Earthquake

 

Deseret Evening News; November 10, 1884

  "DID YOU FEEL THE EARTHQUAKE"

This question passed from mouth to mouth, this morning, among neighbors in different parts of the city. "Yes" and "No" were the answers elicited. From several reliable sources we learn that about 2 a.m. a low rumbling was heard, which lasted a few seconds and passed: others felt a shaking which awoke them, and windows and pieces of furniture were affected by the vibration. Others heard and felt nothing at all, being sound sleepers. That it was an earthquake tremor there is but little doubt, as so many experienced its effects which though not violent, were plainly manifest.

The following dispatch was received this morning:

PARIS, Idaho, Nov. 10, 1884

Six distinct earthquake shocks were felt here this morning. 'The first, at seven minutes before two, was terrific and lasted over half a minute. Five other shocks, comparatively slight, occurred at brief intervals afterwards; the last at twenty minutes after four. 'The shocks were felt through the valley as far as heard from. Considerable damage to houses is reported, and some moveable articles were broken, although nothing serious occurred. People were affected as if by sea sickness. The movements of the first were severe shocks from northeast to southwest, and then a swaying motion from north to south. 'The others were from east to west.
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Ogden Daily Herald; November 10, 1884

Early this morning the slumbers of a number of the citizens of Ogden were disturbed by the rattling of windows, furniture, etc., caused by a slight shock of earthquake. During the day reports have been received from stations along the Utah & Northern to the same effect, the worst being apparently experienced between Logan and Pocatello, the shock at Battle Creek being very severe, and scaring the people considerably. The tremors evidently followed the chain of mountains, for the residents in the western part of this city, knew very little, if any. of the occurrence at the time.
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Ogden Daily Herald; November 11, 1884

BRIGHAM BITS The Election Return Of Brigham Morris Young
 Democratic Jollification
he Earthquake
Condition Of The Schools
From our Correspondent.

...Quite a severe

Shock of Earthquake

was experienced in this city about twenty minutes to two o'clock, this morning. Parties who felt it, say the shock appeared to pass from north to south, the vibrations lasting about ten seconds.

Mr. David Booth said he was awakened from a sound sleep by the shaking of the bed, and experienced a very peculiar sensation which he could not describe. In another instance a lamp was shaken from a table, breaking the chimney and leaving the globe uninjured.

Resp'y yours, J B
Brigham City, Nov. 10, 1884
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Deseret Evening News; November 13, 1884

PARIS POINTS Earthquake Incidents And Other Jottings

Brother Richard G. Lambert, of this office, who is traveling through the "north countree" in the interests of the News, sends us a few interesting fragments picked up in Paris, Bear Lake County, Idaho. He begins with last Monday's earthquake of which we have already heard something.

Says he: "This quiet town was startled this morning at ten minutes to two o'clock by an earthquake, the shock lasting at least half a minute. It was quite severe, causing ornaments to be thrown from shelves and a rattling among dishes. It was preceded by a rumbling sound resembling, as much as anything, a runaway team with a heavy wagon, or a heavy train of cars. It cracked the walls of houses and the first shock was followed by four lighter ones.

The town was thoroughly startled, some thinking that the end had come. One young man who drives a team, imagining it was running away, awoke: calling out "Whoa! Whoa!" In the office of Woolley Bros., a heavy, clock was thrown from the top of a sate to the floor and broken. Sundry articles were cast from the shelves in their store.  The shock seemingly passed from north-west to south-east, and was felt at Evanston and north of here along the Oregon Short Line. At Soda Springs and Pocatello the shock was heavy and was felt at other places as well.

The Stake Conference convened on Saturday and was concluded last night. 'The Saints had an enjoyable time and the instructions were very timely and seasoned with the spirit of God. The weather is very pleasant and favorable for this altitude. Business remains quiet, though there is a good market for stock. At present there is very little demand for other products of the country. The health of the community is good except with those who got scared at the earthquake.
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Salt Lake Daily Harold, November 11, 1884

THE EARTHQUAKE
Salt Lake Visited With A Slight Shock On Monday Morning

Visitors and telephone messages came in thick succession to THE HERALD office yesterday morning, all eager to know what had been reported of a sudden movement in real estate during the previous night. All accounts agreed that there had been a sharp and generally prevalent shaking up at about 2 o'clock Monday morning, and a reporter, who had slept too soundly after the demonstration to have heard it himself, started out to see what could be learned concerning the event.

