was born Sept. 1, 1847; his parents came to Illinois in 1854 and located in Galena; he came to Dubuque the following year, and attended school and grew up to manhood here; he engaged in his present business in July 1877. He manufactures and supplies the merchants here, and has built up a good trade and does the largest and principal trunk business in Dubuque.

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W. H. PEABODY, capitalist; residence, corner Locust and Fourteenth Streets; is a native of Syracuse, N. Y. and was born in 1823; he grew up and received his education in that State; after reaching manhood, he engaged in mercantile business at an early day in Toledo, Ohio, and established the first wholesale and jobbing trade that was ever done there; he was actively and prominently identified with the interests of the city for ten years; in 1856, he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque and engaged in mercantile business, which he carried on successfully for eighteen years, until 1874, when he retired from active commercial business; he had nothing when he began life, and owes his success to his own industry, energy and good management. In 1847, Mr. Peabody was united in marriage to Miss J. A. Barr, a native of Onondaga Co., N. Y.; they have had three children, none of whom are living.

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PROF. H. L. PEET, Principal of the High School, Dubuque; is a native of Rochester, Monroe Co. N. Y. he grew up to manhood, and received his education in that State; he entered Genesee College, and graduated in 1870; a degree was also conferred upon him by the Sycracuse University; he engaged in teaching; he came West to Winona and was Principal of the schools there for two years, and was for four years connected with Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.; having studied law, he was admitted to the bar; he practiced law in Chicago for two years; in 1878, he came to Dubuque, and since then has held his present position as Principal of the High School.

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MARTIN PERKIN S. farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Rickardsville; born Oct. 7, 1836 in Columbiana Co., Ohio; in 1869, he removed to Dubuque Co.; he owns 130 acres of land; he enlisted in 1864, in Co. D, 23th Ohio V.I.; served to the close of the war. Married Miss Harriet Burge in 1856; she was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio; her father. James Burge, in a native of Bristol, England; he was born March 26, 1806; when a boy, he came with his parents to Philadelphia, and was apprenticed to the cabinet trade; in 1831, he came to Jefferson Co., Ohio; he followed his trade till 1852, when he removed to Union Co., Ohio; in 1867, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns forty acres of land. He married Miss Rachel House in 1831; she was born in Berks Co., Penn., March 8, 1813; they have ten children - five sons and five daughters.

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CHARLES J. PETERSON, dental surgeon, corer Main and Eighth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Rockland Co., N. Y., and was born in 1854; his parents came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1856; he grew up and attended school here, and graduated at the high school; he studied dentistry and graduated at the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery in March, 1877, and since then has practiced his profession here; Dr. Peterson is one of the few graduates in dental surgery now in practice in this State, and he has established a leading business in Dubuque. He is a member of the Masonic Order and also of the Knights of Pythias; he belongs to the 4th I.N.G., and is Lieutenant of Co. A.

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BRONSON PETTIBONE, dealer in groceries and provisions, No. 1098 Main Street; is a native of Oneida Co., N. Y., and was born May 3, 1830; he grew up to manhood in that State, and came West to Iowa in 1852, and located in Dubuque; he entered a store as clerk, and afterward engaged in the dry-goods business; in 1862, he engaged in the grocery and provision trade, and since then has been engaged in that business. Soon after coming to Dubuque, in 1853, Mr. Pettibone was united in marriage to Miss Eveline Egglesston; she is a native of New York, but is an early settler of Dubuque; they have four children - Frank B., George E., Charles J. and Harvey. Mr. and Mrs. Pettibone have lived in their present location on Seminary Hill twenty-three years.

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FRANK B. PETTIBONE, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner Main and Eleventh Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque April 13, 1858; he grew up to manhood here, and engaged in his present business during the past year, and is building up a good trade. He married Miss Jennie Heck, from this city, Sept. 3, 1878.

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ANDREW PFIFFNER, stonemason and contractor, No. 658 Fifteenth Street corner of Washington Street, Dubuque; is a native to Switzerland, born Jan 10, 1830; his father, Jacob Martin Pfiffner, was born in Switzerland Aug. 13, 1794; he was a soldier in the army, and was present when Bonaparte was last taken; he emigrated with his family to America in 1845, and came to Dubuque; is still living here, and is 86 years old; he has four children living- Martin, Andrew, Jacob and Mary. Andrew, when 15 years of age, came with his parents to America, and to Dubuque in 1845, and began working ar his trade of stonemason; he and his brother Martin have been partners, and engaged in stonemason work and contracting over thirty-three years, and are the oldest in the business in this city. Married Miss Magdalena Wilthaber May 9, 1854; she was born in Switzerland Feb. 5, 1828; they have four children - Andrew, Josephine, Bertha, Lena.

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J. J. PFIFFNER, dealer in groceries, provisions, flour and feed, Couler Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland, and was born Sept. 8, 1828; he emigrated to America in 1843; he came to Illinois and lived nine years in different places, then came to Galena and lived eight years; he came to Dubuque County in 1859, engaged in farming eight years, then was engaged in the saw-mill and flour mill business; he came in the city and engaged in his present business in 1877; he has held the office of Assessor of Jefferson Township, and also held school offices. In 1854, he married Miss Lena Kessler, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they have six children - A. H., J. J., E. J., Charles F., George A., Maria L.; they lost three children.

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ADAM PIER, dealer in groceries, corner White and Eleventh Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born June 15, 1842; he emigrated to America in 1858, and came to Galena the same year, and lived there until coming to Dubuque in February 1868; he worked at the cooper's trade, and was in a grocery store with his brother several years, and held the office of market-master four years; he engaged in his present business in 1879. He married Catharine Krause, a native of Germany, Dec. 29, 1868; they have six children - Stephen, William, John, Addie, Lorenzo, Katie.

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JOHN PIER, proprietor of the Key City Brewery, South Locust Street, Dubuque; was born in Germany Nov. 5, 1834; he emigrated to America in 1853; came to Galena in 1855, and came to Dubuque, where he located, in 1857; he and his brother had a boat store on the Levee; in 1861, he engaged in the grocery business, near the court house, and continued until 1879; he has held the office of City Alderman and Chief Engineer of the Fire Department, and belongs to the Order of I.O.O.F., and Order of Workmen. In the spring of 1861, he married Miss Lizzie Ham, from St. Louis; they have two children - John A. and Lena. Mr. Pier is a member of the German Benevolent Society, and the Mechanics' Benevolent Society.

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JAMES PLAISTER, insurance agent, over Commercial National Bank, corner Fifth and Main Streets, Dubuque; is a native of England, and came to this country in 1849, he came to Iowa the same year and located at Dubuque; he entered a store with Peter Waples in the same room now occupied by the office of the Julien House; in 1853, he went to Dyersville, in this county, and became identified with James Dyer, the founder of the town; they owned the location of Dyersville, and also that of Manchester, and a part of Earlville; they were extensively engaged in real estate, and entered at one time 3, 200 acres of land in one body in Dubuque Co., known as "Farley Prairie." Mr. Plaister returned to Dubuque in 1862, and, in 1864, he formed a partnership with Gen. Smith, the firm being Smith & Plaister, which continued until July, 1879, and since then Mr. Smith has continued the business; his insurance agency is the oldest in the city of Dubuque. Mr. Plaister was united in marriage to Mrs. Laura T. Rice, in Marshalltown, Iowa; she is a native of Keene, N. H.; he has three children - Joseph D., book-keeper for John Bell & Co., of this city, and Mrs. Morley, of Dyersville, and one daughter, Anna D., at home.

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JACOB F. PLAPP, cooper, corner Jackson and Thirteenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Wittenberg, Germany; born Jan. 2, 1824; grew up and learned his trade there; emigrated to America in March 1853, and came direct to Dubuque; worked at his trade one year and then engaged in business for himself, and has carried on over twenty-five years, a longer time than any other cooper in the city, and carries on the largest business in the city, employing ten hands; when Mr. Plapp came here, he only had a very little and owes his success in life to his industry and close attention to business. In August, 1852, was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Bockel, a native of Germany; she was born March 14, 1831; they have three children, two sons and one daughter - Frederick William, attending the high school; Christian Henry and Louise, both attending school.

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CHARLES PLATT, farmer and wagon-maker, Sec. 25; P. O. Cottage Hill; born Oct. 22, 1835, in Ohio; in 1855, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 137 acres of land, also his wagon and blacksmith shops; he and his brother have been engaged in this business since 1856. Married Miss Adaline Stuart in September, 1858; she was born in Iowa; had seven children, six living - Byron, John, Wilbur, Berthie, Hervey and Mabel; lost Nellie in infancy. Republican.

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F. M. PLEINS, of the firm of Pleins & Beach, soap and candle manufacturers, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Rhenish Prussia Aug. 13, 1823; he grew up to manhood and learned his business there; he came to America in October 1849, and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque Aug. 10, 1855, and established his present business, the firm being F. M. Pleins & Co.; in the spring of 1858, James Beach bought his partner's interest, and sine then they have carried on the business and have built up a large trade. Mr. Pleins has been twice married; his first wife was Dorothea Klingenberg, a native of Hanover, Germany; she died in 1871, leaving four children - Elizabeth, Tecla H., Francis and Rudolph. In July, 1872, he married Louise Nieustaedt, a native of Hanover, Germany; they have one son.

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SAMUEL M. POLLOCK, attorney and counselor at law, corner Eighth and Main Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Ohio and was born in 1829; he received a good academic education; he commence reading law and having pursued his studies for several years, was admitted to practice in the courts of that State; about the year 1855, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque and engaged in the practice of his profession; being a close student and applying himself closely, ha soon gained distinction in his profession, and in the spring of 1859, was elected Judge of the City Court, which had concurrent jurisdiction in civil cases with the District Court; he afterward resigned his position and resumed the practice of his profession. After the breaking-out of the rebellion, in 1862, he enlisted in the 6th I.V.C., and was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment; the regiment was sent on the frontier to fight the Indians, and Col. Pollock participated in several severe conflicts with the savages; Col. Wilson having resigned his commission, Lieut. Col. Pollock was appointed Colonel of the regiment and continued in command until 1865, when the regiment was mustered out of the service. After the close of the was, Col. Pollock returned to Dubuque and again resumed the practice of his profession, taking into partnership James H. Shields, and the firm of Pollock & Shields have built up a large and lucrative law business; they continued together until 1879, when they dissolved. In 1872, Col. Pollock was united in marriage to Miss Hughlet, of Galena, Ill.; they have two children.

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HORACE POOLE, of the firm of Poole, Gilliam & Co., jobbers and wholesale dealers in fancy groceries, teas, syrups, canned goods, fruits, tobaccos and cigars, 272 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Danvers, Essex Co., Mass.; he grew up to manhood there, and came West to Iowa in 1859, and located in Dubuque. Upon the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted in the 1st I.V.I.; in 1862, he enlisted in the 21st I.V.I., and was commissioned Adjutant; in February, 1863, he was commissioned Adjutant General, and held that position until the close of the war in July, 1865. He returned to Dubuque and in 1870, the firm of Poole, Gilliam & Co., was organized, and they have continued in business since them and have built up a large trade. Mr. Poole was united in marriage, Sept. 27, 1863, to Miss Frances Langworthy, a native of Dubuque, and a daughter of Solon Langworthy, one of the early settlers and an honored citizen of Dubuque; they have two sons - Clark L., and Horace S.

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B. W. POOR, attorney at law and Register in Bankruptcy; is a native of Berlin, Washington Co., Vt. and was born Jan. 15, 1818; he grew up to manhood and received his education there; he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1844; after being admitted, he went to Lowell, Mass, and engaged in the practice of law in the same office with Gen. Butler; he remained there seven years, and came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque in June 1852; in December, he engaged in the practice of law; for six years he was one of the well-known law firm of Smith, McKindley & Poor. He was appointed Judge of Circuit Court, to fill vacancy caused by the resignation of Judge D. S. Wilson; in February 1869, ha was appointed Register in Bankruptcy, and is commissioner of the United States Circuit Court. In 1845, he was united in marriage to Miss Johanna P. Walker, a native of Fairfax, Franklin Co., Vt.; they have four children.

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DR. A. B. POORE, physician and surgeon, Dyersville; he was born in 1850 in Vermont; when a child, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; he attended the Hamilton College at Clinton, N. Y., for a term of four years, and graduated with honors, taking the first prize in chemistry; he then returned to Dubuque and taught school two years; then commenced studying medicine with Dr. C. G. Pomeroy, graduated in 1879 from the university at the city of New York, first degree M. D.; he then came to Dyersville, and at once commenced the practice of his profession.

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C. L. PRITCHARD, of the firm of C. L. Pritchard & Co., manufacturers and wholesale dealers in patent vehicle tops, corner Fourth and White streets, Dubuque; is a native of Connecticut; he grew up to manhood and received his education in Connecticut and New York State; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1869, and in 1877, established the business of C. L. Pritchard & Co.; they began making a cheap sun top for wagon-seats for summer use; they then made a more substantial top, similar to the buggy top; the demand increased, and they patented their present popular and substantial vehicle top; from the small beginning that they first made, they now employ forty men during the busy season, and have five men on the road soliciting orders; they ship their good to every State in the Union and to Canada, and their business is constantly increasing.

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B. B. PROVOOST, No. 1067 Clay Street, Dubuque; is a native of the city of New York, and was born Feb. 15, 1813; his parents were descendants of the Huguenots, and were one of the oldest families of New York City; his grandfather was the first Episcopal Bishop of New York State after the Revolutionary war. Mr. Provoost grew up and attended schools in New York City until 16 years of age, then went of the Morris Canal under Co. R. B. Mason of Chicago. Mr. Provoost ran the first level to get the height of Bergen Ridge on the survey of the road from Jersey City to Newark. In 1851, when Col. Mason was appointed Chief Engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad. Mr. Provoost came West with him, and was appointed Division Engineer, and had charge of the survey and building of the division of the road from Rock River to Dunleith. In 1854, he came to Dubuque, being appointed Chief Engineer of the Dubuque & Pacific Railroad; he located the road to Sioux City, and had charge of building the road as far west as Manchester; he afterward located and helped build the Western Union Railroad from Freeport to Lanark; has had a large experience in engineering and contracting on railroad work. He has been one of the Directors of the Second National Bank fro a long time. He was united in marriage, in November, 1847, to Miss Grace Ann Merwin, a native of Connecticut; they have four children - Mary, now Mrs. Albee, of this city, Sarah, Nellie and George.

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W. W. PYNE, fruit-raising and mining, Wilde Street, Dubuque; is a native of Berkshire Co., Mass., and was born Aug. 23, 1840; he was raised mostly in Casenovia, New York State; he came West to Dubuque in 1858; in March 1859 opened the Key City House, and kept that hotel nine years; he engaged in fruit raising, and has ten acres of land in the city limits well improved, with over three thousand grape vines and also cherries and small fruits; in March, 1878, he opened the Tremont House, and kept that until September, 1879, when he engaged in mining. When the war broke out, he enlisted in the 18th Wis. V.I., Co. G; during the first year, he was in every battle of the regiment; was wounded twice the same day at the battle of Corinth; he served four years. In 1866, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Eleanor Clinton, from Grand Rapids, Wis.; they had on son - Jesse -who is not living.

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CHARLES QUADE, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Ballyclough; born in Hanover, Germany, Jan. 20, 1820; at the age of 26, he emigrated to America, landing in New York on the 8th of August; a month later, he went to Providence, R. I., where he remained until March, 1861, when he removed to Dubuque Co., Iowa; up to the time of coming here, he pursued his occupation of cabinet-maker; since coming West, he has been engaged in farming, his farm comprising eighty acres. He has held township offices; his political preferences are with the Democratic party, but voting for the "the best men" is his political method. He was married in 1846, to Miss Theresa Rodermith, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they have nine children - Frank, Augustus, Louisa (now Mrs. Bennett ), Caroline (now Mrs. Baehler ), William, Theresa (now Mrs. Charles Winders ), Charles, George and Henry.

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ERNEST QUADE, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Ballyclough; born in Germany Sept. 10, 1853; emigrated to America in 1848; for three years, he made his home in St. Louis, attending school and clerking in a store while there; came to Dubuque Co. in 1851, and has since been engaged in farming; has a farm of 200 acres. He was married in 1861 to Miss Alvina Mehrdor - a finely educated lady, and a native of Germany; they have five children - Augustus, Ernest, Alvina, Bertha and Bruno.

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JOHN QUAIL, engaged in stone-quarrying, West Locust Street, Dubuque; was born in County Down, Ireland, November 12, 1827; he emigrated to America in the year 1854, and came to Dubuque in the spring of 1855; he has lived here for twenty-five years; he rents Blake's quarries, and has been engaged in quarrying for the past five years, and he gets out an excellent quality of heavy stone. In 1850, he married Susan Wilie, a native of Ireland; she died in 1863, leaving three children - Ellen, John and Robert. In 1867, he married Mary Leahy, a native of Ireland.

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SAAC QUIGLEY, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Farley; born in County Derry, Ireland Feb. 17, 1813; came to America in 1832; settled in Pennsylvania; lived five years in Westmoreland Co., and nineteen years in Philadelphia; kept a dairy on Mr. Gratz's farm, quarter of a mile form Girard College; removed to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in 1856; has lived on his present farm of eighty acres, well adapted to his joint business of farming and stock raising, as a fine stream of water runs all the way through his farm. Religion, Catholic politics, Democrat. He was married, in 1840, to Mary McGlonan, a native of Ireland; two of their children have died - Mary Ann and Thomas; four are living - Ellen, Catharine, now Mrs. Winters, of Dubuque; John, married, and living in Dubuque; Margaret, now Mrs. Haley.

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DR. JOHN P. QUIGLEY, City Recorder; is a native of the city of St. Louis, Mo., and was born June 29, 1825; his father, Patrick Quigley, was born in Londonderry, Ireland, in 1799, and his mother, whose maiden name was Catherine Rooney, was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1798; they were married in St. Louis in 1824; they came to Galena early in the year 1833; they came to Dubuque and located in August 1833, and were among the earliest white settlers that came on this side of the river; Patrick Quigley was a man of great intellect, unswerving honesty and integrity, and noted for his determined opposition to all forms of dishonesty is public as well as private life; he died Aug. 10, 1865, and his wife died Aug. 8, 1878. Dr. John P. Quigley grew up and received his education here; studied medicine in Galena for two years, then pursued his medical studies here and in Cleveland, Ohio; in 1850, he went overland, with the great tide of emigration, to California, and remained there five years and returned in 1855. During the same year, in St. Louis, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret A. Sullivan, from this city. Dr. Quigley has held the office of City Treasurer, and held the office of City Alderman fro seven years, and has served as a member of the Board of Education; he was elected City Recorder in 1878. Dr. and Mrs. Quigley have four sons - J. P. Quigley, Desmond C., Joseph H. and Charles A., all holding good positions in this city.

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P. J. QUIGLEY, Clerk of the Courts of Dubuque Co.; is a native of Susquehanna Co., Penn., and was born June 1, 1837; his parents came to Iowa when he was 10 years of age, arriving in Dubuque in June 1847; he grew up and received his education here, and since then has resided in this county. He held the office of Justice of the Peace four years; in 1870, he was elected Clerk of the Courts, and has been re-elected to the same office every two years since then, and, is now serving his ninth year. He married Mary L. Van Every, a native of Canada; they have one son - Joseph C.

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WILLIAM QUIGLEY, farmer and dairy, Sec. 3; P. O. Dubuque; born Sept. 21, 1839, in Susquehanna Co., Penn.; in 1845, he came, with his parents, to Illinois; in 1847 they removed to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he and his sister live on and own their old homestead, consisting of over five hundred acres of land.

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JOSEPH RADFORD, Sec. 2; P. O. Rockdale; born in England April 5, 1839; came to Dubuque Co., Iowa with his parents in 1843; His father, James Radford, died March 3, 1878; his mother, Martha Radford, died in April, 1852; Mr. R., for most of his business life, has been engaged in smelting, handling ore, etc. During the civil war, he was, for the entire term of service, a member of Co. C, 21st I.V.I., participating in all the numerous battles in which that gallant regiment was engaged, among which may be mentioned Hartsville (Mo.), Spanish Fort, Champion Hill, Mobile, Port Gibson, siege of Vicksburg, etc., being honorably discharged with his command at the close of the was. In politics, he is a Republican, oftentimes voting for "the best men, " irrespective of party. He was married, in 1866, to Miss Elizabeth Coates, a native of England; they have two children - Mary Jane and John Thomas.

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LEONARD RADFORD, engaged in teaming, Grand View Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of England and was born Sept. 2, 1836; he came to America in 1843, and came to Dubuque in 1844; he grew up to manhood here, and since then has lived here. He married Miss Alice Chalber, from Platteville, Wis., in 1859; they have three children - Martha, Ellen and Robert H.

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ANDREW RAHE, farmer, Sec.6; P. O.; New Vienna; born May 24, 1824, in Prussia; in 1845, he came to Cincinnati, Ohio; in 1847, he came to Dubuque Co., he owns 500 acres of land, one third interest in the Dyersville Grist Mills, also 140 acres land in Delaware Co. Married Catherine Hellman in 1848; she was born in Germany; they have four children - Clements, Henry, Anna Mary and Franz. Mrs. Rahe has two children by a former marriage - Mary and Bernard Weikman. Catholic.

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L. D. RANDALL, of the firm of L. D. Randall & Co., wholesale dealers in leather and saddlery hardware; is the oldest merchant now in business in Dubuque, and is the oldest dealer in leather and saddlery hardware west of the Mississippi River; Mr. Randall is a native of Washington Co., N. Y. and was born Sept. 25, 1818; he grew up to manhood in that State, and came West to Illinois, in 1836, with his parents, and located on Fox River, at St. Charles; he remained there until April 1846 when he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque, which was then in its infancy; he began harness-making on Main Street, where the store of John Bell & Co. now stands, the firm being L.D. Randall & co.; he continued the business until 1861, when Mr. John Thompson became associated with him, and since then they have carried on the business under the same firm name and have established a large and leading trade through the Northwest. Mr. Randall has no taste for office, though he was elected and served as City Alderman, and has been actively identified with the interests of the city. In 1849, Mr. Randall was married to Miss Fannie Simplot, a native of New York; she died in 1855; they had two children, who died the same year. In 1859, Mr. Randall was united in marriage to Miss Maria E. Crandal l, a native of New York; they have two children - Fannie M. and Juliette.

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J. S. RANDALL, manufacturer of lumber and dealer in all kinds of lumber, lath and shingles-saw mill and lumber-yard on Southern Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Washington Co., N. Y., and was born in 1816; he grew up to manhood in that State, in 1836, he came with his parents to St. Charles, Kane Co., Ill., where he lived until coming to Dubuque in 1861; he associated with Mr. Pelan, the firm being Pelan & Randall; they bought the present mill, which was built by Gibbs Brothers in 1857; it is the oldest saw-mill in Dubuque, and one of the oldest on the river; it has a capacity of cutting 3,000,000 feet of lumber annually, giving employment to forty hands. Mr. Randall was elected Sheriff of Kane Co. while living in Illinois. He was united in marriage to Miss Emerette Foster, a native of Ohio; they have three children - Frank L., Emerette, now Mrs. Kingman, and Maud.

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AUGUST RASMUSSEN, sign and decorative painting; is a native of Denmark, and was born in 1848; he grew up and served an apprenticeship in art and decorative painting; he came to the United States in 1869, and came to Dubuque the same year and engaged in working at his trade; in 1877, he engaged in business for himself, and is building up a nice trade; Mr. Rasmussen gives special attention to art and decorative painting, and has few equals in this branch of work; he has testimonials from many of the leading citizens of Dubuque who testify to his ability.

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CHRISTIAN RATH, farmer and gardener, Wilde Street, Dubuque; was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, May 1, 1811; he emigrated to America in 1851, and came to Dubuque the same year and engaged infarming and gardening; he has lived here twenty-nine years, and has a nice place well improved. In 1841, he married Maria Volff, a native of Neihaus, Germany; they have six children - Johanna, William, Henry, Eliza, Mary, Otto.

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GEORGE RATH, of the firm of George Rath & Son, pork packers and provision merchant, corner Twelfth and Clay Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Wittemburg, Germany, and was born Dec. 21, 1821; he emigrated to America in 1847, and came to Dubuque in the fall of the same year; he worked for R. Nolte and C. Rose; after a few years, he engaged in business with J. H. Strobel, and the firm of Strobel & Rath carried on business about sixteen years, since then, he has given his son an interest in his business, and they have a good trade. When Mr. Rath began, he had nothing, and his success is owing to his own efforts. He married Miss Elizabeth Steiner, a native of Switzerland, June 28, 1848; she came here in 1846; they have six children - George C., Annie, Augusta, Minnie, Eddie and Emma.

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E. RATCLIFF, capitalist; residence, 365 Julien Avenue; is a native of England, and was born Nov. 12, 1828; his parents came to Canada in 1836, and afterward came to New York State; he came West to Chicago in 1840, when that city was not as large as Dubuque; he was in the employ of the great stage line of Frink & Walker, and was with that company five years, and afterward kept hotel at Twelve Mile Grove, and also at Rockford. He came to Dubuque in 1855; engaged in omnibus business, transferring passengers and baggage between here and Dunleith, and afterward engaged in the livery business. When he began life, he had nothing; when he left Watertown, N.Y. he had only 15 cents. Mr. Ratcliff married Miss Mary L. Paul, from Montpelier, Vt.; she died in August, 1877, leaving one daughter, now Mrs. Frank Parker, of this city.

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GEORGE RAW, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Farley; born in Yorkshire, England, Sept. 27, 1834; came to America in 1855, and, after stopping a year at Shellsburg, Wis., to Dubuque Co. in 1856; his first seven years in the county were employed in mining, which occupation he had previously pursued in Wisconsin and in England; the last seventeen years he has been a farmer, and has every reason to feel gratified at his success, the result of his own efforts, as he came to the county a poor man; he has 180 acres of fine land, with good improvements, and all that is requisite to make what he evidently enjoys - a happy home.Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican. Mr. R. was married in 1860 to Miss Margaret R. Simpson, of Dubuque; they have four children living - Isabella, George T., Bertha Hope, Myra Myrtle; five have died - Mary A., Ellen, John R., Martha C. and Elsie M.

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WILLIAM REBMAN, builder and contractor; residence, Bluff and Sixteenth Streets; is a native of Lancaster Co. Penn., and was born Oct. 20, 1821; when very young, his parents removed to Ohio; he came to Dubuque on the steamboat Palmyra, and arrived here May 3, 1837; he found employment at McKnight's furnace; after a few years, he learned the trade of blacksmith, and worked at that and engaged in building; in 1850, he engaged in the real-estate business, and since then, he has been extensively engaged in real-estate, contracting and building; he has erected more buildings than any
contractor in Dubuque; he built Rebman Block, now known as Sanford's Block, the first business block built north of Eighth Street; the work was begun in February, when the frost was two and a half feet deep in the ground, and the stores were rented and occupied in May. Mr. Rebman has been actively identified with the interests of the city, and had done more for the excellent street improvements of the city than any other one man; he was instrumental in securing the grading and beautifying of Washington Park; he was twice chosen Health Officer, and built the hospital and quarantined the city. In February, 1847, Mr. Rebman was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ann Kephart, a native of Pennsylvania; they have had nine children, only five of whom survive - Willam H., Charles A., Frank, Minnie B., and Gertie. Mr. Rebman is a member of the Second Presbyterian Church, and has been more actively identified with Sabbath-school interests than almost any man in the State; he
has been Superintendent of two Sabbath-schools for thirty-two years, without a vote ever being cast against him, and defraying the expenses himself; he has traveled twenty-two miles and held five meetings in one Sunday, and it is said that, in twenty years, he has not missed being present as many Sabbaths. Mr. Rebman was chosen President of the Sunday School Convention of the Third Congressional District, and was also President of the Dubuque County Sunday School Convention four different terms, and now holds that position; his election as presiding officer of this conventions was entirely unsolicited by him, but was made because of his peculiar fitness for the position; he was instrumental in organizing the Young Men's Christian Association of this city, and was elected President of it, and has served as Director and Chairman of the Finance and Mission Committee, and for a long term was one of its principal supporters.

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WILLIAM RECHE, gardening and fruit-raising, Delhi Road, Dubuque; is a native of Germany and was born Oct. 28, 1823; he grew up and learned his business there; he came to the United States in 1849 and lived in Schenectady, N. Y.; he came to Dubuque in 1856 and engaged in gardening; he established the first market for vegetables in Dubuque, and used to supply the boats; he is the oldest gardener in Dubuque; has been in the business twenty-four years; he is a member of the Order of I.O.O.F. In 1850, he married Miss Louise Casper, from Prussia, Germany; they have four children- Ida, Eliza, (now Mrs. Dr. Hall, of East Dubuque), Isabella, Henry; they have lost one daughter, Theresa.

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JOHN REDDIN, merchant, Cascade; is a native of Ohio; his parents are Michael Reddin and Mary Joice, who now live in Butler Township, Jackson Co., Iowa, where they located on their removal from Ohio when the subject of this sketch was a small child; he remained home on the farm till 31 years of age, when he started a drygoods, grocery and general merchandise store in Cascade, and is now counted one of the the leading merchants of that city; he does not sell liquor. He was married on the 21st of November, 1877, to Miss Mary Healy, formerly of Dubuque; she was a successful and popular teacher of music in this vicinity. Himself and wife are members of St. Martin's Catholic Church. They have a son named Anthony Morris, born July 27, 1878. He is a reliable Democrat, but does not give time to local politics, neither does he accept office, preferring to devote his entire energies to conducting his own business. He owns the block wherein is his store and dwelling; he is pecuniarily interested in the success of the new railroad to Cascade; he is an unassuming, law-abiding citizen, and quietly looks after his own business, which is in a thriving condition.

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HENRY REED, lumber dealer, corner White and Seventh Street, Dubuque; is a native of Hallowell, Me., and was born in 1816; he grew up to manhood there and engaged in lumbering and ship building in 1838, and continued in that business many years; he came West to Iowa in 1856 and located in Dubuque, and since then has been engaged in the lumber business here and is one of the oldest dealers in the trade. In 1839, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy W. Freeman, from Hallowell, Me., they have three children - two daughters, Ella F. and Lizzie M., and one son, Arthur H., engaged in lumber business in Wisconsin.

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C. A. REED, of the firm of Stahlman & Reed, dealers in groceries and provisions, 640 Main Street, Dubuque, is a native of Platteville, Grant Co., Wis., and was born Jan 19, 1841; his parents came over to Dubuque in 1843; he grew up to manhood and received his education mostly in this State, completing his literary course at Cornell College; he afterward entered the State University of Michigan, and graduated from the medical department. When the war broke out he enlisted and went out with the Governors Greys, which was afterward Co. I, 1st I.V.I.; he was afterward appointed First Assistant Surgeon of the 9th I.V.I. and served until the close of the was; after the war closed, he was Secretary and Surgeon of the Peace Commission to make treaties with the Indians on the Missouri River, and since then has been engaged in business here. In 1867, Dr. Reed was united in marriage to Miss Augusta E. Woodworth, daughter of W. W. Woodworth; they have three children - Georgiana, Julian and Hortense

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JOSEPH REINFRIED, dealer in groceries and provisions, 1796 Clay Street; is a native of the city of Dubuque, and was born Oct. 11, 1848; his parents were early settlers; he grew up and attended school here; he engaged in his present business in April 1878, and is building up a good trade. He married Miss Louise Hilsob, from Fountain City, Wis., Dec. 18, 1872; they have two children - Charles and Lulu. Mr Reinfried belongs to the German Benevolent Society.

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LOUIS REINECKE, dealer in fresh and salted meats, corner of Julien Avenue and Bluff Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Saxony, Germay, and was born in 1845; he grew up to manhood there, and came to the United States in 1866, and came to Dubuque the same year, and since then has been connected with the meat trade; in 1874, he engaged in business for himself in his present location; has built up a good trade. He is a member of the Masonic Order and also belongs to the I.O.O.F., and the United Workmen. In 1867, he was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Sippel, a native of Germay; they have five children - Charlie, Emma, Agnes, Alvina, Eddie; they have lost one son - Louie.

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DR. E. REITZ, physician and surgeon; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born May 22, 1842, in Prussia; in 1861, he came to Calumet Co., Wis. In 1862, he enlisted in Co. E, 26th Wis. V.I.; served to the end of the war; he then returned to Prussia, and there commenced the study of medicine, and graduated from the Jena Medical College in 1868; he then came to Platteville, Wis., and commenced the practice of his profession; he afterward removed to Columbus, Wis., thence to Appleton, Wisc.; during the winter of 1872-73, he attended the Rush Medical College, Chicago; in 1878, he came to his present locality. Married Fredrica Brodbeck in 1868; she was born in Germany; they have three children - Robert, Emily and b.

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GEORGE REYNOLDSON, dealer in leather, shoe-fingings and whips, No. 808 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of England, and was born in 1822; he grew up to manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1845, and came to Iowa in 1846, and located in Dubuque Co, at Center Grove, and engaged in mining, and continued for fifteen years; then engaged in tanning for several years, and afterward engaged in the leather and shoe-feinding business, and has established a good trade; he had nothing when he began life, and owes his success to his own efforts. Mr. Reynoldson has been married three times; his present wife was Anna Curry, a native of England; he has six children - Mary Ann, Margaret, Joseph, John, Fanny, George. Mr. Reynoldson attends the Methodist Church.

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HENRY T. REYNOLDS, yardmaster Illinois Central R. R., Dubuque; is a native of Illinois, and was born in Springfield, Sangamon Co., Sept. 20, 1839; he grew up to manhood and when 19 years of age, entered the employ of the Illinois Central R. R.; he came to Dubuque in 1856; he has held the postion of the yardmaster in Illinois and Iowa for sixteen years; he has been connected with the Illinois Central R. R. for twenty-one years, except while in the army, and, what is very unusual among railroad men, during all that time he has never smoked a cigar, used tobacco or drank a glass of beer or liquor of any kind. In 1861, he enlisted in Co. E, 13th I.V.I.; he also served in the 45th I.V.I., Co. F. He was united in marriage to Miss Margaret C. Girton, from Buchanan Co., Iowa, April 26, 1863; they have two children - Harry J. and Willie G.

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L. A. RHOMBERG, of the firm of Jaeger & Rhomberg, wholesale dealers in wines and liquors, 521 Main Street, is a native of Austria, and was born June 15, 1843; he came Dubuque Feb. 28, 1860; after reaching manhood, he engaged in business in 1864, the firm being L.A. Rhomberg & Bro., and, afterward, was a member of the firm of Paul Trant & Co., who were succeeded by the present firm of Jaeger & Rhomberg. Mr. Rhomberg was united in marriage July 23, 1866, to Miss Margaret Jaeger, a native of the city of Dubuque; they have three children - Louise L., Alphonse and Augusta. Mr. Rhomberg belongs to the German Benevolent Society, shooting societies and others.

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JOSEPH RHOMBERG, residence 17 Prospect Street, is a native of Tyrol, Austria, and was born in 1833; he came to the United States in 1852, and, the following year migrated to Iowa and settled in Dubuque; when arriving here, he had only 25 cents; in 1863, he built a large distillery, and engaged extensively in distilling; afterward, in 1873, the building was changed into a flouring mill; Mr. Rhomberg was prominently identified with warious railroad enterprises; when the Chicago, Clinton & Dubuque Railroad was built, he was the first Vice President and Superintendent, and was also President of the Construction Company; he was the last President of the road before it changed hands; he is President of the Dubuque Street Railroad Company, and has been actively identified with the interests of Dubuque. In 1857, he married Miss Catharine Breall, a native of Tyrol, Austria; they have four children - A. L. Rhomberg, Joseph, Edward and Ludmillo.

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C. J. RICHARDS, fruit grower, Seminary Street, Dubuque, is a native of Otsego Co., N. Y., and was born June 27, 1812; he came West to Illinois in 1834; at which time Chicago contained only 1, 800 people; in 1836, he came to Milwaukee when there was less than 1, 000 people there; he lived there eighteen years, and came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in 1853; engaged in mercantile business; he afterward moved to his present location and engaged in fruit growing; he owns ten acres of land finely located on Seminary Avenue, well stocked with small fruits; he held the office of Acting Sheriff of Milwaukee three years, and has servied as street Commissioner of Dubuque three years. In July, 1841, while living in Milwaukee, Mr. Richards was united in marriage to Miss Mira Blanchard, a native of Massachusetts; they have four children - George L (cashier of the Union National Bank, of Streator, Ill.), Levancia (now Mrs. E. E. Bale, of Streator, Ill), Ella B. (engaged in teaching in the Fifth Ward School, this city), and Edward A. (engaged in banking business at Nanson, Iowa), George L. enlisted and served in Co. E, 89th Ill. V.I.; he was severely wounded in the battle of Stone River.

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JACOB RICH, former editor of the Dubuque Times; is a native of New York City, and was born Dec. 18, 1832; he grew up to manhood and received his education in Philadelphia; he came West in 1856, spent some months in Dubuque, and then removed to Buchanan Co., where in the fall of the same year, he commenced the publication of the Quasqueton Guardian; in 1853 he removed the paper to Independence, in the same county, where he continued its publication until 1865; in 1861, he was appointed by President Lincoln Postmaster of Independence, and in 1864, was unanimously nominated by the Republicans of the General Assembly Chief Clerk of the House, and elected, serving through the session, in 1865, he wrote to Washington as Clerk of the Naval Committee of the U.S. Senate, holding that position until 1869; in the summer of that year, he started on a tour through Europe, and extended it to South America, returning in August of the following year; in October, 1870, he bought a half-interest in the Dubuque Daily Times establishment, and assumed editorial control of the paper; the next year the paper was greatly enlarged and improved, provided with steam machinery and a new dress, and removed to a fine, new building, erected specially for its occupancy. In the Presidential campaign of 1872, Mr. Rich was Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee of Iowa, and again in 1877; in 1874, he was appointed Pension Agent at Dubuque, continuing to hold the office until the consolidation of pension districts in 1876, and the removal of the office to Des Moines; in 1875, he disposed of his interest in the Dubuque Times, and retired from its editorial management. In 1877, he was united in marriage to Annie K. Smith, daughter of Sabin Smith, Esq., of Chicago.

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HENRY RICHTER, of the firm of Richter & Newman, carriage and wagon manufacturers, Third and Locust Streets; was born in Prussia, Germany, Nov. 24, 1844; at the age of 13, he began learning his trade; when 17 1/2 years old, he left home and worked at his trade in Russia, Hamburg, Berlin and Leipzig, and elsewhere; he came to the United States in 1869; worked in the large carriage factory of Coan & Ten Broecke, Chicago; afterward joined the colony and went to Colfax, Colo., where he lost all he had; returned to Chicago, and, after the great fire in 1871, he came to Dubuque and entered the employ of Tom Connolly, and for seven years he held the position of foreman of the wood-working department of his extensive factory; he has recently associated with Mr. Newman, and engaged in business for himself; Mr. Richter is one of the best-skilled and finest workman in the city. In October, 1872, he married Miss Emma Shenker, a native of the city of Dubuque; they have two children - Matilda and Emma.

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JONATHAN RICKARD, of the firm of Farley, Loetscher & Co., proprietors of the Key City Planing-Mill; is a native of Massachusetts, and was born in Plymouth Co., May 25, 1829; he grew up to manhood and lived in that State until he came West to Iowa in 1856, and settled in Dubuque April 11. Mr. Rickard has been connected with the manufacturing of sash, doors and blinds for twenty-five years, and is the oldest in this business in Dubuque; he has been a member of the present firm since 1876. Mr. Rickard was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Bland, a native of New York, January, 1866; they have three children - Fred, Alvin, Lyman.

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MICHAEL RIDER, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Dubuque; born in Germany July 22, 1843; came to Dubuque with his parents in 1846, and has resided here since, except during an absence of two summers; his father, Hubert Rider, died in 1852; his mother, Anna C. (now Mrs. Hilkin ), lives in the city of Dubuque; Mr. R. was for some years engaged in mining, but the greater part of his time has been employed in farming and stock-raising, In politics, he is a Republican. He was married in 1879 to Mrs. Mary Rider (maiden name, Mary Authier ), who came to Dubuque Co. with her parents - Renne and Mary E. Authier, in 1870; her parents live in Dakota; they have on child - Malinda Rider.

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GEORGE RIDLER, Sec. 30; P. O. Rickardsville; born Nov. 16, 1809, in Gloucestershire, England; when a boy, he came to New York City, and was apprenticed to the carpenter trade; in 1832, he came to Ohio; in 1835, he returned to New York, always following the carpenter trade; in 1837, he came to Illinois; in 1844, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns 240 acres of land and moved to this farm with two yoke of oxen; he camped out until he could build a cabin, which occupied about three months; his house now is of stone, and on e of the best in this county. Married Elizabeth Baker in 1838; she was born in Illinois in 1813, and died in 1858; have five children - Martha Ann, John W., Eliza, Mary and Sarah; John W. enlisted in 1862 in Co. C, 21st I.V.I.; served to the end of the was; was at the battle of Vicksburg, and others; his second marriage, to Eliza Lundbeck in 1860; she was born in Indiana; have two children - Emma and Esther.

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HENRY RIKER, of the firm of Fischer, Wheeler & Co., wholesale and retail dealer in ice, corner Third and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Canada, and was born in 1844; his parents came to Iowa in 1848, and located in Dubuque; he grew up to manhood here; he entered the employ of Cushing, Fischer & Co. in 1858, and has been with the firm twenty-two years; since 1872 he has had an interest in the business. He enlisted in the army during the war, but was under age and not accepted. He belongs to the I.O.O.F., the United Workmen and the Legion of Honor. In December, 1865, he married Miss Annie Moore, from Stevens Point, Wis.; they have five children - Harvey, Fannie, Harry, Carrie and Mamie.

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DR. H. J. RISCHATSCH, physician, corner of White and Tenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland, and was born March 19, 1811; he grew up and was educated in Switzerland and Germany; he studied medicine and graduated, taking his diploma, which bears date March 6, 1839; he emigrated to America in 1849, and came to Wisconsin and practiced medicine in Milwaukee; he came to Iowa and settled in Dubuque in 1856, and since then has practiced his profession here over twenty-three years. He married Laura Lefever, a native of France, Jan. 13, 1851; she died in 1861, leaving two children; in 1863, he married Mary Ann Dansch, from Pennsylvania; they have four children - Herman, Laura, Mary, Bernard.

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RUFUS RITTENHOUSE, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Dubuque; born May 16, 1825, in Hunterdon Co., N. J.; in 1834, he came to Philadelphia with his parents; in 1836, he came to Dubuque Co.; he has followed the business of bricklaying more or less since 1843; he owns forty acres of land, which is used in farming and reissuing fruit; he has an orchard of about six acres. Married Ann McAvoy in 1851; she was born in Ireland; they have two children - William and Mary, now Mrs. Thorp; lost Eliza in 1878, aged 18 years; they also lost three children in infancy. Republican.

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J. H. ROACH, proprietor of the Key City Candy Factory, 182 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Champaign Co., Ohio; he came to Iowa in 1855, and came to Dubuque and located permanently in 1860; he established business in 1864; he has built up a large wholesale trade; he manufactures largely for the jobbing trade in this city. Mr. Roach married Miss Mary Dunnen, from this city, in 1861; they have five children.

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ASA ROBERTS, carriage blacksmith, corner of Fifth and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; was born in Montreal, Canada, Nov. 11, 1827; he grew up and learned his trade in Montreal; he came to Dubuque in 1857 and began working at his trade; he was in partnership with T. Connolly for three years; he has been engaged in business here over twenty years. In 1852, he married Margaret Perkins, from Kentucky; they have three children - Mattie, now Mrs.Morgan; Minnie, now Mrs. Coffee; Fanny, now Mrs. Richards, all living in this city, Mrs. Roberts has two daughters, Mrs. Agnes Jones, living in New York, and Mrs. Maria Straight, living in Eau Claire, Wis.

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FRANK M. ROBINSON, attorney at law, corner Main and Sixth Streets; is a native of South Reading, Windsor Co., Vt.; he grew up and attended school there, and entered Dartmouth College, where he completed his education, and began reading law; he came to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque Feb. 16, 1856; he completed his law studies and was admitted to the bar in 1857 and engaged in the practice of his profession; in January, 1862, he formed a copartnership with Hon. Austin Adams, now Judge of the Supreme Court, and they remained together fourteen years; he was also associated with Judge Lacy, both of whom are on the bench. He was united in marriage to Miss Laura G. Spaulding, a native of Vermont; they have three children.

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W. H. ROBISON, wholesale and retailer in boots and shoes, 544 Main Street; is a native of Wooster, Ohio; he grew up to manhood there, and in, 1840, engaged in the boot and shoe trade; he carried on the business for fifteen years, and, in 1855, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in the wholesale grocery business, and continued for several years, and, in 1860, he engaged in his present business; he does both a wholesale and retail business, and has built up a large and leading trade; he also has a branch store in Clinton, which is managed by his son. In 1852, Mr. Robison was united in marriage to Miss Mary J. Marshall in Cincinnati, Ohio; they have three children - Edgar M., Charles S., Alice Maud.

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J. M. ROBISON, deceased; was a native of Wooster, Wayne Co., Ohio; he grew up and attended school there, and entered Western Reserve College, and completed his education at that institution; afterward, he engaged in business. In 1850, he was united in marriage to Miss Juliet Bostwick, daughter of Judge Bostwick, of Cadiz, Harrison Co., Ohio, who was one of the early settlers of that country; he was elected Judge of the courts, and served on the bench over twenty years, and was honored with many offices of trust; he was one of the most prominent men in that section of the State. In 1853, Mr. and Mrs. Robison went to New York City, where he was engaged in business until 1858, when he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in the lumber trade; he built large mills in Wisconsin, and carried on the lumber business until his death, which occurred in July 1876; he left three children, two of whom survive - D. B. Robison, living in Chicago, and Charles W. Robison, engaged in the lumber business in Dubuque, and living with his mother, on Main Street.

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JAMES ROCKWELL, proprietor of the Boston Bakery, 974 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Lewis Co., N. Y., and was born in 1828; he grew up to manhood there; in 1870, he came West to Wisconsin, and, in 1876, he came to Dubuque; he engaged in his present business in 1879; the bakery was established in 1873; he is building up a good business. In 1854, he married Miss Matilda Kidder, a native of Lewis Co., N. Y.

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AUGUST ROEBER, brick manufacturer, North End Lake Street, Eagle Point, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born Jan. 1, 1849; he came to the United States in 1866, and came to Dubuque in 1870, and engaged in making brick, and has carried on the business for the past ten years; he manufactures 1, 000,000 annually; his brick is of a superior quality, and he is building up a large business. In 1870, he married Mrs. Wilhelmina Bechrens, a native of Germany; they have one son - August; Mrs. Roeber has two children - William and Theresa, by her former husband.

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F. ROEHL, dealer in hardware and groceries, corner of Couler Avenue and Nineteenth Street, Dubuque; was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, Oct. 9, 1836; he grew up to manhood there; and came to America in 1862, and came to Dubuque the same year; he entered the store of Junkerman & Haas, and was with the firm ten years, and was with Andrew & Treadway five years - two of the oldest and best firms in the city; in 1879, he engaged in his present business, and is building up a good trade. During the war, he enlisted in the 21st I.V.I., Co. E; after serving a year, was discharged on account of sickness. In 1866, he was married Wilhelmina Grutzmacher, a native of Germany; they have five children - Emma, Frank, Emilie, Fred and Clara.

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HON. THOMAS ROGERS, (deceased), was born at Fort Edward, N. Y., Oct. 14, 1808; he graduated at the Albany Academy, and studied law at Saratoga in the office of his step-father, Judge Esek Cowen, the eminent jurist; his fellow students were Stephen P. Nash and William A. Beach, now prominent lawyers on New York City; his uncle Judge Halsey Rogers, was an active Democratic politician, and Mr. Thomas Rogers became early interested in politics, and won a reputation in Saratoge and vicinity as a public speaker and debater; he was admitted to the bar in 1836; Henry Clay, having heard him speak, advised him to seek a fortune in Iowa; in 1839, Mr. Rogers disposed of his property in New York, and came to Burlington, Iowa, and Hon. Augustus Dodge there gave him a letter to Gen. George W. Jones, of Dubuque; so, in 1839, Mr. Rogers commenced the practice of law in Dubuque, and his life henceforth, for over thirty years, was identified with that of his adopted city. Mr.Rogers formed a partnership with J. V. Berry, and afterward with W. J. Barney; , Mr. Rogers' spontaneous oratory, strict integrity and genial nature, made him at once a popular lawyer and politicain; a year after his arrival in Dubuque, he was elected, in 1840, to the Legislature, and re-elected in 1842; his legislatvie ability and brillant talents made him a leader in that body, and his wit and eloquence became traditions throughtout the Territory; Mr. Rogers was a life-long Democrat, and the Constitution was his idol; his speeches owed their force to his enthusiastic belief in this cause, for both at the bar and on the rostrum, he only advocated what he thought was right; Mr. Rogers was an adept in the appropriate use of words, and in private converstion, as well as public speaking, his English was beautiful; from 1840 to 1850, he frequently contributed to the press of his city - an occupation for which he was peculiarly fitted by his tastes and his judgement; his tact and courtesy were such that his opponents never became enemies; he was the object of warm personal attachment of his friends, and disinterestedly gave his advice and services whenever they were needed; though an ardent partisan for others, he was not ambitious for his own advancement; he refused the Surveyor Generalship of Iowa and Wisconsin, and in 1855, Gen Jones in vain urged him to accept the United States District Judgeship, which was afterward give to Judge Love; he discontinued his law practice, and entered into the flouring-mill business in 1858, with C. H. Booth and N. Nadeau. Mr. Rogers was dark, short of stature, and had classic features; his voice was wonderful for its power and magnetism; during the discouragement which followed the battle of Bull Run, Mr. Rogers made his last public speech, which was a vigorous and effective appeal for enlistments. Mr. Rogers married Anna W. Borton in 1850; they had three children who survive them - May, Alice A., and Tom M.; after a brief illness, Thomas Rogers died Feb. 6, 1874, aged 65 years. The Hon. Thomas Rogers will be remebered as one of the best and kindest of men; simple-hearted as a child, with a man's wisdom, and the noble instincts of a true gentleman.

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S. ROOT, photograph artist, corner of Eighth and Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Ohio, and was born in 1820; he grew up to manhood in Ohio, and studied the profession three years in the city of Philadelphia, then opened a gallery in the city of New York, where he remained until the early part of 1857, when he came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque; he opened a gallery and has practiced his profession here since then; he is the oldest photographer in the State, and one of the oldest in the country now engaged in the business. Mr. Root made the first picture of Jenny Lind ever taken in this country; he has daguerreotypes which he made of Henry Clay, G. W. Curtis, Dr. Albert Barnes, Bayard Taylor, George M. Dallas, Edwin Forrest and others, all taken from twenty-five to thirty years ago; he has been engaged in the business over one-third of a century. In 1856, Mr. Root was united in marriage to Miss Harriet Furman, from Rochester, N.Y., daughter of Rev. Charles Furman; they have no children, but lost one son during the war in the Government's service.

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H. ROUSE, senior member of the firm of Rouse, Dean & Co., proprietors of the Iowa Iron Works; is a native of New York State, and was born in the town of Penfield, Monroe Co., Oct. 15, 1824; he grew up to manhood in that State; came West to Iowa in the spring of 1851, and located in Dubuque and established their present business; he was associated with J. P. Farley in the business from 1851 until 1858. Mr. Rouse has carried on the business since then, a period of twenty-eight years, and is the oldest in the business on the river north of St. Louis; he is well known along the river and through the West, and built up a large trade. Mr. Rouse, after locating in Dubuque, returned East and was united in marriage, Sept. 23, 1851, to Miss Mary L. Dean, of Fulton, Oswego Co., N. Y.; they have four daughters - Jane, Isabel, Martha and Mary. Mr. Rouse has long been a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and has served as one of the Ruling Elders of that body.

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JOHN RUEGAMER, of the firm of Ruegamer & Ade, butchers and dealers in fresh and salted meats, No. 1216 Iowa Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Bavaria Feb. 7, 1830; he grew up to manhood there, and came to America in 1850, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in the fall of 1854; in 1855, he started a meat market, and in the fall of 1856 he and Mr. Ade entered into partnership, and they have successfully carried on the business for twenty-four year, and have built up a large trade; they are one of the oldest firms in the city without change. Mr. Ruegamer has held the office of County Supervisor for eleven years, and has also served as City Alderman four years. He is a member of the German Benevolent Society, and the Pius Society; when he came to this country he only had $10 and owes his success in life to his own industry and good management. In November, 1855, Mr. Ruegamer married Miss Mary B. Coughlin, in Dubuque; they have four children - Peter, Amelia, Katie and Joseph; they have lost one child.