At the telephone office the young man on night watch, .I. Moore, said his hair was lifted by suddenly seeing the gas lamps commence a fearful shaking without any visible reason for it. There was no other movement that he could perceive and according to his judgment the movement continued for twenty or twenty-five seconds. Other accounts do not. make it of so long duration. Mr. J. S. Barnes, Seventh Ward, was awakened by a violent shaking of his bed; his daughter was also aroused in an adjoining room, and called out to her father asking what the matter was. Mr. Barnes looked at his watch on the moment and found it was just five minutes of ?. He thought it lasted from five to ten seconds. 'The inmates of Bishop Sharp's house. and that of Mayor James Sharp, Twentieth Ward, were also awakened by the shock. Dr. Benedict's family, Ninth Ward, were among those who experienced it. Frank Jennings, Eighteenth Ward, Francis Cope. Sixteenth Ward, W. J. Bateman. Seventh Ward, the White House, and residents in many other quarters of the city all report that the shock was unmistakable, and all agree that it occurred about 2 o'clock. Mr. J. F. Little awoke to find himself upon his feet in the centre of the room and the windows rattling fearfully on every side of him.

'The shock seems to have been severest up north. The Utah & Northern train running south was shaken up and the passengers arrived in Ogden terribly frightened. Reports from other points have not reached us, but the following is an account of how they felt in Idaho.

Paris, Idaho, Nov. 10, 1884

Six distinct earthquake shocks were felt here this morning. The first, at seven minutes before 2, was terrific and lasted over half a minute. Five other shocks, comparatively slight, occurred at brief intervals afterwards; the last at twenty minutes after 4. The shocks were felt throughout the valley as far as heard from. Considerable damage to houses is reported, and some moveable articles were broken. although nothing serious occurred. People were affected as if by sea sickness. 'The movements of the first were severe shocks from northeast to southwest, and then a swaying motion form north to south. The others were from east to west.

OGDEN FLASHES

Several of Ogden's citizens were awakened last night by a slight shock of earthquake, which did no serious injury, excepting to frighten some timid and nervous persons. The only accepted theory for its appearance is that Mother Earth was congratulating Grover Cleveland on his election.
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Salt Lake Daily Tribune; November 11, 1884

THE EARTHQUAKE

About 2 o'clock yesterday morning the city was perceptibly shaken by an earthquake. It was distinctly felt by a great number of citizens in all parts of town, some asserting; that the movement was from east to west and some that it was from north to south. Chandeliers were seen to move, mirrors to tremble and the rattling of dishes and windows was distinctly heard by many residents. 'The swaying motion was felt for fully half a minute, but of course it seemed a good deal longer time than that to most people. The last shock perceived here was the one that occurred two years ago this month about (?) o'clock one evening.
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Salt Lake Daily Tribune, November 13, 1884

MONTPELIER, Idaho November 10, 1884

EARTHQUAKE IN BEAR LAKE VALLEY

This small berg and surrounding country was thrown into a fever heat of excitement by a terrible shock of earthquake.  It began at 1:56 a. m. by a low, rumbling noise, accompanied by a slight trembling, sufficient to cause a rattling of windows, stoves, etc. and was followed in about 10 or 15 seconds by a most terrific shock, throwing books, dishes, etc. from their shelves and rocking houses to and fro almost akin to a vessel at sea.  This was followed at exactly 2 a.m. or about four minutes after the first shock, by another shock much lighter than the first and again at 2:53 another shock was felt, but was so slight as to be hardly noticeable.
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Deseret Evening News; November 15, 1884
 

Logan had two distinct shocks of earthquake last Monday morning. It is understood that Blaine has had several also.
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