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T. W. RUETE, druggist, 568 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, where he was regularly educated as an apothecary, and, after passing his examination, received his license as a pharmacist in the Prussian Kingdom; in 1861, Mr. Ruete emigrated to the United States, and was soon employed in a drug house in New York City. During the war of the rebellion he served in the medical department of the Army of the Potomac, and participated in almost every battle and engagement of the historic army; having after the close of the war made an extensive European trip, Mr. Ruete was again engaged in the drug business, alternately in New York, Philadelphia, and later in Western New York, until he located in Dubuque in 1873; the famous old stand, the Pioneer Drug Store, well known under its former proprietors, Messrs. Dr. T. Mason and P. C. Samson, as the "Good Samaritan Drug Store", being at that time vacant, Mr. Ruete established himself here, and built up a thriving business, which soon made a removal into more spacious quarters necessary; consequently, in the centennial year, his present commodious store in the Langworthy Block, between Fifth and Sixth Streets, was occupied and fitted up in the most substantial manner; by steady growth, this establishment has become one of the most extensive ones of its kind in Dubuque, comprising everything pertaining to drugs, chemicals, toilet articles, paints, oils, brushes, instruments, bandages, etc., etc.; as Mr. Ruete devotes his entire time to his business, and employs competent and skillful assistants, it is no wonder that his share of public patronage is large and continually increasing.

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WILLIAM RUFF, retired, No. 532 Main Street, Dubuque; was born in Baden, Germany, May 28, 1811; when 10 years old, he went to Lyons, France, where he grew up and learned his trade of cabinet-maker; he lived in Paris ten years, and came to America in 1843, and came to Dubuque in June, 1845 he engaged in the cabinet-making business, on the same lot where he now lives; people laughed at him for locating in the country; he was the first cabinet-maker to engage in the business in Dubuque, and he continued in the trade until a few years ago; he laid the first brick sidewalk in front of is store that was laid on Main Street. In 1844, in New Orleans, he married Miss Katherina Schunk, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they have had ten children, six of whom are living - William A., attorney in Chicago, he was in the army and was Captain of Co. G, 16th I.V.I., served four years, and was wounded at the battle of Shiloh; Herman, auditor, C. C & D. R. R.; Emilie, money-order clerk in the post office; Carrie, now Mrs. C. H. Meyer, Charles H., machinist; Edward F., letter carrier in Dubuque Post Office.

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BENJAMIN RUPERT, Deputy Surveyor of Customs; is a native of the city of Philadelphia, and was born May 1, 1805; he grew up to manhood and lived there until coming to Iowa; he arrived in Dubuque June 5, 1836, and began working at the trade of carpenter and joiner; he continued building until 1852, when he was elected Clerk of the Courts, and held that office until 1859; when the City Court was established he served as clerk for two years. In 1831, he was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Dungan, a native of Philadelphia; they have two children; one son - J. K. Rupert, and one daughter - Frances, now Mrs. A. G. Chapin, living here; they lost one son - William. Mr. Rupert is prominently connected with the fraternity of Odd Fellows, and has been a member of the Order over fifty years; he is a member of Harmony Lodge, No.2, the second lodge formed in the State; in 1867, he was elected Grand Master of the State, and, in 1868, was elected Grand Representative to the Grand Lodge of the United States; in 1869, he went to California and attended the annual session held there; he is quoted as authority on matters pertaining to the Order.

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G. F. RYAN, of the firm of Ryan Bros., dealers in groceries and provisions, Main Street, between First and Second Streets, Dubuque; is a native of the city of Dubuque, born May 9, 1856; grew up and received his education here; after reaching manhood, engaged in the grocery and provision trade in 1879, and is building up a good business.

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REV. ROGER RYAN, Pastor of St. Patrick's Church, corner Fifteenth and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland, and was born in the County Limerick April 6, 1843; he grew up and received his literary education there, and then pursued his theological studies; he came to the United States in 1866; he came to Dubuque and was appointed Pastor of St. Patrick's Church in 1869, and has served acceptably in his present pastorate for eleven years.

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H. L. RYDER, Superintendent of the Diamond Jo Boat Store, Nos. 1 and 2 Levee, Dubuque; is a native of Ohio, and was born in Cincinnati, Jan. 19, 1840; he grew up and was a licensed pilot when only 18 years of age, and was one of youngest pilots on the river. After the war broke out, he enlisted and served in the 1st Wis. Heavy Artillery, and was in several battles. Mr. Ryder has been on the river since 1858, since 1877, he has been Superintendent of the Diamond Jo Boat Store; he holds the office of Alderman of East Dubuque; he has lived there since 1873. He married Miss Sophia Plourde, from Benton, Wis., Sept. 29, 1869; they have two children - Mattie and Gertrude.

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GEORGE SALOT, Deputy Sheriff of Dubuque County, Dubuque; is a native of France and was born March 15, 1837; when 16 years of age, he came to America, and came to Dubuque in 1853, and since then has resided here; he has held the office of City Recorder and Wharfmaster; he was appointed Deputy Sheriff and has held that office since Jan. 1, 1872, and is a courteous and popular officer. He was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Scheibler, of this city, Feb. 2, 1860; they have five children.

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HORATIO W. SANFORD, was born in Sherburne, Chenango Co. N.Y.; at an early age even in boyhood, he migrated to Dubuque; while in his native town, and before the age of 14, he received, at the village school all the education he ever obtained; but his subsequent history proves that he gave himself a business education by practical experience, which is no less creditable to himself than it is a bright example of what American youth may accomplish by imitating his course of industry; temperance, prudence and economy, used in acquiring a fortune and then enjoying it before age dulls
the sense, and in a manner conducive to the best interests of society; he learned something of the mercantile business in a store in his native place; like thousands of other boys and young men in New York and other Eastern States, his thoughts and aspirations were turned to the West, the utmost limit of which was then considered to be the shores of the Mississippi. When he came to Dubuque, a town of only about 500 inhabitants he sought a situation as a merchant's clerk. But there was no vacancy in the few stores which then managed all the commerce of the largest town above of St. Louis; the few business houses were all situated in the vicinity of Main, Locust and Iowa streets, and below Second street; while seeking employment in the only business he considered himself fitted for, he stopped at an Irish boarding-house situated near the present site of A. A. Cooper's wagon manufactory; failing for several weeks to obtain a clerkship, he concluded to go into the country and seek other employment; every kind of business was very dull _ the town was then sickly _ and his prospects seemed gloomy; still
he determined to save his $100 and invest it in some way for profit when an opportunity should offer. He accordingly packed up some of his wearing apparel and started up the Coule (now Couler avenue) on foot to look for work; in a mile he had passed over the prairie which is now the center of population, and of the business of Dubuque, and entered the Coule Valley; he saw some men making hay and offered his work for the mere consideration of board; the haymaker was Jesse Morning, who looked at the slim spare youth before him, and thought there was not sufficient strength in him for work enough to pay for three meals a day, and he declined Mr. Sanford's proposition. He went on northward several miles farther, and at noon reached the site of the subsequent Sageville, five miles distant, where, with one of the early settlers along the Little Maquoketa, he procured dinner, but no chance to work. Learning that there were some settlers still further up the stream, he set out to find them, and reached the last "cabin" in three miles, but no one wanted to furnish board for any "help." Being afraid to try to cross the hills and prairies to any other 'settlements,' in fear of being lost or waylaid by strolling Indians, he resolved upon a retreat, and to apply to every man he met on his way to Dubuque. Toward night, he reached the spot which afterward became the John E. Miller farm, a part of which is now the present fair ground, where, by the side of the road, he accosted two lead miners standing by their rudely constructed cabin. They were two bachelor brothers, of the name of Carson. He told his condition, of wanting clerkship, but was willing to do any kind of work till he could get such a situation. Partly from sympathy, the Carsons told him that he might board with them and do such work as he could till he could get other employment. He adopted a new kind of life at once, and slept on the floor of the log cabin. The next day, he took his trunk to the Carson cabin and assisted the bachelors in making hay, and in other work in providing for the winter. Dubuque, dating from the first permanent settlement, was then but two years old, and everything about it indicated the very first stages of pioneer life. But young Sanford had no congeniality for the much whisky drinking, some gambling and more rowdyism incident to the first settlement of all mining localities. He was not one of the adventurers who sought to make a fortune in a day or a week, and who would be likely to waste it in a month or a year, and hence the moral principles of his youth were not affected by the allurements of the dissipation he saw around him. The better part of the community _ those who, if able, would have built churches and established schools and public libraries _ were not only in the minority, but it required, in that year, all the moral power of the new town to close the stores, shops and liquor saloons (then called 'groceries') on the Sabbath. Mr. Sanford remained with the brothers Carson about two months making hay, harvesting their grain, and in other work, until October. Meantime, he waited to see a chance for a clerkship for any one of the few merchants who then controlled all the commercial affairs of the first place settled in Iowa, and which has since become the metropolis of the State. One evening, one of the Carsons told him that he had engaged a situation for him with Messrs. Sleator & Smoker, dealing in dry goods and groceries, in a small building on the east side of Main street near the site of the present Julien House.He entered upon his clerk duty the next day at a salary of $50 per month and board and remained with his employers about a year, when they closed business. He then entered the service of another merchant, Davis Gillilan, with whom he remained a year at the same salary. Mr. Gillilan having closed his business, Mr. Sanford next became a clerk for F. K. O'Ferrall, then one of the most prosperous of Dubuque merchants. He took nearly the entire charge of Mr. O'Ferrall's business as well as that of O'Ferral & Haberson, smelters, for about five years. While in the service of Mr. Gillilan, Mr. Sanford made his first purchase of real estate, a lot on the west side of Bluff street, above Fifth. Soon afterward while a clerk for Mr. O'Ferral, he began to lend money, at the then usual rate of 25 per cent interest, a rate often exceeded in all the new mining towns. Mr. Sanford has saved his earnings to the amount of $1,500 besides the purchase of a few lots. In 1842 he became a clerk for William Lawther whom he remained in mercantile business for about four years, at a salary of from $600 to $700 a year. In the year 1846, Mr. Sanford thought he could make better use of his time and money by giving his exclusive attention to the loaning of money, to brokerage, to land agency, purchase and sale of city lots, and especially the "entering land on time, " the latter plan being to enter Government land in his own name on the request of parties desiring it, and giving the party a bond expressing an obligation to deed to him the land at the end of a specified time on the payment of the Government price, with a certain high rate of interest added. If the new Iowa farmer was successful, the "promise to pay" was a profitable investment for him, as was the case with a majority of those who obtained, in that way, their first claim to Iowa lands. If, however, the party left the country or did not improve the opportunity he had himself sought, Mr. Sanford retained the title to the land which often doubled in value in a single year by the general growth and prosperity of the country. So profitable was this business, that in four years, or in 1850, he had accumulated about $30,000, but partly from the rise in value of some of his city lots. His land office was first opened in a second-story back room, of the building occupied by the hardware business of J. Christman & Co., on Main, below Fourth street. In a few years he moved his office to the corner of Fourth and Main, then to the center of business and, about 1856, on becoming the owner of the "Sanford Block" he moved his business to commodious rooms in that building. His most extensive purchases of city property were made in 1854-55 at prices which were then considered very high; he did not sell many lots until after 1860, though he commenced the sale of his country lands before that time, and had sold them all by the year 1865; retaining most of his city property, he found it rapidly increasing in value up to 1867; when he concluded that twenty-five years of steady work entitled him to the privilege of some rest and recreation. In 1858, when he had over $100,000, and had securely laid the foundation for his present fortune, he arranged his business for a half-year's absence, and made his first tour to Europe. In 1846, his capital, including the value of his lands and lots, did not reach $10,000; at that time, and for several years after, there were several other parties engaged in competition with him, each with a much larger amount of capital, but none attended so tenaciously to the business, especially in reference to the dealings in public lands; some of them failed about the time Mr. Sanford's success was complete; of his competitors who are living, few, if any, own any property in Dubuque or elsewhere. In the ten years of his hard labor of brain, pen and book-keeping work in the land business, he never had a clerk _ never intrusted any man with his letters, papers plans, or accounts; to this fact may be ascribed to the circumstances that he made no errors involving a loss, and that he could, at any moment, by ready reference, know all the facts of any of his former or pending business transactions; the result has shown that he did more work than the competing land agencies with their several clerks, and did it better; the titles to over a million acres of land have passed through his hands, in Northern Iowa, and no title or paper to which his name has been attached, touching lots or lands, has ever been disputed, and he has never had any lands or lots sold for taxes; he has had but few law-suits, and in all cases has been successful; his word, his business integrity and his moral character are not surpassed by the reputation for like qualities by any man in the State. The success of Mr. Sanford in being the architect of his own fortune is a worthy example for the youth and young men to imitate, not for the mere purpose of making money, but for the higher object of leading a pure life, maintaining a spotless reputation, and, in later years, enjoying the fruits of industry in a conscious prosperity, and in the use of wealth in the most rational manner; he has not only built costly buildings, but he has enabled others to do so; he has never lived in a house of his own, though a hundred families are his tenants. Now, though in good health, he gives little attention to business, having affairs all so well arranged that they can be easily attended to by an agent; hence with no desire to accumulate more, he spends a part of his time in Dubuque, and in visiting each season his birthplace at Sherburne, taking in the Eastern cities and the numerous summer resorts at the sea shore. There is not residing here a better example to the boys and young men of Dubuque of what may be accomplished in one-fourth of an ordinary lifetime that the result shows by the success of Mr. Sanford; with only a limited education, but indomitable perseverance, he worked years at the rate of $600 a year, while now the same labor would command $1,000 to $2,000; he was content with small profits, compared with those made by many others and soon lost; he sought only honest gains that were untainted by fraudulent speculations; he reaped only where he sowed, and was himself the just steward of his own conscience; few men, of active temperament, are so contented with what they have gained as Mr. Sanford; his success is plainly to be attributed to his untiring industry, his abstemious habits, his strict temperance, his rigid economy and his punctual regularity, all tending to his perfect health, clear mind, quick perception and ready action for the dispatch of any business that came before him. Since June, 1858, he has passed over half the time on the Eastern continent; in his first tour, that year, he visited all the principal cities and traversed the most important countries in Europe; he returned happy, and with expanded ideas of the world's progress, and resolved not to pass the rest of his life filling out deeds, receiving and paying out money, or in looking for new investments; the next year he extended his European travels and included a tour of Russia, and in passing through Moscow, he approached Middle Asia, and in half a year added largely to his knowledge of the geography and of the political and civil condition of the Eastern World. In 1862, he made his third tour and visited Palestine and Egypt, passing some months in the ancient land of the Israelites, among the localities known in ancient history as the places of events narrated by the sacred records of the Bible; on this trip he revisited the principal cities he had see before, and a hundred others for the first time, and returned gladly to Dubuque, though not quite satisfied with having seen only a part of the thousand attractions which kept half his thoughts upon the Old World. In 1865, he set out again, without fixing the time for his return. He had learned to make traveling haste more slowly, and stopped longer to learn all about the evidences of the progress by which an Old World city is built in a thousand years, and how, and why great cities of the dead past became ruins thousands of ages ago _ to compare the rapidly progressive America with the slow movements of some of the nations of Europe _ to study the habits of the people of different classes, nations and races and amuse himself with a study of human nature in the phases that mark different degrees of civilization under different forms of Christianity, and the religious policy of Mohammedanism. In the course of his travels, he has become familiar with the land where historic cities stood, where ancient battles were fought for human freedom or political aggrandizement; has followed the roads which ancient and modern armies marched, and drank at the fountains where even the fabled heroes of antiquity were said to have quenched their thirst; he has seen all the best of modern civilization of the Eastern World from Sweden to the Mediterranean, and from the Bay of Biscay to the land of the Tartars; with a mind stored with a knowledge of the present and the past he had food for thought for the rest of his life; even the names of the sites of ancient cities and of the modern cities and towns he has visited beyond the Atlantic, is the hundred thousand miles he has traveled, would more than fill a newspaper column. On his tour abroad of 1865, he was absent more than three years; spent a winter in Egypt, ascending the Nile to the Cataracts, and was present at the world's exposition at Paris in 1867, returning home to Dubuque in 1868; since that time he has made three subsequent tours to Europe _ making seven in all; he spent the summer of 1873 at Vienna, attending the world's exhibition held there that year. In 1876 he was present most of the season at Philadelphia, at the centennial exhibition, and in 1878, attended the world's exhibition at Paris for several months, returning home last in the fall to Dubuque; that was his seventh trip to Europe; in November, 1868, Mr. Sanford sailed from New York to Havana, and spent the entire winter in Cuba and in Mexico, arriving in the City of Mexico in January; he found his visit to Mexico very instructive and most pleasant, as well as that to the tropical region of Cuba; he returned to New York in the spring of 1869, with a valuable addition to his stock of knowledge of this world and of foreign lands. In stature, Mr. Sanford is tall and slim, being near six feet in height and never weighing over 140 pounds; his complexion is fair, his eyes dark, his manners are unassuming and plain and kindly to all, gentlemanly and courteous, becoming one who has seen so much of the world and so many of the distinguished personages in it; he has a fluent tongue, and a vast fund of knowledge of nearly all the world; his powers of describing are remarkably good and intelligent; he is almost as familiar with the continental capitals and cities as with Dubuque, where he resides; his fortune is ample, and he gives it liberally and quickly where he thinks it is most needed. The public county records of all of Northern Iowa, showing deeds from Mr. Sanford by thousands to the farmers for hundreds of thousands of acres of land, now their cherished homes and their children's after them _ these will be a monument to Mr. Sanford, more enduring than marble or granite, and it is great satisfaction to him to know that every one of those thousands of persons has a solid title to his land, and that all the varied and numerous transactions connected with their titles and Mr. Sanford, each and every one, rich and poor, were honorably and honestly dealt with by him.

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H. H. SATER, Superintendent of the manufacturing department of the Norwegian Plow Company; was born in Norway, about seventy miles from Christiana, the capital, in 1842; he grew up to manhood in that country and emigrated to America in 1868; he came West to Wisconsin the same year; he engaged in blacksmithing; he is a natural mechanic, inheriting it from his father, who was a plow-maker. Mr. Sater began making plows on a small scale, and by giving close attention to his work, he soon earned a reputation for his plows. In May, 1875, Mr. Mitchell, the present Vice President of the company, became associated with him, and they manufactured the Norwegian Plow at Brodhead, Wis., until June 1879, where the Norwegian Plow Company was organized; in October, they removed to Dubuque and erected large works, and Mr. Sater was elected Superintendent of the manufacturing department. In 1874, Mr. Sater was married to Miss Barbara Jensvold, a native of Albany, Green Co, Wis; they have two children - H. Melvin and Josephine.

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J. B. SAUSER, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Cascade; born in Luxemburg, Germany, Aug. 16, 1826; came to America in 1848; for two years, he was employed as brick-manufacturer in Detroit, Mich.; removed to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1850, since which time he has been engaged in farming, stock-raising, stock-dealing, etc.; he has acquired extended possessions, having 1, 150 acres of land in Secs. 20, 22, 27, 28 and 29, with a probable average value of $30 per acre; his magnificent barn is 43 X 133 feet in size, erected some eight years ago, of native limestone, is one of the noted landmarks of this region, cost about $5, 000, and destined to last for ages; his residence, built of brick, at a cost of about $3, 000, is well adapted for the comfort and convenience of the household. His religion is Catholic; politics, Democratic. He was married, in 1850, to Mrs. Mary Kurt, a native of Luxemburg; they have five children - Catherine, now Mrs. Pettinger, of Cass Co., Iowa; Annie, Peter; Susan, now Mrs. Bisenius, of Dubuque Co., and Michael.

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NICHOLAS SCHAEFER, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Dec. 10, 1828, in Hanover, Germany; in 1851 he came to Ohio; in 1853, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 80 acres of land. Married Mrs. Labar June 23, 1853; she was born in Wurtemberg, Germany; have six children - Emma, Mary A., Caroline, Rosena, Sophia, and Anna; lost Charles in 1870, aged 2 years and 3 months. He has been President of the School Board and Director for the past three years. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

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JOHN D. SCHAFFER, miller, Spring Valley Mills, Sec. 26; P. O. Cascade; born in Jackson Co., Iowa, March 6, 1854; came to Dubuque Co. in the spring of 1865. Was married in 1878 to Miss Maggie Thyson, daughter of John and Susan Thyson of Cascade; they were natives of Luxemburg, Germany and settled in Cascade at a very early day; one child, a daughter, named Mary. Mr. S. is a Catholic in religion; Democratic in politics. He is thoroughly skilled in his business, having been employed in milling since he was 11 years of age; his father and grandfather were both millers, also, so that the vocation may almost be claimed to come to him by inheritance. His father, John Shaffer, a native of the city of Luxemburg, was one of the oldest and best known millers of Dubuque Co.; he was running the Dubuque City Mills thirty years ago; he afterward operated the Teddy Moore Mills, the Burton Mills, the Bellevue Mills, the Rockdale Mills, Thompson Mills, Dyerville Mills and Prairie Spring Mills, being assisted in the last four places by the subject of this sketch, who, from this extended training, acquired an exceedingly accurate, practical knowledge of the business; the father died of heart-disease in 1869, and was buried by the I.O.O.F. of Dubuque, and Order of which he had for many years been an honored member.

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JOSEPH SCHEMMEL, farmer, Sec.5; P. O. New Vienna; born Dec. 8, 1826, in Prussia; in 1833, came to Baltimore, Md. with his parents, thence to Mercer Co., Ohio; in 1839, he removed to Hamilton Co., Ohio; in 1846, he came to Dubuque Co., he is the owner of the New Vienna Woolen Mills, which he is now overhauling and putting it in good running order; he also owns 153 acres of land, and fifteen lots in New Vienna. Is a Notary Public, auctioneer, Secretary of the School Boars, and has been Assessor. Married Lesatte Vente Aug. 17, 1853; she was born in Oldenburg, Germany; have ten children, seven sons and three daughters. Catholic.

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M. H. SCHILLING, brickmason and contractor; residence 2011 Couler Avenue; is a native of Germany, and was born April 1, 1835; he grew up and learned the trade of stonecutter; he came to the United States in 1852, lived in New Jersey and Ohio, and came to Iowa, learned the trade of bricklayer, and settled in Dubuque April 1, 1857, and began bricklaying, and since then has been engaged in that business; he is one of the oldest bricklayers and contractors in Dubuque and has done some of the best work in the city. He married Miss Mary Froeley, a native of France, in 1858; she died Sept. 14, 1874, leaving six children - Matilda, Henry, Emile, William and Bertha; Annie has since died. In June 1875, Mr. Schilling married Matilda Stold e, from Mecklenburg, Germany; they have two children - Alma and Eddie. Mr. Schilling belongs to Julien Lodge, No. 2, I.O.O.F, and to Haleyon Encampment and to the A.O.U.W. and to the Knights of Honor. His father died in 1858; his mother is 80 years of age and is living here with her son.

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PAUL SCHLENKER, dealer in general hardware and stoves and worker in tin, sheet iron, and copper, No. 1378 Clay Street, Dubuque; was born in Prussia, Germany, Nov. 24, 1831; he came to America in 1853, and the same year came to Dubuqu; he went over to Galena and learned the tinners trade; in 1861, he returned to Dubuque and engaged in his present business, and has carried it on since, building up a good trade. He belongs to the I.O.O.F. and is a member of Schiller Lodge, No 11, and also of the Encampment. He married Miss Barbara Zanuck, a native of Switzerland, Dec. 27, 1859; she died Aug. 13, 1874, leaving on son - Albert; he married Miss Anna Rehbaum, a native of Buffalo, N. Y.; they have two children - Emma and Paul.

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FRED SCHLOTH, of the firm of Schloth Bros. & Gray, manufactures of Caledonia oatmeal and kiln-dried cornmeal, foot of Eleventh Street Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born Feb. 9, 1831; he emigrated to America in 1854, and came to Dubuque in 1856; in 1858, he engaged in the butchering and meat market business and continued for twenty years; they established their present business in October 1879 and promise to build up a large trade. In 1866, he married Miss Sophia Meyer, a native of Germany; they have five children - Mary, Laura, Freda, Selma and Charles.

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MICHAEL SCHMIDT, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Pin Oak; born Dec. 9, 1818, in Germany, he came to Dubuque Co.; owns 300 acres of land; part of this land he entered. He married Catharine Thiel in 1854; she was born in May 1822, in Germany; they have eight children - Anton, Frank, Peter, Theo, Nick, Mary, Anna, and Catharine. Catholic.

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GEORGE SCHMITT, farmer, Sec. 24, P. O. Dubuque; born June 17, 1836 in Alsace, France; in 1847, he came to Dubuque Co., with his parents; he owns 168 acres of land; has been Township Clerk, Township Treasurer; is Township Assessor; has held this office the past fifteen years; has been Constable. Married Harriet Bahl in 1858; she was born in November 1835 in Alsace, France; died April 14, 1872; have three children - Andrew P., Edward G., Frank N. Second marriage to Louisa Joos Jan. 2, 1874; she was born in Switzerland; have four children - Otto P., Mary E., August G. and Bernet G. Is Catholic in religion and Democrat in politics.

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JOSEPH SCHMITT, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Lattnerville; born in France Feb. 17, 1840; at the age of 7, came with his parents to America, and settled in Dubuque Co., Iowa, in 1847; his parents, old and well known settlers here, are both deceased; the father died in 1862, the mother in 1879; Mr. S. has a good farm of ninety-five acres. His religion in Catholic; his politics, Democratic. He was married Jan. 9, 1862 to Miss Mary Lattner, daughter of Joseph and Veronica Lattner; eight children - Annie Caroline, Paul Joseph, William W., Amanda, Caroline H., John George, Adaline and Frank Joseph.

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VIT SCHMITT, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Dubuque; born Feb. 2, 1810, in Alsace, France; in 1846 he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; there were but two brick houses in Dubuque when he first came here; he owns 240 acres of land; he has been four years School Treasurer, and twenty years Township Treasurer. Married Catharine Hofner, in November 1845; she was born in 1813 in Alsace, France; they have four children - Sophia, Eliza, Antony and Louis.

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C. W. SCHRIEBER, of the firm of Schrieber & Strinsky, proprietors of the Key City Iron Works, Eighth Street, between Iowa and Clay, Dubuque; is a native of Luzerne, Switzerland and was born Dec. 3, 1847; and came to Iowa in 1851. He enlisted in the 27th I.V.I., Co. A, and served three years; was wounded at the battle of Pleasant Hill. After the war, came to Lansing, Allamakee Co., Iowa, and in 1868, came to Dubuque and worked for Rouse & Dean; in 1877, engaged in business with Mr. Strinsky; they are building up a good trade. Mr. S. belongs to the Masonic Order, and is a member of the Chapter and the Commandery; also a member of the I.O.O.F. and the Foresters. In 1872, was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie Woodward, a native of Dubuque; they have two children - George and Olma.

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MATHIAS SCHROEDER, farmer and grocer, Sec. 27; P. O. Cottage Hill; born Dec. 19, 1832, in Luxemburg, Germany; in 1852, came to Wisconsin; in 1854 to Dubuque Co.; he commenced his present business in 1862; he also owns eighty-two acres of land. He has served three years as a member of the Board of Supervisors. Married Mary Beaver in 1859; she was born in Germany, and died Dec. 8, 1871; had four children - Mary, Nicholas, Margaret and John. Second marriage was to Gertrude Dousch Nov. 12, 1872; she was born in Pennsylvania; have five children - Theressa, Mathias, Peter, Frank and Mary. Catholic.

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HENRY SCHUELER, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner Delhi and Center Streets, West Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Hesse Darmstadt, Nov. 2, 1830; he came to the United States in 1848, and came to Dubuque in 1849; he entered a printing office and learned the printing business, and afterward published the Iowa Banner for two years; in December 1859, he engaged in his present business, and has carried on mercantile business in his present location since 1861; there are few merchants who have been engaged in business here longer than he has. In 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Duffit, daughter of Francis Duffit; they have had six children, four of whom survive - Sophia, May, Florence and Estella.

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JOHN SCHULER, dealer in groceries, dry goods and notions, No. 1772 White Street, Dubuque; was born in Luxemburg, Germany, April 3, 1825; he emigrated to the United States and came to Dubuque in May, 1855; he worked at the carpenters trade for eighteen years, and since then has been engaged in his present business; when he came to this country he only had $30; he owns his store and other city property. He married Miss Elizabeth Haerten, a native of Germany, Feb. 2, 1854; they have seven children - Catharine, Anna, Peter, Maddie, John, Lucy and Nicholas.

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JOSEPH SCHULLER, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Jan 17, 1840, in Prussia; in 1855, he came to Chicago, and the following year, he came to Dubuque Co. with his parents, there he has since lived; he owns 107 acres of land, He has been three years Township Treasurer, is Township Clerk and Clerk of the School Board. Married Catharine Eppendorf in 1862; she was born in Prussia; they have ten children - John, Joseph, Henry, Anna, Nicholas Catharine, Marlin, Hubert, Theressa and Magdalena. Catholic in religion; Democrat in politics.

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BERNHARD SCHULTE, of the firm of Schulte & Wagner, stonecutter and contractors, White Street, corner Tenth, Dubuque; was born in Westphalia, Germany, Oct. 29, 1831; he grew up and learned his trade there; he came to the United States in 1854, and, in December of the same year, came to Dubuque and began working at his trade; in 1857, be began contracting; in 1867, Mr. Wagner went in partnership with him, and since then they have successfully carried on the business and have the largest trade here. Mr. Schulte belong to the German Benevolent Society. He married Miss Annie Becker, an native of Westphalia, Prussia, Jan 19, 1854; they have five children - John, Katie, Gerhard, Mary and Valentine.

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JACOB SCHWIND, Tschirgi & Schwind, brewers, Dubuque; born in Baden, Germany, Feb. 18, 1827; he grew up to a manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1848; he went to Wisconsin and lived in Milwaukee and Oshkosh, and came to Dubuque in August, 1853; the following year, he went in partnership with Mr. Tschirgi, and they engaged in the brewing business, building a brewery where they are now located; it was then covered with hazel brush, and away out of town; they have continued in the business over twenty-six years, and have, one of the largest and best breweries in the State, and do a large business. In 1852, he married Miss Mary Deitz, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they have nine children - Emma, Mary, Josephine, Minnie, Annie, Louise, John, Bennie and Clara.

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J. P. SCOTT, lumberman; residence, 1212 Locust Street, Dubuque; is a native of Oneida Co., N. Y.; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in August 1854, and engaged in the mercantile business; he continued in the mercantile business for thirteen years; then engaged in the lumber business, and is the manufacture of sash, doors and blinds; he carries on the business in Wood Co., Wis.; he has lived in Dubuque over twenty-five years. He married Miss Alice De Wolf, of Cleveland, Ohio; she is a native of New York; they have four children, one son and three daughters.

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JAMES SCOTT, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Farley; born in Lorain Co., Ohio, July 15, 1827; came to Dubuque Co., in 1853; he was among the first to settle in his part of the county, and knows by personal experience all of the hardships, inconveniences and warm friendships growing out of the frequent interchange of help and hospitalities among the early settlers; a house 18x20 feet in size (now used for a shop by Mr. Scott), was, during their first winter here, the home of both his and Mr. Freeman's families, over a dozen persons in all; and the chalk-line division between households is yet merrily talked of by both families; his present neat and well-arranged residence was built fourteen years ago; Mr. Scott, a practical carpenter and joiner, doing the work himself on that and most of his other buildings; he has a nicely rolling, well watered farm of 101 acres in Secs. 20 and 21, besides 20 acres of timber land in Iowa Township; he carries on farming and stock raising, and, in addition to the through work in both of these departments, carries on quite extensively a third branch, beekeeping, keeping thoroughly posted on all the improvements and discoveries in this branch in industry. Mr. Scott is a Republican in politics, but is too busily employed in other directions to devote much time to political affairs. He has been married twice; his first wife was Miss Sarah Freeman, of Ohio, the marriage taking place in 1847; she died Oct. 15, 1860; his second wife was Miss Elizabeth Wilkinson, a native of Pennsylvania; they were married April 24, 1862; six children are living - Harriet, Elizabeth, Willma, Joseph, Clarence and Russell; one, Aretus, is dead.

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JOHN G. SCOTT, steamboat inspector; residence, 78 Center Place, Dubuque; is a native of Washington Co., Penn., and was born Sept. 14, 1830; he grew up to a manhood and came West in 1856, and went on the river as engineer for the Minnesota Packet Company; he remained with this company seven years; during the war, he entered the naval service, and served as chief engineer of the Mississippi squadron, until the close of the war, in 1865, when he again went on the river; he held the position of chief engineer of the "Diamond Jo" nine years, from 1869 to 1878; in July 1878 he was appointed steamboat inspector, and since then has occupied that position; this inspection district embraces more territory than any other district in the United States. In December, 1857 Mr. Scott was united in marriage to Miss Anna Delaney, from Pittsburgh; they have three children - Frank, Stella and Kittie.

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CALVIN SCRIPTURE, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Dubuque; born July 25, 1826, in Lewis Co., N. Y., at about the age of 7 years, he came, with his parents to London, Canada; in about 1844 he came to Dubuque Co., Iowa; he owns 120 acres of land, well, improved; he has been Township Assessor, School Director, etc.; he has a large supply of weekly and monthly papers, which he takes regularly, and owns a well-selected library, and is otherwise well-informed. Married Miss Mary Strohl March 3, 1853; she was born in Ohio; they have four children - Mary, Adelia, Carrie and James L. Members of M. E. Church.

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IGNATZ SEEGER, retired, No. 1185 White Street, Dubuque; was born in Switzerland Feb. 14, 1807; he grew up to a manhood in Austria, and emigrated to America in December, 1849, and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in May 1851; the following year, he engaged in the brewing business; in 1853, his brewery burned down, he rebuilt it; when completed, the arches were not strong enough, and the building came down; after two years, he rebuilt it, and carried on the business successfully until 1868. In 1849, he married N. Kaufmann, a native of Germany; she died in 1862, leaving two children- Louis and Josephine. In 1863, he married Gertrude Bowmann, from Baden, Germany; they have two sons - John and Frank. Mr. Seeger had very little when he began, and owes his success to his own efforts. He belongs to the Pius Society.

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C. H. SEYMOUR, D. D., Rector of St. John's Episcopal Church, Dubuque; is a native of Watertown, Conn., and was born May 15, 1831; he grew up and attended school there; entered Trinity College and graduated from that institution; he was connected with the Hampden Rectory School in Connecticut four years, and was at the head of the Punchard Free School, at Andover, Mass., two years; he was ordained by Bishop Eastburn, of Massachusetts, and for ten years was Rector of Trinity Church, at Haverhill, Mass.; remained there until 1868, when he came West to Dubuque, and since then has been Rector. In 1853, Dr. Seymour, was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Burnham, from Hartford, Conn.; they have one daughter, now Mrs. F. Daniels, of this city.

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E. G. SHACKFORD, fuel agent for the Iowa Division of the Illinois Central Railroad, Dubuque; is a native of Strafford Co., N. H.; in 1840, he removed to Massachusetts and remained there until he cam West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, Oct. 4, 1862; during the same month, he entered the employ of the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad, and remained with that road until 1867, when it was leased by the Illinois Central Railroad, and since then he has been connected with this division of the railroad, and is one of the oldest officials of the company here. In July, 1846, he was united in marriage to Miss Abbie V. Crocket, a native of New Hampshire; they have two daughters - Nettie M. (now Mrs. Pollard ), of Waterloo and Emma J., at home.

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NICHOLAS SHAFFER, liveryman, Cascade; son of John N. Shaffer and Mary Barbara Cline; was born Dec. 25, 1825, in Lorraine, France; came to Indiana with his parents in 1831, and up to his 24th year was at home on the farm. Was married in Indiana, Dec. 18, 1849, to Miss Mary Sims, by whom he has had six children; the following are still living: Mary R., John, Henry and William; the other two died in infancy. After marriage, he worked two years on the Wabash & Erie Canal, then five years as a cooper, then, in 1856, came to Cascade; was two years partner of Frank May in starting a brewery; then resumed occupation of cooper, in 1871, bought livery stable and stock of Lemuel Fairchild, and now has the main livery establishment in Cascade. At Dubuque, in November, 1863, was married to his second wife, Mrs. Margaret Grogan, of La Fayette, Ind.; by this union he had had three children, all now living - Josephine, Ellen and Margaret. Himself and wife are members of the St. Martins Church; is a Democrat. Has been President of the School Board, also served four years as Justice of the Peace in the township of Whitewater.

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EDWARD R. SHANKLAND, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. Dubuque; born March 7, 1819, in Lewes, Del.; when a child he came with his parents to Philadelphia; in 1837, he enlisted in the Florida war; served one year; he then came to Pittsburgh; in 1856, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns one of the best-improved farms in the State, consisting of 160 acres, with very substantial buildings. He has been Deputy United States Marshal and President of the State Agricultural Society two years; he has been prominently connected with the Grange movement from 1871 to 1877. He has four children by a former marriage - Edward, now in New Orleans, in the employ of the United States Covernmant (he graduated in the Polytechinc Institure, at Troy, N. Y., June 1878; in September, he entered the Govermant service as civil engineer; : Ellen, now Mrs. Casey, living in Nebraska; Ralph and Emeline, now attending the Fifth Ward School. William enlisted in 1862, in the 5th I.V.C., and died in 1863 of disease contracted in the army.

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W. B. SHARP, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Centralia; born in Missouri in 1833; came to Dubuque Co. in 1840 with his parents, and with the exception of a four years' residence in California, from 1853 to 1857, has been here since; his father Peter L. Sharp, a much-respected citizen of the county died in 1874, at the advanced age of 72; Mr. S. has acquired quite handsome possessions, his farm embracing 240 acres, well improved and in good condition. He is identified, religiously, with the Methodist Church; politically, with the Republican party. Has held school offices. He was married, in 1855, to Miss Mary Paul, daughter of John Paul, on the the very earliest settlers of the county, who, at the age of 78, is yet living neat Waterloo; Mr. and Mrs. Sharp have nine children living - Alice, Fannie (now Mrs. Morse ), Charles, William, Cora, Jenny, James, Harry and George; two died in infancy - Annie and Henry.

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B. SHERIDAN, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Dubuque; born Sept. 12, 1826, in Luzerne Co., Penn.; in 1833, he came to New York with his parents; in 1834, he removed to Dubuque Co.; he owns 76 acres of land in this section, also about 10 acres in the city. Married Miss Mary A. Reed in 1855; she was born in Ireland; have eight children - John J., now engaged in merchandising in Dubuque; Estella F., Agnes R., Kate, Frank, Margaret, Dennis C. and Joseph E. Catholic

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JOHN J. SHERIDAN, dealer in groceries and provisions, and agent for the National Steamship Line, No. 5 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque, Dec. 26, 1856; his parents were early settlers; he grew up to a manhood in this city, and engaged in his present business Aug. 1, 1879, and is building up a good trade.

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GEN. JOHN G. SHIELDS, Long- contact me if you want

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J. H. SHIELDS, attorney at law, corner Main and Seventh Streets, Dubuque; is a son of Gen. John G. and Elizabeth Emerson Shields, and was born in Frankfort, Pike Co., Mo., May, 8, 1842; he came to Dubuque in infancy, his parents being early settlers here; he grew up and attended school here, and prepared for college; he attended Alfred University at Allegany, N. Y., where he spent two years of his collegiate course, then entered Union College as a junior and graduated in 1862; after graduating, he studied law with Gen. Henderson, of Missouri, and was admitted to the bar in 1863; he engaged in the practice of law, and, during the same year, he was elected City Attorney and held that office for two years; in 1867, he associated with Judge Barker, one of the leading attorneys in this section of the State; there they continued togerther until the latter was elected Judge, and went upon the bench; in 1871, he became associated in practice with Judge Pollock, and this partnership continued eight years. Mr. Shields is a close student, and has taken a leading position in the profession; he is attorney for the Dubuque Harbor Company, and has been a Director in the company since 1863; at the recent election for city officers, he was earnestly solicited to accept the nomination for Congress, but declined, preferring to devote his whole time to the interests of his profession. Mr. Shields was united in marriage June 3, 1874, to Miss Mary Tomlin, a native of Galena and daughter of Allan Tomlin, Esq., who came to Galena in 1827, and is one of the oldest settlers of that place now living; Mrs. Shields died Nov. 8, 1879, leaving one daughter - Eleanor.

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PHILIP SHIPTON, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Farley; born in Jo Daviess, Co., Ill July 24, 1832; came to Dubuque Co. in 1848; fifteen years of his time, at different periods, have been employed enterprises in the vicinity of Dubuque, in 1860, he removed to Missouri, and was a resident of that State until three years after the close of the civil war, when he returned to Dubuque Co., and has been identified with the interests of the county since that time; living during the great rebellion, in a locality in which some of the most stirring scenes in theater of war were enacted; he was from patriotism an active participant as a soldier on the side of the; from 1862 till the close of the war; he was constantly in service, two years of the time in Co. C, 2d Ark. V.C; the remainder of the time in Missouri militia, which did effective work in bring the war to a successful termination; in later years he has been a farmer. Religion, Methodist; politics, Republican. Mr. Shipton was married in 1855 to Hannah Smith, of Dubuque Co.; they have ten children living - Georgiana, Susan, Emma, William, Philip, Izora, Lottie, Lucia, Ada and Frankie; two, Ellen Jane and Ida, are dead.

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W. J. SHOUP, Principal of the Fourth Ward School, Dubuque; is a native of Armstrong Co, Penn., and was born in 1846; he grew up to manhood in Illinois and received his education in that State, and graduated at Knox College, Galesbury, in 1873; after graduating, he came to Dubuque, and since then, has benn connected with the public schools of this city. During the war, he enlisted and served in Co. H, 48th I. V. I. Mr. Shoup is editor of the Iowa Normal Monthly, the official school organ of the State; he was chosen and served as President of the State Teachers Association.

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F. W. SHUTTE, school-teacher; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Dec. 3, 1849, in Peru Township; he attended the Hopkinton Institute in 1867, and finished this course in 1870; in 1876, he attended the German Theological Seminary, and here graduated; he has taught eight terms- four in Center and four in Peru Township. Married Catherine Wetter, Oct. 11, 1877; she was born in Jefferson Township; they have one child - William; he owns 120 acres of land. Presbyterian.

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ALEXANDER SIMPLOT, engraver and designer, Julien House Building, Dubuque; a native of the city of Dubuque, and was born Jan. 5, 1837, in a log cabin on Main Street, between Fifth and Sixth Streets; his parents Henry and Susan Simplot, were among the earliest settlers of Dubuque Co.; his father was engaged in general mercantile business; he was one of the first Board of Alderman elected in Dubuque, and represented the First Ward; he was one of the wealthiest men in Dubuque at the time of his death, which occurred in 1847; his wife died in 1876. Alexander grew up and attended school here, and afterward attended Rock River Seminary, and was a student there with the late John A. Rawlins and Gov. Cullom of Illinois; he entered Union College and graduated in the class of 1858; during the war, he was special artist for Harper's Weekly, and was with Gen. Fremont, Commodors Foote, and with Gen. Grant. Mr. Simplot has had a large experience as an artist in sketching and engraving, and has an extended reputation; he works by the new photo-engraving process, and with excellent success, and has all he can do with his other business. In 1866, Mr. Simplot was united in marriage to Miss Virginia Knap p, of this city; they have five children - Ella N., Mamie, Frank A., Henry A., Leroy; they have lost on daughter - Ada M.

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CHARLES SIMPLOT, engaged in mining; Sec. 22; P. O., Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque April 24, 1840; he grew up and attended school here, after reaching manhood, he was engaged in the grain business, and is now engaged in mining. During the war, he enlisted in the 46th I.V.I., and was Commissary Sergeant and Acting Quartermaster. An April, 1867, Mr. Simplot was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Bonson, a native of this county, and daughter of Richard Bonson, one of the oldest and most honored settlers of Dubuque Co.; Mr. and Mrs. Simplot have three children - Susan H., Henry F. and Jane B.

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JOHN SIMPLOT, capitalist, 504 Julien Avenue, Dubuque; is a native of Besancon, France and was born July 7, 1808; he came to Ameria in 1820; he grew up to manhood in Oneida and Oswego Cos., N. Y. and came West to Iowa and landed in Dubuque June 1, 1835; he engaged in the grocery trade; Mr. Simplot is one of the early settlers; in the early days of Dubuque, when every one engaged in mining, it is something unusual to say that he was never persuaded to enter it; he was engaged in the iron and heavy hardware business for some years, and carried on an extensive trade. In 1847, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Moffet, of Dubuque; they have had four children, three daughters and one son - Mary A., Fannie, Ida and Henry J.

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JAMES SIMPSON, deceased; father of Albert R. Simpson, Sec. 34; P. O. Zwingle; was born in the county of Antrim, Ireland, May 1, 1876; came to Philadelphia about 1819; moved to Westmoreland Co., Penn., in 1837; came to Iowa in 1854. Was married May 18, 1826, to Ann Bowle s; had ten children - James W., born Feb. 26, 1827; Washington, May 23, 1829; Samuel, July 16, 1831; William C., Sept. 23, 1833; Hiram, April 14, 1836; Amanda, Sept. 14, 1838; Mary A., Dec. 4, 1841; Harriet, April 22, 1843; Martha, March 2, 1846 and Albert R., April 10, 1848; Mr. S. died Nov. 7, 1857; Albert R. was married Nov. 22, 1876 to Agnes Campbell; owns 120 acres of land. Is a Republican and belongs to the United Presbyterian Church.

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J. E. SIMPSON, Collector of Internal Revenue; is a native of the State of New York, and was born in the city of New York Aug., 10, 1833; he grew up to manhood in that State; he came West to Iowa in 1855, and located in Winneshiek Co., at Decorah; he engaged in teaching, and was elected Superintendent of Schools, and was very active in advancing the early educational interests of the county; he was also elected County Surveyor. Upon the breaking- out of the rebellion, he enlisted, in 1861, in the 12th I. V. I., Co. G; he was Orderly Sergeant, and was afterward, promoted and commissioned Second Lieutenant; after serving one year, he was obliged, on account of ill heath, to resign his commission; he returned to Decorah, and, the following year, entered the Provost Marshal's office and served as Deputy until 1865; then he entered the Internal Revenue Service, and was Supervising Agent in charge of Iowa Minnesota, Nebraska, Dakota, Colorado, Montana and New Mexico; he served in this position over ten years; in 1868, a law was passed by Congress, limiting the number of revenue agents or supervising officers in the United States to twenty-five, and Mr. Simpson was among those retained in the service; after ten year service in seven States and Territories, he was promoted and received and appointment of Collector of the district, taking charge of the office April 18, 1878; there are few officials in this department of the Government service who have experience of Mr. Simpson. On the 7th day of July, 1860, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Rankin, a native of the city of Chicago; she was the second daughter of the late Wm. Rankin, of Frankville, Allamakee Co., Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. Simpson have two children, one son and one daughter - Charles T. and May W.

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JOHN SIMPSON, retired, Simpson's Hill, Dubuque; is a native of Yorkshire, England; born Dec. 13, 1811; he grew up to manhood there and came to this country in 1838; he came to Dubuque and arrived here July 4 of that same year; he engaged in mining; he has continued mining ever since he came, a period of forty-one years, in the vicinity of Dubuque - a greater length of time than any miner now living here; he has been engaged in mining fifty-nine years, altogether; when Mr. Simpson came to Dubuque, he only had two sovereigns; his success in life is owing to his industry and good management; he laid out Simpson's Addition, where he now lives; it is called Simpson's Hill. In December, 1835; he was united in marriage to Miss Martha Lobley, a native of Yorkshire, England; they have six children - Nathan, Margaret R., John R., George M., Mary A., James T.; all are married except James, who is now in Cornell College; he is reading medicine; Nathan enlisted and served in the 21st, I.V.I., during the war, and was also wounded. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson are members of the M. E. Church.

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N. F. SIMPSON, farmer, Secs. 20, 21, 28, and 29; P. O. Epworth; born in Yorkshire, England, Oct. 14, 1838; to America and to Dubuque Co., in 1839; has 140 acres of land admirably adapted to farming and stock-raising, and, with characteristic energy is extending his business and possessions; quite a number of years in his earlier life were spent in mining, of which business he has thorough knowledge; before settling on his present farm thirteen years ago, he had traveled extensively over Wisconsin, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska; has made personal observation of much of the Union; with patriotic devotion to the land of his adoption, he devoted three years of his life to the service of his country during the civil war, serving as a non-commissioned officer in Co. C, 21st I. V. I., making an honorable record in the battles of Hartsville and Beaver Creek, Mo., where he was wounded; the Red River and Atlanta campaigns, siege of Vicksburg, etc., until mustered out with his command at the close of the war in 1865; his first wife was Miss Azubah Welsh, of Virginia, married in 1860, she died in 1862; his second wife, Miss Alice Hinde, a native of Cheshire, England, married in 1865; six children - Martha Elizabeth, Jane Alice Effie, John Thomas, Nathan Frank, Della May, Howard Lee.

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NATHAN SIMPSON, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. Dubuque; born Aug. 15, 1828, in Yorkshire, England; in 1839, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived; he owns one-half interest in 420 acres of land and smelting works. His brother George enlisted, in 1861, in the 21st I.V.I. and was killed at the battle of Vicksburg May 16, 1862. Married Nancy Clark in 1854; she was born in Indiana; they have one child, Mary E.; lost Thomas E. in infancy. M. E. Church.

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JAMES SIMS, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. Dubuque; born in New York, in September, 1826; in 1836, with parents, Alexander and Catharine Sims, came to Dubuque Co., Iowa; was chiefly engaged in milling until the last twelve years; to two years was at the Rockdale (then Catfish) Mills; five years at Sageville (now Thompson's Mill), and then, with his father built and operated the Sims Mill, in Center Township, until 1868, since which time he has been engaged in farming, for the last ten years of the time at his present place; in 1850, he went to California and spent five years there, returning in 1855; his farm comprises eighty acres of nicely located, well-improved land, with good buildings, etc. Mr. S. inclines to the Presbyterian faith in religion; to the Republican party in politics. Has held school offices, and is one of the present Trustees of the township. His wife, nee Miss Malinda Sutherland, daughter of Martin and M ary Sutherland, came with her parents from her native State of Illinois, to Scott Co., Iowa, in 1837, when 10 years of age; thence they removed to Dubuque Co. in the spring of 1845; her mother died March 28, 1873; her father, for the past four years has lived in California; Mr. and Mrs. Sims have seven children living - Mary E., Herbert R., Malinda, Katie, Maggie, Alice, Allene and Edgar E.; one child, James, deceased.

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J. P. SKAHILL, proprietor of the only strictly grocery store in Cascade; was born in Dubuque June 1, 1850; left Dubuque with his parents when he was less than 3 years old; lived at home till 22 years of age. Married in Cascade, June 12, 1871, to Miss Ann Kenny; they have had four children, three of whom still live - Mary, Jane, Martha (died in infancy), Callista. He was three years in the cabinet business with N. Takes; then he clerked for John Reddin till the fall of 1877, then he started a grocery which does not include liquors; he is, by common report, a moral, law-abiding citizen. Is a Democrat; both are Catholics.

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JAMES SLONE, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. Dubuque; born March 19, 1812, in Lincoln Co., Ky.; when about 4 years old, his parents came with his to Edwardsville, Illl.; the following year they came to St. Charles, Mo.; in 1819, they came to Fountain Ferry, now Alton, Ill.; he then, with his father, ran the ferry; there was but one house there at that time; in 1834, he came to Dubuque, and attended the ferry here till 1839; there were but five stores here then; in 1840, he came to his present farm; he now owns 320 acres of land, which he has improved. Married Rhonda J. Gilbert in 1841; she was born in Marion Co., Mo.; had six children, five of whom are living - Elizabeth S., Ellen, Martha, John and Sarah; Susan died June 19, 1860, aged 7 years.

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JOHN S. SMEAD, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Peosta; born in Wisconsin, Feb. 14, 1838; came to Dubuque Co. in 1866; lived nine years in the city of Dubuque, since then on his beautifully located stock farm of 240 acres, near Peosta. He was marrried, on the 29th of August, 1872, to Mary E. Rider, a native of Dubuque Co.; has three children - Cornelia B., Horace G. and Helen; Mr. Smead's father, John S., came from St. Louis to Galena mines in 1827, when there were no white settlements west of Dodgeville, Wis., and the family, having lived in the vicinity of Dubuque ever since, are properly ranked among the earliest pioneers of this locality.

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EDWIN SMEDLEY, master mechanic of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad; is a native of England, and was born in the city of Manchester Nov. 22, 1840; he came to the United States in 1853, and served an apprenticeship of four years in Wooster, Wayne, Co., Ohio, as mechanical engineer. Upon the breaking-out of the rebellion, he enlisted April 15, 1861, in Co. E, 4th Ohio V. I. and served three months; then re-enlisted for three year in the same regiment; after serving nineteen months, he was transferred to Battery A, of the 4th U.S. Artillery; he was in the battled of Rich Mountain, Malvern Hill, Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and the Wilderness campaign, and others; he served over three years, and returned to Ohio; in 1865, he came to Illinois, and in January, 1873, he came to Dubuque, and became general foreman of the railroad shops; in 1875, he was appointed to his present position of master mechanic; his profession is mechanical engineer and draughtsman. He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity and the Order of I.O.O.F. Mr. Smedley was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Cobb, a native of Pennsylvania, April 3, 1865; they have had three children, only one of whom survives, a daughter - Lillian.

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C. A. SMITH, school teacher, Dyersville; born July 21, 1843, in Rhenish, Prussia; in 1853, came with his parents to Chicago, and there received his first English schooling; in 1861, came to Dubuque Co.; in 1872, he commenced teaching in Delaware Co., and has been engaged in teaching since. Married Mary M. Limback Jan. 11, 1875; she was born in Lyons, Iowa; have three children - Jenofova, Lawrence C., and Ann S.; Catholic.

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DWIGHT T. SMITH, of the firm of M. M. Walker & Co., commission merchant and dealers in oil, foreign and domestic fruits, and grain, Nos. 242 and 248 Main Street; is a native of Windham Co., Vt., and was born Feb. 14, 1845; he came West to Dubuque in 1865; in 1871, he entered the large commission house of M. M. Walker, and remained there until September, 1879, when he became a member of the firm. He holds the position of Major of the 1st Calvary I.N.G. Mr. Smith was united in marriage, April 8, 1868, to Miss E. M.Boyce, a native of Washington Co., Vt.; she is a lady well known in literary circles - a contributor to several papers; writes under the nom de plume of "Maud Meredith; " she is now in New York, having been solicited to take charge of the literary department of several papers. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have one daughter - Georgie G., and have lost one son, Dwight E.

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G. B. SMITH, foreman car-shops Illinois Central Railroad, Dubuque; is a native of Bridgeport, Conn., and was born April 11, 1814; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade of carpenter and joiner; in 1854, he came West to Chicago, and became connected with the Illinois Central Railroad; in the spring of 1855, he came to Dunleith, and since then has lived there; he built the first house erected on the bluff there. He entered the employ of the old Housatonic Railroad in 1839, and has been connected with the Illinois Central Railroad twenty-five years. He has held school offices, and served as Alderman and Justice of the Peace. In 1855, he married Miss Sallie Sherman, from Newton, Conn.; they have four children - Abbie J., Julius M., Mary F. and Ada L.

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JOHN M. SMITH, painter, No. 153 Seventh Street, Dubuque; is a native of Westmoreland, England, and was born in 1834; his parents came to America when he was very young, and grew up in Ohio; he came to Iowa in 1855, and settled in Dubuque; he learned his trade here, and since then he has been connected with the business; he is one of the oldest painters in Dubuque. In August, 1858, he married Miss Christina Curtis, a native of Cornwall, England; they have five sons and four daughters.

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THOMAS SMITH, butcher and dealer in fresh and salted meats, Farley; a native of England, was born Nov. 4, 1838; when 10 years of age, his parents came to America in 1847; they lived in New Jersey and Pennsylvania until 1855, when they came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque Co. After the breaking out of the rebellion, he enlisted in the 9th I. V. I. Co. C; he was in the service over three years, and was at the taking of Vicksburg, Atlanta, Pea Ridge, Champion Hill, Grand Gulf and other battles; was knocked down by a ball, but not hurt; he was in thirteen engagements; after the war, he returned here, farmed two years, and, since then has been engaged in his present business; he holds the office of Justice of the Peace; when he began life, he only had $48, and his success is owing to his own efforts. He married, Miss Mary A. Bazeley, a native of Wisconsin, Jan. 24, 1860; they have three children - Harriet (now Mrs. King, living here), Emma, Martha M.

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JAMES SNODGRASS, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Peosta; born in Harrison Co., Ky., Oct. 28, 1811; moved to Missouri in 1832, to Grant Co., Wis., in 1835, and to his present location in 1840; has farmed here since, the only extended absence being a trip to California, going the overland trip in 1850, returning by water in 1851; he has a fine farm of 302 acres. Mr. S. was married, May 3, 1840, to Amanda Jordan; she was born March 7, 1825, and died May 4, 1874; he has ten children, all living - William H. (in Fremont Co.), Mary A., Harrison W., Eliza E. (in Minnesota), Isabella (near Dubuque), Sarah O., John M. (in Minnesota), Laura A. (in Fremont Co.), Charles A., Walter F.

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ROBERT SNOWDEN, farmer, Sec. 2, Richland Township, Jones Co.; P. O. Cascade, Iowa; was born May 9, 1809; his parents were William Snowden and Elizabeth Allison, of County Monaghan, Ireland; he came to America in 1829, and settled in Philadelphia, where he remained till 1836. On the 4th of June, 1833, he married Miss Mary Boyd, a native of Ireland; they have no children. He came to Dubuque in 1836, and was engaged two years as a miner and smelter; then, in 1837, took up a claim in Richland Township, Jones Co., where he removed with his family the fall of 1838; he sold his farm in 1849, and bought in Whitewater Township, Dubuque Co., where he lived eleven years; in 1860, he rented his farm, and for ten years lived in Cascade; in 1870, he repurchased eighty acres of his original farm in Richland Township, where he now resides, he was born a farmer and has no desire for any other occupation; he claims to have been the second settler in Richland Township. He and his wife joined the Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia in 1833, the year of his marriage. His great-grandfather was a soldier under Oliver Cromwell. Mr. Snowden, in his early days, was a Whig, and has been a Republican from the organization of the party. Mr. S. is a prompt and liberal contributor to every cause of moral and commercial progress; he was made a Master Mason in 1859, and is the oldest member of the Lodge ar Cascade, in whose prosperity he is much interested, and he desires to be buried by the fraternity; he is growing old, bur, being secure against want, he takes life easy, being pleasantly situated and having kind neighbors and many friends.

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EDWARD SPECHT, Sec. 8; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Dec. 26, 1836, in Dubuque; he own 120 acres of land, and is engaged in running the ferry in connection with his brother Werner. Their father bought these premises and ferry in about 1850, and it has since been known as Specht's Ferry; he also owned about 1,300 acres of lad, which has been divided since his death among his family; Mrs. Specht retains the ferry and stand; he died Oct. 24, 1866, in his 58th year. The buildings on these premises are valued at about $5, 000, and the steam ferry is valued at about $3, 000. He married Louisa Felthouse in March, 1864; she was born at Sherrill's Mount; they have three children - Emma, Frank and Albert. Attends the Presbyterian Church; Republican in politics.

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WERNER SPECHT, farmer and ferryman, Sec. 8; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born April 19, 1843, in Peru Township; his parents came to Dubuque Co. in 1835, and soon after entered about 1,300 acres of land, and established Specht's Ferry; he holds a license as engineer of pilot, and acts in either capacity' he has been running on the river since 1852, at first on a flatboat, afterward on a horse-boat, and now on the steam ferry. He enlisted in 1864 in Co. E, 5th I.V.C., and served to the end of the war; participated in the battle of Nashville under Gen. Thomas, lasting four days, also battles of Pulaski, Tenn., Spring Hill, Ala., Selma, Ala., Columbus, Ga. and others; was mustered out ar Nashville, Tenn., and received an honorable discharge at Clinton, Iowa. He married Miss J. Albright Dec. 31, 1873; she was born in Peru Township; they have two children - Hiram and Hattie. Methodist; Republican.

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JOHN SPENSLEY, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. Dubuque; born Feb. 6, 1821, in Yorkshire, England; in 1831, he came with his parents to Pottsville, Penn.; in 1834, they removed to Dubuque Co.; he owns 128 acres of land, which he has improved. Married Mary Cocker on 1841; she was born in England; they have seven children - James, John, William, Elizabeth, Emma, Mary A. and Allen. M.E. Church.

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WILLIAM SPENSLEY, engaged in mining, residence West Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born Feb. 14, 1842; his parents were early settlers here; he grew up to manhood here, and engaged in mining; he began working in the mines when only 8 years of age; he has carried on the business successfully, and is taking out a large quantity of ore. In 1873, he married Miss Sarah Beatty, of Dubuque; they have three children - Charles, William and an infant son not named.

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DR. JOSEPH SPRAGUE, deceased, was a native of the State of Rhode Island, and was born in Providence May 22, 1807; during his boyhood, his parents came West of Ohio; after reaching manhood, he began his professional studies in the medical department of Bishop Chase College at Worthington, Ohio, and graduated at Western Reserve College at Cleveland; he associated with Dr. Asa Horr, now of this city, and engaged in the practice of medicine at Baltimore, Ohio; he afterward, practiced medicine at West Union, Adams Co., Ohio, for four years; in 1847, he came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque, and again formed a copartnership with Dr. Horr; they continued together several years; Dr. Sprague went back to Ohio and remained there three years, and again returned to Dubuque. On the 18th of November, 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah J. Burton, a native of the State of Delaware; she came to Dubuque in 1853. Dr. Sprague continued the practice of his profession until failing heath compelled him to abandon it; his death occurred Nov. 20, 1878; Mrs. Sprague still resides in this city.

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S. F. SQUIRES, proprietor Squires' Mill, Sec. 35; P. O. Epworth; born in Connecticut Dec. 3, 1820; in the spring of 1855, he settled in Dubuque Co., having before traveled quite extensively through the South and West, spending some two years in California and shorter periods in several other States; his first fourteen years here were employed in farming; has been engaged in his resent business since 1869; in addition to his mill property, he has seventy acres of land in Secs. 34 and 35, Iowa Township, and Sec. 3, Taylor Township. He has held township and school offices. Religion, Methodist; politics, Democrat. He was married in 1846 to Miss Adaline Pilgrim, a native of Massachusetts; they have two children - Annie and Hattie; both are married, the former being now Mrs. Hapgood, the latter, Mrs. Burrell. His son-in-law, Mr. J. D. Burrell, has for many years been employed in the mill, and is intimately associated with Mr. Squires in business; Mr. Burrell was born in Canada Dec. 24, 1848; came to Dubuque Co. in 1862, and was here five years; went back to Canada in 1867; remained there until 1870, then he returned to Dubuque Co., and has resided here since; has been a miller for the last twelve years; previous to that was employed in farming. Was married in 1874; Mr. and Mrs. B. have one child, a daughter, named Addie Dwight.

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CHARLES STAFFORD, retired, , No. 463 Windsor Street, Dubuque; a native of Northamptonshire, England, and was born Aug. 19, 1812; he came to Canada in 1828; he came to Dubuque in August, 1838; in 1839, he ran a flat-boat ferry for Timothy Fanning, the first ferry run across the river from this side; the next year he ran Gen. Jone's horse-boat; he afterward engaged in plastering. Mr. Stafford has lived here forty-two years, and has been engaged mostly in farming and mining; he laid out Stafford's Addition to Dubuque; he had nothing when he began life, but has secured a competency. In 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie Pfotzer; she is a native of Galena, and came with her parents to Dubuque July 3, 1833; they kept the first boarding house ever kept in Dubuque; her mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford have seven children - William, Charles, Jackson, Mary, Emily, Francis and Henry.

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GEORGE F. STARR, engaged in mining; residence, Delhi Street; is a native of Dubuque, and was born Nov. 16, 1850; he grew up and attended school; after reaching manhood, he engaged in mining; he, in company with three others, are engaged in working a mine in West Dubuque. He married Sarah Eddy, a native of Dubuque, in December 1874; they have two children - Milton S., and an infant son.

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JOHN STEINER, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Centralia; born in Switzerland in 1829; emigrated to America and came to Dubuque Co., Iowa in 1856; for a number or years, he was engaged in the dairy business in Dubuque; after that, he lived for a considerable time in Vernon Township; of later years, he has resided at his present location, and been exclusively engaged in farming; his farm embraces eighty acres in Secs. 28 and 29. In politics, he is identified with the Republican party; in religion, with the German Presbyterian Church. He was married, in 1850, to Maggie Gadient, a native of Switzerland; they have eight children - Andrew, John (married and lives in Wisconsin), Margaret (now Mrs. Humke ), Lena, Rosa, Christian, Annie and Katie.

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J. F. STEINER, of the firm of Steiner & Parker, dealers in fancy goods and notions, ladies' and gents' furnishing goods, 730 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland, and was born Feb. 18, 1842; his parents came to Dubuque when he was only six years old; he grew up and attended school here, and entered a store; he has been engaged in mercantile business here over twenty years; the firm of Steiner & Parker was established in 1878, and they have built up a good trade. In November, 1867, Mr. Steiner was united in marriage to Miss Mary S. Humkey, a native of Dubuque Co.; they have three sons and three daughters - Anna C., Bertha W., Fannie A., Frank C., Clifford E. and John F.

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T. C. STEWART, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Dubuque; born May 1, 1818, Lee Co., Va.; in 1831, he came with his parents to Missouri; in 1852, he came to Dubuque Co.; he first visited this locality in 1835, but since 1852 has been a resident here; he owns 142 1/2 acres of land, which he has improved, and has erected very substantial buildings; he has been about six years a member of the Board of Supervisors; has been President of the School Board and Director; he is now Treasurer of the Board. Married Mary A. Singleton in 1846; she was born in 1819 in Missouri; they have four children - Dewitt C., John W., Ellen and Mary; lost Margaret in June 1876, aged 28 years.

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WILLIAM G. STEWART, President of the Dubuque County Bank, Dubuque. Among the honored names of Dubuque's early settlers, none are more worthy of record than that of the subject of this brief sketch; is a native of Lee Co., Va., and was born July 10, 1813, and is the son of William and Jane Stewart, both natives of Virginia; his early education was limited, but later, through his own efforts of reading and study, he has placed himself above others with much better opportunities for learning. In early life, he had an ambition to see and live in the Great West, and, in September, 1831, his father's family removed to Montgomery Co., Mo., and he he accompanied them; in the spring of 1832, he was employed by the Government to assist in the removal of the remnants of the tribes of Seneca, Delaware and other tribes of Indians, from Ohio to their reservations, about one hundred miles above Little Rock, Ark.; having heard of Galena and the great lead mines, he determined to visit them; arriving in Galena in October 1833, he remained until the 10th of February, 1834, when he came to Dubuque, which was then in Michigan Territory, and returned to Missouri the following summer; after remaining away about one year on account of sickness, he returned to Dubuque and engaged in farming and mining. He was elected Sheriff of Dubuque Co., in 1847, and held that office for six years; in 1856, he was elected to the State Senate for a term of four years; he was elected Treasurer of Dubuque Co. in 1869, by a large majority, and, by re-elections, he held that office for twelve years; he is connected with the Dubuque & Sioux City, Chicago, Dubuque & Minnesota and Iowa Pacific Railroads, and is active in the development of the interests of the city and county; he has acted with the Democratic party and is an advocate of its principles. On the 2d of June, 1842, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Caroline Wilson, by whom he has six children.

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PETER STILLMUNKES, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Jan. 7, 1844, in Prussia; in 1846, he came to Baltimore with his parents; in 1847, they came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 120 acres of land, which was entered by his father; he has been Township Clerk, Secretary of the School Board and Notary Public. Married Elizabeth Weiland in 1867; she was born in Germany; her parents now live in Otter Creek Township, Jackson Co.; they have six children - Anna Mary, Frank, Louisa, John N., Catharine and Joseph. Catholic Church.

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W. STOLTEBEN, merchant tailor and dealer in gents' furnishing goods, corner Main and Fifth Streets Dubuque; is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born March 27, 1829; he grew up to manhood and learned his business there, and emigrated to America; came to Dubuque in May, 1856; he began working at his business, and has been engaged in merchant tailoring since then; when he began he had nothing, and by industry, good management and close attention to business, he has built up the largest and leading trade in the city; in addition to his large stock of goods, he has built one of the finest and most pleasant homes in Dubuque, and is one of the successful business men of Dubuque. In 1867, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary F. Hellman, oldest daughter of John H. Hellman, on of the oldest and wealthiest citizens of Galena; they have four children - Frank, Willie, Paula and Bertha; Mr. Stolteben has two sons, Rudolph and Anton, by a former wife.

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A. B. STORY, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. Epworth; born in Illinois May 3, 1828; came to Dubuque Co. in 1841; has a farm of sixty-one acres in Vernon and Iowa Townships, and is joint inventor and owner of a valuable stump extractor, for which several thousand dollars; with of territory has been sold. In 1847-48, he was in the Mexican war, in the 1st Regular Infantry; he also served three year s in the late civil war, as a member of Co. F, 21st I.V.I., being promoted to Lieutenant neat the close of the war; he was engaged in the battles of Vicksburg, Jackson, Hartsville, Mo., Port Gibson, Mobile, etc., being wounded at Port Gibson. Mr. S. was married, in 1850, to Martha McDowell, of Missouri, who died in 1851. He was married again, June 27, 1853, to Sarah Anderson, of Virginia; has four children living - Adelia A. (now Mrs. Bradfield ), Albert J., Sarah M. and John A.; six are dead - Buell S., Norris, William, Aaron, James and Paton R.

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CASPER STREIF, dealers in wines and liquors, Eighth and Bluff Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland and was born Feb. 28, 1834; he came to America in 1847, and came to Galena the same year and grew up to manhood there; he came to Dubuque in 1869, and since then has resided here. He married Mrs. Mary Andrews March 18, 1856; she is a native of Pennsylvania, they have six children - Lillian, William, Ada, Ned, Stella and Selma Augusta.

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FRANK STRINSKY, of the firm of Schreiber & Strinsky, proprietors of the Key City Iron Works, Eighth Street, between Clay and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; a native of Bohemia, born June 30, 1847; his parents came to America when he was 10 years of age; they came to Dubuque in 1857; he grew up and learned his trade here, and in January, 1877, engaged in the business with his present partner, Mr. Schreiber, and they are building up a good trade. He belongs to the Masonic Order, the I.O.O.F and Foresters and the Bohemian Mutual Association. In 1867, he married Miss Rachel Hunt, from Zanesville, Ohio; she died in August 1872. In February, 1876, married Laura Matthews, a native of Bohemia; they have three children - Mary A., Joseph and Florence.

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JOHN H. STROBEL, pork-packer, Clay Streets, between Fourth and Fifth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Bavaria, Germany, and was born Sept. 19, 1825; he emigrated to America in 1844; lived in Missouri three years, and came to Dubuque in 1847; he began work at brickmaking; then worked for Mayor Bush and Fred Weigle, all three of them were bachelors together at that time; in 1853, he engaged in business for himself in packing port, in a small way, and had a candle factory; he did a large business in manufacturing candles during the war; he took George Rath in partnership with him and the firm of Strobel & Rath carried on the business for sixteen years, and since then he has continued in business alone. During the war, he was chosen Treasurer of the draft fund for the Second Ward, and was active in recruiting men for the war; he has held various church offices. When Mr. Strobel began life he had nothing, and he owes his success to his own efforts and good management. In August, 1853, he married Miss Eliza Benner, a native of Switzerland; they have six children - Emelia E., Andrew, Rosalie, Caroline, John E. and Charles A.

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DR. O. STUART, physician and surgeon, Sec. 25; P. O. Cottage Hill; was born Aug. 10, 1848, in Dubuque Co.; in 1869, he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. McKinzie, and graduated at the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, in 1872; he then removed to Davis Co., and commenced practicing; remained there about six months, and then removed to his present locality, where he has been practicing since. He is Township Clerk and Secretary of the School Board. Married Miss Minnie Schoonover in 1873; she was born in Iowa; they have two children - Nellie and Olive. Republican.

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MRS. MARY A. STUART, Sec. 35; P. O. Cottage Hill; she was born Jan. 2, 1821, in Pennsylvania; she came to Dubuque Co. with her parents in 1839; she is the widow of Moses Stuart, who was born Nov. 11, 1811 in New Hampshire; when a boy, he came, with his parents, to Maine; in 1839, he came to Dubuque Co. He was married to Miss Mary A. Glew Feb. 18, 1841; he died in September 1878; they had eleven children, nine living - Adaline, Elvira, Orren, Ellen, Summer, Moses, Mary, Ansel, Alvin, Oliver (enlisted in 1862, in Co. C. 21st I. V. I., and died June 17, 1863, of disease contracted in the army), Olive (died in 1870, aged 3 years). She owns about three hundred acres of land.

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JOHN STURGEON, of the firm of Lawther & Sturgeon, dealers in dry goods and clothing, 145 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Ireland and was born in County Down June 27, 1848; he emigrated to America in 1862, and came to Dubuque the same year, and entered his uncle's store as clerk; he associated with Mr. Lawther, and succeeded his uncle in their present business, and they have a large trade.

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MARK SULLIVAN, farmer and President of the Board of Supervisors of Dubuque Co.; Sec. 31; P. O. Ballyclough; is a native of Dubuque Co, and was born in 1840; his parents came here in 1834, and were among the first settlers; he grew up and attended school here, and, after reaching manhood, engaged in farming; he is the oldest of nine children, and he has the management of the estate, which consists of 480 acres of land, also city property. Mr. Sullivan was elected County Supervisor in 1875, and has held the office for the past five years, and has been twice elected President of the Board; he has also held the offices of Town Clerk, Assessor and Town Trustee.

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PETER SUMMERS, Cascade; son of Levi Summers and Lydia Elmore was born January 19, 1807, in Green County, Ky.; his father was a farmer and the subject of this sketch worked at home until after attaining his majority; in his 17th year he, with his parents, removed to Sangamon Co., Ill., where they died; he came to Whitewater Township, Dubuque Co., Iowa, in the spring of 1839. He was married in Springfield, Ill., on Sept. 27, 1828, to Miss Polly B. Pantier, daughter if James Pantier, originally from Kentucky; her father was born in one of the then frontier forts in Kentucky, and she remembers hearing him tell that when a mere lad he ate some wheaten cakes or bread, which he was afterward informed was made from the first wheat ever raised in Kentucky; it was ground by hand, or rather crushed with stones in the crudest manner, and was sifted by his mothers' homespun nightcap; that was at the time of Daniel Boone and his trusty rifle were becoming famous in the wilds of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Summers have been blessed with nine children, all of whom are now living - Elizabeth, who married David Poole; Harriet, married to Amster Cook, a soldier; Arathusa, married to Marcus Price; Susanah, married to John Peters, Mary, married to James Carl; Eady, married to Anderson Lewis; Eliza, married to Jefferson Goodin; James, supposed to be in Oregon; David A., married to Ellen Macomber, and is a farmer in Cascade Township. They have upward to forty grand children and four great-grandchildren. He had 220 acres in his original farm which he carried on until all his children were of aged, when he sold out and moved to East Cascade, where he now resides. He still owns a small farm near Cascade, which he usually rents; he also owns a brick business block on the main street. In January, 1852, he went to California, where he mined until 1855, when he returned, having bettered his condition. He has never desired and accepted political office, although to his own business, keeping debts paid, taking few risks, but faithfully meeting all the obligations of a good citizen. He has been an active member of the Methodist Church more than forty years. He and his worthy wife are passing to the sunset of life surrounded by friends and blessed with a competency.

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FRED SUNDERMEYER, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Durango; born Feb. 15, 1835, in Hanover; in 1856, he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 117 acres of land, which he has improved. Married Mena Dietrich in 1869; she was born in Hanover; they have five children - Julia, Mena, Bertha, August, and Dora. Lutheran in religion.

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OWEN SWEENEY, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Cascade; born in Ireland in 1815; emigrated to America in 1840; stopped two years in Maryland; removed to Dubuque Co., Iowa, in 1842; being on of the pioneers of his locality, he has done much work in its improvements, and by industry and economy has acquired possession of a handsome landed property; has 320 acres in Sections 9, 10 and 11. Religion, Roman Catholic; politics, Democratic. He was married, June 4, 1858, to Catharine Lawler, also a native of Ireland; they have nine children living - Maria C., Margaret, Bridget, Peter, Sarah, Thomas, Julia, Owen and Dennis; three have died - Margaret, Thomas, and one who died in infancy.

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JAMES W. TAYLOR, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O., Dubuque; born April 9, 1821, in Sullivan Co., Tenn; when a boy, he came with his parents to Kentucky; thence to Illinois; in 1834, they removed to Galena; his father being a millwright, he also earned his trade as well as that of carpenter; in 1836, they built a mill in Tete des Mortes Township, Jackson Co.; in 1837, they came to Dubuque Co., and rebuilt a mill for Wheeler & Loomis, in Center; they also built the works known as Craig's mill and Grist Mill, owned by John W. Gray, of Potosi, Wis.; his brother Joel B., was licensed to preach in about 1840, and has been constantly engaged in this work ever since; his first charge was the M.E. Church at Pleasant Valley; he preached in the Centenary Church, at Dubuque, two years; he is now located at Toledo, Iowa. In 1846, Mr. T. removed to Center Township and improved a farm of eighty acres; this farm he afterward sold; in 1867, he came to his present location; he now owns 160 acres. He has been Township Treasurer of Center Township and School Director; for the past forty years he has been Steward or leader in the M. E.Church. Married Eliza L. Morgan in 1847; she was born in Wisconsin; had twelve children; eight living - Emeline, Mary A., Landon F., Sarah E., George W., Thomas, Ulysses H., Jennie and John B. M. E. Church.

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HENRY TEGELER, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Dyersville; born Sept. 19, 1852, in Quincy, Ill.; in 1855, came, with his parents to Dubuque Co.; lived in Liberty Township till 1870, when he went to Milwaukee and attended the St. Francis College till 1873, then returned to Dubuque Co. and engaged in teaching school; he now owns eighty-four acres of land on which he lives and cultivates. Married Anna Burkle Oct. 18, 1877; she was born in Dyersville; they have one child - Cecelia. Catholic.

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JOHN H. THEDINGA, (deceased) was the son of Claus Herman and Follmina Margaretha Thedinga, and was born Mary 25, 1814, on the family estate. "b," near Leer, in the province of Ostfriesland, Kingdom of Hanover, Europe; being of a studious nature and very delicate in his early youth, he was destined to study law and for this purpose received a classical education; but, at the age of 18 years, when prepared to enter the university, he, being in poor health, with the assent of his father (influenced by his
brothers-in-law, who were all merchants), resolved to abandon his studies and become a merchant. In 1832. he went to Amsterdam and took a position in the counting house of a brother-in-law, where he remained till 1835, when he came to the United States too visit a sister, who had removed to St. Louis, Mo., with her husband the year before; but instead of returning to Europe, as intended, he concluded to remain here. He at first entered into business in St. Louis with his brother-in-law, I. N. A. Bentzen, under the firm name of I. N. A. Bentzen & Co., but soon dissolved this partnership, and came to Dubuque with a young Russian gentleman, Mr. Konopka, with whom he opened store at Peru, then a flourishing village a few miles north of Dubuque. They closed this business in the spring of 1837. In 1838, Mr. Thedinga went to St. Louis, but, in 1839, he returned to Dubuque and opened a store in connection with his brother-in-law, Bentzen. From
that time, he remained in Dubuque, and was engaged in various kinds of commerce till 1852, then, in consequence of injuries received in 1851, by which his sight was nearly destroyed, he quit the commercial business. It was on the evening of Jan. 11, 1851, that this terrible calamity befell him. He was then in the grocery and drug business, and, on Saturday evening, when he and two clerks were alone in the store, one of the clerks, whom he had befriended and given an interest in the drug department, in apparently his usual mood, placed a lot of sulphuric acid upon the stove and heated it to a boiling point' this he then suddenly dashed into the face of Mr. Thedinga . The agony was excruciating, as it burned its way into the flesh and consumed one of the eyeballs. Frantic with pain, he ran to the door screaming "Murder!" and fell prostrate upon the sidewalk. As soon as it was discovered what had been done, the most intense excitement prevailed; the bells were rung, and all the town was called out to search for the dastard who had perpetrated this diabolical act. He could not be found that night, but next morning he was discovered dead in a stable in the vicinity - a suicide by strychnine. Mr. Thedinga never harbored any ill feeling toward the man who had done him such an irreparable injury, believing him to have been insane, though no trace of it had been discovered before. The last entry in the diary of the man who did this fiendish act was "Strange that I could do my best friend such a terrible injury.". In the year 1846, he was married to Maria Louise, daughter of Dr. C. Koepfli, by whom he had thirteen children - four sons and nine daughters; his wife, two sons, and seven daughters survived him. He held several offices of honor and trust; in 1844, he was elected Alderman, and re-elected in 1845 and 1846; in 1850, he was elected County Commissioner; in 1852-54, Justice of the Peace; in 1858, member of the Board of Education, to which position he was continually re-elected without opposition, and which he held at the time of his death; in 1861, he was chairman of the Board of Supervisors, and, in 1862 and 1863, Mayor of the city of Dubuque; he was the first German Mayor of the city; in 1847, he was one of the committee of twenty-five citizens to settle all land claims in the mining district of Dubuque before the land sales. When the German Savings Bank (afterward German Bank) was established in the fall of 1864, he was elected President and remained at the head of this institution until his death. As member of the Board of Education, he was for many years Chairman of the Finance Committee, and it was to his good judgment and management, mainly, the the school finances of Dubuque City were gotten in such good condition. He died Dec. 13, 1876, aged 65 year and 6 months. We add the following from the Dubuque Times of Dec. 14, 1876: " In whatever position he was placed, he was no passive figure-head, of the party that nominated him; he was always a positive power, actively influential, and that always on the side of morality, justice and right. When storms of opposition came that others found it impossible to breast, he remained firm and calm and steadfast. When others deemed that a little compromising, a little temporizing might be the better policy, he asked only where the right was, and then he took and kept his position. When others were carried off their feet by some tidal wave of enthusiasm or rush of indignation, his judgment was as clear and unperturbed as ever. Yet while so strong in all the element of intellectual and moral manhood, he assumed no air of bearing of superiority, his sympathies went forth not only toward all good and noble things, but toward all mankind, making him ever genial and approachable. His clear judgement and strong self-control was combined with the sincerity and simplicity of a child. When things were going wrong in city and county, in public or private affairs, in financial matters or school matters or social matters, as the case might be, no one ever appealed to him without receiving not only a kindly, but a cordial hearing; certainly wise and practical suggestions, and, if possible, active assistance. To say that his neighbors and acquaintances esteemed him is too weak and expression; they loved him, rather. To his wife and children he was less a husband and father than their genial associate and dearest friend."

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N. H. THEDINGA, dealer in hardware, nails and paints, 679 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque March 28, 1847; he grew up to manhood and received his education here; he engaged in the hardware business in 1872, and is building up a large trade. In May, 1876, he was united in marriage to Miss Louise Ryhiner, daughter of Dr. Ryhiner, of Highland, Ill.; they have one daughter - Ilda.

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N. O. THEISEN, proprietor of New Harmony Hall, corner Tenth and Clay Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Luxemburg Feb. 17, 1833; America in 1855, and came to Iowa and located in Tete des Morts, Jackson Co.; engaged in mercantile business and buying grain for four years; then came to Mosalem Township, this county, and opened a store; engaged in farming about ten years, then came to Dubuque, and since then has been in present business. He married Miss Catherine Noel, from this county, Jan. 29, 1861; they have six children - John, Frank, Mary, Katie, Lena, Annie.

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JOHN THEISEN, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. Cottage Hill; born April 13, 1833, in Prussia; in 1857, he came to Chicago, thence to Wisconsin; in 1868, he came to his present farm, consisting of 120 acres of land. Married Anna Mary Schafer, in 1860; she was born in Prussia; have four children - Mary F., Anna M., John, and Catharine. Catholic.

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P. J. THEVIOT, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born Feb. 26, 1811, in Prussia; in 1842 came to New Orleans; in 1843, he came to Dubuque Co., where he has since lived. For a number of years after coming here he had usually been called upon to draw up legal documents and other clerical work, he then being the most competent to perform this work. He entered 160 acres of land; , now owns 80 acres. He has held all the township and school offices. Married Rosa Kestler Feb. 13, 1850; she was born Oct. 16, 1829, in Switzerland; they have had eight children, four living - Oliver, Louis, Albert and William. Catholic in religion.

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MRS. HENRIETTA THOMPSON, Sec. 34; P. O. Sageville; her husband H. Thompson, was born Sept. 26, 1873, in Kentucky; at the age of about 10 years, he came with his parents to Missouri; in 1841, he came to Dubuque Co., where he lived till the time of his death, which occurred in December 1859; he built his mill in 1852, which is known as the Thompson Flouring Mill; this mill is of stone and has a capacity of grinding about 125 bushels per day. He married Miss Henritta Challes in August 1851; she was born in Baltimore, Md.; when a child, she came with her parents to Ohio; in 1848, they came to Dubuque Co.; she owns as individual half-interest in 170 acres of land, with her homestead; she has five children - John, Samuel, Gilbert, Harvey and Allen. Attend the M. E. Church.

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J. W. THOMPSON physician, oculist and aurist, 153 Ninth Street, Dubuque, a native of Monmouth County, N. J.; when 12 years of age, he came to Ohio; he attended school there and entered the University of Michigan, where he completed his literary course and took two courses in the medical department of the University and graduated at Starling Medical College, Columbus, Ohio, in 1865; after graduating, he went abroad and spent one year in London and one year in Vienna; after his return, he engaged in the practice of medicine in Indiana for twelve years; he came to Dubuque in February, 1879, and since then has practiced his profession here, giving special attention to the treating of the eye and ear, and is building up a good practice.

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JOHN THOMPSON of the firm of L. D. Randall & Co., wholesale dealers in leather and saddlery hardware; is a native of Chautauqua Co., N. Y., and was born on Aug. 1, 1821; he grew up to manhood in that State, and came West in the summer of 1854, and located at Galena; he came to Dubuque in 1857, and in 1861 he associated with his present partner, L. D. Randall, and since then they have successfully carried on the leading and largest wholesale, leather and saddlery hardware trade west of the Mississippi River; in 1876, Mr. Thompson was appointed Receiver of the Chicago, Clinton & Dubuque and the Chicago, Dubuque, & Minnesota Railroads; the appointment was entirely unsolicited by him directly or indirectly, though there were many applicants for the position; he turned the road over to the bondholders after it was sold, and made his final report in April 1877, and was complimented by the court for his able management and the full and complete account rendered of the same. Mr. Thompson in politics is an Independent Democrat; he is not an office-seeker; he has held the office of Mayor of the city three terms; he was elected in 1862; the following year, he was unanimously re-elected by both parties without opposition, and he was again re-elected, and the administration of the affairs of the city during that time was characterized by great energy and efficiency; it being during the war, he was active in lending his aid in raising volunteers for the support of the Government; he is a great admirer and an intimate personal friend of Gen. Grant, and during his administration as Mayor of the city, tendered him one of the finest receptions that he had ever received at that time, and since his return from abroad, on the 1st of December, 1879, he rendered him a private reception at his elegant residence on Locust Street, in this city. In March 1843, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Mary Marshall, from Erie Co., Penn.; they have two children - one son - J. Frank, and one daughter, Ella M.

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BERNARD TIGGES, farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; he was born in February, 1797, in Germany; in 1852, he came to Dubuque; they own 118 acres of land. He married Agnes Linemann in 1839; she was born in 1813 in Germany; have five children - Fred, Catharine, Frank, Bernard, and John; Frank was married to Anna Klein Feb. 28, 1878; she was born in Peru Township; they have one child - Mary; he has been Constable, President of the School Board, is Township Treasurer; he manages this farm; his brother Bernard married Catharine Utzig Nov. 25, 1879; she was born in Peru Township.

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GEORGE L. TORBERT, Postmaster, Dubuque; a native of Camden, Oneida Co., N. Y.; he grew up to manhood and received his education in that State; he came West to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque in November 1855, and engaged in real-estate and loan business, and afterward connected insurance with it; after the was breaking out of the rebellion, he was appointed Quartermaster, and served in that position at Camp Union during the early part of the war; he was afterward commissioned Major of the 46th I.V.I.; he received the appointment of Postmaster of Dubuque, March 25, 1872, and is serving his seventh year. He was united in marriage to Miss Margaret R. Rockwell, from Utica, N.Y., Oct. 20, 1869; they have three children - Horace G., Kate Kellogg and James R.

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W. H. TORBERT, wholesale druggist, 576 Main Street, Dubuque, warehouse 445 and 447 White Street; the drug business now carried on by the subject of this sketch was established by Timothy Mason, in 1837; he was succeeded in the business by P.C. Sampson; Mr. Torbert was a partner of Mr. Sampson, and succeeded him in the business; Mr. Torbert is a native of Camden, Oneida Co., N. Y.; and was born in 1845; he came West to Dubuque in 1864, and in 1868 located here permanently; he carries on both wholesale and retail business; he has by his ability and energy built up a large trade, which extends through Iowa in Minnesota, Nebraska, Dakota, Illinois and Wisconsin; he gives special attention to the retail prescription department of his store, and the perfection it has attained we should expect for two reasons - the first one is the almost unparalleled accuracy with which prescriptions have been put up by this house; it being a fact that in 100,000 prescriptions put up in the last twenty years, no error of an important or serious character has been made; secondly, every patient and customer knows that their medicine will be compounded with pure goods at the lowest possible prices.

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JOHN TOUSSAINT, general merchandist, Worthington; born Nov. 17, 1835. in Luxemburg, Germany; in 1852, he came to Chicago; in 1865, to Port Washington, Wis.; there he engaged in the foundry business about two years; this business he followed in Germany; in 1868, he came to Worthington and commenced his present business; during the years of 1874 to 1877, was then dealing in dressed hogs and grain, as well as general merchandising. Married Mary Miller Dec. 13, 1856; she was born in Luxemburg, Germany, in 1837; they have four children - John, Henry, Apollonia, Nick. Catholic.

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PAUL TRAUT, of the firm of Traut & Heer, dealers in hats, caps and furs, and gents' furnishing goods, No. 559 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque June 27, 1850; he grew up to manhood and received his education here; he was book-keeper in the wholesale drug house of E. H. Moore for five years; in 1873, he engaged in the wholesale liquor business, firm Paul Traut & Co., and continued for six years; in 1879, he engaged in his present business and is building up a good trade; he is a member of the Dubuque Sharpshooters. In April, 1873, Mr. Traut was united in marriage to Miss Louise Jaeger, a native of the city of Dubuque; they have four children - Nora, Frank, Louise M., Mary A.

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HUGH TREANOR, retired, 190 Julien Avenue, Dubuque; was born in the North of Ireland Aug. 18, 1802; he grew up to manhood there and emigrated to America in 1832; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in June 1837, and was one of the early settlers; he engaged in mining for several years, and then engaged in the grocery trade; ht continued in mercantile business about a quarter of of century; he has held the office of City Alderman for eight years. He was united in marriage to Miss Catharine Sherlocke, a native of the North of Ireland, Sept. 16, 1828; she died in 1860; they had eight children, six of whom survive - Philomine, Catharine, Joseph, Elizabeth, Mary and Hugh. Mr. Treanor was actively identified with the State militia at an early day, and was Captain of the third company of militia raised in Iowa; his command was called out and were under arms during the Missouri boundary line war; during the Mexican was, eighty men of his company volunteered, and Mr. Treanor was elected Captain, but before going into the field orders came for them to remain here; as their services might be needed to assist in defense of the British line.

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ALFRED TREDWAY, of the firm Andrew, Tredway & Sons, wholesale dealers in heavy and shelf hardware, 484 to 488 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of the State of New York, and was born in New York City 1817; he grew up to manhood and lived in that city and State until 1851, when he came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque; in 1853, he associated with his present partner, Mr. William Andrew and established the house of Andrew & Tredway, which has successfully carried on the leading trade in their line in Dubuque for over a quarter of a century; in addition to their large and commodious double store on Main Street, they have three stores fronting on Iowa street, stored with iron, heavy hardware and carriage timber, to meet the demands of their jobbing trade; they have a large and extensive business. Mr. Tredway was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth S. Taft, a native of Lyons, N. Y.; they have five children, three sons and two daughters.

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JOHN TREXLER, contractor and builder corner of Jackson and Seventeenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Bavaria, Germany andwas born March 3, 1825; he grew up to manhood there, and emigrated to America in 1852. and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1855, and began working at his trade of carpenter and joiner, and has been engaged in building and contracting for twenty- five years. He belongs to the Pius Society. In October, 1851, Mr. Trexler married Miss Kate Eichmann, a native of Germany; they have six children - Caroline, John, Emma, Louie, Kate and Otto.

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TRILK BROTHERS, ceiling and decorative paper-hangers, house and sign painters, No. 255 Eighth Street, Dubuque; Theodore Trick is a native of Dubuque, and was born May 3, 1852; he grew up and attended school and learned his business here; he engaged in business for himself in 1877, his brother being associated with him, and by industry and close attention to the demands of the trade, they are building up a good business. Adolph Trilk, of the firm of Trilk Brothers, is a native of Dubuque, and was born July 31, 1860; he grew up, and attended school and learned his business here; since 1877 he has been engaged in business with his brother.

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HENRY TRILLER, firm of Triller & Co., proprietors of Thompson's Mill, Sec. 34; P. O. Sageville; born Feb. 1, 1846, in Hesse, Germany; in 1866, came to Galena; in 1873 to Dubuque Co., and ran the Sherrill's Mount Mill about four years; in 1879, he bought the Thompson Mill; this mill has three run of stone, and has a capacity of grinding about 125 bushel per day; Mr. Triller learned the milling business in Germany and has followed it since a boy. Married Dorothea Loetscher July 7, 1873; she was born in Dubuque Co.; have four children - Henry A., A. A., Matilda M. and John O. Presbyterian in religion.

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J. O. TROWER, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. Epworth; born in Indiana Nov. 1, 1840; his parents removed to Linn Co., Iowa, when he was less than a year old, and thence to Dubuque Co. in 1842; remaining in the city of Dubuque five years, they then removed to Vernon Township; from there, after a two years' residence, they came to the farm now occupied by the subject of this sketch in the fall of 1849. Mr. T. is a member of the Christian Church, and was connected therewith at the time of its organization in Peosta and Epworth; is identified with the Republican party; has held township and school offices; He was married, Feb. 5, 1863, to Miss Margaret A. Earl, of Pennsylvania; they have three children - John, William, Garland, Earl and Allen Rowe. Mr. Trower's parents were Garland Trowe r, who died in Dubuque about 1845, and J ane Trower, now Mrs. Webster, having married again in 1849, and removed to Shelby Co., in 1875. Mrs. Trower is a daughter of Benjamin Earl, who died in 1857, and Angelina Earl, now living in Farley, but will probably return to farm near her daughter during 1880.

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JOSEPH TRUEB, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner of Eleventh and Jackson Streets, Dubuque; was born in Switzerland June 12, 1844; he came to America in 1867, and came to Dubuque the same year; engaged at the cabinet and carving trade; he afterward engaged in his present business. In 1868, he married Miss Mary Gurthner, a native of Switzerland; she died in 1875, leaving two children - Louis and Annie.

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MATTHEW TSCHIRGI, JR., City engineer, city hall, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque Nov. 28, 1850; he grew up and attended school here; then entered the University of Michigan, where he took an engineering course and graduated in June, 1872; he opened an office on the corner of Fifth and Main Streets. In 1876, he was elected County Surveyor, and, in April, 1877, he was elected to his present office of City Engineer.

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M. TSCHIRGI, of the firm of Tschirgi & Schwind, brewers, Dubuque; is a native of Switzerland; was born Oct. 25, 1824; grew up to manhood there and emigrated to America in 1845; came to Dubuque in the spring of 1846, and engaged in the brewing business; afterward, in 1854, he formed a partnership with Mr. Schwind, and they engaged in the brewing business, building a brewery on their present location, which was then out of town; they have continued in the business twenty-six years without any change of firm; they have one of the largest and most complete breweries in the State. In 1848, Mr. Tschirgi married Miss Kathrina Zollicoffer, a native of Switzerland; her father was one of the earliest settlers, and came here in 1834; he died in 1873. Mr. and Mrs. Tschirgi have seven children - Catharine (now Mrs. F. Jaeger, of this city), Marrhew (City Engineer of Dubuque), Louise (now Mrs. Jacob Traut, of this city), John, George, Arnold and Frank.

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A. C. TUCKER, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Pin Oak; he was born Feb. 23, 1833, in Jefferson Co., N. Y.; in 1857, he came to Dubuque Co.; owns 400 acres of land; he has been President of the School Board and Director, Township Clerk, etc. Married Miss S. F. Floyd in 1860; she was born in 1840 in Concord Township; they had three children, two living - George and John; they lost Elizabeth, aged 3 years. Christian Church.

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L. E. TUCKER, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Pin Oak; born Oct. 18, 1838, in Rutland, Jefferson Co., N. Y.; in 1862 he came West and has been engaged in teaching school and dealing in general merchandise at various points, both in Illinois and Iowa; he has been a resident of this township since 1869; he owns large tracts of land in this county, as well as in other parts of the State. He married Miss Fannie E., daughter of J. H. Floyd, who is probably the oldest settler and also the largest land-owner in the county; they were married June 21, 1869; she was born in Concord Township; they have three children - Martha E., Nettie C. and Jackson G.

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NICHOLAS TUSING, stock-dealer and dealer in fresh and salted meats, 185 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Luxemburg Jan. 7, 1830; he emigrated to the United States in 1858, and came to Dubuque the same year; engaged in buying stock six years, then engaged in farming until 1874, when he again engaged in buying stock, and has contined in this business since then; he also carried on a meat market on Main street. In 1860, he married Miss Connolly, a native of Ireland; they have three children - Catharine, Margaret, Ellen.

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L. B. TUTTLE, carpenter and builder, corner Iowa and Fifth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Connecticut; he came West to Iowa and arrived in Dubuque, Oct. 11, 1858; he learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, and afterward he engaged in building, and has continued in the business for the past fifteen years, and has built up a good business; he has been connected with the Blue Lodge, the Chapter and Commandery, and all Masonic bodies. He was in the army; enlisted in the 44th I. V. I. He married Miss Julia Thurston, of Canada, in 1866.

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D. W. TYLER, foreman of machine-shop of Novelty Iron Works, residence, 709 West Fifth Street; is a native of Massachusetts, and was born in Worcester; he grew up and learned the trade of machinist; after reaching manhood, he went South and was engaged in putting up steam mills in Louisiana until the was broke out; he came North in 1861. Married M iss Harriett M. Freeman, a native of Cleveland, Ohio. During the war he served in the Ordinance Department as Inspector of Arms; after the was, he came West to Minnesota; in 1871, he came to Dubuque, and since then for nine years has held the position of foreman of machine-shop of Novelty Iron Works and he is a member of the firm of Grow & Tyler, manufacturers of the turbine water-wheel which is acknowledged to be the best water-wheel manufactured. Mr. & Mrs. Tyler have four children - Herbert F., Fred W., Frank E. and Wilma Jessie May. Mr. Tyler belongs to the A. O. U. W., the Knights of Honor and the Independent Order of Foresters.

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MRS. JACOBINA UFFEL, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner Jackson and Nineteenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Germany; she came to America in 1850, and the same year came to Dubuque. Before leaving Germany, in 1849, she married Fred Von Uffel, a native of Germany; he died Aug. 7, 1856; they had two children, and all died within one year; Mrs. Uffel has carried on the business since his death, a period of twenty-four years; she paid all the debts of the store and paid for her house; she does her own buying and selling and manages everything for herself; she has good credit and can buy all the goods she wants; there are very few men who conduct their business with more care and prudence.

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SAMUEL UPTON, proprietor of the American Restaurant, No. 583 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of England, and was born Feb. 15, 1832; came to America in 1850, and came to Dubuque in 1852; engaged in making brick and mining; he established his present business in 1862, corner Seventh and Main Streets, and was burned out in 1874; since then has been in present location; the American Restaurant is the oldest in the city; has served two years and Deputy Marshal; belongs or I. O. O. Foresters. He married Miss Mary A. Nelson, from Galena, Nov. 11, 1856; they have six children - Wallace, William H., Kate, George, Charlie and Fannie.

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J. B. UTT, firm of Utt Bros., attorneys, Dyersville; he was born Oct. 14, 1854, in Platteville, Wis.; there attended the normal school; he commenced reading law in 1876, and attended the university at Ann Arbor; graduated there in 1877; he then removed to Dyersville, and has been in constant practice ever since; his two brothers are practicing law in Dubuque, he being a member of the firm.

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A. H. VAN ANDA, farmer, P. O. Epworth; born in Lycoming Co., Penn., Sept. 2, 1810; came to McHenry, Ill., in 1845; was there four years, and then removed to Dubuque Co. in 1849; he settled in Taylor Township when it only had nine people in it, and not over a section of land broken for cultivation in the township; he has farmed all his life, except some seven years employed on public works, and as conductor on the Williamsport & Elmira Railroad in New York, and on the Georgia & Forsyth Railroad in Georgia, previous to coming West; he bought, in 1849, 160 acres of land in Sec. 21, Taylor Township, on which he lived till, 1875, since which time he has lived in Epworth, where he has a good house and lot, and five acres of land. Mr. V. is a Methodist and a Republican. He married, June 10, 1842, Miss Ann E. Newell, of Pennsylvania; they have three children living - Francis E., Arthur J. and Isabella; one child, Willard N., is dead.

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JAMES VANDIVER, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Worthington; born April ____, 1820______Co., Ind.; in 1841, came to Dubuque Co., the following year, he went to Galena and was there engaged in lead mining till 1849, when he returned to Dubuque Co. where he has since lived; he own 150 acres of land, which he entered. Married Nancy Sharp Nov. 9, 1849; she was born in Clark Co., Ill.; have six children - Eliza Athelia, Richmond, Dorron, Rosa, Patterson, Lola M. Republican.

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LUCIUS VANDIVER, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Worthington; born April 22, 1820, in Parke Co., Ind.; in 1840, he came to Galena, IlL., and engaged in mining most of the time till 1848, when he came to Dubuque Co., he owns 180 acres of land, which he entered. Married Susan Gallahan in 1848; she was born in 1828, in Ohio, and died in 1862; have six children - John W. Jonas, James, George, Maggie and Martha. Second marriage to Sarah Bunn in July, 1870; she was born in England; have four children - Bertram, Charles, Louisa E. and Geneva. Republican.

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CHRIS VATH, shaving and hair-cutting parlor, No. 861 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born Aug. 14, 1832; he grew up and leaned his trade there; he came to the United States in 1849, and came to Iowa in October, 1855, and located in Dubuque and engaged in his present business; he has carried on the business longer than any barber in Dubuque; he belongs to the I. O. O. F., and to the United Workmen and the the Turner Society. He married Miss Catharine Seilmann, a native of Germany, Aug. 30, 1856; they have six children - Gustave, Louise, William, Lena, John and Julia.

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JOHN VOEGE, bakery and confectionery, No. 337, Thirteenth Street, Dubuque; was born in Germany June 21, 1848; he came to the United States in 1864; he came to Iowa in 1869, and located in Jackson Co. and engaged in farming; continued farming ten years, then sold his farm and came to Dubuque and engaged in the bakery and confectionery business. In 1867, he married Miss Sophia Hagerhorst, from Ohio; they have four children - Tillie, Katie, Willie and Lulu.

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ERNST W. VOGEL, of the firm of Vogel & Ferguson, plumbers, steam and gas fitters, and dealers in all kinds of plumbing material, iron pumps, bath tubs and chandeliers, No. 264 Eighth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co., and was born in the city of Dubuque Nov. 4, 1856; he grew up, attended school and learned his trade here; in 1879, he engaged in business with his present partner, and they are building up a good trade.

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ANTON VOGLER, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, No. 2190 Couler Avenue, Dubuque; was born in Switzerland Oct. 23, 1845; his parents came to America in 1849; they came to Dubuque the same year; he grew up and leaned his trade here; he engaged in his present business in 1873, and has continued it since then; he belongs to the Alphonsus Society and to the German Mutual Society, He married Miss Anna Spahn, from Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, Oct. 30, 1871; they have three sons - Leo, Alouis and Alfred.

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JOHN VYVERBERG, farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Dec. 24, 1841 in Holland; in 1847 he came to Dubuque Co.; he owns 170 acres of land. He married Miss Caroline Siber May 29, 1873; she was born Nov. 4, 1848, in Germany; she came to Dubuque Co., in 1873; they have four children - William, Emma, Kryn, and Alfred; his father, Kryn Vyverberg, was born Jan. 4, 1807 in Holland; He married Jennie Freaze in 1835; she was born Sept. 10, 1815, in Holland; they have six children - Hannah, Jennie, William, John, Carrie and Mena. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

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WILLIAM VYVERBERG, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Sept. 30, 1838, in Holland; in 1847, he came with his parents to Dubuque Co.; his parents are now living with his brother John; he owns 170 acres of land. Married Anna Leother in October 1866; she was born in Switzerland in 1845; they have eight children - William, Anna, Mena, Dora, John, Mary, Henry and Lydia; he has been Constable. Presbyterian in religion; Republican in politics.

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A. WAGNER, manufacturer and dealer in all kinds of furniture, Tremont House Block, Eighth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born March 30, 1833; he emigrated to America in 1848; lived in New York ten years, and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in July, 1857; he began working at his trade for awhile and then engaged in the furniture business for himself, and has built up a good trade; he manufactures and does upholstering; employs from five to ten men. Mr. Wagner was united in marriage to Miss Louise S. Stumpf, a native of Germany, Oct. 28, 1861; they have six children - Ferdinand, Amelia, Tina, Hugo, L. Hermann and Adolph. Mr. Wagner has one son, Charles, by a former wife. When Mr. Wagner began life he had nothing, and owes his success to his own efforts. His father, Henry Wagner, was born in 1801, and is still living in this city; his wife died one year ago, after they had lived together fifty-six years.

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MARTIN WAGNER, of the firm of Schulte & Wagner, stonecutters and contractors, White Street, corner Tenth, Dubuque; is a native of Germany, and was born in Hesse-Datmstadt in 1833; he grew up and learned his trade there, and came to the United States in 1854; he came to Dubuque in September of the same year, and began working at his trade; in 1867, he associated with Mr. Schulte, and since then they have carried on the business and have built up a large trade. In 1860, he married Miss Margaret Burkhart, from Byrne, Germany; they have eight children - Mary, Margaret, Henry, Caddie, Lizzie, John, Mena and Christina. Mr. Wagner belongs to the Germany Benevolent Society.

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STEPHEN WAGNER, farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. Sherrill's Mount; born Aug. 15, 1811, in Luxemburg, Germany; in 1843, he came to New York City, thence to Buffalo, N. Y.; in 1844 he came to Stark Co., Ohio; in 1846, he came to Dubuque Co., he owns 270 acres of land, also 80 acres in Wisconsin; has been School Director and Township Treasurer. Married Elizabeth Fitler in 1844; she was born Oct. 18, 1818, in Luxembourg, Germany, and died May 2, 1872; have eight children - Mary, Catharine, John, Frank, Lena, Lambert and Anna. Catholic in religion.

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A. C. WALKER, of the firm of A. C. Walker & Co., dealers in dry goods and groceries, Farley; is a native of Vermont, and was born in Dummerston, Windham, Co., Sept. 27, 1834; he grew up to manhood there, and, in 1852, went to Boston, and remained in that city for ten years; in 1865, he came to Dubuque Co., and located at Farley, and engaged in mercantile business, and has continued since then. The firm of A. C. Walker & Co., is the oldest mercantile house engaged in business here. Mr. Walker holds the office of Mayor of Farley, and also President of the Public Library. On Dec. 31, 1868, Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Richards, from Silver Lake, Penn; they have has one son, Sewell A., not living.

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C. H. WALKER, proprietor of Walker's dairy, also member of the firm of Atherton, Walker & Co., miller, Iowa Street, between Second and Third, Dubuque; is a native of Windham Co., Vt., and was born Jan. 3, 1823; he grew up to manhood there, and came West to Iowa in the spring of 1856, settled in Dubuque County, and engaged in the wood business; in 1859, he engaged in the dairy business, and has carried on the business since then over twenty-one years; his dairy farm is located just outside of the city limits; he milks from fifty to one hundred cows, and has a large trade; Mr. Walker is also engaged in the milling business, being of the firm of Atherton Walker & Co., In December, 1853, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah T. Martin, a native of Brattleboro, Windham Co., Vt.; they have four children - Cyrel M., Elizabeth T., James B. and Marshall L.

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F. T. WALKER, attorney at law, of the firm of Walker & Rhomberg, law, loan, real estate and collecting, corner Fifth and Main Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Ontario, Canada, and was born in the town of Lindsay, Aug. 1, 1841; he grew up and received a thorough classical and collegiate education in Montreal and Quebec, remaing in college for nine years; he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque April 15, 1864; he entered the law office of Griffith & Knight, and commenced reading law; he completed his law studies and was admitted to the bar in 1867, and has practiced his profession here; in August, 1875, he associated with Mr. Rhomberg, and engaged in the law, loan, real estate and collecting business, operating mostly in Northern Iowa and Southern Minnesota, and within the past five years they have loaned over $1, 000,000 - ca fact which speaks very highly for their integrity and fair dealing; they own the only complete set of abstract books in Dubuque County. Mr. Walker was united in marriage July 1, 1867, to Miss Nellie J. Leydon, of this city; they have four daughters.

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M. M. WALKER, commission merchant, dealer in oils and fruits, 242 to 248 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dummerston, Windham Co., Vt., , and was born in 1836; when 18 years of age, he went to Boston, and remained there until 1856, when he came West to Iowa and located at Dubuque; he engaged in the grain business, and has built up an extensive trade; he is a heavy dealer in oil and gives special attention to this brach of the business and deals, largely in fruit during the season; he is also connected with the Key City Barrel Company; Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Cornelia Fairbanks, of Worcester, Mass.

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P. F. WALKER, of the firm of A. C. Walker & Co., dealers in dry goods and groceries, Farley; is a native of Dummerston, Windham, Co., Vt., and was born June 4, 1826; he grew up to manhood in that State, and came West to Iowa in 1855, and located in Dubuque, remained there six years, and came to Farley in 1861 and engaged in mercantile business, in 1865, the firm of A. C. Walker & Co. was organized, and is the oldest business firm here; Mr. Walker established the business, in 1861, and is the oldest merchant here. He of County Supervisor, Assessor, and school offices, and is at this time President of the School Board. In September, 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss L. M. Walker, a native of Dummerston, Windham, Co., Vt., they have has four children, only one of whom survives, a son, Robert S.

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RICHARD WALLER, capitalist, Bluff Street, Dubuque; is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born Feb. 26, 1796; he grew up to manhood there and married Miss Mary Harker, from the same place, Dec. 1, 1818; she was born Jan.4, 1800; they emigrated to America, leaving Liverpool May 4, 1834, and arrived here in Dubuque, in August; during the same fall, he, with Mr. Bonson and others, built a blast furnace at Little Platte; it was the first blast furnace for smelting mineral erected in this country, the following year they built three more, one at the mouth of the Fever River, one at Rockdale and one at Mineral Point, and all are now standing, except one. Mr. Waller continued successfully in the smelting business for about thirty years; he was associated with Mr. J. P. Farley in the mercantile business, and also with Mr. Christman; he is one of the earliest settlers, and there are few now living that were here when he came; when Mr. Waller began life, he had nothing, but by industry and good management, he has acquired a large property; he and his wife have been prominent members of the Methodist Church for a great many years; they have had eleven children, only three of whom survive - Robert, living in Rockdale, Mary Ann, now Mrs A. W. Kemler, and Sidonia, now Mrs. A. W. Hosford, both of this city.

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JOHN R. WALLER, of the firm of Duncan & Waller, loan broker, real estate, insurance and collecting agents, 151 Fifth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Dubuque Co, and a son of Robert and Maria Waller, who were among the early settlers of Dubuque; he was born March 10, 1845; he grew up to manhood and received his education here; during the war, he enlisted in the 44th I. V. I, Co. A; after his return from the service, he engaged in smelting and continued for four years; In January 1871, he associated with Mr. E. W. Duncan and engaged in his present business. Mr. Waller was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Cooper, daughter of A. A. Cooper Jan 24, 1877; they have one daughter - Mary.

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JAMES WALLIS, of the firm of John Bell & Co., wholesale dealers in dry goods and notions, 445 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of England, and was born Sept. 25, 1813; he grew up to manhood there and came to America in 1842; he spent one year in Ohio, and, in 1843, and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque; he engaged in mining for some years, then went to Mineral Point, Wis, where he had charge of a furnace, and sold exchange for James Carter & Co., bankers of Galena; he returned here and took charge of a merchant flouring-mill at Rockdale for several years; in 1862, he engaged in the mercantile business and became a member of the wholesale dry-goods house of John Bell & Co., and, since then has been a member of the firm. In February 1843, Mr. Wallis was united in marriage to Miss Ann Bell, a native of England; she came to this country in childhood; they have two children, one daughter - Sarah J., now Mrs. Winall, living in this city, and John W., connected with the wholesale dry-good house of John Bell & Co. Mr. and Mrs. Wallis have brought up two of their nephews and given them a home. When Mr. Wallis came to this country, he had nothing; he has been successfully engaged in business for one-third of a century, and enjoys an enviable reputation for integrity and fair dealing, and has one of the most pleasant and attractive homes in Dubuque.

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N. J. WALSH, State Manager of the American Sewing Machine, 69 Eighth Street, Dubuque; is a native of New Jersey, and was born in Norristown May 14, 1857; his parents came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1860, and he grew up and attended school here; in 1877, he was appointed Manager for this State of the American Sewing Machine, and since then he has held that position; he has built up a large trade.

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MARSHALL H. WAPLES, physician and surgeon, Main Street, Dubuque; is a son of the late Peter Waples, M. D.; his parents were among the early settlers here; he was born in the city of Dubuque July 3, 1841; his early boyhood days were spent here until 12 years of age, when he went to Philadelphia and completed his education there; he afterward studied medicine and graduated at Jefferson College, Philadelphia, in 1865; after graduating he was appointed one of the physicians in Blockley Hospital, and remained there over a year, and was appointed Contract Surgeon in one of the army hospitals; he returned to Dubuque in 1868, and engaged in the practice of medicine, and since then has practiced his profession here. He held the office of County Physician, and has served as a member of the Board of Health, and for ten years he has been Commissioner of Insanity for Dubuque Co.; he has held the office of President of the Dubuque County Medical Society, and is a member of the State Medical Society. He was united in marriage, Dec. 10, 1875, to Miss Louise Stewart, daughter of W. G. Stewart, President of the Dubuque County Bank, and one of the oldest settlers of the county; they have two children - Laura and Marcia.Peter Waples, the father of Dr. Waples, was a native of the State of Delaware, and was born Aug. 18, 1814; when 14 years of age, he went to Philadelphia and entered a store as a clerk, and afterward became a successful merchant there; in 1838 he came to Iowa and located at Dubuque; in 1839, he engaged in business on his own account on the corner where the Julien House now stands; he built the Julien House, which was then called the Waples House - at that time the boast of the city and the largest house in the Northwest; he continued in business here until 1851, when he returned to Philadelphia and opened an extensive clothing store, and continued for ten years, until the breaking-out of the war. Mr. Waples married Miss Elizabeth Burton, a native of Delaware, and his death occurred in November, 1870; his wife survived him only one month later; her death occurred in December, 1870; they left three children - Mrs. R. A. Babbage, Mrs. C. J. Rogers and Dr. Marshall Waples.

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THOMAS WATTERS, proprietor of the South Dubuque Mills; P. O. Rockdale; born in Rockdale Oct. 28, 1840; his parents, Thomas and Ann Watters, were very early settlers here, the present flourishing city of Dubuque being only a small village at the time of their coming; his father's long and useful life here was closed by death in 1866; his mother - and active, cheerful old lady of 78 - is still living, at Center Grove. In 1870, the subject of this sketch was married to Miss Mary Case, daughter of Hiram and Julia Case, who removed from New York, to Dubuque Co. in 1860; her mother was called away by death in 1878; her father is still living, aged 84; previous to 1868, Mr. Watters was engaged in farming, stock-dealing, and kindred enterprises; in the year above mentioned, he purchased an interest in the Rockdale (now South Dubuque) Mills; an additional purchase since makes him the largest owner in these mills, now operated by himself and A. W. Hosford; for the past dozen years, his attention has been given to his business in the mills, whose able management proves the proprietorship to be capable, efficient, energetic and progressive.

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NICHOLAS WEBER, dealer in wines and liquors, 351 Main Street, Dubuque; was born in Luxemburg, Germany, March 10, 1840; he came to America in 1855; came to Iowa the same year, and in 1861 came to Dubuque, and since then has engaged in business here. In April 1866, he married Miss Mary Henry, from Baden, Germany; they have four children - Annie, Lena, Joseph, Martin; they have lost one daughter - Mary H.

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VALENTINE WEBER, contractor and builder, Dyersville; born in Baden, Germany, Nov. 3, 1830; came to America in 1853, worked in Rochester, N. Y., at his trade, that of a mason; in 1854, went to Dubuque, where he lived most of the time until 1860, when he married Barbara Christoph, a sister of the Hon. John Christoph, and afterward settled down in Dyersville, and followed his trade; he is the owner of one of the finest homesteads in the suburbs of Dyersville, situated on "Pleasant Hill, " called Union Park; contains five acres, In 1872, he was elected Assessor, and has held this office ever since, now eight years; in March, 1880, he was elected Director of the public school in Dyersville; his family consists of seven children, four boys and three girls, as follows - Rose, aged 17; Gustave, aged 16; Valentine, aged 14; Annie, aged 13; Joseph, aged 9; Christopher, 7; Louise, 5. Wife's maiden name was Barbara Christoph. Married her Nov. 20, 1860; she was born in Bavaria and came to Dubuque Co. in 1846. Himself and family are Catholics.

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FRED WEIGEL, residence 1192 Locust Street; is a native of Germany, and was born Oct. 28, 1819; his parents emigrated to America and came to Dubuque in June, 1833, and were among the earliest settlers; he grew up to manhood on a farm; then engaged in business; he carried on butchering and packing business successfully for many years. He had nothing when he began life, but by industry and good management became one of Dubuque's successful business men. He has held the office of City Alderman. In 1850, he was united in marriage Miss Susanna Hatton, from Indiana; they have five children - Jessie, Ella, Anna, Lucy and Fred P.

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CHRIS WEINZIERL, dealer in wines and liquors, No. 7 Levee, Dubuque; was born in Bavaria, Germany, January 16, 1841; parents came to Dubuque in 1845 and he grew up and has lived here thirty-five years; he was in the army; enlisted in Co. G, 15th I.V.I. and was in the service over three years; was in battles of Pea Ridge, Chickamauga, Stone River and Mission Ridge; he has been engaged in business here since 1868. In 1868, he married Miss Kate Krapf, a native of Baltimore; they have two children - Freddie and Flora.

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W. E. WELLINGTON, capitalist, residence corner Madison and Seminary Streets; is a native of Massachusetts, and was at Arlington, now West Cambridge, Middlesex Co., July 8, 1834; after reaching manhood he came West to Iowa, and arrived in Dubuque March 29, 1855, with only 15 cents in his pocket; he began driving a dray; in 1856, when he was appointed agent of the Northern Line and the Minnesota Packet Co.; in the spring of 1863, he bought the steamer Pearl, and during the season ha and four others became joint owners of the boat, he having the entire management; in November, 1863, he, with three other persons, formed and organized the North-Western Packet Co.; they bought the stock in the Minnesota Packet Co., and Mr. Wellington was appointed Superintendent and General Manager of the line, and ran it until 1866, when he resigned; from 1863 until 1870 he acted as agent here for different lines, all the boats on the river, and during a portion of the rime there was fierce opposition among the rival lines; the difficult complications caused by this oppositions and conflicting interests, he managed with consummate skill and ability to the entire satisfaction of each line; during the war, the Government transportation under his charge mounted to nearly $2, 000,000, and he never had but one voucher returned for correction; the amount was for $4, and he had omitted his signature to the voucher; Mr. Welllington built the first bulk barges for carrying grain on the river to New Orleans; he signed the first through shipping bill of lading for cargo to Liverpool via New Orleans; In 1873, he was appointed by the Board of Directors to settle the affairs of the Merchants National Bank, and he afterward bought the assets; Mr. Wellington has invested largely in land, and is now a full-fledged granger, and is a carrying on seventeen farms in this State. Mr. Welllington was united in marriage to Miss Addie Jackson, a native of Wooster, Ohio, Jan. 1, 1866; they have one son - Harry S., born May _0, 1867.

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JAMES E. WELSH, Principal of the First Ward School, Dubuque; is a native of New York State, and was born in the city of Rochester; when very young his parents came West to Iowa, and located in Dubuque; he grew up and attended school and graduated at the high school; he engaged in teaching, and was first assistant at the high school; in 1878 he was elected Principal of the First Ward School, and since then has occupied that position.

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S. S. WEMOTT, of the firm of Wemott, Howard & Co., importers and jobbers of crockery, glassware, china and cutlery, and wholesale dealers in wooden and willow ware, 656 to 664 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Lewis Co., N. Y. and was born Jan. 5, 1830; he grew up and received his education in that State; in 1855, he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in business here; he established the present business in 1867, and has built up a large and extensive trade, extending through Iowa and into Minnesota, Nebraska, Dakota, Wisconsin and Northern Illinois. They occupy nine floors, 22 X 114 feet; the carry the largest stock, and do the largest business in their line of any house in the State. Mr. Wemott is President of the Dubuque Library Association. He was united in marriage to Miss Elvira A. Woodworth, a daughter of W. W. Woodworth, Feb. 12, 1862; they have four children - three daughters and one son.

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J. M. WERNER, Deputy Clerk of the Courts of Dubuque Co.; is a native of Germany, and was born in Baden Dec. 16, 1832; his parents came to the United States when he was very young; they came to Ohio, where he grew up and attended school; in 1847, he went to Wisconsin, and lived there until 1863, when he came to Dubuque, and engaged in teaching. In June 1871 he was appointed Deputy Clerk of the Courts, and has held that office for the past ten years. He is a member of the Pius Benevolent Society and Financial Secretary of the Church Building Association. In 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Clara H, Schneider, a native of Wisconsin. Mr. Werner's parents are both living here with him; his mother in 77 years of age; his father in 87 years old. He was a soldier under Napoleon, and was at the burning of Moscow, and in the battles of Leipsic and Waterloo; he also served in the Mexican war, and was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th Ohio I.V, during the rebellion. He was anxious to enlist and go in the service.

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MRS. THERESA WERTIN, proprietor of the American House, corner of Clay and Fourth Streets Dubuque; a native of France; her maiden name was Theresa Kormann; her parents came to America in 1852. In 1854, she married Christ Isaminn, a native Germany; he died in 1859, leaving two daughters, Theresa and Katie; Mrs. Isaminn came to Dubuque in 1860, and the following year, 1861, she married Peter Wertin, he came to Dubuque in 1858, and engaged in the hotel business on the same corner now occupied by the American House; he was also engaged in the ice business for seven years; he died in 1878, leaving four children - Annie, Peter, Joseph and George.

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WILLIAM WESTPHAL, (deceased), was a native of the Kingdom of Westphalia; he came to Dubuque in 1855, and engaged in the hardware trade, and established the business of the present firm of Westphal, Hinds & Co.; in 1857, the firm became Westphal & Hinds; Mr. Westphal was successfully engaged in business until his death, which occurred March 23, 1869; he left four children. Mrs. Westphal is still interested in the firm of Wesphal, Hinds & Co.

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G. R. WEST, retired, Bluff Street, West Hill, Dubuque; is a native of Cayuga Co., N. Y., and was born April 21, 1809; he grew up to manhood there, and removed to Huron Co., Ohio where he was engaged in the mercantile business for some years; in September, 1844, he came to Galena and bought an interest in a mining claim with a Scotchman named Gilbert; Mr. West came over to Dubuque one Saturday, and that night his partner was murdered in his cabin; upon the return of Mr. West on Monday, he was advised for his own safety to give up his claim and not return to it; he came over to Dubuque and bought an interest in diggings here, and engaged in mining, which business he has continued more or less ever since; he engaged in the forwarding and commission business, and built up a large trade, and was also steamboat agent. When the war broke out, Mr. West was actively engaged in securing recruits for the army, and was appointed recruiting agent; he afterward enlisted in the 37th I. V. I., and was elected and commissioned Captain, and was in the service about three years; after the war he returned, but since then has not engaged in active business, except buying grain at times when the market is favorable. Capt. West was united in marriage, April 12, 1832, to Miss Phebe V. Mortimer, a native of Locke, Cayuga Co., N. Y.; they have two sons - Orlando L. and Orville T.; they have lost one daughter - Lizzie W.

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H. WHEELER, of the firm of Fischer, Wheeler & Co., dealers in pure lake ice, corner of Third and Iowa Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Fitchburg, Mass., and was born May 23, 1837; he grew up to manhood in that State, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1865; engaged in the ice business, and has been connected with the present firm for the past fifteen years; the business was established in 1857; it is the oldest firm in the business, and they have always done the largest trade, Mr. Wheeler having the management of the business; he is prominently connected with the Order of Knights of Honor, and is now Grand Dictator of the Order for the State of Iowa; he is also a member of the Order of I. O. O. F., and the United Workmen; he was a member of the State Central Committee at the Presidential election in 1876, and was chairman of the Dubuque County Central Committee. In 1859, Mr. Wheeler was united in marriage to Miss Orinda S. Slocumb, a native of Vermont; they have two children - Flora E. and Abbie S.

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DANIEL WHITE, farmer, Sec.30; P.O. Farley; born in Limerick, Ireland in 1830; came to America in 1850; settled in Pennsylvania, and remained there, until 1867, when he removed to Dubuque Co.; has been engaged in farming, mining, etc. has a fine farm of 120 acres in Secs. 29 and 30. Religion, Catholic; politics, a Democrat. He was married in 1854 to Eliza Cragan, also a native of Ireland; they have seven children - Daniel, John, Frank, Joseph, Mary, Maggie and Katie; two are dead, John and Joseph.

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C. A. WILBER, architect, No. 240 Ninth Street, Dubuque; is a native of Columbia Co., N. Y., when 17 years of age, he went West Stockbridge, Mass., where he learned his trade; he lived in Massachusetts and New York, and studied architecture; in 1854, he went came to Canada and remained five years, and came to Dubuque in March, 1859, and engaged in his business here. During the war, he enlisted in 8th I. V. I.and was commissioned Lieutenant of Co. G; he was in the severe battles of Franklin and Nashville. After the war, he returned here and since then has been engaged in contracting and building, and architectural work, and has carried on a large business. In November, 1853, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Armstrong, a native of Geneva, N. Y., they have five children.

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S. C. WILCOX, practical watchmaker and engraver, No 622 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Kalamazoo Co., Mich.; he grew up to manhood in that State an Illinois; he began learning his business in Coldwater, Mich. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, he enlisted in the 1st Michigan Light Artillery; he was in the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Stone River Knoxville and Nashville, and many others, he was in the service four years, then returned to Michigan and was engaged in the jewelry business in Coldwater and Grand Rapids; he came to Chicago and was connected with the Elgin National Watch Company over four years; he came to Dubuque in 1878, and engaged in business for himself in January 1880. Mr. Wilcox gives special attention to repairing fine watches, and has had a large experience in that class of work; he gives special attention to fine engraving, and has few equals in this branch of the business.

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GEORGE WILDE (deceased), a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born May 14, 1821; he came to the United States in 1829, and settled in Pottsville, Penn; in the spring of 1834, he came West to Galena; in 1835, he went to Mineral Point, Wis, and, in March 1836, he came to Dubuque; in 1847, he engaged in smelting, and continued until 1864. He was united in marriage, Dec. 6, 1854 to Miss Mary Warmouth, a native of England; she has lived in Dubuque since she was 10 years of age. In 1850, Mr. Wilde went to California, still retaining his interest in the smelting business; after his return, he built the store on the corner of Main and Second Streets, and was engaged in the mercantile business, the firm being Coates and Wilde; he afterward was engaged in the livery business; he was the first Alderman elected in the Third War of the city.Mr. Wilde was actively identified with the interest of the city; a man of strict integrity and great kindness of heart and beloved by all who knew him; he died Aug. 20, 1876, leaving a nice property; they had ten children; only six survive - John T., Fred M., George, Sarah W., Albert and Mary E. Mrs. Wilde resides with her family in her pleasant home, corner Dodge and Wilde Streets, Dubuque.

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J. C. WILSON, farmer, Sec.32; P. O. Farley; born in New York May _, 1850, removed to Dubuque Co., in 1874. Is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of the Republican party; Mr. Wilson was married in October, 1877, to Miss Mary _ Newell; they have two children - Annie and Charley.

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MRS. MARY WILSON, Sec. 8; P. O. Dubuque; she was born in Derbyshire, England, Dec. 14, 1829; in 1852, she came to Dubuque Co.; she owns, with her residence, 280 acres of land, which is known as Dercy Grange and is one of the finest suburban residences in the country, being located fice miles west of Dubuque. She was married to John Burton in 1852; he died in 1854, aged 50 years; she has one daughter by this marriage - Miss Mary Burton, who also inherits a large amount of property by her father - this residence was built by Mr. Erritt ar a cost of over $7, 000. She has three children by other marriages - Ernest and Grace Wilson, and J oseph T. Stokety.

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HON. THOMAS S. WILSON, attorney at law, one of the original Judges of the Territory of Iowa, and of the District Court for many years, was born at Steubenville, Ohio, Oct. 13, 1813; he graduated at Jefferson College, Penn, in 1832, and, after studying law two years, was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1834; after being admitted, he began practice with Gen. Stokely, at Steubenville; soon after, contrary to the advice and wishes of his friends, he determined to come West; having a brother -
Capt. George Wilson, of the 1st U.S.I., under command of Col. Zachery Taylor - at Prairie du Chien, he went there with his wife, and remained there until he could select a place of settlement; deciding to locate at Dubuque, he removed there in October, 1836; in the spring of 1837, he was elected President of the Board of Trustees of the town of Dubuque; Iowa was then a part of Wisconsin Territory, and contained two counties - Dubuque and Des Moines; he practiced law in Dubuque, Mineral Point, Lancaster and Prairie du Chien until July 4, 1838, and was engaged in almost every suit up too that time; in June, 1838, he was nominated a delegate to congress by the northern counties of Iowa; at the same time he was appointed, by President Van Buren, Judge of the Supreme Court of Iowa; he had no application for the appointment, and it was made without his knowledge; his appointment was renewed by Presidents Tyler and Polk, and he continued Judge of
the Supreme Court until a year after the admission of Iowa into the Union as a State in 1846; when the first Legislature met and went into joint ballot, he came within one vote of being elected United States Senator; the first court ever held in Iowa Territory was held by Judge Wilson at Prairie la Porte, now Guttenburg, on the second Monday in November, 1838; he resigned his office as Judge of the Supreme Court in 1847, and practiced law in partnership with Platt Smith, Esq., and his brother, Hon. D. S. Wilson; in April 1852, he was elected, without opposition, Judge of the District Court, and by successive elections, held the office until Jan. 1, 1863, serving over twenty years as Judge; he held the first courts in the counties of Clayton, Delaware, Allamakee, Jones, Winneshiek, Black Hawk, Chickasaw, Bremer, Fayette and Clinton' it is stated, on good authority, that Judge Wilson never had ten cases reversed during all the time he was on the bench. Judge Wilson was elected two consecutive terms to the Legislature, in 1866 and 1868; at the session in 1866, he was tendered by the Democratic members the nomination of United States Senator, which he declined. Judge Wilson has been twice married; his first wife, whom he married in Ohio before he came West was Miss Anna Hoge, daughter of David Hoge, Esq., of Steubenville; he married Miss Mary Stokely, his present wife, in 1864, and has had five children.

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S. S. WINALL, of the firm of Palmer, Winall & Co., blank-book manufacturers, printers and book-binders, corner of Sixth and Iowa Streets Dubuque; is a native of Ohio, and was born in the city of Cincinnati March 29, 1834; he 1843, his parents came to Galena, and he grew up to manhood there, except one year spent in Dubuque; he came to Dubuque and located permanently in 1864, and assiciated with his present partners, and since then they have carried on their present business, doing the largest business in their line in Dubuque; they built the large and commodius building which they now occupy, in 1879. Mr. Winall has been a member of the I.O.O.F. for twenty-five years, and has been prominently connected with the Order, having filled all the offices, and has been Grand Master of the State and Grand Patriarch; his is a charter menter of the Order of Workmen, and also of the Legion of Honor. Mr. Winall married Sarah J. Wallis, of this city, in 1875; he has two children by a former wife.

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JOSEPH WINDERS, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Key West; born in Pittsburgh, Penn., Feb. 12, 1825; came to Dubuque Co. in 1850, and has since that date been engaged in farming, his farm embracing ninety-three acres. Politics, Republican. He was married in 1846, to Miss Mary Whitaker, a native of England; they have eleven children - Joseph, James, Alice (now Mrs. Brunskill ), Nannie (now Mrs. Addyman ), Anthony, George, John, Miles, Frank, Thomas and Mary Elizabeth; six have died - Eddie, Mary E., Sarah A., and three died in infancy.

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BENJAMIN WITTER, Postmaster and plow manufacturer; Sherrill's Mount; born Sept. 11, 1838, in Baden; in 1846, he came with his parents, to Jefferson Township, where he has since lived; he owns his shop, and a very substantial stone residence, with about an acre of land; he was appointed Postmaster in 1878; he has been Township Trustee four years, and School Director. Married Anna Mary Hock in 1861; she was born in Wurtemberg, Germany; have seven children - Elizabeth R., John B., F., George P., Emma, Mary, Fred J. and Martha; lost four children in infancy. M. E. Church; Republican.

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JOSEPH WITTMER, dealer in wines and liquors and selling lime, No. 264 Eighth Street, Dubuque; was born in Switzerland, Nov. 10, 1826; he came to America in 1849, and came to Dubuque in April 1855; he worked at the furniture business and kept boarding-house and hotel, and was also engaged in the grocery business. He belongs to the Dubuque Lodge I.O.O.F. and to Humboldt Encampment, the United Workmen and to the Dubuque Sharpshooters. He married Miss Johanna Shoemaker, a native of Switzerland, Jan. 13, 1855; they have five children - Joseph W. (attending college of Pharmacy, St. Louis), Leo (clerk in store, and attending commercial college), Bertha, Hortensia, Hilda.

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A. WOLCOTT, of the firm of Farley & Wolcott, proprietors ot the Key City Bakery, corner of White and Sixth Streets; is a native of the State of Vermont, and was born Feb. 9, 1835; he grew up to manhood in that State and in New Hampshire; he came to Iowa in 1869, and located in Dubuque; he was engaged in railroading for seventeen years; in 1878, he associated with Mr. J. P. Farley, one of Dubuque's oldest and most substantial business men, and established their present business; the Key City Bakery is one of the best arranged and complete establishments of the kind in the West; Mr. Wolcott has the management of the business, and they are building up a large trade. In 1856, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy A. Woodruff, from Chelsea, Vt.; her parents came here in 1869; they had been married and lived together over fifty-eight years at the time of her mother's death, which occurred recently. Mr. and Mrs. Wolcott have two children - Edwin H, and Carrie Louise.

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S. A. WOLCOTT, Assistant Superintendent of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad Dubuque; is a native of Orange Co., N. Y., and was born Sept. 8, 1824; he grew up to manhood in that State, and went to Boston and engaged in railroading for fifteen years; in 1857, he came West to Iowa and engaged in farming for a short time, then returned East and engaged in railroading; in 1863, he came to Dubuque, and the following year was appointed trainmaster on the Dubuque & Souix City Railroad, and remained with that road and the Illinois Central until the spring of 1871. and since then has been connected with the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad as Assistant Superintendent. In 1850, he was united in marriage to Miss Louisa A. Morey, a native of Chelsea, Vt.; they have five children - three sons and two daughters.

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A. P. WOOD, retired, Dubuque; is a native of Little Compton, R. I. and was born in 1817; at the age of 12 he began working in a newspaper office in Fall River, Mass., and, with the exception of some time afterward spent in school, he continued to bo so employed until he reached his majority; subsequent to this he worked at printing. and during most of one year read law, with a view to entering the legal profession; early in 1841, he was invited to become the editor of the Iowa Standard, a Whig paper established at Iowa City, then the seat of government for the Territory of Iowa; he accepted the invitation, and continued in that position about four years. The Whig party being steadily in a minority, the Standard failed to receive sufficient support; Mr. Wood determined to remove to Dubuque; this purpose was carried into effect in the fall of 1846, and he established the Dubuque Tribune; in 1848, a rival journal was established, and the rivalry continued about two years, when the opposition paper became absorbed in the Tribune, which from that time held the position of the leading Whig paper of Northern Iowa; in 1854, on account of impaired health, brought about by excessive application to business, he relinquished the management ot the Tribune to other hands; after retiring from newspaper business, he became somewhat largely engaged in real estate operations, which were brought to a sudden and disastrous close in 1857; during several months of 1857, he became editor and publisher of the Dubuque Republican, a daily and weekly paper, devoted especially to the advocacy of the present Constitution of the State of Iowa, which was adopted in the fall of that year; soon after that the Republican was discontinued; soon after this, Mr. Wood entertained the purpose of writing a history of Iowa as a Territory and State, but gave it up in favor of a history of the part taken by the State in the war of the rebellion, and to the preparation of this work, which is now completed, he has given years of time and valuable research. In the spring of 1844, Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Mary S. Murdey, from Ohio, they have had six children - four survive.

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GEORGE D. WOOD, senior member of the firm of Wood, Crocker & Co., dealers in dry goods and notions, No 831 to 835 Main Street; is a native of Franklin Co., Mass., and was born Jan. 7, 1829; when 17 years of age he removed to Little Falls, N. Y.; in 1849, he came West to Chicago; the following year, he went overland to California; remained there three years, and returned in 1853; in the fall of the same year, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque; engaged in the dry goods trade, the firm being Wood & Luke, which was succeeded by the firm of Wood & Luke & Co.; they had two stores, one wholesale and the other retail; they continued till 1864, the following year, the firm became Sheffield, Wood & Co., and continued until 1869, when it changed to Wood, Crocker & Co., and afterward to George D. Wood & Co., and Wood, Coates & Co., which was succeeded by the present firm. Mr. Wood has been engaged in the business longer then any one here except John Bell; in 1872, he built the "town clock building", which they now occupy. In 1856, Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Emily M. Baker, a native of Conway, Franklin Co., Mass., they have three children - Nathan, George and Winnifred.

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JAMES WOOD, engineer of the Illinois Central Railroad, residence 372 Bluff Street; is a native of Schoharie Co., N. Y., and was born Nov. 7, 1834; he grew up to manhood in that State, and began railroading on the Eastern Division of the New York & Erie Railroad in 1852; he came West to Dubuque in 1855, and remained with that company until 1864; then went South, and ran a train for the Government from April until July; then came North again, and was engineer on the Chicago & North Western eighteen months; then entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad and since then, for the past thirteen years, has run a passenger engine on the Iowa Division of this road. In 1855, Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Ann Smith, she was born in County Cavan, Ireland, April 4, 1836; she came to New York in March, 1851; Mr.and Mrs. Wood have six children - Francis J., Maggie J., Marion L., Harriet E., Charles A. and William T.

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W. J. WOODS, brickmason and contractor, Bluff Street extension, Dubuque; is a native of Steubenvill, Ohio; he grew up to manhood and learned his business there; he came West and located in Dubuque in April 1856, and engaged in building and since then has carried on his business here; he is on the the oldest builders and contractors in Dubuque. In 1847, he was united in marriage to Miss Ann E. Stapleton, from Ohio; they have three children - John H., Elzda V., (now Mrs. F.W. Brown, of this city) and George F., at Menominee, Wis.

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M. C. WOODRUFF, editor of the Dubuque Times, Dubuque; is a native of the State of New York, and was born in Aurora, Erie Co., March 21, 1831; he grew up and attended the common schools there, and also attended Aurora Academy; when 19 year of age, he went to Buffalo, and was connected with a wholesale house in that city for several years; he came West to Illinois, and taught school in Boone Co. for three years; he came to Iowa in 1855, and located in Hardin Co., at Iowa Falls; in 1863, he purchased the Sentinel newspaper at Eldora and managed it there for two years, then removed it to Iowa Falls; in Mary, 1870, he disposed of the Sentinel, and, with Charles Aldrich, purchased the Waterloo Courier, of which he was editor four years; in February, 1874, he disposed of his interest in that paper and purchased one-half interest in the Dubuque Times, and since then has been editor-in-chief of that paper. Mr. Woodruff was Chief Clerk of the Iowa House of Representatives of the Twelfth General Assembly, and held the office of Postmaster of Iowa Falls; in 1878, he was appointed Railroad Commissioner for the State by Gov. Gear, and still holds that office. Mr. Woodruff was united in marriage, April 7, 1861, to Miss Eliza E. Weller, of Norwich, N. Y.

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W. B. WOODWARD, foreman machinist for Rouse, Dean & Co., Iowa Iron Works, residence 1767 Jackson Street; is a native of England, and was born April 5, 1846; he came to Canada in 1851, and came to Dubuque the same year and grew up and learned the machinist's trade trade in this city; he entered the employ of Rouse, Dean in 1864, and held the position of foreman since 1877; he is a member of Dubuque Lodge, No. 3, A., F. & A.M., and of Harmony Lodge, No. 2, I. O. O. F., also of Dubuque Lodge, No. 9, A. O. U. W. Mr. Woodworth was united in marriage to Miss Amelia S. Trith, of Dubuque, May 8, 1871; they have three children - William, Robert and Thomas E.

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W. W. WOODWORTH, proprietor of Julien House, corner Main and Second Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Herkimer Co., N. Y., and was born Jan. 1, 1817; when 18 years of age he entered his father's store; he remained there until 21 years of age, then with his brother engaged in the mercantile business, and continued until 1857, when he came West to Iowa and located in Dubuque, and engaged in mercantile business here with his brother; they continued business until 1870, and since then he has owned and had the management of the Julien House. Mr. Woodworth has been married three times; he married his present wife, Mrs. Thorn, from Herkimer Co., N. Y. in 1876. Mr. Woodworth has four children - two sons and two daughters by former marriages.

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IGNATUS E. WOOTTON, retired, 47 Burch Street; is a native of Kentucky, and was born April 22, 1810; in 1817, he went to Missouri and grew up to manhood there; he helped survey the half-breed tract, which was the first surveying done in this State, he was mustered in the service during the Black Hawk war; he came to Dubuque and arrived here Oct. 10, 1832, and was one of the earliest settlers in this county; soon after he came, during the fall, he built a cabin on the same lot he now occupies, and the foundation of the old cabin still remains; he engaged in mining, and continued it until 1842, and has been engaged in mining more or less since until within the past ten years; he has held the offices of Constable, Deputy Sheriff, and was elected the second County Treasurer of Dubuque County. In 1844, he married Miss Sarah Evans, from Ohio; they have three children - two sons, William M. and Joseph, both farmers in this county; one daughter, Tabitha, at home; they have lost two children.

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LYMAN WRIGHT, retired farmer, Epworth; born in New York April _, 1809; came to Iowa, Jackson Co. in 1845, and to Dubuque Co. in 1857; before coming to Iowa, Mr. Wright had lived four years in Canada, leaving there in the time of the Canadian rebellion, and, after his Canadian residence, was for seven years a citizen of Ohio, having left New York at the age of 28; he has been engaged in farming until the past eight years, since which time he has lived in Epworth, where he is nicely located in a beautiful, well-appointed home, and is one of the most esteemed citizens of the town. Has held offices in the M. E. Church; is identified with the Republican party. His first wife was Miss Olive Cidmore, of New York; married in 1827; she died in 1846; his second wife was Mrs. Sarah Foster, of Indiana; the marriage taking place in 1848; her death occurred in 1859; his third wife was Mrs. Sarah M Wright, of New York, to whom he was married in 1865; eight children are living - John B., Lydia, George, Olive, Phebia, Abigail, Wilbur and Alcinas; four are dead - Ancil, Clarissa, Eusebe and Lorin D.

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HON. CHRISTIAN WULLWEBER, (deceased), was born in Hagenow, Germany, July 1, 1833. He grew up and attended school there and in 1847, entered college at Guerin; he came with his father's family to America, and arrived in Dubuque in 1850; he gave lessons in German and the classics, and, in 1853, was appointed a Professor in Alexander College, and occupied that position until 1856, when his parents returned to Germany; he went with them, and again entered college and completed his course and graduated at Hamburg; he subsequently entered the University at Berlin and studied civil law and the higher branches of learning; he continued his law studies at the famous Heidelberg University; in 1858, when the family returned to the United States, Mr. Wullweber entered the Dane Law School at Harvard College, where he graduated in 1859, and received his diploma; he returned to Dubuque and engaged in the practice of law. In 1864, he was elected Vice President of the Board of Education, in 1870, he was again elected a member of the Board, and, in 1874, was elected President of the Board. On Nov. 10, 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Joarns, a native of Holstein, Germany. Mr. Wullweber continued the practice of law until July, 1875, when he was appointed United States Minister to Ecuador. His death occurred Sept. 22, 1877. Mr. and Mrs. Wullweber had five children - four of whom survive - Anna, Hannah, Olga and Martha; they lost one daughter, Mary.

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CHARLES W. WULLWEBER, of the firm of Wullweber Bros., wholesale dealers in furniture; is a son of the late Christian Wullweber, and was born in Germany March 29, 1846; he came with his parents to Dubuque in early childhood; when 10 years of age, he went with his parent to Europe and attended schools in Germany for two years and returned with then to Dubuque; after reaching manhood he engaged in business in 1871, and, in 1877, he became a member of the firm of Wullweber Bros. In 1868, Mr. Wullweber was married to Mrs. Frances Smith, nee Brino, from Washington, D.C.; they have six children.

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OTTO L. WULLWEBER, of the firm of Wullweber Bros., wholesale dealers in furniture; 835 Main Street, Dubuque; is a son of the late Christian Wullweber; was born in Germany May 27, 1840; he came with his parents to Dubuque, attended school here and afterwards spent two years in Germany in the best schools in Hamburg, studied civil engineering, bridge building and architecture; after his return to Dubuque, during the war, he enlisted in Battery L, 2d Missouri Artillery, and remained in the service two years; after his return he engaged in the furniture business; he was Manager of the Dubuque Cabinet Makers' Association eight years; in 1877, the firm of Wullweber Bros. was established, and they have built up a large trade, both wholesale and retail. Mr. Wullweber was united in marriage to Miss Sophia Klentz, from St. Louis, Mo., Dec. 5, 1863; they have six children.

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HENRY WUNDERLICH, manager of the Dubuque Cabinet Makers Association, 429 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Saxony, Germany, and was born Aug. 31, 1836; he grew up to manhood there, and studied music; he emigrated to America in 1855, and came to Dubuque the same year and learned the cabinet making business, and since then has been connected with the business; he has occupied his present position, as manager of the Association, since 1876, and has built up a large business. He was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Ernst, a native of Pennsylvania, Nov. 29, 1858; they have five children - George W. (druggist in St. Louis and studying pharmacy), Henry J., Martha, Norma and Harry. Mr. Wunderlich has given much attention to the study of music, and his family have great taste for music and are natural musicians.

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F. O. WYATT, General Superintendent of the Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad Dubuque; is a native of Windsor Co., Vt.; he came West to Ohio in 1849; he has been engaged in railroading since 1852; was connected with the Cincinnati & Chicago Short Line road, and was also connected with several roads in the South; he came West and was connected with several roads in Kansas and Nebraska; In 1867, he came Wisconsin and built the Wisconsin Valley Railroad; in March of 1877, he was appointed to his present position as General Superintendent Chicago, Clinton, Dubuque & Minnesota Railroad; the Wisconsin Valley Railroad is also under his supervision. Mr. Wyatt was united in marriage to Miss Marion Purdy, from Wayne Co., Penn; they have three children - Edith, Stacy and Faith.

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ROBERT YATES, (deceased), was a native of Ireland, he came to this country when 8 years of age; he grew up to manhood in Pennsylvania and engaged in the mercantile business in Chambersburg. In 1818, he married Miss Mary M. Britt, a native of Bedford, Penn., and was born in 1800, daughter of John Britt; he was in the Revolutionary war, and, served as aid de camp to Gen. Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Yates came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in 1846; in 1852, he went to California and remained there until his death, which occurred in 1854, leaving ten children, six of whom survive. Mrs. Yates is still living near her son in this city; she has prepared, without aid from any one, a history of their family, which in the future will be of great interest and value.

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ROBERT G. YATES, manufacturer and dealer in stoves in tinware, 132 Main Street, Dubuque; is a native of Chambersburg, Penn. and was born Feb. 10, 1836; his parents moved to Ohio in 1838; they came Iowa in 1846, and located in Dubuque when he was only 10 years of age; he grew up to manhood and learned his trade here; he has lived in this city thiry-four years, except about three years in Waterloo; he owns the store where he is engaged in business on Main Street. In 1870, he married Miss Josephine Simplot; she is a native of this city; her parents were among the early settlers. Mr. and Mrs. Yates have three daughters - Alice, Edith and Mary.

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THOMAS YATES, retired, Bluff Street, Dubuque; is a native of Franklin Co., Penn., and was born March 13, 1820; he grew up to manhood and learned the trade of tinner and copper-smith; in 1839, he went to Wayne Co., Ohio, and in July 1846, he came to Iowa and located in Dubuque; he engaged in manufacturing tinware and continued until 1855; since then, he has not been engaged in active business, but has given his attention to the care of his property. Mr. Yates has lived here thirty-four years; when he came here he only had $75 and a horse and buggy, and his success in life is owing to his own efforts. In 1876, he was united in marriage to Miss Beckkie J. LaFrance, a native of Dubuque; they have two sons - Thomas and an infant son.

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CAPT. W. B. YATES, captain of the ferry-boat, Key City, Dubuque; is a native of Chambersburg, Penn., and was born Sept. 9, 1825; when quite a lad, he came to Ohio, and lived there until 1848, when he came to Dubuque. In 1850, he was united in marriage to Keziah Cox, a native of England. Went back to Ohio, and in May, 1856, returned to Dubuque; on the 7th of June, he commenced running on the ferry-boat as collector; the following year, he had charge of the boat, and since then, for a period of twenty-three years, he has had charge of the ferry-boat, and, with the exception of two weeks when he was called away, he has run on the boat every day during the season. Capt. Yates and his wife have six children - Walter G.; Mary E., Anna Belle, William Herbert, May, Eve. The parents of Capt. Yates are both living in Ohio; his father is 82 years and his mother 76 years of age.

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ALEXANDER YOUNG, capitalist, residence corner of Main and Fifteenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of the city of New York, and was born Feb. 24, 1814; he is of Scotch descent. His father was in the war of 1812; he was a merchant in New York City, but failed in 1826. Alexander grew up to manhood in New York City, and left there April 8, 1833, with his father's family, and came to Quincy, Ill.; his mother died a month later, and his father died May 6, 1841; Mr. Young was the oldest living of seven children, six of whom grew up to maturity, and upon him developed the care of the family; in March, 1834, he came to Galena in company with Capt. Nathaniel Pease, on the steamer O'Connell; he came to Dubuque March 22, 1834, and got employment at $20 a month; Feb. 20, 1835, he went to Galena and remained about twenty-five years. He was elected Sheriff of Jo Daviess Co, in 1840, and was re-elected in 1842, and was again re-elected in 1844; in April 1845, he resigned the office and engaged in steamboating for a short time in company with Smith & Carter, bankers of Galena, taking charge of the steamer Monona; Nov. 19, 1859 he returned to Dubuque, and since then has resided here; he was largely interested in lumbering until 1868, and since then has not been engaged in active business. When he first came here, he only had $7.30, and his success in life is owing to his own efforts. Mr. Young was united in marriage, Aug. 8, 1847, to Miss Elizabeth Bates, second daughter of Nehemiah Bates, one of the earliest settlers in Galena; they have two children - one son, William A., and one daughter, Mary E., wife of Dr. Albert H. Hoy, of Racine, Wis.

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HEZEKIAH YOUNG, Postmaster and merchant, Epworth; born in Vermont Dec. 29, 1816; his parents removed to St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., before he was _year old; he resided in New York until the age of 18, when he came to Joliet, Ill.; remained there four or five years; then for nearly as long a period was a resident of Indiana; the winters of these years, while he was a citizen of Illinois and Indiana, were spent in the milder climate of Louisiana; removing from Indiana, seven years were employed in the lead mines of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa, coming to Dubuque Co. in 1847; he went to California in 1850, and after two years there, returned to Dubuque Co., and settled in what is now Epworth, in 1852. Mr. Young is a Methodist and a Republican, and is a man much esteemed as a citizen, and loved as a neighbor; he was one of the founders of his town, and, has always aided its churches and public institutions with a most liberal hand, and no call upon his time, labor or capital, has ever been made by any needy, deserving individual, or worthy enterprise, without eliciting a generous response. On the 13th of August, 1857, he married Mrs. Susan Ford, of Iowa City; they have two children (twins) living - George W. and Amy L.

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JACOB ZANGMEISTER, dealers in groceries and provisions, 504 Julien Avenue, Dubuque; was born in Bavaria, Germany, Nov. 7, 1833; grew up to manhood there, and came to America in 1858, and came to Dubuque; soon after coming here, he engaged in the grocery trade, and has carried on that business for twenty years, and is one of oldest grocery merchants in the city. He belongs to Dubuque Lodge, No 9, A.O.U.W., and is a member of the Knights of Honor and also of the Legion of Honor. In September 1868, he was united in marriage to Miss Dorothea Hargesheimer, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they have six children - Laura, George, Oscar P., and Edward C. (twins), William B., Clara May.

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WASHINGTON ZARR, farmer, Sec.; P. O. Worthington; born in Lycoming Co., Penn., Oct. 8, 1826; removed to Dubuque Co., Iowa in the fall of 1854; was first engaged in brickmaking and other enterprises; has been farming since 1857; has 140 acres located in Secs. 5 and 8; his fine house and splendid surrounding grounds, decorated in such tasteful profusion with luxuriant evergreen trees, consitute one of the most beautiful home-locations in Dubuque Co.; Mr. Zarr is an active helper in good enterprises. Was first elder of Zion Reformed Church; his politics is Democratic. He was married in 18520 to Miss McRina Tolburt, a native of Lycoming Co., Penn.; they have five children - Ellis, Walter, Wilson, Charity and Mary Alice; one child died in infancy.

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H. ZIEPPRECHT, druggist and apothecary, Clay Street, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born July 27, 1826; he grew up to manhood there, and began learning his business in 1840; he emigrated to America in 1854, and came to Iowa and located in Dubuque in the spring of 1856 and established his present business, which he has carried on over twenty-four years, and is one of the oldest druggists in the city. In 1857, he married Caroline Kompe, a native of Germany; she died in 1864, leaving two children - Mary and Conrad; he married Emma Heinlein, native of Germany, June 8, 1870; they have two sons - Leo and an infant not named.

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JACOB ZOLLICOFFER, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Dubuque; born in March, 1839, in Dubuque Co.; in 1836, his parents settled on this land, which he owns, now consisiting of about four hundred and sixty acres. He married Miss Lizzie Friend in 1864; she was born in Mount Pleasent, Iowa; they have five children - George E., Franklin S., William G., Lizzie and John. Attends the Evangelical Church; Republican in politics.

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GEORGE ZUMHOF, of the firm of George Zumhof & Sons, packers, corner of Clay and Fourth Streets, Dubuque; is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born Jan. 9, 1821; he grew up to manhood there and learned the bakery trade; in 1845 he emigrated to America, and lived in Philadelphia two years, and came to Dubuque April 24, 1847; the second day after he came, he began work for Lucius Langworthy in 1849, he began the bakery business, and continued in that business for twelve years, he also carried on the ice business for eleven years; in 1851, he built the old Mississippi House; he engaged in his present business in 1870. He has been a member of the I.O.O.F. since 1849, and a member of the Masonic Order since 1853. When Mr. Zumhof came to this country he only had $50, and he has carried on business successfully over thirty years. In 1852, he married Miss Mary Wilhelm, a native of Switzerland; they have had fourteen children-only seven living - Wilhelmina, George, Emma, Clara, Tillie, William and Bertha.

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